US1655279A - Mount-making machine - Google Patents

Mount-making machine Download PDF

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Publication number
US1655279A
US1655279A US517620A US51762021A US1655279A US 1655279 A US1655279 A US 1655279A US 517620 A US517620 A US 517620A US 51762021 A US51762021 A US 51762021A US 1655279 A US1655279 A US 1655279A
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United States
Prior art keywords
filament
wire
leads
jaws
holder
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US517620A
Inventor
Michael E Mcgowan
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General Electric Co
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General Electric Co
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Publication date
Priority to FR559101D priority Critical patent/FR559101A/fr
Priority to NL12306D priority patent/NL12306C/xx
Priority to FR559102D priority patent/FR559102A/fr
Application filed by General Electric Co filed Critical General Electric Co
Priority to US517620A priority patent/US1655279A/en
Priority to GB3194222A priority patent/GB189459A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1655279A publication Critical patent/US1655279A/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01KELECTRIC INCANDESCENT LAMPS
    • H01K3/00Apparatus or processes adapted to the manufacture, installing, removal, or maintenance of incandescent lamps or parts thereof
    • H01K3/08Manufacture of mounts or stems
    • H01K3/10Machines therefor

Description

Jan. 3, 1928. 1,655,279
M. E. McGowAN MOUNT 4MAKING MACHINE l Filed Nov. 25. 19:21 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 Inventor:
MChaelEM: Gowgn www I Hfs nti-@meg Jan. 3, 1928. A 1,655,279
M. E. McGowA'N Mouw MAKING MACHINE Filed Nov. 25. 1921 e sheetsfsneet 2 il Figla A- Inventor*- Mchael EMCGowan,
Kbsmw- Jan. s, 1928. 1.5655379 M. E.` McGowAN MOUNT MAKING MACHINE Filed Nov. 25, 1921 SaSheeizs- Sheet 3 lll l--Illh ichaelEMcGow/an,
Jan. 3, 192s. 1,655,279
M. E. McGowAN MOUNT MAKING MACHINE:
Filed Nov. 25. 1921 I e sheets sheet 5 1?/ 7g. [76
Jan. 3, 1928.
1,655,279 M. E. MGGOWAN MOUNT MAKING MACHINE Filed Nov. 25. 1921 6 Sheets- Sheet 6 Fig..
. Micha 1E.MGOWm Inventor: .l
Patentedv Jan. 3, 1928.
UNITED STATES-PATENT OFFICE.
`MICHAEL' E. MUGOWANLOF NEWARK, vNEW JEBBE'Y, ABBIGNOR TO GENERAL COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK. I
ELECTRIC rouvrir-MAKING MACHINE.
appucanbn med november, naar. serial immane voltages, such as two to four volts. Owing to the very short length of filament, these mounts must be made with very considerable accuracy as to the length of filament included in circuit between the lead wires,
' and heretofore it has been necessary to have these mounts made by comparatively skilled labor in order to obtain lamps made accurately enough to be of the desired uniformity in candle power and voltage.
One object iof my invention is to provide a machine for performing automatically those operations of mount making which require great accuracy and which heretofore could be performed successfully only by skilled operators.
Another object of my invention is to provide a machine by skilled operator 1s able to make mounts whicheare much more accurately made and more "uniform than similar mounts as heretofore'made even by the skilled operators ordinarily available in a lamp factory.
A further object is'to provide a simple and efficient mount making machine in which the operation of securing the filament to the leads with the proper length of filament in circuit between them and imparting the proper shape to the filament are all performed automatically and with a de of accuracy and uniformity not obtainable by hand workers under ordinary factory conditions, and not obtainable at all except by very highly skilled operators.
Still another object is to provide a mount making machine which, while automatically holding the lead wires parallel and at the proper distance apart, will take from a long wire or filament, wound on. a spool a short length of wire sufficient for a filament, attach it to the leading-in wires, shape the filament, and cut it off from the long wire and thereby free the finished mount, and will also, if desired, automatically deliver the finished mount ready for use in lamp making.
Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear from the description of means ofpwhich an un-I the particular embodiment thereof which is described in the following specification and of which the novel features are pointed out w1t h greater particularity in the annexed claims, although in its broader aspects my invention is capable of embodiment in numerous forms different from that herein described, and various of the elements illus- -trated may be changed and modified without departing from my invention.
My invention will best be understood in connection with the accompanying drawing, in. which Figure 1 is a plan view, with certam parts broken away, of a machine embodylng my invention; Figure 2 is a sectional view along the line 2-2 of Figure 1 showing with certain parts in section, a. holder for the leading-1n wires, the `automatic mechanism for feeding the leading-in wires into place, and parts of other associat'ed mechanism; Figure 3 is a sectional view along the line 3-3 of Figure 2, with some parts omitted and showing the holder for' the leads and parts of the wire feeding mechanism in elevation; Figure 4 is a view in perspective of the finished mount made by the machine. Figures 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 are diagrammatic and fragmentary views of certain parts of the mechanism to illustrate the sequence of operation in feeding the filament into place, attaching it to the lead wires, shaping it, and cutting it off -from the spool of filament wire with the end ready to be secured to a lead wire ofthe next mount; Figure 13 is a plan View of the filament mounting mechanism with the filament wire feeding mechanism omitted for clearness of illustration; Figure 14 is a side view of the mechanism shown in Figure 13.
Figure 15 is a side view of the same mechanism shown in Figure 12, but with the parts in a different position. Figurey 16 is a side elevation of the filament feeding mechanism with a part of the mount carrying table and one of the pinching-jaws of Figure 13 shown 100 to illustrate the relations of the parts; Figure 17 is a view in pers ctive of art of the filament feeding mec anism in its forward position corresponding to Figure 16;
Figure 18 is a perspective view of part of 105 thefilament feeding mechanism i'n its retracted position, corres ondin to 'Figure 12; Figure 19 is a sectional v1ew through the holding frame best shown in Figures 17 and 18, along the pivot. ofthe wire feeding 110 ends of thelead wires the proper distance apart and simultaneously cuts them to the proper length, and also positions them at Vthe proper distance from the center of the rotating table; Figure 23 is a plan view looking down u on the' spacing and cuttin blades with the elders of the blades `omit to show more clearl the relation of the blades tothe leading-1n wires and the holder in which they are gripped; Figure 24 is a diagram illustrating the cutter for electrically cutting the li ament wire. Figure 25 is a front view of the cutter mounted on a swinging arm and showing the actuating mechanism for the cutter; Figure 26 is a side view 0f the cutter shown in Figure 25 and illustratin its relation to the ,mount while cutting t e filament wire; Figure 27 is an elevation of the mechanism for spreading and shaping the lower ends of the leading-in wires; Figure 28l is a longitudinal view, partly in section ofv the upper part of the mechanism shown in Figure 27; Figure 29 is an elevation of the spreading ngers of the mechanism shown in Figure 27 at the end of their upward travel when they are between the leading-in wires and are on the point ofl spreading them apart; Figure 30 is an elevation of the mechanism shown in Figure 29 in a di'erent position where the spreading fingers have; finished their spreading movement and the shaping die is imparting the final shape to the leading-in wires; Figure 31 is a perspective view of the shaping die and the sliding block which carries it; Figure 32 isa plan view of a conveyor type pf automatic delivery mechanism which I have found advantageous; Figure 33 is a side elevation of the mechanism shown in Figure 32; Figure 34 is a view in perspective of a part of the conveyor chain shown in Figure 31, and Fi re 35 is a pers ective view of the -inis ed mount dellvered by the complete machine.
In the particular form of machine which I have illustrated" in the drawings as one embodiment of my invention, the various parts 'are mounted on a base 40 conveniently made in the form of a heavy table. The driving mechanism is mounted underneath the top of the base 40 and comprises two driving shafts 41 and 42 set at right angles to eachother and geared together to operate at the same speed. For imparti-ng an intermittent or step by step movement to a movable carrier for themounts, the drivnism just described, all of which is underneath the top of the base 40. l
By means of a travellin carrier such as the rotatable table 47, eac mount during itsv manufacture is brou ht into operative relation to different mec anisms in 4succession and is held there stationary for a short time while each mechanism automatically performs some operation on the mount. In the particular machine illustrated, the driving mechanism is so designed that each mount holder stops in twelve different ositions during oneA complete rotationpo the table. This number of positions'is a convenient one, but a reater orless number can be used,if desire The two le'ads or lead Wires of the mount are heldin place and substantially parallel during the various operations of making the mount'by means of a bodily movable lead wire head or holder mounted on the table 47. In this particular machine twelve holding heads are secured to the rota-ting table 47 to project radially therefrom, cach head consisting ofA a pair of movable projecting holding jaws 48 which are pivoted near the middle and grip opposite sides of a separator 49 rigidly secured to the edge of the table to. project radially from it. The holding jaws are as best shown in Figure 1 normally held open by leaf` springs 50, and are posiA tively closed by a .spring actuated closing means such as a Wedge 51 which is forced by a coil spring 52 into closing position between the ends of the holding .jaws to close them upon the separator 49. The wedge 51 is pulled back to permit the holding jaws to open under the iniluence of the springs 50 by some suitable actuating mechanism which as shown in Figures 2.and 20, engages a pin 53 secured to the wedge 51 to projectl be 0W the lower surface of the rotatin table 47. At the discharge position where t e fmished mount is to be released, the wedge 51 is pulled back and the ja-Wsare automatically opened becausc the travel of the table 47 causes the pin 53 to ride along on a stationary cam 54 mounted underneath the rotatable table 47, and shown in dotted lines in Figure 1. This cam holds thewedge 51 back and the jaws open at the discharge position, and keeps them open until the hold-A ing head arrives at'the next position and is at station A,- Figure 1, where the control of the wedge 51 and of the holding jaws is transferred from the stationary cam 54 to' an automatically actuated jaw .controlling mechanism which controls the jaws as long as the holder head is at station A. vThis jaw controlling mechanism is best shown 1n Figure 20, and comprises a sliding block 55 having a slo't to receive the pin 53 as the table 47 brings the holding head into position A. This block is moved radially of the rotating table by link work 56 actuated from a cam 57 on the driving shaft 41. The shape and timing of the cam 57 is such that the block 55 is moved toward the center of the table into the position shown in Figure 20, where the pin 53 will enter the slot in the block 55 as rotation of the table 47 moves the pin 53 oil' the end of the stationary cam'54. The rotatable table 47 then stops, with the holding head at station A and with the holding jaws open because the block 55 is in its retracted position shown in Figure 20. While at station A the holdingl jaws are under the control of the jaw controlling mechanism,
which may be actuated to move the block 55 forward and thereby open the jaws as required.
The leading-in wires from which the leads of themounts are made are automatically placed side by side in the holder head at station A by some suitable wire feeding mechanism, suchl as that illustrated in Figures 2 and 3. At this station the jaw controlling mechanism holds back the wedge 51 and the holding jaws are open. The two leading-in wires, preferably of great length and wound on spools, are fed from the spools in such a way that'their ends are positioned in the holdingI head on opposite sides of the separator and between it and the holding jaws. These wires are fed automatically by vertically movable feed tubes 58 preferably set to form an acute angle with each other, as best shown in Figure 3, and provided with one way clutches A59 of such a character that as the tubes rise the clutches grip the leading-in wires and carr them along with the tube to a lposition'w ere their ends are in the holding head and are seized and held while the tubes move downward along the leading-in wires and the clutches sli along the wires. The feed tubes 58 of t e wire feeding mechanism are actuated by a cam 60 'on the driving shaft 41. The parts are so timed that while the table 47 is stationary and the holding jaws at station A are held open, the feed tubes 58 are lifted until the upper ends of the leading-in wires which project from the tubes, pass on opposite sides of the separator and between it and the .holding `jaws as shown in Figure 3. The holding jaws maybe closed on the wires at the 'end of this movement, but as indicated in Figure 2, I prefer to grip the upper ends ofthe leading-in wires between gripping jaws 61 slidably mounted in a housing 62 and provided with rack teeth which engage a pinion '63 .actuated by a crank and a push rod 64.
tion shown in Figure' 2, and while the feed,
tubes are stationary in their uppermost posi- Y tion, the gripping jaws 61 are closed by the spring 65 to seize the projecting ends of the leading-in wires, whereupon the feed tubes fall back to their initial po:ition, shown in Figure 3, while the wires are held b l their upper ends in the gripping jaws. T en the holder jaws 48 close and firmly clamp the wires to the separator 49, and hold them side by side.
The leading-in wires while held by the holding jaws 4.8, are then cut to the proper length for leads by an automatic shear or cutting mechanism which is placed at station A and comprises cooperating sliding cutter blades 67 actuated to cut the leading-in wires above the ends of the feed tubes 58. I prefer to actuate these lsliding cutter Vblades by providing them with rollers 68 which enter oppositely inclined slots 69 in a vertically movable cam 70 slidably mounted in the housing 62. As the cam rises the together. As the sliding cam 70 is lowered the rollers 68 are pulled toward each other and the cutting jaws are opened. This sliding ycam 70 is actuated through a push rod .driven by a box cam 71 on the driving shaft 41.
The leads are now of proper length and are held side by side in the holder head at position A because firmly clamped against the separator 49 which holds them at about the propler distance apart. Their upper tips are slig tly inclined toward each other due to the fact that they were so inclined when they were seized by the gripping jaws 61, and this slight inclination faci itates the lacing of a ring of glass over the two leads y the operator while the holder head if; moving through the next two positions. This glass ring is of a size to fit easily over the two leads in the holder head and is con'- veniently formed by cutting short sections from a glass tube. These sections or rings of glass are set down over the two leads and are of a height which is only a fraction of thev length or' lead projecting above the holder head. The lgllass ring is placed over the two leads by t e operator, and as the holding head is carried along by the step by step movement of the table 47 the glass ring passes between two pairs of burners 72, the first pair set to give the ring a preliminary heating, and the second pair set to melt the ring intoa glass bead which embeds the middle portion of the leads and holds the leads at approximately the proper distance apart.
The next operation is to space the upwardly projecting ends of the lead wires a definite distance apart, position them radially at a definite distance from the center of the table 47, and cut them to the proper length. These operations are automatically performed at station B by an automatic spacing and cutting mechanism of which a desirable form is illustrated more in detail in Figures 22 and 23. This spacing and cutting mechanism comprises a stationary housing 7 3 which contains a slidable' spacing blade 74, having as shown in Figure 23 two notches 75 for engaging and spacing the ends of the leads, and which also contains a cooperating slidable cutting blade 76 to form with the spacing blade 74 a shear for cutting the leads. The blades are actuatedby a sliding double slotted cam 77 like that which actuates the cutter blades- 67, but with the upper and lower ends of its slots parallel for a short distance so that the first and last parts of the upward and downward movements of the cam 77 are idle so far as actuating the Vspacing and cutting blades is concerned.' This sliding cam is actuated through a push rod 78 by a cam 79 on the driving shaft 42. The parts are so timed that `while a holder head is stationary at station B the spacing blade 74 moves toward the leads in the holder head until its middle point is between the two leads, and above the glass bead which embeds them, and the bottoms 0f the two notches 75 are at the proper distance radially from the center of scribed are performed while the glass bead of the mount is in a plastic condition.
lTo make sure that Iin each position of the table 47 a holder head will be in a definite and correct relation to the various mechanisms which o erate upon the mount, I provide' an in exing and locking mechanism of which one form comprises a housing 80 placed adjacent station B and carrying a slidable locating bolt 81 provided with a tapered end to enterV shaped notches 82 which, as shown in Figure 1, are cut in the rim of the rotatable table 47. Any slight inaccuracy in the angular osition of the table is corrected when the w ge shaped end of the locking bolt enters one of the V shaped notches 82, and furthermore the table is firmly locked as long as the locking bolt is firmly seated in the notch. These notches 62 'correspond in number to the positions taken by each holding head during` the complete revolution of the table 47, although only two of the notches are shown in Figure 1, where apart of a thin sheet metal cover of the table 47 is broken away to show them. The locking bolt is yieldingly driven into the notches 82 by some automatically actuated mechanism, such as a push rod 83 driven from the cam 79 on the driving shaft 42 through a spring 84. The timing of the mechanism is such that the locking bolt enters the V shaped notch and positions and locks the table prior to the beginning of any operations of the mount, and holds the table firmly in placeuntil after the operations at each position are completed. In the particular arrangement shown the cam 79 through the spring 84 seats the bolt 81 in the notch 82 during the first part of the upward movement of the push rod 78, while the sliding cam 77 is moving idly and'before the spacing and cutting blades 74 and 76 begin to move, holds it firmly yet yieldingly seated while those blades are actuated to complete their function, and also holds it seated until after these blades have returned to their initial position.
As the mount leaves' the spacing and cutting mechanism at station Bit is ready to have the filament applied to it.v The :rotation ofthe table carries it to the filament applying mechanism at station C, where the filament is automatically given the proper vsha-pe and length, secured to the leads, and
then cut off from the spool of wire from which the filament is formed. This filament applying mechanism includes a filament wire feeding device for supplying filament wire from a spool, a filament attaching and shaping device for securing the filament to the leads and giving it the proper shape, and a filament wire cutter for cutting the filament wire after the .filament has been secured to the leads.
The operation of the filament applying mechanism can better be understood by bearing in mind the finished mount produced by the vmachine and shown in perspective in Figure 4. This mount consists of 'a metaly wire 0r filament'85, usually of drawn tungsten, and preferably reversely curved to have anS shape, although for some types of lamps the filament may be a straight wire extending fromone lead to the other, or may be I" j ers 72 melted down the glass ringwhich was laced over the leads at a preceding sition. t the time the filament is attache by the filament applying mechanism, the leads 86 are straight both above and below the bead,
- but subsequently the lower ends of the leads but also hold it in proper relation to the are bent into the form shown in Figure 4 to facilitate sealing the mount into the lam The filament may be secured to the eads in various ways, as by bending the ends ofthe leads into hooks and closing the hooks upon the filament, or in any other suitable way, but I prefer to attach the filament by em edding 1t in the leads by pinching. The drawn tungsten wire commonly used for the filament is very much harder than the lead wire, which is usually a low expansion nickel steel wire coated with enough copper to make a composite wire that has the right coefficient of expansion to make a hermetical seal with glass. If a lament wire of drawn tungsten 1s placed across or in contact with such a lead and pressed upon the lead with a powerful pressure, the tungsten wire will sink into the metal of the -lead and be firmly embedded in it, making a good electrical connection which is mechanically strong, as the filament wire will sink into the lead to a depth as great as its diameter and the softer metal of the lead will fiow over it to some extent and lock it in place.
The se uence of operations in securing and shaping t e filament will best be understood by referring to Figures 5 to 12 inclusive. As indicated in these gures, the tungsten wire 85 is fixe-d or embedded in the leads by two cooperating pinching jaws or pins- 88 and 89 which close upon the two leads 86 and the filament 85 while the filament is sol disposed that its ends overlap the ends of the leads at the point where lthe pinching jaws engage the filament and the leads. The filament is shaped by some suitable former which bends it and places it in proper relation to the leads. If the filament is to be given an S shape, I may use two shaping lades 90 and 91 mounted to overlap between the pinching jaws and preferably having notchesin their overlapping ends to take hold of the filament wire. These blades by their overlapping not only shape the filament leads, and act as a solid block 'between the aleads, so that as the pinching jaws close the leads can not move toward each other, but
are held so rigidly that the lpressure causes the filament wire to be embedded in them. By varying the extent of overlapy of the shaping blades the length of lament in circuit can be varied.
The end of the filament wire 85 is rst placed in the path of movement of the spaced and positioned .leads held in the 'mount holder as shown in Figure 5, and as the movement of the table 47 carries the leads into position at station C the forward lead encounters the filament wire and swings the end of it intothe position shown in Figure 6 where it is in contact with the lead and extends across it at right angles. The pinching jaws 88 and 89 with the shapin blade 90 between them, now advance bodi y' into the operating position shown in Figure 7 where the lead and'thevfilament wire lying across it are both between the pinching jaw 88 and the shaping blade 90. The pinching jaw 88 nowadvances just enough as shown in Figure 8, to grip the lead 86 and the overlapping tungsten wire 85 so tightly between the jaw 88 and the comparatively stiff blade 90 that the end of the filament wire is held against displacement during subsequent operations. Should it happen that no mount is. in place when the pinching jaws advance into operating position, the wire 85 remains in the position of Figure 5 and is merely pushed by the blade 90 in a clockwise direction and held out of range of the pinching jaws, returning to its initial position when the pinching jaws and blade 90 fallback.
The filament wire guide 92 now swings from the position indicated in Figure 7 to that indicated in Figure 9 thereby placing the filament wire 85 across the path of the other shaping blade 91, which swings with the guide 92 into the position shown in Figure 9, and then advances toward the other shaping blade 90 until it engages the filament wire 85, continuing to advance and drawing more filament wire through the guide 92 and offthe spool of filament wire, until finally 'it overlaps the other shaping blade so far that the filament is S shaped, as indicated in Figure 10, and its ends lie transversely across the leads 86. There is no displacement of the leads, as all of the strains due to bending the filament wire and getting it into place between the leads are taken up by the shaping blades and associated mechanism. The pinching jaws now close completely as indicated in Figure 11 while the two shaping blades 90 and 91, constituting a former which substantially fills the space between the leads, hold the filament in shape and in place during the pinching which causes the filament to be embedded in the leads. -The only way any'variation in length of filament in circuit can occur is by displacement of the leads 86 lengthwise of the shaping blades, which is not likely to occur, as there is no force exerted during lll() llO the shaping of the filament or during the placement, consequently the filaments are all .of very uniform length.
vfit',
While the pinching jaws are still closed the filament wire guide 92 moves back into the position shown in Figures 11 and 12, leaving a considerable length of wire between the guide and the lead 86. It remains in this position while the pinchlng jaws open and fall back, and the shaping blades separate, as shown in F1 re 12, whereupon the filament wire is cut c ose to the lead 8 6, leaving the end of the wire projecting so far that when the guide 92 swings back into the position shown in Fi re 5, the end of the filament wire will be 1n the lead, as shown in that figure.
The filament applying mechanism and the holder head for the mount are relativelg movable, and are moved away from eac other to permit the table 47 and holder head to move from one position 'to the next. When the holder head carrying the leads to which th filament is to be applied has been brought into place at station C, the filament applying mechanism and the holder head are moved toward each other so as to bring the filament applying mechanism into operative relation to the leads, as shown in Figures 8 to 11 inclusive. After the lfilament has been ap lied the filament a plying lmechanism an the holder head fort e mount are moved away from each other into the relative positions. shown in Figure 12, to permit the table 47 to carry the mount away from the filament applying mechanism. ln the particular machine illustrated the filament aplying mechanism is mounted so as to be bodily movable toward and away from the table 47, and the shaping blade 91 is mounted to swing back out of the way while the table is rotated. In the particular arrangement shownV in Figs. 13, 14 and 15 the pinching jaws or pins-88 and 89 are normally held separated by springs and are slidably mounted in bosses 93 on a slidable block 101 having between the bosses a slot or recess containinga rectangular member 94 which carries the shaping blade 90 and is adjustably positioned by a set screw 95. By moving the member 94 in the slot the blade 90 can be set to project, more or less between' the pinching'jaws 88 and 89. Bell cranks 96 pivoted on the bosses engage the outer ends of the pinching jaws, and are yieldinglyheld as by a spring 97 in engagement with a. sliding cam 98 which has cam surfaces 99 and 100 so related that Ias-the cam advances into jaw closing position the jaw 88 is closed prior to the other one. This cam is slidably mounted in guide ways in the block 101 which carries the bosses 93 and which in.
turn is slidably mounted to move radially of the table on a standard 102 secured to the base 40. The sliding cam 98 has a lost motion connection to the block 101 through path of the' l free to move, but will yield and ermit thev maaar@ between the block and a lug or projection 105 ,on the cam 98. To actuate both the cam 98 and the block 101, I connect the cam by a pivoted lever 106 to an actuating box cam 107 having a groove shaped as shown to impart the desired movements to the sliding cam 98 and block 101. The spring 104 is normally extended as shown in Figure 15 and is of such strength that it acts as a rigid connection between the Sliding cam 98 and the block 101 as long as the block is cam to move relatively to the b ock if the movement of the block is stopped positively by some means such as the adjustable stop 108 mounted on the sliding block in position to engage the standard 102 when the block is in its forward position shown in Figure 14.
The filament applying mechanism is inthe back position shown'in Figure 15 while the table 47 is moving and in fact at all times except while the filament is being attached to the leads.v When the holder head carrying ythe two leads sto s `at station C and the table is locke by the locking bolt 81, the filament wire 85 is by the filament wire feeding mechanism hereinafter described, heldin position such that its projecting end overlaps one of the leads v86, as indicated in Figure 6. Cam 107 now begins to rock the arm 106 and move both the -block 101 and sliding cam 98 forward, that is to the right as Figures 15 and 16 'are drawn. The block 101 moves with the cam because the spring 104 is stifl' and acts like a rigid connection as long as the block is free to move. At the end of the travel of the block, when it is in the posit-ion shown in Figure 14, and is in operative relation to the. leads, as indica-ted in Figures 7 to 16, the stop 108 strikes the standard 102 and the block stops with the shaping blade 90 between the leads. of the mount. The sliding cam 98 continues to move forward and the spring 104 is compressed by this forward movement. 'The cam' 98 is now slidingI on the block, and therefore being thrust between the ends of the bell cranks 96. Presently the cam surface 99 causes the corresponding bell crank to move pinching in 88 until in cooperation with the shaping blade 90 it holds the end of the tungsten filament wire firmly in 'place on the lead, as shown in Figure 8, and then the cam remains stationary for a time, due to a dwell in the groove of cam 107 on the drive shaft 42 while the filament wire feeding mechanism is actuated, as hereinafter described, to draw the filament wire into the path of the other shaping blade 91, as shown in Figure 9. During these operations the other shaping etween the cam and block blade has been he'ld back out of the way, as indicated in Figures 5 to 8v. It now swings into its initial position shown in Figure 9, and then is automatically moved forward into position as shown in Figure 10, where it is in place between the leads and'overlaps the blade 89. During this forward movement it bends the filament wire over the end of shaping blade 90 and back over the end of shaping blade 91, pulling whatever wire is needed through the wire guide 92, so that at the end of its movement the filament is S shaped and is in p'lace between the leads. The blade 91 may be moved by various mechanisms, but the one I prefer to use is shown in the drawings and comprises an arm 109 resiliently jointed near the middle by a spring hinge 110 so the lower end on which the blade 91 is mounted can be swung to one side, as indicated in Figures 5 to 8. This arm is mounted on a rock shaft 111 actuated by a'. crank arm 112, the travel of which is controlled by an adjustable stop 113 which limits the travel of the crank arm and thereby of the sha ing blade 91. The crank arm is actuated t rough a rod 114 from a cam 115 mounted on the drive shaft 41 and so timed with relation to the other parts of the mechanism and so shaped as to swing the blade 91 into place while' the sliding cam 98 is stationary, and to hold it in place until after the filament is pinched into the leads.
The length of the filament is determined by the overlap of the shapin blades. The position of the blade 90 is adjusted by moving the member 94 in its slot, and the position of the other blade 91 at the end of its travel is determined by adjusting the stop 113. As the shaping blades have the same overlap and come into the same position with relation to the leads each time a filament is shaped, and as all of the leads are set-at the same distance from the center of the table 48, the same length' of filament is included in circuit-in each mount.
When the shaping blade 91 is in place and the two shaping blades lie side by side and overlappingv as shown in Figure 10, the movement of the sliding cam 98 is resumed, and now the other cam surface 100 causes the other jaw 89 to move until at the end of the travel of the sliding cam as shown in Figure 13, both pinching jaws are fully home, and the filament is firmly embedded inthe leads, as indicated in Figure 11. The pinching jaws and the shaping blades now remain stationary for a period of time in theosition indicated in Figure 11, while the filament wire feeding mechanism moves into position, as indicated in that figure, to leave the end of -the filament wire projecting the proper distance from the wire guide 92 when the filament is cut off from the rest of the wire.
The filament wire feeding mechanism which is best shown in Figures 16 to 19, comprises the wire guide 92 which may be a block having in it a hole larger than the wire. The feed of the wire through the guide is controlled by some suitable friction or tension device, such as a spring blade 118 mounted on an arm 117 which carries the wire guide 92 on its free lower end. in many cases. a pad of felt orleather under the blade 116 in position to press on the wire is ofadvantage. The wire can be moved lengthwise in the tension device, and will remain where it is left, so it can be set in any desired position in the guide 92 by drawing the wire through the guide and tension device. 'The arm 117 is pivoted to swing in a vertical plane, and has a bracket. 118 provided with a spindlefor a spool 119 of filament wire, controlled by a friction clamp 120 to keep the wire taut. The arm 117 is mounted near its upper end on an insulating horizontal axle formed of a tube 121 of fiber or other insulation firmly set in the arm and having in its ends firmly tting metal plugs 122 recessed to receive the points of threaded .pivots 123 which are removabl mounted in the frame 124 so that by loosening the pivots the arm 117 can be removed bodily at will from the frame. The arm can be swung bodily in a horizontal plane, by moving the frame 124 about a vertical pivot 125. The position of the arm 117 is determined by an insulating stop, such as the insulating block 126 on the end of the arm in position to abut against an adjustable pin or stop threaded in the frame. rounded edge which cooperates with the end of an adjustable stationary finger 127 made of insulation, such as fiber, and secured to a standard 128 in which the pivot 125 is The arm 117 has a aoy mounted. The pivoted frame is swung in a ,125 and at the other end to a crank 130 on the upper end of a vertical rock shaft mounted in avertical pillar 131 and rocked' by a crank 132 mounted in its lower end and actuated by link work 133 from a cam 134 on the drive shaft 42. When the frame 124 is in the position shown in Fi re 18 the cam 117 isheld back by the en, of the finger 127.
The cycle of operation of the `filament feeding mechanism is as follows: Assume that the wire guide 92 is in the position of Figures 1, 5 to 8, and 16, which may for convenience be called its first position, and in which the end of the wire 85, which projects from the wire guide92, is held in the path of the leads in the advancing holder head, as shown in Figure 5. It remains in this position while the leads come into place.
leads, and is parallel to the line of movement it holds the other shaping blade 91 and the lower end of the spring hinged arm 109 out of the way as shown in Figure 1 by means of aprojection 135, which is mounted on the side of the spool bracket and engages the lower part of the jointed arm 109. After the pinching jaw 88 and the shaping blade 90 have gripped the end of the'wire 85 as above described, and as indicated in Figure 8, the frame 124 swings in a counterclockwise direction into the, second position, shown in Figure 17, where the rounded edge of the arm 117 just touches the end of the finger 127. vThis movement of the frame 124 permits the shaping blade 91 to return to the operative position shown in Figures 8 to 11, because the spring hinge 110 straightens out thejointed arm 109 when the spool bracket swings out of the way. The movement of the filament wire feeding mechanism from the first position to the second position stretches the tungsten wire across the path of the shaping blade 91, as shown in Figure 9,y so that the filament wire is caught by the shaping blade in its forward movement, bent, and finally laid across the end of the lead which is free from the pinching jaw 88, so that the filament wire is laid across the ends of the two leads ready to be attached to them.
During the shaping `of the filament the frame 124 remains stationaryin the second position of Figures 9, 10 and 17, while the shaping blade 91 advances into place' along- Side the other blade 90 as shown in Figure 10, thereby shaping the filament and at the same time pulling as much wire as required off the spool 119, because the end of the wire is firmly held between the pinching jaw 88 and the shaping blade 90. Both pinchingl jaws are then actuated by the further forward movement of sliding cam 98 to Sink the filament wire into the leads, and, while the jaws are closed, the filament feed mechanism moves to its third position, the frame 124 swinging further in a'counterclockwise direction and causing the arin 117 to ride up on the end of thel Figure 18, and draw the arm 117 and the wire guide 92 back, as shown in Figures 12 and 18, to leave a relatively long end of wire projecting from the guide. ment the arm 117 tilts about its horizontal axis and the wire guide moves back along the stretched wire into the position shown in Figure 18, the tension device or blade116 slipping along the wire which is held by the pinching jaws. The filament wire feedabout 1/64 of an inch in thickness.
ger 127, as shown' in In this move-` ing mechanism is now back in its first posi.-
the' position in icated in Figure 12 and shown in Figure 15.
The filament is cut 0H from the rest of the wire while the'ilament feeding mechanism is in its third position and after the pinching jaws have moved back out of the way, as indicated in Figure 12. Any suit-` I able form of cutting device can be used but the form which I prefer, and which has been used successfully, is an electrical cutter of which the essential parts are shown diagrammatically in Figure 24. As indicated in this figure, the cutter consists essentially of two electrodes 136 mounted side by side and separated by insulation 137, which may in practice be a sheet of n'ilca e two electrodes are connected to some source of current, such as a battery, and with the size of tun :ten wire ordinarily used, a potential of slx volts orvless is suihcient to operate the cutter. In the particular machine shown, the cutting electrodes are mounted on end of a pivoted arm 138 to which the electrical connections are made by a sliding brush or contact 139, this arm being actuatedat proper intervals through a push rod 140 actuated from a cam 141 onthe driving shaft 42. The mechanism is sp timed that the arm is swung up to bring the cutting electrodes into contact with the tungsten wire just after the filament wire feeding mechanism has completed its cycle of movement, and the filament attaching mechanism has moved back out of the way into the position shown in Figure 15, so that at the time of cutting the parts are in the relative position indicated diagrammatically in Figure 12. The cutting electrodes swin up into contact with the wire -and suficient current flows from one electrode carried. This bending operation is performed by' a bending and shaping mechanism best shown in Figures 27 to 31, and comprising ink general two fingers which come up between the lower ends of the lead izo wires and then separate so as to spread the wires apart, and a die which gives the final shape by pressing the leads against the lower 'side of the holding jaws and thereby bending the leads to the exact shape desired. During the spreading and shaping of the lower ends of the leads the mount is still gripped by the holder jaws and in order to avoid any displacement of these jaws bythe pressure exerted during the bending and shaping of the lower ends of the leads, Iv
of thedie which-'shapes and bends the leads.
The spreading and bending mechanism as best shown in Figures 27, 29 and 30, comprise two spreading lingers 143 mounted to move bodily into place between the leads and then separate. 4These fingers are normally held in contact with each other by springs and are so shaped that when theyare together the ends constitute a wedge, the sharp edge of which will enter between the lower ends of the leads as the fingers are raised into position between the leads- In the particular arrangement shown these ingers are pivoted on a vertically movable head 144, sliding on vertical guide posts 145 which project from a horizontal base plate 146 secured to the frame 40. The upward movement of the head 144 is limited by a stop, such as caps 147 on the upper ends of the guidel posts. This head is raised and lowered through an impositive or frictional connection comprising an actuatingblock 148 which slides in a groove in the head with suficient friction to carry the head withvit unless the head is positively` restrained. This actuating block carries on the upper end a resiliently mounted shaping die 149 having a center notch 150 .which receives the lower edgev of the separator 49 when the block is in its uppermost position, in which the die cooperates with the separator and the lower sides of the holder jaws to accurately shape and bend the leads. In the preferred construction the die is mounted on a bracket 151l on the upper end of a rod 152 which is in eii'ect splined on the block 148 by being slidably fitted in a vertical hole in the block and provided with a slot 153 to receive the inner end of a pin 154 mounted `in the block to limit the movement of the rod 151. Thedie is cushioned by a spring connection between it and the actuating block, such as a coiled compression spring 155 placed atthe bottom of. the hole. in the block .to engage the lower endof the rod 152 and normally hold the rod inits uppermost position. The sliding block is-raised and lowered by any suitable mechanism: for example` it may have a bracket 156 fastened to vit to connect it to a l.push rod 157 actuated from acam 158 on the driving shaft through a connection such that the sliding block is positively moved in both directions. This can be accomplished in various ways, as for example, by the arrangement in which a slotted link 159 on the shaft is provided with two rollers which engage opposite points on the cam, one of these rollers beingin contact with the cam when the block is moved upward and the other when the block is moved downward.
The separating and shaping mechanism is normally in the position shown in Figure 27 so that the mount can be carried into operative relation to it without interference. As the mount in the holder comes to station 'D the outer. ends of the holder` jaws come under the holder jaw support 142 as shown in Figures 27 and 28. Presently the head 144 begins to rise, sliding on the guide posts 146 and raising the fingers 143 until their ends are into place between the leads 86. This will occur even though the leads are close together, because the sharp edge of the wedge formed by the ends of the spreader fingers, willenter between the leads under almost any condition encountered in practice. The friction between the sliding block andthe head 144 is sufiicient to raise the head and the ngers without any relative movement of the parts until the liead is positively stopped, as by encountering the stops or caps 147 at which time the parts are in theI position shown in Figure 29 with the ends of the lingers, 'as shown in dotted lines between the leads and close to the lower edge of the separator. The actuating sliding block 148 continues to move upward and 1s nowmoving in the groove in the head 144 because the head is positively restrained by the cap on the guide posts. As a result of this movement of the block rela-tively to the head, the'block is thrust in between the. pivoted spreading fingers 143, acting like a wedge to separate them and move them into the position shown in Figure 30. This separating or spreading movement of the lingers carries the ends of the leads so far apart that as the actuating block 148 continues its upward movement the leads are spread out practically at right angles to the path of the block, so that by the 'time the shaping die 149 comes in contact with the leads they are across the face of this shaping die practically at right angles to the path of the block and are in Vthe most favorable position to'be shaped.' The sliding actuating block 148 with the shaping die yieldingly mounted on it continues its upward movement, during which the separator 49 of the holding head enters the slot 15() in the shaping die, and at the end of the upward travel of the sliding block the shaping die yieldingly seats on the lower sides of the holder jaws, positively pressing and forming the lower ends of the leads into the shape shown' in Figure 4. In effect' each therefore all oi them'are uniform, which'is a Iii) marked advantage in lamp manufacture. Y The mount is now completed and is of the form shown in Figure 4. As the table rotatesand the holder containing the finished mount moves to the-finalv or discharging station E the stationary cam 54 shown in Figure 1 automatically opens the holder jaws by pulling back the wedge 57. The finished mount can nowbe removed byjhand orby various forms of automatic devices.
The automatic discharge device which I prefer, shown in Figures 32 to 34, is of the conveyor type, constructed to automatically pick 11p the finished mount and carry it out of the holder jaws to the deliver;7 point, where it will beA automatically discharged. This discharge device will also, if desired, apply a coatlng to the bend ofthe leads, as indicated in Figure 35. j Thisdischar'ge conveyor has'a frame which overhangs the table 47 at the discharge position and carries a sprocket wheel-160, directly over the! table and another similar wheel 161 at the discharge point where the mounts are dropped. A chain'- belt 162 having pairs of conveyor jaws 163 runs on these wheels. the conveyor jaws being pivoted onl the chain by pivots 164 which project beyond'the sides of the chain. The conveyor jaws take hold of the leads of the finished mount between the lilamentand. the head. These jaws, as best shown in Figure 34 are normally resiliently held closed by some means such las the spring 165. One of the jaws of each 'pair is provided with an actuating member, such as a bell crank with a projecting pinv 166. The jaws are automaticall opened in the osition where the finishe mount is taken rom the mount holder and also in the discharge position where the finished mount is vautomaticallydropped. The automatic control l of the aws is preferably effected by stationa cam 167 mounted adjacent the sprocket w eels in such a position that as each pair of jaws is carried around the sprocket wheel by the chain the pin 166 on the bell crank rides up on the cam, which is of such an extent andcontour as to hold the 'aws open until they are on the lower si eof the sprocket wheel and in'position to pick up the mount in the mount holder or to drop the finished mount at the other end of the device. The conveyor chain is given a step by step movement in some suitable way, as by a ratchet wheel 168 connected to the sprocket wheel 161 and actuated by a rocking arm 169 carrying a pawl 176 and rocked by a push rod 171 from a cam 172 on the drive shaft 41. The parts are so timed that during movement of the table 47 the conveyor chain is stationary and a pair of jaws are held open on the lower side .of the sprocket wheel 160 over the table in such a mount holder is carried in between the jaws bly the movement of the tablewhich brings .t e
" relation it that'the finished' mount in the i I mount holder into the iinal or discharge position. The conve or chain then begins to move, 'whereupon t e conveyor jaws close, due to the 'actuatin in 1 66 of one of the jaws riding off the hlg part of the cam 167. As the jaws close under the pull of the spring 165, they grip the leads of the mount between the lament and the bead, and sweep the' mount out from between the holder jaws. The air of conveyor jaws carrying the finishe vmount thentravel over to the other sprocket wheel'161 where the jaws are automaticallj7 opened by the pin 166 riding up on the stat1onary cam 167 adjacent that wheel and the mount is dropped.
In addition ,to` automatically removing thc finished mount. from the machine, this discharge mechanism can also be used to apply -a paste or similar compound to the bends of the leads. To do this the mounts while held in the jaws are carried to a device which automatically applies the paste. The particular arrangement which I prefer is shown in the drawing and comprises a horizontal steadying guide bar'173 on which the projecting pivots 164 of each pair of jaws slide as the mount is carried from the machine to the discharge osition. At a point in the path ,along whic the mounts are carried, I
provide a paste applying means such as a l wheel 174 having a groove cut in the rim to leave two ridges at a slightly greater distance apart than thel spacing of the leads. This wheel is mounted so that the lower edge dips into the semi-liquid paste material which is contained -in a cup 175. Thelpa'rts are so positioned, as shown in Figure 33. that as the finished mounts are carried along by the discharge mechanism the bends ot the mount come into contact with the ridges on the wheel 174 and as the wheel is coated with the semi-li uid paste some of it adheres to the ben s of the leads and forms beads 176 of paste as indicated in Figure 34. This paste, which may be lead -borate or similar material, facilitates making a good hermetical seal between the glass 'and the lead wire- 86. The coated mount then passes along to the final ldischarge position and during its travel to that position the paste dries so that when the mount is finally released by the automatic opening of the conveyor jaws, the paste is dry and the mount is` ready to be sealed into a lamp.
The operation of the machine will now for convenience be explained by considering the various operations in v succession, from thel head to the removal of the finished mount placing ofthe leading-in wires in the holder neuwareL that during one revolution of the table each head stops for a certain length of time in twelve different positions, and is accurately ositioned and firmly held in each position y the indexing and locking bolt 81which corrects any error in the angular movement of the table.
AS seen in Figure 1, the holder jaws 48 are open at the final or discharge station E and remain open while the holder head is moved from that station to its first position at station A. iVhile the jaws are open the leading-in wires are automatically fed into place, and their ends are seized, as shown in Figure 2, by gripping jaws 61, which hold themas thegfeed tubes v58 drop back into their initial position', exerting enough pull, due to the friction of the clutches 59, to straighten out any bends or kinks in the leading-in wires and to hold the straightened wires rather taut. The holding jaws 48 now close, firmly clamping the lead vwires to the separator 49, and remain closed until thel completed mount is removed from the machine. The lead wires are then'cut by the shears 67 below the holder jaws 48, leaving such a length of wire projecting from the feed tubes 58 that the gripping jaws G1 will catch the ends of the wires when the feed tubes are again in their uppermost position, as shown in Figure By this mechanism at station A the two leads are placed in the holding head with their upper ends projecting some distance above the head.
The holder head with the leads 'firmly gripped in itsjaws 48 is then carried by the step by step movement of the table 47 through its second and' third positions, in one or the other of which the operator places over the upwardly projecting ends of the leads the ring of glass which is melted down toform the bead'87. In the fourth and fifth positions this ring is within range of the burners 72, and is melted down into a bead or button 67 in which the two leads are firmly embedded the proper distance apart.
When the'hold'er head arrives at the seventh position at station B it is in operative relation to the spacing and positioning mechanism with the upper ends of the leads between the blades 74 vand 76. As the blades approach each other the leads are first pushed to the bottom of the two notches 75 in blade 74, which stops with the bottoms of those notches at a predetermined distance from the axis 46 ofthe table, so that the two leads are not only spaced a definite distance apart, but are positioned a definite distance from the axis of the table. The surplus length of lead is then sheared off by further movement of the blade 76 over the blade 74.
The two leads, accurately spaced apart and accurately positioned radially of the table, are now carried to station C, where the filament is applied. As the leads approach station C the filament feedin mechanism takes up a position substantia y as shown in Figure 5 in which the wire guide or holder 92 holds the end ofthe wire 1n the path of the oncomin leads and when the leads stop at station the end of the wire overlaps one of the leads, as shown in Figure 6. The filament applying mechanism now advances, and as previosly explained, grips the lead and the overlapping end of the filament wire between the pinching jaw 88 and the shaping blade 90, as shown in Figure 8, firmly holding the wire and the lead. The filament feeding mechanism now swings the frame 124 and associated parts, includin the spool 119 of filament wire, in a counterc ockwise direction, stretching the wire into the position shown in Figure 9 and permitting the spring hinged arm 109 to straighten out and bring the shaping blade 91 into the osition of Figure 9. Then the shaping bla e 91 is swung toward the other blade 90 by the rock shaft 111, catching the wire and bending it over the end of the shaping blade 90, and also shaping it into a reverse curve as indicated in Figure 10. Whatj ever length of wire is necessary to form this reverse curve is drawn off th-e spool 119 by the blade 91 during its movement, as the end of the wire is held immovable by the pinching jaw 8. The direction of the movement of .the shaping blade 91 and its relation to sha ing blade 90 and the other` parts of t e mechanism are such that practically all of the strains due to the bending and shaping of the wire are taken up by the shaping blades 90 100 and 91, and the reversely curved wire is put in place between the leads without displacing either of them. The filament wire is now reversely curved and is on the two overlapj ping shaping members 90 and 91, which are 10. of such a thickness as substantially to fill the space between the two leads. The pinching jaws now advance toward each other into the position of Figure 11, the jaw 88 pressing the filament wire against one lead, which 1l. is supported by the shaping blade 90, and the jaw 89 pressing the other lead against the filament wire, which is supported by the blade 81, thereby pinching the leads and the wire together where they are in contact and causing the wire to sink into and be embed- 'ded in the leads. While the pinching jaws are closed-the wire guide 92 is moved back along the wirea short distance, due to a further counterclockwise movement of the frame 12. 124 sufficient to cause the arm 117 to be swung back as Shown in Figure 18 and the wire guide to move back along the wire into the position shown in Figure 11, so that when the wire is cut near the mount there 125 will be left projecting from the guide a portion of the wire long enough to bring the end of the wire into the path of the oncoming leads when the wire guide returns to the osition shown in Figures 5 and 6.- The al Yment is -now shisltied and'is secured to the leads, but is st I' s ool 119. In order to free the mount from t e rest of the wire the filament applying mechanism falls back into the osition shown in Figure 14, and thereupon t e cutter, confsisting'of electrodes 136, is brought into conn lead, as indicated in Figure l2.
I tact with the wire bly1 mg arm `138 and t e arclbetween' the electrodes separates or cuts the ,wire near the The mount with the filament in place -1- now carriedto station D, where the lower ends ,of the leads are spread apartby the spreading Iingers 143 and {inally'shaped by the ,die 149. The spreading. and shaping mechanism then drops back into the post tion shown in Figure 27 leaving the mount free to be carried `to the next position.V
The mount is .now completed, and by the further movement of the table 47 .is carmount'came into place between the open jaws 163 of hhe conveyor discharge device,
and while yholder head with the jaws Aopen is at station E the chain 162 moves, causin the conveyor jaws 163 to sweep the nishe mount out from between the holder jaws 46 and to grip it between the filament and the bead. The mount is now carried along by, the chain 162, the paste is automaticall applied to the leads` to produce the beads 1.3, as shown in Figure 35, and by thel time the mountjreaches the discharge end of thel conveyor the paste is dry, so that when the conveyor jaws 163' automatically open at the discharge end of the conveyor they release a finished mount ready to be 'put into a lamp.
It will be noted that this machine performs automatically all of those operations which must be performed with accuracy if the mounts are to be uniform, and also performs lautomatically other operations, such as placing the leads in the holder headand shaping the leads, which requires skill. With this machine the operator need only place the glass rings for the beads over the leads, and even this could be done automatically if desired.
While I have described this machine as a machine for making lamp mounts, it is not restricted to such use, but can be 'used in making many other articles, such as fuses, detonators, and similar articles in which a vpredetermined length of wire is secured to two other wires -or supports. Furthermore,-
numerous structural alterations may be.
part of thel wire on the' movement of the swing- Vllamara alterations and Imodifications which fall within thescope'of Athe appended claims. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is,-
1. In apparatus of the character Adescribed, the combination of aholder for a air of leads, ilamentapplying mechanisn'i scribed, the combination of a holder for holding a pair of leads with projecting ends side by side, a spacing` mechanism for setting the projecting ends of the leads in said holder a predetermined distance apart, a
filament applying mechanism, and actuating means for producing intermittent and relative bodily movement of said holder and said mechanisms to bring said holder into and hold it in operative relation with said spacing and filament `applying mechanisms in succession and to actuate each of said mechanisms while said.holder is in opera` tive relation to it.
3. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a bodily movable holder for holding a pair of leads with projecting ends side by side, a spacing mechanism for spacing the projecting ends of the leads in said holder, lament applying mechanism for kautomatically securmg a filament to the spaced ends of the leads in the holder, bending mechanism for bending the projecting free ends ofthe leads into a predetermined shape, and actuating means for intermittently bringing said holder into and stopping it in operative relation to each of said mechanisms in succession and for ac' tuating said mechanisms while said holder is in operative relation with it. j
4. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a bodily movable holder for a pair of leads, an automatic wire feeding mechanism for placing tv@ leads in said holder, a spacing mechanism for spacing the projectingends of the leads -in said holder, a lament applying mechanism for automatically securing the filament to the spaced ends of the leads, a bending mechanism for bending and shaping the 'free ends of the leads, and common actuating means for actuating said mechanisms and said holder to bring said holder into and stop it in registry with each of said mechanisms in succession and toactuate each menare mechanism while said holder is in registry with it.
5. In apparatus of lthe character de-4 with projecting ends slde by side, means forclamping one end of a filament wire in contact with and .perpendicular to a lead wirein said holder, means for bringing a remote eratinor j leads liorA embedding said filament wire in portion of vsaid wire intocontact with the other lead, pressing said filament and lead wires-together to secure them to each other, and common actuating means for said holder and said other means.
6. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a holder` for a pair of lead wires, means for-clamping the end of a filament wire to one of the lead wiresin said holder, a filament wire holder movable to lay the filament wire across and in contact with the other lead wire, securing means for fastening the filament wire to both lead wires at the points of contact, and actuating means for actuating said clamping means, said filament wire holder, and said securing means in sequence.
7. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a holder for holding a pair of leads,V with projecting ends side by side, a filament wire holder for holding a filament in contact with the leads in said holder, a filament applying mechanism comprising a former movable into position between the ends of said leads and cooperating means for exerting pressure' in the line of said'leads to fasten the wire to the leads, and means for actuating said holders and said mechanism in sequence.
8'. In' apparatus of the .character described, the combination of a holder fora pair of lead wires, a filament wire holder movable to bend a filament wire into place with its ends in contact with both leads,`
pinching means comprising a former movable into place between said leads and coopjaws movable in the line of said both lead wires at the points of contact, and means for actuating said wire holder and said inching means in sequence. j
9. n apparatus of the .character described, the combination of a holder for a air of leads, a lamenta plying mechanism or securing a filament wire to leads in said holder and comprising pinching jaws movable toward each other, a movable Shaper for shaping the filament wire and movable linto'place between said jaws, and actuating mechanism for .bringing said holder into 4're ist with said mechanism movin said Shaper into place between said jaws, and moving said jaws toward each other.
10. In apparatus -of the character described, the combination ofa lead wire holder, a-filament applying mechanism comprising a pair of co-operating pinching jaws for securing a filament `wire to .lead wires 1n said holder, a blade co-operatln'g with .one of said jaws to form a clamp, a wire holder normally in position to hold the end cfa filament wire between said jaw and said blade and movable toward the other jaw, a second blade movable into place between said jaws to overlap the first blade, a wire cutter movable into operative position adjacent said other jaw, and actuating means for bringing said lead wire holder and said mechanism into registry and for actuating in sequence said first mentioned jaw, said wire holder, said second blade, said other jaw and said cutter.
11., In apparatus of vthe character described, the combination of a lead wire holder, a filament apply-ing and shaping mechanism bodily movable toward and away from said holder and comprising co-operating jaws for securing a filament to the leads in said holder and means for shaping a filament and placing it between said jaws, a cutter movable into cutting position adjacent one of said jaws, and actuating means for moving said mechanism forward bodily to bring it into registry with said holder, actuating said mechanism to shape and secure a filament, moving said mechanism bodily away from said holder, and actuating said cutter. l
12. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a movable carrier, a holder on said carrier for holding a pair of leads, a filament applying mechanism mounted to move bodily transversely of the direction of movement of said carrier and comprising co-operating 'aws for securing a filament to the leads 1n said holder, and actuating means for moving said carrier to bring said holder into alignment with said mechanism and to move said mechanism toward said carrier to bring said mechanism and said holder into registry and to close said jaws. A
13. In apparatus of the character described, a filament applying mechanism comprlsing a pair of co-operating pinching jaws, two relatively movable shaping blades mounted to overlap between said 'aws, means for varying the extent of yoverlap of said blades, and common actuating means for said blades and said jaws.
lll
n 'et Vmi blade mountedl to be movedinto position alongside said rst blade and to overlap it, and actuating means for bringing Said movable shaping blade into position between the said jaws to overlap the rst blade, and for moving said pinching jaws toward each other.
16. In apparatus of the character described, a Yfilament applying mechanism comprising a block, pinc ing aws mounted on said block to move towar each other, and a sliding cam mounted on said block to actuate said jaws by movement of said cam on said block.
17. in apparatus ot the character described, a filament applying mechanism com'- -prising a pair of co-operating pinching jaws, a shaping blade positioned between said jaws, a cam for actuating said jaws and shaped to move one jaw toward said blade prior to moving the other jaw, a Iilament wire holder mounted-to hold the end of a filament wire in the path of the first mentioned jaw and movable to carry the wire tol ward the other jaw, a second shaping blade movable into place beside the first blade, and means for actuating said cam to move said first mentioned. jaw, said wire holder, and said secondshaping blade in sequence and further actuating said cam to close both aws.
j 18. In apparatus of the character described, a filament shaping and applying mechanism comprising a air ofco-o erating pinching jaws mounte to move bo ilyin a direction transverse to their opening and closing movement, a Ashaping blade mounted .to move in the direction of bodily movement of said jaws and movable into place between said jaws, a lament wire holder mounted to move across the r.path of said-shaping blade and yalso away from said jaws, a wire 'cutter movable into operative position adjacent one oit said jaws, and actuating means for moving said wire-holder and said blade, closing said jaws while closed, opening said jaws and moving them away bodily, andactuating said cutter.
19. 'In apparatus of the character described, a filament applying mechanism comprising a slidably mounted block, pinching jaws mounted on said block, a cam slldably mounted on' said block to actuate said jaws by movement relative to sad'block, a lost motion v`connection between said cam an said block, a resilient connection between Lsaid cam and said block to normally hold` l said cam in jaw opening position on said block, actuating means for moving said cam toward jaw closing position and thereby moving said block by vsaid resilient connection, and means for stopping said sliding block in a predetermined position during the movement of said cam'whereby further movement of said cam causes relative moveincasso ment of said cam and block and'cloaes said ament applying mechanism m- Y said jaws and across the path of said Shaper,
and common .actuating means'v for said lh. er,'sa1d pinching jaws, and said o er.
2.1. In apparatus of the character del scribed, a tilament applying mechanism com- A prising a pair of pinching jaws, a filament s haper comprising two shapmgbblades 4movable into position to overlap etween .said
jaws, a filament wire holder movable across the path of said shaping blade to place a filament wire in position to be caught by one of said blades and carried" into place between said jaws, and actuating means for actuatin said wire holder, said shaping blade, an
said pinching jaws in sequence.
22. In apparatus of the character described, a filament wire holder comprising a frame pivoted to swing in a horizontal lane, a wire holding arm pivoted in said grams to swing in a vertical plane, actuating means for said arm rendered operative by movement of said frame into a predetermined position, and actuating means for swmgn "said frame horizontally into and out of sai position.-
23. In apparatus of the character described, a filament wire holdin mechanism comprising a horizontally mova le frame, a wire` holding arm pivoted on said frame to swing in a vertical plane, a stationary cam y mounted in position' to encounter said arm and swing it about its pivot near the end table to co-operate with the leads in. said holder when it is in registry with the mechanism, a locking bolt movable radially of the table to enter said notch and mounted adjacent the rim of the table to position it with d said holder in registry with said mechanism when said locking bolt is seated in said j notch, and common actuating means for in succession moving said table to bring said holder into registry with said mechanism', seating said locking bolt in said notch to lock said table in osition, and operating said mechanism whi e said holder is in registry with it and said table is locked.
25. In apparatus of the character de scribed, the combination with la'holder -for
US517620A 1921-11-25 1921-11-25 Mount-making machine Expired - Lifetime US1655279A (en)

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FR559101D FR559101A (en) 1921-11-25
NL12306D NL12306C (en) 1921-11-25
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US517620A US1655279A (en) 1921-11-25 1921-11-25 Mount-making machine
GB3194222A GB189459A (en) 1921-11-25 1922-11-22 Improvements in and relating to methods of and machines for making incandescent electric lamp mounts and similar articles

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2554013A (en) * 1945-02-26 1951-05-22 Westinghouse Electric Corp Lead wire positioner
US2605537A (en) * 1948-01-15 1952-08-05 Albert F Pityo Machine for forming and welding parts
US2650634A (en) * 1951-04-18 1953-09-01 Sylvania Electric Prod Lead-in wire orienting apparatus
US2659409A (en) * 1949-09-26 1953-11-17 Saginaw Wire Products Inc Wire bending machine
US2775069A (en) * 1951-04-24 1956-12-25 Westinghouse Electric Corp Sealing machine for tubular lamps
US2820505A (en) * 1955-08-02 1958-01-21 Torrington Mfg Co Spring coiling mechanism having a coiling abutment holder operated by a cam operatedyoke
US2935782A (en) * 1949-11-10 1960-05-10 Alexander R Rangabe Assembly methods for electrode structures of electrical discharge devices

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2554013A (en) * 1945-02-26 1951-05-22 Westinghouse Electric Corp Lead wire positioner
US2605537A (en) * 1948-01-15 1952-08-05 Albert F Pityo Machine for forming and welding parts
US2659409A (en) * 1949-09-26 1953-11-17 Saginaw Wire Products Inc Wire bending machine
US2935782A (en) * 1949-11-10 1960-05-10 Alexander R Rangabe Assembly methods for electrode structures of electrical discharge devices
US2650634A (en) * 1951-04-18 1953-09-01 Sylvania Electric Prod Lead-in wire orienting apparatus
US2775069A (en) * 1951-04-24 1956-12-25 Westinghouse Electric Corp Sealing machine for tubular lamps
US2820505A (en) * 1955-08-02 1958-01-21 Torrington Mfg Co Spring coiling mechanism having a coiling abutment holder operated by a cam operatedyoke

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