US1713858A - Closure cap - Google Patents

Closure cap Download PDF

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Publication number
US1713858A
US1713858A US164701A US16470127A US1713858A US 1713858 A US1713858 A US 1713858A US 164701 A US164701 A US 164701A US 16470127 A US16470127 A US 16470127A US 1713858 A US1713858 A US 1713858A
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Prior art keywords
neck
cap
flange
container
bottle
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Expired - Lifetime
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US164701A
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Swan N Tevander
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D41/00Caps, e.g. crown caps or crown seals, i.e. members having parts arranged for engagement with the external periphery of a neck or wall defining a pouring opening or discharge aperture; Protective cap-like covers for closure members, e.g. decorative covers of metal foil or paper
    • B65D41/02Caps or cap-like covers without lines of weakness, tearing strips, tags, or like opening or removal devices
    • B65D41/10Caps or cap-like covers adapted to be secured in position by permanent deformation of the wall-engaging parts
    • B65D41/12Caps or cap-like covers adapted to be secured in position by permanent deformation of the wall-engaging parts made of relatively stiff metallic materials, e.g. crown caps

Definitions

  • This invention relates to closure caps adapted for containers of various kinds and its object is to provide a cap which may be firmly secured to the neck of the container so as to provide a positive seal which is secured more reliably than by mere friction, but which may be readily removed with a simple tool such as the common type bottle'opener, or in some cases by the insertion of a knife blade or coin between the edge of the cap and a shoulder formed on a container for that purpose.
  • the invention consists in certain features of construction and in the method of producing them, as herein more fully described and illustrated in the drawings and as indicated by the claims.
  • Figure 1 is a perspective View of the neck portion of a standard lass milk bottle having a cap embodying t is invention applied thereto.
  • Figure 2 is a side elevation in partial axial section showing the bottle neck with the cap at the initial position in the process of ap- 2 plication.
  • Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing the cap fully applied and secured to the bottle neck.
  • Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing a slightly modified form of cap as initially formed and applied.
  • FIG. 5 shows the-samecap as finally secured in place.
  • Figures 6 and 7 illustrate a further modi- 5 fication in the form of a cap as applied to a bottle neck having no internal shoulder and showing the cap respectively in its initial and final positions.
  • Figure 8 is a side elevation partly in section showing a cap embodying this invention applied to a metal can, the cap being illustrated in its finally secured sealing position.
  • FIGs 9 and 10 are enlarged detail sections of the cap and container of Figure 8,
  • Figure 11 illustrates the cap embodying this invention applied to the reduced spout or neck of the type used for varnish cans and the like.
  • Figure 12 is a vertical axial section illustrating somewhat diagrammatically the forming means for securing a cap in accordance with this invention.
  • Figure 13 is a transverse section taken substantially as illustrated at line, 13-13, on Figure 12.
  • Figures 1 to 7 illustrate a cap embodying this invention and preferably formed of sheet metal as applied to the typical glass milk bottle in'common use and as replacing the usual paper closure cap commonly employed.
  • the neck, 1, of the bottle, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 is formed with a thickened or beaded portion, 2, at its upper end having a maximum diameter at 3, and tapering or narrowing downwardly therefrom as at 4.
  • the bottle neck is formed with a counterbore, 5, which provides an upwardly facing shoulder, 6, against which the usual paper sealing cap is inserted.
  • the closure cap shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 comprises an annular portion, 10, surrounding a circular depression, 11, the latter being dimensioned to seat against the shoulder, 6, when the annular portion, 10, is seated against the end of the bottle neck.
  • the cap has a skirt or flange, 12, whose lower edge is shown in Figure 2 as initially formed, so that it fits loosely around the narrowing part, 4, of the bottle neck, but when the parts, 10 and 11, have been properly seated, this flared skirt is compressed by suitable dies so that segmental portions of it fit snugly around the narrowed part, 4, of the bottle neck, while the excess of material between these segmental portions is forced outwardly forming doubled projections as seen at 13, in Figures 1 and 3.
  • a sealing or packing ring, 14, of some compressible material such as waxed paper is secured against the under surface of the annular part, 10, for contact with the upper edge of the bottle neck, and to hold this sealing ring in place prior to application of the cap to the bottle, the flange may be formed with an inwardly projecting bead, 15, which extends toward the depression, 11, and narrows the 105 annular groove in which the ring, 14, is contained, so that the latter will not drop; out of this space.
  • Figures 4 and 5 illustrate a very similar construction except that the sealing ring is omitted and the contact of the cap with the end of the bottle neck and with the shoulder, 6 is relied upon for the sealing function.
  • the inner shoulder of the bottle neck may be omitted entirely as shown in Figures 6 and 7, and the circular depression in the cap may be formed as an annular head, 11", so that when drawn down into position as shown in Figure 7, it snugly engages against the inner edge of the bottle mouth and thus supplements the contact of the annular part, 10, with the end surface of the neck.
  • Figures 8, 9 and 10 illustrate the invention as applied to a metal container, 20, and show the latter formed with a neck, 21, which is slightly flared upwardly from a shoulder, 22. That is, the neck, 21, tapers downwardly from its upper edge which is preferably reenforced in the usual way by the formation of a bead or hem at 23.
  • the cover is shown with an annular depression, 24, just inside its marginal skirt or flange, 25. When the cover is applied the depression, 24, fits inside the neck of the container forming a seal against the inner surface of the beaded edge, 23.
  • the skirt, 25, is initially flared downwardly so that its lower edge is a loose fit for the downwardly narrowing portion, 26, of the neck, 21.
  • This lower edge which is preferably hemmed at 27, is compressed inwardly in segments so that the excess metal is forced out in doubled formation between them, as seen at 28, in Figure 8, and in a manner substantially like that already described in connection with the bottle neck, 1.
  • the shoulder, 22, however, is spaced just below the final position of the hem, 27, so that a coin or knife blade may be inserted in this space for prying off the cover when desired.
  • FIG 11 shows substantially the same features in the cover, 30, as those already described. This figure merely illustrates the application of such a cover to a small neck or spout, 31, of the type frequently used on a container, 32, of much larger cross-section. As this spout, 31, is especially designed for pouring liquid material from the container,
  • a bead, 34 in the neck provides a shoulder, 35, just below the skirt of the cover, 30, for insertion of a tool for prying the cover ofl.
  • Figures 12and 13 illustrate in a simple diagrammatic manner the means which may be used for securing the closure cap to the neck of a container.
  • Four dies or jaws, 40 are mounted for radial movement with respect to the neck, 1, of the container, and their curved surfaces, 41, are substantially segments of the circular outline of the portion of the neck, 1, to be engaged by the gathered flange of the cap. I find that it is not essential that these curved surfaces be true arcs of this circle; they may be of slightly less curvature so as to actually engage the cap in final position only at the ends of the segment.
  • jaws or dies, 40 When the jaws or dies, 40, are in closed position, they form spaces into'which the excess material is forced outwardly at 13 and substantially doubled upon itself, forming short, radial lugs as seen at 13 in Figure 1 and at 28 in Figure 8. Simultaneous movement of the jaws, 40, may be secured by some such means as the wedges or cam members, 42, moving transversely to the radial direction of movement of the jaws themselves.-
  • Oushioning means may be provided in the mechanism to avoid any danger of applying excessive pressure to the bottle neck, 1, in contracting the flange cover therei on, this being a well understood expedient not requiring illustration.
  • I claim 1 In combination with a container havin a neck, a cap having a top portion designe to seat against the outer end of said neck, the neck having a downwardly tapered portion and the cap having a flange made initially as a loose fit for said tapered portion of the neck and doubled upon itself at its lower edge to form a marginal bead and tightened around the neck b gathering the material of the bead, where y the top portion of the cap is drawn against the end of the neck.
  • a flanged cap applied thereto, the flange being doubled upon itself to form a marginal bead and made initially as a loose fit for the neck and being tightened around its narrower portion by gathering the material of the flange and bead at intervals in its circumference, said container being formed with a shoulder below the neck and spaced a short distance from the lower edge of the flange to permit the insertion of means for prying of the cap ofl the neck.
  • the method of securing a cylindrically flanged cap to theneck of a container comprising first making the fiange a loose flt for said neck, then applying the cap with the flange depending around the neck, compress ing the flange against the neck by applying pressure thereto and confining the application of pressure to peripherally spaced areas of the flange to force the surplus metal of the flange outwardly between the spaced pressure areas and forming the surplus metal into radial projections.

Description

s N. TEVANDER fl,7l3,858
CLOSURE CAP v Filed Jan. 31, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet l y 21, 1929- s. N. TEVANDER 1,713,858
' CLOSURE CAP Filed Jan. 51, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented May 2t, 1922.
SWAN N. TEVANDER, OF HAYWOOD, ILLINOIS.
CLOSURE CAP.
Application filed January 31, 1927. Serial No. 164,701.
This invention relates to closure caps adapted for containers of various kinds and its object is to provide a cap which may be firmly secured to the neck of the container so as to provide a positive seal which is secured more reliably than by mere friction, but which may be readily removed with a simple tool such as the common type bottle'opener, or in some cases by the insertion of a knife blade or coin between the edge of the cap and a shoulder formed on a container for that purpose. The invention consists in certain features of construction and in the method of producing them, as herein more fully described and illustrated in the drawings and as indicated by the claims.
In the drawings:
Figure 1 is a perspective View of the neck portion of a standard lass milk bottle having a cap embodying t is invention applied thereto. I
Figure 2 is a side elevation in partial axial section showing the bottle neck with the cap at the initial position in the process of ap- 2 plication.
Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing the cap fully applied and secured to the bottle neck.
Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing a slightly modified form of cap as initially formed and applied.
Figure 5 shows the-samecap as finally secured in place.
Figures 6 and 7 illustrate a further modi- 5 fication in the form of a cap as applied to a bottle neck having no internal shoulder and showing the cap respectively in its initial and final positions.
Figure 8 is a side elevation partly in section showing a cap embodying this invention applied to a metal can, the cap being illustrated in its finally secured sealing position.
Figures 9 and 10 are enlarged detail sections of the cap and container of Figure 8,
showing the cap at initial and intermediate positions in the process of application.
Figure 11 illustrates the cap embodying this invention applied to the reduced spout or neck of the type used for varnish cans and the like.
Figure 12 is a vertical axial section illustrating somewhat diagrammatically the forming means for securing a cap in accordance with this invention.
Figure 13 is a transverse section taken substantially as illustrated at line, 13-13, on Figure 12.
Figures 1 to 7 illustrate a cap embodying this invention and preferably formed of sheet metal as applied to the typical glass milk bottle in'common use and as replacing the usual paper closure cap commonly employed. The neck, 1, of the bottle, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, is formed with a thickened or beaded portion, 2, at its upper end having a maximum diameter at 3, and tapering or narrowing downwardly therefrom as at 4. Usually the bottle neck is formed with a counterbore, 5, which provides an upwardly facing shoulder, 6, against which the usual paper sealing cap is inserted.
The closure cap shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 comprises an annular portion, 10, surrounding a circular depression, 11, the latter being dimensioned to seat against the shoulder, 6, when the annular portion, 10, is seated against the end of the bottle neck. The cap has a skirt or flange, 12, whose lower edge is shown in Figure 2 as initially formed, so that it fits loosely around the narrowing part, 4, of the bottle neck, but when the parts, 10 and 11, have been properly seated, this flared skirt is compressed by suitable dies so that segmental portions of it fit snugly around the narrowed part, 4, of the bottle neck, while the excess of material between these segmental portions is forced outwardly forming doubled projections as seen at 13, in Figures 1 and 3. This engagement of the gathered flange, 12, with the downwardly tapering part, 4, tends to draw the top portions, 10 and 11, of the cap downwardly against the upper edge of the bottle neck and its shoulder, 6, respectively, forming a reliable seal and at the same time securing the cap against 95 accidental removal. Preferably a sealing or packing ring, 14, of some compressible material such as waxed paper is secured against the under surface of the annular part, 10, for contact with the upper edge of the bottle neck, and to hold this sealing ring in place prior to application of the cap to the bottle, the flange may be formed with an inwardly projecting bead, 15, which extends toward the depression, 11, and narrows the 105 annular groove in which the ring, 14, is contained, so that the latter will not drop; out of this space. The gathering of the skirt, 10, around the'tapered portion, 4, of the bottle neck, of course draws the sealing ring, 14, 11
into firm contact with the upper edge of the bottle neck, insuring perfect retention of the contents.
Figures 4 and 5 illustrate a very similar construction except that the sealing ring is omitted and the contact of the cap with the end of the bottle neck and with the shoulder, 6 is relied upon for the sealing function. In fact, the inner shoulder of the bottle neck may be omitted entirely as shown in Figures 6 and 7, and the circular depression in the cap may be formed as an annular head, 11", so that when drawn down into position as shown in Figure 7, it snugly engages against the inner edge of the bottle mouth and thus supplements the contact of the annular part, 10, with the end surface of the neck.
Figures 8, 9 and 10, illustrate the invention as applied to a metal container, 20, and show the latter formed with a neck, 21, which is slightly flared upwardly from a shoulder, 22. That is, the neck, 21, tapers downwardly from its upper edge which is preferably reenforced in the usual way by the formation of a bead or hem at 23. The cover is shown with an annular depression, 24, just inside its marginal skirt or flange, 25. When the cover is applied the depression, 24, fits inside the neck of the container forming a seal against the inner surface of the beaded edge, 23. The skirt, 25, is initially flared downwardly so that its lower edge is a loose fit for the downwardly narrowing portion, 26, of the neck, 21. This lower edge which is preferably hemmed at 27, is compressed inwardly in segments so that the excess metal is forced out in doubled formation between them, as seen at 28, in Figure 8, and in a manner substantially like that already described in connection with the bottle neck, 1. This draws the top of the cover at 29, down against the upper edge of the neck, and at the same time locks the cover against unintentional removal. The shoulder, 22, however, is spaced just below the final position of the hem, 27, so that a coin or knife blade may be inserted in this space for prying off the cover when desired. This can bedone without rupturing the metal at an point because the gathered portions, 28, Wlll open slightly as they are forced over the larger portion of the neck at its upper end and the cover will still remain a reasonably snug fit so that it can be replaced, if desired, although special means would be required for again sealing it to the container, 20.
Figure 11 shows substantially the same features in the cover, 30, as those already described. This figure merely illustrates the application of such a cover to a small neck or spout, 31, of the type frequently used on a container, 32, of much larger cross-section. As this spout, 31, is especially designed for pouring liquid material from the container,
32, its hem or head, 33, is curled outwardly leaving a smooth inner surface over which the liquid may be poured. A bead, 34, in the neck provides a shoulder, 35, just below the skirt of the cover, 30, for insertion of a tool for prying the cover ofl.
Figures 12and 13 illustrate in a simple diagrammatic manner the means which may be used for securing the closure cap to the neck of a container. Four dies or jaws, 40, are mounted for radial movement with respect to the neck, 1, of the container, and their curved surfaces, 41, are substantially segments of the circular outline of the portion of the neck, 1, to be engaged by the gathered flange of the cap. I find that it is not essential that these curved surfaces be true arcs of this circle; they may be of slightly less curvature so as to actually engage the cap in final position only at the ends of the segment. When the jaws or dies, 40, are in closed position, they form spaces into'which the excess material is forced outwardly at 13 and substantially doubled upon itself, forming short, radial lugs as seen at 13 in Figure 1 and at 28 in Figure 8. Simultaneous movement of the jaws, 40, may be secured by some such means as the wedges or cam members, 42, moving transversely to the radial direction of movement of the jaws themselves.-
Oushioning means, not shown, may be provided in the mechanism to avoid any danger of applying excessive pressure to the bottle neck, 1, in contracting the flange cover therei on, this being a well understood expedient not requiring illustration.
In the drawings I have shown the material of the skirt or flange as crimped at four uniformly spaced points in each embodiment of the invention. It may be understood, however, that various changes may be made in the specific arrangements illustrated without departing from the spirit of the invention.
I claim 1. In combination with a container havin a neck, a cap having a top portion designe to seat against the outer end of said neck, the neck having a downwardly tapered portion and the cap having a flange made initially as a loose fit for said tapered portion of the neck and doubled upon itself at its lower edge to form a marginal bead and tightened around the neck b gathering the material of the bead, where y the top portion of the cap is drawn against the end of the neck.
2. In combination with a container having a neck tapering downwardly, a flanged cap applied thereto, the flange being doubled upon itself to form a marginal bead and made initially as a loose fit for the neck and being tightened around its narrower portion by gathering the material of the flange and bead at intervals in its circumference, said container being formed with a shoulder below the neck and spaced a short distance from the lower edge of the flange to permit the insertion of means for prying of the cap ofl the neck. I
3. In combination with a container having a neck a flanged cap applied thereto, the flange being made initially as a loose fit tor the neck and doubled upon itself to form a marginal bead and tightened around the neck by gathering the material of said flange and 4. In combination with a container having a neck narrowing downwardly, a closure cap applied thereto having a flange made initially as a loose fit for the narrowed ortion of the neck, the edge of said flange eing doubled upon itself to form. a bead, and the flange being tightened by gathering the material of the flange and bead at intervals in its circumference.
5. The method of securing a cylindrically flanged cap to theneck of a container comprising first making the fiange a loose flt for said neck, then applying the cap with the flange depending around the neck, compress ing the flange against the neck by applying pressure thereto and confining the application of pressure to peripherally spaced areas of the flange to force the surplus metal of the flange outwardly between the spaced pressure areas and forming the surplus metal into radial projections.
6. lhe method of securing a cylindrically flanged cap to the neck of a container comprisin first making the flange a loose fit for said neck, then applying the cap with the flange depending around the neck, compressing the flange against the neck by, applying pressure thereto in a radial direction and confining the application of pressure to eripherally spaced areas of the flange to orce the surplus metal of the flange outwardly between the spaced pressure areas and forming the surplus metal into projections each doubled upon itself and projecting radially from the cap.
In testimony whereof, l have hereunto set my hand at Chicago, Illinois, this 19th day of January, 1927.
SWAN N. TEVANDER.
US164701A 1927-01-31 1927-01-31 Closure cap Expired - Lifetime US1713858A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940633A (en) * 1956-04-17 1960-06-14 Continental Can Co Tamperproof metallic receptacle
US4106655A (en) * 1975-03-17 1978-08-15 Thomassen En Drijver-Verblifa N.V. Container having a mouth, such container provided with a metal cap and metal cap for closing such container
US4555208A (en) * 1983-04-13 1985-11-26 Cebal Method of fitting a metal closure
US5215203A (en) * 1989-01-23 1993-06-01 Kinder-Grip International, Inc. Baby or child bottle with handles
US11104492B2 (en) 2006-01-14 2021-08-31 World Bottling Cap, LLC Bottle crown with opener assembly

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2940633A (en) * 1956-04-17 1960-06-14 Continental Can Co Tamperproof metallic receptacle
US4106655A (en) * 1975-03-17 1978-08-15 Thomassen En Drijver-Verblifa N.V. Container having a mouth, such container provided with a metal cap and metal cap for closing such container
US4555208A (en) * 1983-04-13 1985-11-26 Cebal Method of fitting a metal closure
US5215203A (en) * 1989-01-23 1993-06-01 Kinder-Grip International, Inc. Baby or child bottle with handles
US11104492B2 (en) 2006-01-14 2021-08-31 World Bottling Cap, LLC Bottle crown with opener assembly

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