US1669969A - Gun cartridge - Google Patents

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US1669969A
US1669969A US136984A US13698426A US1669969A US 1669969 A US1669969 A US 1669969A US 136984 A US136984 A US 136984A US 13698426 A US13698426 A US 13698426A US 1669969 A US1669969 A US 1669969A
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projectile
cartridge
shell
diameter
bore
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US136984A
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William A Caruth
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William A Caruth
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B5/00Cartridge ammunition, e.g. separately-loaded propellant charges
    • F42B5/02Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile
    • F42B5/025Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile characterised by the dimension of the case or the missile

Description

' 'WILLIAM A. CABUTH, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.
PATENTv OFFICE.
GUN CARTRIDGE.
Application led September 22, 1926. Serial No. 136,984.
My invention relates generally to gun cartridges and more particularly to that class of metallic and paper cartrid es that have a powder chamber of enlarged iameter as compared to the diameter of the projectile and bore of the gun. Y
In the operations incident to the manufacture of the shell component or case in high power small arms ammunition the requirements call for the contraction or crushing down of the straight drawn metallic cai'- tridge shell, thus producing a tapered Shoulder near the forward end of the shell and forming a neck of reduced caliber to receive and hold the projectile. This crushing or contraction process, carried out for the purpose of producing at the forward end of the cartridge shell a shoulder and a neck of reduced diameter, causes inherent weaknesses at both the taper andneck of the shell and further the operations incident to the reduction of diameter or bottle necking of the shell add materially to production costs.
My invention has six principal objects:
First, the production of a cartridge with an explosive containing chamber of superdiameter as compared to the caliber of the projectile and bore of the gun, together with the elimination of the shoulder and neck at the forward end or mouth of the shell.
Second, the provision of a'cartridge shell having exterior and interior wall surfaces following a modified taper, or if specifications require, with straight cylindrical eX- terior and interior wall surfaces, said shell having an explosive chamber of superdiameter, thus contributing to strength at the nozzle or mouth of the shell and enablin the shells or cartridges to' be readily pro uced and with minimum cost of manufacture.
Third, the accomplishment of an automatic obturator or gas. check by the projectile due to the shape of the rear portion thereof, whereby at the rst instant of explosion, the escape of powder gas between the cartridge shell and the rojectile is stopped. This action material y increases the eiiiciencyof the combustible charge by preventing escape of power, and such action also protects the bore of the gun from erosion caused by the usual swift passage of superheated gas around and in front of the projectile before the same has moved' forwardly into and completely iilled the bore diameter of the gun. F ourth` the elimination of loss of power and accuracy in the case of fire arms that have been bored irregularly or above the usual limits of the maximum tolerance that is allowed over standard bore diameters. This is obtained by having my improved projectile made in two diameters, the diameter of the forward or reduced portion of the projectile conforming to the standard bore and rifling of the gun and the diameter of the larger rear portion of the projectile being that of the outer rim of a hollow cup that moves forward and contracts and shapes itself into the reduced actual bore diameter during the iirst instant of combustion of the explosive charge.
Fifth, the`provision of a suitable stop or check to restrain the cartridge from moving too far forwardly into the breech or chamber of the gun while being inserted thereinto, said stop or check also serving to support the cartridge shell against the forward thrust of the firing pin at the time of discharge. This stop or check, which is to hold the cartridge in proper place within the chamber or breech of the gun, is in the form of a shoulder, preferably tapered so that its diameter gradually increases toward the rear of the body of the projectile. Thus, my improved cartridge does not require as a chamber stop the heretofore generally used rim or semi-rim that projects from the base of the shell, nor does it require the commonly designed stop shoulder in the bottle neck of the rimless cartridge case.
Sixth, the reduction of recoil and the lessening of gun barrel strains and vibrations by the elimination of all changes and irregularities of gas pressure and projectile velocity while the projectile is passmg through the bore of the gun.
With the foregoing anad other objects in view, my invention consists in certain novel features of construction and arrangement of parts that will be hereinafter more fully described and claimed and illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:
Fig. 1 is an elevational View of a cartridge constructed in accordance with my invention.
Fig. 2 is a longitudinalsection taken on a plane through the center of my improved cartridge. y
Fig. 3 is a sectional View ofa cartridge embodying the rinci les of my invention and which includes a boat tail projectile.
Fig. 4 is a sectional view showing the forward portion of the shell or case with the projectile therein,4 said parts being shown positioned within4 a gun barrel and with dotted lines showing the contracted position of the rear portion ofthe projectile as the saine passes through the bore of the Fig. 5 is .aA` longitudinal' section taken through the center of a cartridge of my improved construction and with the rear end of the shell or case provided with a projecting rim. j
Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through the center of a shel'l constructed'in accordance with my invention and which is vparticularly adapted for automatic riiles, machine guns, self-loading rifles, and the like.
Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section taken through the center of a cartridge constructed in accordance with my invention and which is suitable for use in automatic pistols and sub-machine guns.
Referring b letters to the accompanying drawings, an particularly to the form of cartridge illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, A designates the projectile, S th-e cartridge she'll or case,T the tapered shoulder on the projectile, E the cannelure or groove for the accommodation Aof the shell extractor and X the circumferential line betweenthe rear end of the tapered shoulder T and the .front end of the portion of the projectile that has the greatest diameter, which portion of `greatest diameter is positioned in the forward ortion of the shell or case so that the line between said portion of greatest diameter and the rear end of the tapered shoulder T practically coincides with the straight shoulder' at the forwardend of the wall of the shell or case S.
Projectile A is made up of a jacket .or relatively hard metal having great ductility and a core of lead or analogous metal and which core is provided in its base or rear portion with a substantially conical recess M and the inner end or bottom of .said recess is made substantiallyv at so as to provide a pressure face Y. Jacket J wholly encloses the enlarged base or rear portion of the projectile and the `rear .edge of said jacket is preferably lianged. inwardly over the endl of the wall of core G that surrounds chamber M, as designated by F.
When the projectile is roperly seated'in the shell or case S, the c amber M within the hollow base of the core 'C provides a forward extension for the loading space within the shell S that receives the combustible charge. Seated -in the base orv rear end of the shell S is the usual primer and fulminate P. I
vIn Fig. 3 I have illustrated a projectile of the type generally described a s a. boat tail and where this form of projectile embodies my invention, the rear portion of the core C of the projectile terminates in a v boat tail portion C1 that is enclosed by a jacket J1L and this jacketed boat tail portion is concentrically arranged within that portion of the projectile jacket J that is Iseated in the mouth or forwardend of the shell S, there being an annular space between tlie rear portion of jacket J and the boat tail portion of the projectile..
In Fig. 4., L designates the loading space 'for the combustible charge, S the shell orportion of the bore B in this yligure illus? trate the form assumed by the bas-e'portion of the projectile after it has received the first impulseof forces resulting from combustion of the charge and when said projectiley has been moved forwardly into the bore of the gun. Inasmuch as the recessed base of the projectile is collapsed when said projectile enters the bore of 'the gun, the recess M will be materially reducedV in diaineter and it will take substantially the form as indicated by dotted lines H.
-In Fig. 5, I have illustrated a cartridge provided at its baseer rear end with a rim or iange, but as a result of my invention of a. dual caliber projectile, or a projectile having an enlarged hollow base, the shell has a superdiameter explosive chamber without resorting to the usual bottle neck in the forward portion of the shell. The case or shell S illustrated in this gure is uniformly tapered throughout its entire length, v
It is obvious that it is one of the purposes of my invention to preclude the necessity of fa rimmed cartridge shell such as Fig. 5 portrays, but this design is to show the possibility of the use of a projectile of my invention ina cartridge suitable for use without sub-alteration of the chamber in a firearm constructed for handling cartridges with shells having rimmed heads.
The form of cartridgeillustrated in Fig. 6 is especially adapted for use in automatic rifles, machine guns and self-loading ries of the so-called blow back type. In this y instance, the case or shell has the same external diameter throughout ,its length and the formation of a semi-rim or stop behind the extraction cannelure at'thebase of the cartridge is .avoided by the provision ofthe tapered shoulder T 0n the intermediate pory tion of the projectile. A
In Fig. 7, I have illustrated a cartridge particularly designed for use in automatic pistols and sub-machine guns. This particular cartridge is vey similar to the structure illustrated in ig. 6 in'. that the cartridge case is of uniform external diameter throughout its length and the tapered shoulder T on the projectile obviates the necessity for a semi-rim at the shell or case.
Thus it will be seen that my invention contemplates a cartridge shell or case consisting of a straight drawn metallicor paper casing having a suitable head or base, the latter being cannelured or rimmed for extraction and carrying the usual primer, the chamber within the shell or case being adapted to receive the explosive charge and said shell or ease holding at its forward ehd a projectile having two different diameters, the portion of greatest diameter being seated in the shell, there being a tapered shoulder between the' two portions of the projectile of different diameters and the enlarged base of the projectile being recessed.
Drawing is one of the least expensive forms of metal working and by eliminating the bottle neck and the turned semi-rim, manufacturing operatins involving VcomponentY weaknesses and. excessive costs are avoided. The shell per'se herein described include nothing new or original and no claim is made thereto, except as combined with a projectile of the particular construction herein described and illustrated.
My invention has been described as relating to certain forms of rifle cartridges and pistol ammunition, but it should be understood that my invention is applicable to cartridges for all arms and ordnance using fixed and complete unit ammunition. It is generally known and understood that the term fixed and complete unit ammunition herein referred to describes ammunition in which the primer or fulminate is placed in the base of the cartridge case, the explosive charge occupying 'the greater portion of the chamber within the cartridge case and the projectile or lethal load being carried in the forward portion of the shell or case or Vseated therein and projecting forwardly therefrom, all of the part just mentioned being firmly joined together and a. fixed and complete unit of handling an loading for each discharge of the gun.
The projectile contemplated by mj; invention may be properly described as eing of dual caliber inasmuch as it is formed with two different external diameters, the portion of smaller diameter being arranged in front and conforming with the caliber of the bore or rifling of the gun. The rear portion of the projectile has the greater diameter and this portion is fitted into the forward portion or mouth of the shell 0r casing. The projectile may be swaged into the shell by pressure or crimped therein. The tapered portion of the projectile that connects the portions of different diameters provides a shoulder and stop for the carbase of the cartridge providintridge when the latter is positioned in the breech or chamber of the gun and likewise furnishes support when the firing pin strikes the primer to lire the cartridge.
It is obvious that if the forward edge or rim of the shell be of sufficient thickness to abut against a corresponding shoulder in the gun barrel it will assist the shoulder in the projectile in sustaining the forward thrust of loading and firing, but where the cartridge casef or shell is of thin metal this assistance would be insuflicient to function ip slllipport of the forward thrust against the s 1e The enlarged base and tapered portion of the projectile are provided with a centrally or concentrically arranged recess or chamber which, it will be readily understood, permits the enlarged krear portion of the projectile to contractorr crush inwardly as the projectile enters and passes through the bore of the gun.
Sub-caliber orcontracted diameter. projectiles with hollow -or recessed bases have been long known and used and Imake no claim for the invention of a hollow base pro-` jectile recessed or cupped out within a portion of its rea-r body where the outer diam eter is vless or no greater than the bore of the gun.
The phrase super-caliber used herein refers to the commonly constructed cartridgeY with an enlarged diameter powderchamber. My invention comprehends a cartridge containinga projectile having a hollow rear portion or base with an outer diameter substantially greater than that of the front p0rtion of said projectile and which front portion conforms to the bore of the gun. .My invention further includes a cartridge containing a projectile having an enlarged rear portion, the diameter of which is substantially greater than that of the bore of the gun, the-forward lportion of said enlarged rear end having a tapered exterior surface, said enlarged and tapered yrear portion being cupped or recessed so that it will contract as it enters the bore of t-he gun, and which bore is smaller in diameter than the diameterV of the recessed enlarged rear pol'- tion of said projectile. The recess that is formed in the base or rear portion of the projectile must be large enough to still remain when the larger rear portion of the projectile is collapsed or compressed when it enters and passes through the caliber diameter of -the bore, and in order that this result may be attained, the recess is preferably tapered toward its forward end and of necessity it must extend forwardly until its forward end or the surface Y is practically coincident with or a slight distance forward of the forward end of the tapered shoulder T. In
vother words the recess or cavity extends ena recess or cavity' lOl lll
ltirely through the rear portion of thevlargest diameter and through that portion of j the projectile body encompassed by the excaliber solid bodies, but only the slightest and almost inconsidcrable increase in diameter can be accomplished therebyl owing to the tremendous increase in4 breech pressures involved. My invention, by the use of a projectile with a body of super-diameter in its Arear and recessed within said super-diameter, insures the contraction of a vbase of materially enlarged outerA diameter without undue pressures'being incurred. f
A further decided advantage `arisingf'ron'ly my invention is the prevention of practcally all gas escape between theshell and pro-, jectile during the first instantof combustion o'f the explosive charge,.for as the projectile is forced from the mouth of vtheshell, a perfect seal is effectedv between the enlarged base portion of the projectile as it passes the.
tapered shoulder -within the gun bore against which the tapered portion T of the projectile normally rests. The high 'speed rush and wash of gas preceding the projectile ,through the lead and bore is impossible and thus thefull power of the eXplo.. sive charge is conserved. Y v
Another advantage of my invention arises from the fact that the modified taperedor straight cartridge'shells that receive the dual caliber projectiles will not stretch with high .pressure loads-and said shells may be ,readily resized as to diameter for reloading,
whereas the shells of the bottle neck type of cartridge'when used with high intensity charges, become lcngthened and cannot be successfully recharged and used again. The bottle 4neckslicll also requires more careful metallurgical selections and testing than does thestraight shell, and in times of large and urgent quantity manufacture, the bottle neck cartridgeis always al product -of doubtful and uncertain quality.
A further advantage that prevails in fixed ammunition by the :use of my inventionj is the tapered recess or chamber in., the rear or base Vof the projectile for, by referring to Fig. 4 it willl be seen that the projectile has full bore diameter at thepoint designated .by the dotted line Y and to the rear of this.,
line as the projectile moves forward into u the gun bore the pressure of gases within the contracted recess holds the cupped and tapered rear 'portion of the projectile firmly against the rifling andv maintains complete contact with'the bore of the gun. .The Hextheshell and the relatively simple stamping `or diel process forshaping the projectile, to-
gether with the'usual assembly of the component parts of the cartridge, so that all complex operations requiring special gauging and inspection are avoided. l
A further advantage obtained by the'use ,of a cartridge with a projectile of my invention,.is lthat gas pressures within the bore of the gun are regulated more evenly than 1s the case with theordinary cartridge having a projectile lot' the usual shape and form. With' the connnonly'designed cartridge, at the instant of -vlirst ignition of the combus tion charge, the projectile at zero breech pressure leaps out of the mouth of the cartridge shell and travels in the small bore rifle a distance of approximately two inches before. shaping itself into thebore at a point,
of maximum pressure and low velocity. From this point forward,y the full impetus ofniaximum pressure having been received, the projectile travels toward the muzzle of the gun with a constantly decreasing pressure and with a constantly increasing vclocity.
lt is an axiom among authorities on inter- Vnal ballistics that high pressure on tliep'art of the gases fromthe combustion at a point within the bore', means low velocity on thev part of the projectile at said point, and vice versa. A. rising curve of gas pressure, means a decreasing velocity for the projectile, and
a falling curve of gas pressure,'1neans an increasing velocity for the projectile.
By my invention the full height of the pressure curve,4 calculated within the bore during the firing of the cartridge is developed by the explosion and expansion of the combustion charge at a point-nearer the` breech and at least two inches farther back -toward the chamber of the piece than is usual. Thereforemy invention by forcing,
at the first instant of discharge a reduction in diameter and acontraction of, the rearward hollow super-caliber section of t-he projectile retards the customary sudden leap of the projectile into the bore, and avoids the subsequent slowing downof the projectile velocity ata point of high pressure materially forward in advance vof the cartridge chamber.V j
My invention hence', provides for the cartridge, a projectile that develops anl immediately substantially highpressurev withI low velocity at its iirst'advance lup the bore; and
there -is no primary increase, intermediate lsof forwardly through decrease and final increase in the velocity of the projectile, but instead only a regular increase of the velocity accompanied by a constantly reduccd'pressure curve as the projectile approaches the muzzle of the y invent-ion, therefore, by eliminating velocity changes Yithin the bore during the discharge of the cartridge, produces a reduction and an evenncss ofrecoil and" relieves unnecessary strains and vibrations within the gun barrel. l
While I have herein illustrated and described the projectile as being composed of :t lead core and ductile jacket, it will be understood that my invention comprehends a projectile composed -`wholly of lead, lead alloy, or any other suitable metal or combination of metals.
Itwill be understood that minor 'changes in the size, form and construction of the various parts of my improved cartridge may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without-departing vfrom the spirit of the invention, the scope of which is set forth in the appended claims.
I claim as my invention: 1. A cartridge comprising a shell having a. super-caliber chamber adapted to receive an explosive charge, a projectile having two diferent diameters, the forward portion of which projectile, and which has the smaller diameter being adapted to enter the bore of a gun, the rear portion of theprojectile and which has lthe larger diameter being seated in the mouth of the super-caliber explosive `Achamber within lthe cartridge shell the portions of different diameter 'of said projectile being joined by a tapered shoulder and the larger rear portion of said projectile being provided with a tapered recess that extends the shouldered portion of the body of sald projectile to the caliber diameter thereof.
2. A cartridge comprising a shell and a projectile having two the smaller diameter being adapted to enter the bore of a gun, the rear portion of greater diameter of Said projectile fitting snugly within the forward portion of the super-caliber explosivechamber in the shell, the portions ferent 'diameters beir'igV joined by a tapered shoulder that is adapted to bear against a shoulder within the cartridge chamber of the gun in which the cartridge is positioned, and the larger rear portion of said projectile being provided with a tapered recess that extends forwardly through the shouldered portion of the body of said projectile to the caliber diameter thereof.
3. A cartridge comprising a shell and a projectile having two different diameters, the forward portion of said projectile having the smaller diameter being adapted to enter piece. i
, tridge is different diameters,` e forward portion of said projectile having recess that i-s open to the of said projectile having difthe bore'of a gun, the rear portion of greatcaliber explosive chamber in the shell,'the portions of said projectile having different diameters being joined by a tapered shoulder that is adapted to bear against a shoulder within thc carl ridge chamber of the gun in which thecarlridgc is positioned so as to function as a stop to support the cartridge in proper position against the forward thrust of thc bolt in loading and the forward blow of the tiring pin at the time of' discharge and thc larger rear portion of said projectile being provided with a tapered recessl that extends forwardly through the shouldered portion of the body of said projectile .to the caliber diameter thereof.
4.- A cartridge comprising a shell, -a projcctile having two different diameters, the portion of said projectile having the greatest diameter being seated in the forward portion of the shell. the portion of lea-st diameter of said projectile being adapted to enter the bore of the gun in which the carpositioned, the portions of different diameter of said projectile being connected in front of and outside the shell by a tapered shoulder that is adapted to bear yagainst a diameter thereof.
5. A cartridge comprising a shell, a projectile having the forward portion of its body reduced in diameter so as to conform to the bore of the gun in which the eartrldge is fired, the rear portion of the body of the projectile having greater diameter than the forward portion.'the portions of different diameters being joined by a tapered shoulder and the enlarged rear portion of said projectile being formed with a centrally arranged rear of the body of the projectile and which extends forwardly through that portion of thebody that is encompassed by the tapered shoulder.
6. A cartridge comprising a shell, a projectile having the forward portion of its body reducedin diameter so as to conform to the bore of the gun in which the cartridge is tired. the rear portion of the body of the projectile having greater diameter than the forward portion, the portions of different diameters being joined by a tapered shoulder and the enlargedl rear portion of said projectile being formed with a coneentrically arranged chamber that is open tothe rear of the body of the projectile and which extends forwardly through Vthat portion of the body that is' encompassed by the tapered shoulder.
7. A cartridge comprising a shell having an external Wall of straight cylindrical form throughout its length, a projectile having a body of two diameters` the front portion of the internal diameter of the front portion of the super-caliber explosive chamber within the cartridge shell and the chamber Within the hollow segmental rear portion of the body extending forwardly to the transverse plane occupied by the rear portion of the projectile body that conforms to the bore of the gun. l
8. A cartridge comprising a shell, a projectile seated in the forward portion of said shell said projectile having an externally arranged tapered' shoulder intermediate its ends, so that the forward portion of said projectile is smaller in diameter than the rear portion, and the larger rear portion of said projectile being provided with a forwardly extending tapered recess that extends through that portion of the body of the projectile that is encompassed by the tapered shoulder.
9. A cartridge comprising a shell, a projectile seated in the forward portion of said shell said projectile having an externally ,arranged tapered shoulder intermediate its ends` so that the forward portion ofsaid projectile is smaller in diameter thanlhe rear portion, the larger rear portion lof said projectile being provided lwith a forwardly extending tapered recess that extends through that portion of the body of the projet-tile that is encompassed by the tapered shoulder, and the forward vend of which recess terminates in a flat pressure receiving face. j l
In testimony whereof I affix my signature.
WILLIAM A. CARUTH- j
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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2423453A (en) * 1942-05-13 1947-07-08 James V Howe Projectile
US2433334A (en) * 1944-01-11 1947-12-30 Birkeland Leigh Forstner Ammunition
US2482132A (en) * 1943-03-10 1949-09-20 Rene R Studler Cartridge
US2703529A (en) * 1947-08-29 1955-03-08 Arnold J Tuckerman Lining for perforated cartridge cases
US3229583A (en) * 1964-01-29 1966-01-18 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Gun flared projectile
US3412681A (en) * 1965-06-11 1968-11-26 Hans Ludwig Schirneker Cartridge and a firearm for such a cartridge
US3680485A (en) * 1969-12-08 1972-08-01 Colt S Inc Salvo squeezebore projectile
FR2513369A1 (en) * 1981-09-24 1983-03-25 Robert Antoine PROJECTILES FOR HAND AND RAY SHAPED HAND AND SHOULDER GUNS AT VERY HIGH INITIAL SPEEDS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE HAGUE CONVENTIONS AND PRODUCING THE SAME NEUTRALIZING EFFECTS AS SHALLOWED OR EXPLOSIVE PROJECTILES. CLAIM: TWO DEVICES, USE.
EP1334327A2 (en) * 2000-09-28 2003-08-13 Superior Ballistics, Inc. Firearm cartridge and case-less chamber
US9016184B2 (en) 2012-09-27 2015-04-28 National Machinery Llc Precision forged cartridge case
US20160265887A1 (en) * 2015-03-13 2016-09-15 Rene NEUBACHER Projectile with maximized ballistic stopping power
US10386164B2 (en) * 2014-08-26 2019-08-20 Dsg Technology As Projectile of small arms ammunition
US20190271519A1 (en) * 2018-03-01 2019-09-05 Michael Morency Cleary Rifled ammunition system

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2423453A (en) * 1942-05-13 1947-07-08 James V Howe Projectile
US2482132A (en) * 1943-03-10 1949-09-20 Rene R Studler Cartridge
US2433334A (en) * 1944-01-11 1947-12-30 Birkeland Leigh Forstner Ammunition
US2703529A (en) * 1947-08-29 1955-03-08 Arnold J Tuckerman Lining for perforated cartridge cases
US3229583A (en) * 1964-01-29 1966-01-18 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Gun flared projectile
US3412681A (en) * 1965-06-11 1968-11-26 Hans Ludwig Schirneker Cartridge and a firearm for such a cartridge
US3680485A (en) * 1969-12-08 1972-08-01 Colt S Inc Salvo squeezebore projectile
FR2513369A1 (en) * 1981-09-24 1983-03-25 Robert Antoine PROJECTILES FOR HAND AND RAY SHAPED HAND AND SHOULDER GUNS AT VERY HIGH INITIAL SPEEDS, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE HAGUE CONVENTIONS AND PRODUCING THE SAME NEUTRALIZING EFFECTS AS SHALLOWED OR EXPLOSIVE PROJECTILES. CLAIM: TWO DEVICES, USE.
US4572077A (en) * 1981-09-24 1986-02-25 Societe Francaise De Munitions Projectile for hand and shoulder weapons and a cartridge fitted with said projectile
EP1334327A2 (en) * 2000-09-28 2003-08-13 Superior Ballistics, Inc. Firearm cartridge and case-less chamber
EP1334327A4 (en) * 2000-09-28 2006-08-23 Superior Ballistics Inc Firearm cartridge and case-less chamber
US9016184B2 (en) 2012-09-27 2015-04-28 National Machinery Llc Precision forged cartridge case
US10369622B2 (en) 2012-09-27 2019-08-06 National Machinery Llc Precision forged cartridge case
US10386164B2 (en) * 2014-08-26 2019-08-20 Dsg Technology As Projectile of small arms ammunition
US20160265887A1 (en) * 2015-03-13 2016-09-15 Rene NEUBACHER Projectile with maximized ballistic stopping power
US20190271519A1 (en) * 2018-03-01 2019-09-05 Michael Morency Cleary Rifled ammunition system

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