US1634679A - Coin-controlled vending and change-making machine - Google Patents

Coin-controlled vending and change-making machine Download PDF

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US1634679A
US1634679A US577822A US57782222A US1634679A US 1634679 A US1634679 A US 1634679A US 577822 A US577822 A US 577822A US 57782222 A US57782222 A US 57782222A US 1634679 A US1634679 A US 1634679A
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coin
stacks
stack
merchandise
magazine
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Clifton W Nixon
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Clifton W Nixon
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F11/00Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles
    • G07F11/46Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles from movable storage containers or supports
    • G07F11/50Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles from movable storage containers or supports the storage containers or supports being rotatably mounted
    • G07F11/54Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles from movable storage containers or supports the storage containers or supports being rotatably mounted about vertical axes

Description

Ju1 s, 1927. 1,634,679
C. W. NIXON COIN CONTROLLED VENDING AND CHANGE MAKING MACHINE 7 2 Filed July 27, 1922 5 Shee z 1 1,634,679 y 1927' c. w. NIXON COIN CONTROLLED VENDING AND CHANGE MAKING MACHINE Filed July 27. 1922 5 Sheets-Sheet g anmwwoz CuFra/v W Mxo/v I I 1,634,679 July 5 1927- w. NIXON COIN CONTROLLED VENDING AND CHANGE MAKING MACHINE Filed July 27. 1922. 5 sheets-sheet 4 zoi I I 38 avwmboa I CL/FTO/V W /l //0/1 1,634,679 July 5! c. w. NIXON COIN CONTROLLED VENDiNG AND CHANGE 'MAKING MACHINE Filed July 27, 1922 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 /4 avwmtoz Patented July 5, 1927.
A 1,634,679 PATENT OFFICE.
CLHTON W. NIXON, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
j COIN-CONTROLLED VENDING AND CHANGE-MAKING MACHINE.
Application filed July 27, 1922; Serial No. 577,822.
My invention relates to a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, designed to contain a plurality ofstacks or groups of articles of difierent kinds or of the same kinds and to vend the difierent stacks or groups of articles at difierent prices or at the same prices. accordingly as the machine is set, the machine automatically retaining the price of the article sold and automatically returning to the purchaser along withthearticle sold the amount of the change, if any, due him, the amount of the change returned representing the difierence between the size or denomination of the coin-deposited and the rice of the article sold.
The partlcular machine illustrated and described in this application has been designed .in particular for vending different packages or brands of cigarettes and for returning the correct change where change is due the purchaser, in exchange for the deposit of a half-dollar, or of a quarter, or of two dimes; and I. desire to make it understood that in thus illustrating a particular embodiment of. my invention designed for the particular purpose indicated, I have not intended to limit the broader aspects ofthe invention to a machine adapted for that particular purpose only. The machine involves principles of general application which may be variously adapted and modified for vend ing articles of differentkinds at'difierent prices, not only of cigarettes, but also of other articles of various forms, packaged or otherwise, and therefore it is my intention to cover in some of the broader claims hereunto appended, these principles in any modifications of construction and design in which they may be embodied, as well as to cover the specific adaptationbf such principles here illustrated for the particular purpose above indicated.
More specifically considered, the machine I of the present invention contemplates the provision of a coin receiving chute for each size or denomination of coin that may be used to efiect the operation of the machine and the consequent delivery of the merchandise with the customers change' It further contemplates for each coin chute, the provision of two alined longitudinally movable coin-controlling levers co-operatively headed to receive between them the deposited coin as it falls from its chute, such deposited coin forming-a connection between in my two companion applications for patsai'd levels so that the second lever and consequently the machine may be operated by the first lever. The actuation in this manner of each second lever controls the operation of a master-pusher which effects the delivery of the article purchased along with the change, if any, to the purchaser. Provision is also made for positively ejecting the deposited coin from between the co-operatively headed coin-controlling levers at a predetermined place during their operation. Another object of my invention is to provide a rotary magazine constructed with a plurality of stack groups comprising a merchandise-s tack and a set of associated coinstacks, with each of which is associated an ejector adapted to be actuated by the masterpushers under various combinations and conditions. 1
Another object of myinvent-ion is to provide means for manually turning or stepping around the rotary magazine so as to bring any desired stack group in proper register with that particular master-pusher which corresponds with the size or denomination of the coin deposited, and further to provide means for normally holding the rotary magazine locked in stationary position and for automatically unlocking the same when it is to be rotated. r
Another object of my invention is the provision of mechanism, automatically controlled, for preventing the deposit of coins when a stack of any group has been exhausted of its contents, and also to'accomplish this object without interfering in any way with the usual deposit of coins con trolling delivery from the groups of stacks which have not been exhausted of their contents.
Portions of the subject matterof the present inventionare also described in and certain novel features of the invention herein described, but not herein claimed, are claimed ents; both filed on June 5,1924, and bearing Serial No. 718,162, and Serial No. 718,163, respectively. Both of these companion applications are divisions of the present application.
The nature of the eneral principles and objects above referred to, as well asother and additional objects and advantages which will become apparent as the description pro.- c'eeds, and the manner in which they. are. em-
including the mechanism for locking and the.
mechanism for manually actuating the rotary ma azine, and a unitof the mechanism for causing the ejection of merchandise and change from-a stack group of the rotary ma azine, here shown, in order to avoid confusion of lines, with only a partial number of the stack groups.
Fig. 2 shows a top plan view of the machine with the top or cover removed.
Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view, taken on the line 33 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows, this view showing in particular the arrangement in the rotary magazine of the stac groups and also the arrangement of the master-pushers.
Fig. 4 is a partial section of a merchandisestack, showing the construction of the ejector mechanism and also some of the parts employed for effecting the closing of the coin-' e osit slot gate.
ig. 5 is a front elevation showing some of the parts as are shown in Fig. 4, the weighted lunger here being shown in posi tion to hofd closed the coin-deposit slot gate.
Fig. 6 is a partial sectional view of a coin-stack with theejector mechanism associated therewith.
Fig. 7 is a partial sectional view from the rear, showing the gate for closing the coindeposit slot and also the by-pass for spurious de osits.
ig. 8 is a. view in perspective showing the construction of the co-operatively headed coin-controlling levers for sustaining a coin and the means connected therewith for effecting the discharge of the sustained coin during the actuation of the levers.
Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view in perspective showing a stack unit or group consisting of a merchandise-stack and a set of coin' stacks. V
Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary face view of a merchandise-stack, illustrating in particular the liner which may be employed to reduce the interior dimensions.
Fig. 11 is, a detail perspective view of an ejector, showing the auxiliary ejectors that may be connected thereto.
Figs. 12 and 13 are progressive details showing a modified form of co-operat-ive heads on the coin-controlling levers.
Fig. 14 is an exterior view of a casing or cabinet for the machine.
Fig. 15 is a partial sectional view of a merchandise stack and' of a master-pusher,
illustrating in particular the means em-.
ployed for preventing the operation of the e ector for one of the merchandise stacks.
The same reference characters indicate the angle-iron 26 as shown. Such corner angleirons may, if desired, be rigidly connected by cross-pieces (not shown) or such other skeleton frame connections as may be conduoive to the strength and rigidity of the structure. A short distance above the bottom plate 24, I preferably provide a horizontal partition or platform 27, and between said bottom late' 24 and said partition 27 there is slida ly mounted a money drawer 28 which opens at the front of the casing.
In carrying out my invention, I provide, above the horizontal partition 27, a rotary magazine in the form of a vertical cylindrical structure, shown in the present exemplification as made up of eight stack groups represented generally by the reference characters A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. Each of these stack groups includes a merchandise-stack 29 and a set of coin-stacks 30, 31 and 32. The merchandise-stacks, intended in the present embodiment as receptacles for holding columns of packages of cigarettes, are of rectangular form in cross-section; while the coin-stacks are, of course, of circular form in cross-section and differ in size 01' diameter as may be necessary in order to accommodate the different sizes of coins for which they are intended, for instance, in the present embodiment, 30 denotes the stacks for holding quarters, 31 the stacks for pennies and 32 the stacks for nickels.
The rotary magazine is very simple in construction, comprising a top ring plate 33 and a bottom ring plate 34, rigidly connected by the vertically extending merchandisestacks 29 which are arranged as best shown in Fig. 3, in equi-spaced positions and radially with respect to the center about which the ring plates rotate. The actual rigid connection of the merchandise-stacks with the ring plates may be effected in any suitable or appropriate manner. the upper ends of the merchandise-stacks are projected through suitable openings or apertures 33' provided in the top ring plate 33 (Fig. 1), bent over thereupon as at 35 (Figs. 1 and 2) and made rigid by brazing or other suitable means. At their lower ends, the
' beremovably secured upon the bottom ring plate 34 by means of screws 37 or otherwise; and it will be observed that these connections are so made that the merchandise-discharge openings 38, with which the faces of the merchandise-stacks are. provided, come even with or in close proximity to the outer peripherical edge 40 of the ring plate34, in
order that a rectangular package of cigarettes as represented at 41 may be readily kicked out or discharged bodily sidewise from the stack and clear of the ring plate.
The coin-stacks are arranged in a circle upon the bottom plate 34, intermediate or approximately intermediate the widths of the merchandise-stacks, the stacks making up each group being closely associated in .a systematic order and the stack groups being equi-spaced apart, all as clearly shown in Fig. 3. The largest coin-stacks shown in the present exemplification are the quarter stacks 30, and as these require the most space they are preferably placed individually at the ends of the merchandise-stacks, whilestack 29, penny stack 31 and nickel stack 32.
The merchandise-stacks in respect of their 1 cross-sectional dimensions have their greater lengths in the general direction of the circle of stack groups so that rectangular-shaped packages of cigarettes as 41- (Fig.- 9) can be ejected throu h the opening 38 andout over. the outer e ge 40 of the ring plate '34 with a minimum stroke on the part of the ejector's, presently to be described.
The coin-stacks 30, 31 and 32 are each formed at their lower ends with oppositely directed ears 42 for securement to the ring plate 34 by means of screws'43-or other equivalent means. Said coin-stacks are each provided with a coin discharging opening 44, immediately before which for each stack 30, the ring late 34 has a peripheral 0 ening 45, and or each of the stacks 31 an 32, a common'peripheral'opening 46. The purpose of the openings 45 and 46 is'to permit the coins as they are ejected or discharged from the'openings 44 to fall onto the delivery slideway 47 which inclines downwardl and outwardly of the casing passing throug and forming the bottom for the delivery opening or slot 48 in the front panel 20 and terminating in an upstanding inwardly curved portion 49 to provide a delivery pocket 49'. Inasmuch as the coins or even several coins stacked together are of considerable less thickness than a package of cigarettes, the coin-stacks 1n the present embodiment of the invention, are preferably of less height than the merchandise-stacks and terminate a distance below the top ring plate 33, as shown. The cost of 'unnecessary material and the burden of unnecessary weight are thus avoided.
The ring plate 34 centrally and substanedge 51 of said ring plate. Slidable upon this ring plate in a pair of confronting guides 52 secured thereupon along the slot edges 53 resulting from the provislon of the struck out portion 50, is a merchandise ejector 54 of which tlfere is one thus provided for each merchandise-stack. Each' ejector (Fig. 4), is formed at one end with an upstanding pusher lug55, which slidably fits in an opening 56 in the merchandisestack, at the other end with an upstanding movement receiving lug 57 of a len h adapted to slidably come between the gui es 52, and on its'underside forwardly of the position of said last lug with a depending lug 58 slidably fitting between the'slot edges 53. 59-is a push spring confined in horizontal position between the depending lug 58 and the portion 50 at the point 60, this spring normally urging the ejector into thrust position-with the depending lug in engagement with stop 61 secured at 62 to the portion 50, and with the pusher la clearing the interior of the merchan isest'ack in position to engage and eject a package of cigarettes lying therewithm 'upon. the ring plate 34. J I i For each of the coin-stacks, there is similarly provided a downwardly oifset or struck out portion 64, a spring-pressed ejector 65 operatively held in guides 66, and an ejector sto 67, these parts in their arrangement and in their details .being in all respects similar to the corresponding parts for the mercl1andise-stacks, except that they are of smaller dimensions, and it will be understood in this connection that these parts as regards the coin-stacks 30, 31 and 32 and as regards the merchandise-stacks 29 as well,
may vary in dimension and also in specific form to the extent necessary to meet the condi-tions by way ofdiflerent sizes in the denominations of coins and different sizes and I and 32 may vary as may be necessary to effectuallyeject the coins therein contained.
As a means of supporting the magazine for rotary movement, ll. pass around and secure to the merchandise-stacks 29, below the top ends thereof, a ring 68, from which pro jects' at equi-spaced distances the spindles 69 carrying rollers 70 adapted to. travel in a grooved ring track 71, supported upon brackets 72 which are secured to the casing plates or any suitable framework connected therewith. A distance above its bottom end the magazine is guided or braced in operative position by means consisting of a U- shaped ring 73 which is passed aroundand secured to the merchandise-stacks 29, and in' which at equal distances are secured verticle spindles 74: carrying rollers 75 adapted to turn on a guide ring '7 8, supported on brackets 77 which may in secured to the easing frame plates or to any suitable reinforcing framework that may be employed in connection therewith.
The top ring plate 33, around its inner cir-' cumt'erence, is formed with equi-spaced upstanding teeth 78 of which in the present embodiment there are eight in correspondence with the number of stack groups.
Around its outer circumference said ring plate is formed with an upstanding flange 79 of considerably greater height than the teeth 78. This -flange is provided near its top edge with eight equi-spaced keeper-openings 80, there being one heepenopening for each stack group. 81 designates a l'lOP1Z011- tal spider-frame, herein shown as formed with six (Fig; 2) radially extending arms of which 82, 83 and 84 have downturned 'ends as shown at 85 (Fig, 1) whereby to he secured by screws-86 or equivalent means to the casing plates or any reinforcing skeleton frame parts that may be employed.-
Spider-frame arms 87, 88 and 89 project towards the front panel 29 in soul-angular relation and have their ends attached to the 9d yielding in an obvious manner to permit the finger to slide over the points of the teeth.
Located in position to be engaged by the finger 93 each time it slides over the point of a tooth 78 is a downwardly inclined con tact plate 96 which is'pivotally held in a hanger 97 depending from the spider-frame.
98Ldesignates themagazine locking bar, slidably fitted in an opening 99 provided in the reaaeve lug 100 which depends from the olfset portion 101 formed on the spider-frame arm 82. Said locking bar has its inner end pivoted to the upper end of the contact plate 96 and is normally urged into position to have its outer end engaged with a keeperopening as 80 by a pull spring 102, here shown as connecting the locking bar with the lug 100.
"As clearly shown in -liigs. 1 and 2, the draw-bar 92 is normally urged in a direction to draw or step the magazine from right to left by a pull spring 103 which connects it with a depending lug 104 on a web 105 comprising a connection between the spiderframe arms88 and 89. 106 is a horizontal push rod slidably journalcd at 107 in the lug 10d and at 108 in the casing front panel 20 in position to engage and move the drawbar from one tooth to another, its inward thrust movement being limited by the base 109 of the exterior push button 110 and its outer movement by the engagement of a pin 111 with the lug 104. it will be understood that the magazine is normally held locked in stationary position by the projection of the locking bar 98 into one of the keeper-openings 80, and that such position of the looking bar maintains the contact late 96 in position to be engaged by the nger 93 as it clears the high point of a tooth 78. in operation the button 110 is given an inward thrust by the thumb or finger to move the draw-bar finger 93 over the high point of the next succeeding tooth and to withdraw the locking bar from its keeper; whereupon, upon removing the thumb or finger from the button, the draw-bar finger under the influence of spring 103 will draw the magazine until the locking bar slips into the next succeeding keeper-opening. Every thrust thus made on the button will step the magazine one-eighth of a revolution;
1 now come to the means and mechanism for receiving and sustaining the deposited out disclosure, three sets or units of such mechanisms-are provided, one set or unit for each size or denomination of coins that may he deposited in the machine, namely, halldollars, quarters and dimes. For the halfdollar coins, ll provide a pair of controlling levers 112 and 113; for the quarter coins, the controlling levers 11d and 115; and for the dime coins, the controlling levers 116 and 117. The members of each pair of levers are arranged in horizontal longitudinal alinement in spaced-apart positions. With respect to other, the oi levers re radially disposed, the pair "W 113 i alined above the position of the spider frame arm 87, the pair 114 115 above the arm 88, and the pair'116 117 above the arm 89, as best illustrated'in Fig. 2. Exteriorly of the front panel 20, the members 112, 114 and 116 are equipped with buttons 118, 119 and 120, respectively; and thereabove (Fig. 14) said front panel is provided with the co n-deposit slots 121, 122 and 123for the half-dollars, quarters .andidimes', respectively. On the interior of the casing, in communication with the coin-deposit slots I 121, 122 and 123, are the respective coin chutes 124, 1 25 and 126, which lead downwardly and-inwardly to deliver their coins to the proper pairs of levers, said coin chutes being each of the proper interior dimensions ermit its coins to roll inwardly upon their circumferences, and each having -a downturned end as 127 from which the coins will fall; substantially vertically.
The several pairs of coin-controlling levers being supported by like parts and their operation being similarly regulated, a description in detail of these matters relative to one pair will sufiice for alL To this end, by way of example I will refer to the pair coin-controlling levers 114 115, whose supporting and regulating parts are illustrated in detail in Figs. 1 and 8. These levers are preferably made in the form of straight bars of rectangular shape (in cross-section), the inner lever 115 being much the longer. The
outer lever 114 is supported for longitudinal movement at 128 in the U-shaped bracket 129 and at 130 in the front panel 20, said bracket being rigidly secured to the inner face of said front panel. At its inner end the lever 114 is formed or otherwise provided with a'vertically extended head 131, in which is cut a-vertical groove 132 open and laterally widened or flared at the top as shown at 133.' Coiled around this lever is a ush spring 134, one end whereof is secured t ereto at 135 and the other end to the bracket at 136, v the purpose of the spring being obviously to urge the lever into its outer or thrust position, such outward urge being limited by said pin 135 which acts as a stop.
The inner lever 115 is journaled for reciprocating movement in the bearings 136 and 137 provided .in the upri hts or stand ards 138 and 139 respective y which rise from the spider-frame arm 88 to which they are made fast. Upright 139 is made with an arm 140 projectin closely over the top of the lever 115 and aving an upturned end 141, designed to serve as a trip as will presently appear; Upright 138 is made with a vertical extension 142 and a lateral extension 143, the latterbeing parallel with lever 115.
' To the vertical extension 142 ,is pivoted at 144 a kick-outbar 145 having a slot 146 1g)- wardly inclined at 147 and having in ad ition thereto a downturned forward end .148.
To the lateral extension is pivoted at 149 a bell crank lever 150 whose vertical arm is slotted at 151 to receive a pin 152 projecting from the lever 115. 153 is a pull spring which connects the bell crank lever with the upright 138 so as to constantly urge the lever 115 into its forward or thrust position, the urge of the spring being limited by the engagement of a guide-piece 154 with theupright 139, said guide-piece having its upper end bent over at 155 and entered in t e slot 146 whereby to actuate the kick-out bar 145 when the lever 115 is thrust inwardl At its forward end the lever 115 is ma e with a side extension 156 to which is pivoted at 157 a head 158, grooved vertically at 159 and flared at 160 in correspondence with the head 131. A spring 161 pinned at 162 to the lever 115 and bearin of the head 158 normally urges said head upwardly in proper alinement with the head 131, the upward movement of head 158 being properly limited by the engagement of a shoulder 161' with the extension 156. Said pivoted head 158 has a rounded or cam-like portion 162' so that it may swing downwardly whenever a shoulder v163 formed on its top side engages the'trip or lug 141 during the inward thrust of the lever'115. The heads 131 and 158 are held in such 5 aced relation by the arts above-described t at when a coin, in t e present instance a quarter, drops from the deposit chute 125, it will enter the grooves 132 and 159 and be sustained by the co-operating heads. When, in operation, the lever 114 is thrust inwardly, the movement thereof through the medium of the sustained coin is transmitted to the lever 115. Whena thrust is made upon the button 119, the coin-controlling ievers with the sustained coin between them move together until near the limit of the thrust the trip 141 engages the head 158 and swings it downwardly to efiect the discharge of the coin. Simultaneously with the downswing of the pivoted head, the guide-piece 154 enters the slot inclination 147 by which the kick-out bar is given a sudden downward thrust engaging the end 148 thereof with the rim of the coin and thereby positively insur ing the discharge of the coin, which falls into the branch chute 164 and thence into the main chute 165 for deposit in the money drawer 2 8.
The pair of coin-controiiing levers 112 113 carry heads 166 167 Fig. 2) respective- 1y. These heads are sim' ar to those carried by the coin-controlling levers 114 115. except that they arelarger and are held spaced apart the distance necessary to enable them to receive and sustain a half-dollar coin, which is entered through the coin on the under side sustained half-dollar move inwardly tocoin kicked-out as in the The half-dollar coin falls into branch chute.
gether until the head. 167 is tripped; and the revious instance.
168 and thence into main chute posit in thecash drawer.
165 for de- The third pair of coin-controlling .lever's' 116 117 is provided with the heads 169, 170
' respectively, these heads being designed considerably in a direction downwardly to receive, sustain and permit the delivery of two coins (in the present disclosure (of two dimes), the arrangement being such that the lever 117 cannot be actuated by the lever 116 until the second coin has been deosited. The details of this construction are st shown in Figs. 12 and 13, wherein it will be seen that the head 169 is made inte- 117, so as to bev capable of sustaining two dimes as 174 175, one upon the periphery of the other, with the lower dime 174 forming a connection below the center line of thrust while the upper dime 175 is supported thereon to form a connection in the center line of thrust. When two dimes have been inserted, the operationis substantially like that hereinbefore described. On thrusting the button 120, the levers 116 117 with the sustained 'dimes move together, until the head 170 is tri ped and the dimes discharged or kicke -out into the branch chute 176, passing thence through the main chute 165 to the cash drawer. lit only one dime is deposited, at difierent result will be obtained, since it forms a connection below the line of thrust only, and the movement of the lever 116 will swing the head 17 00h its pivot and discharge the sustained dime without, actuating the lever 117. In this case thedischarged dime falls onto the slideway 90 and thence into a ohannelway 177 for delivery to the slideway 47 and thence to the customer. Under these provisions anyone who r forgets to deposit two dimes or who attempts to tamper with the machine, will not be a his [deposit returned. The slideway 90,
which counicates with the channelway 177 extends alike beneath the co-operating heads of all the pairs of coin-controllin levers, so that if a dime should be droppe into either the quarter or the half-dollar deposit slots,- it will be returned to the customer. Similarly, a quarter dropped into the half-dollar deposit slot, or any slugs or disks in imitation of coins, dropped into any of the deposit slots, will he returned without forming a connection for the operation of the machine, except that the article employed by way of an imitation C0111 made so perfect as to be caught and sustained between the co-operatively grooved heads. To prevent deliveryto or between the co-oper- 'ating heads of any metal slugs or disks, I contemplate providing alongside each coin chute 124, 125 and'126 a magnet 178 (see Figs. 2 and 7 adapted to attract such articles and divert the same into a by-pass 178' for delivery to the slideway and thence to the user.
For each of the pairs of coin-controlling levers 112 113, 1151 115 and 116 117, I pro- 30 vide a master-pusher 179, 180 and 181, in mutual relation in the order mentioned. Although of different lengths for a reason presently to appear, these masterushers are curved in substantial agreement with v the bottom ring plate 34, and each is removably su ported in transverse relation on the outer enh of an independent longitudinal plate 182, slidably held in a pair of uide-pieces 183, fastened on a block 184 whic is secured upon the horizontal artition 27. As clearly shown in Fig. 3, t ese three sets of slide plates are arranged radially towards the front panel 20 but within the compass of the magazine and they are s aced on the radial ines of the merchan ise-stacks, so thatvas the magazine is stepped around, the merchandise-stacks will become alined therewith successively; and it will be understood in this connection that the co-operative relation between the three sets and the locking and rotating mechanisms hereinbefore described, is such that'when the magazine is locked three merchandise-stacks are always alined with the three sets of slide plates. .The elevation of the slide plates is such that when they are thrust outwardly or projected, thejmaster-pushers are first brought into engagement with the lugs 57 of the merchandise ejectors and then with the corresponding lugs of the coin-stacks, the masterpushers and the slide plates moving or comin just above the ejector guides.
ihe inner levers of the pairs of coin-controlling levers are connected with their cor; responding masterushers by a precisely similar chain of parts, and it is thought that a description of one of these chains of le to operate the machine and will have 1 arts will suffice for all. Turning, thereore, to Fig. 1, wherein is illustrated by way of example, the chain of parts connecting the inner lever 115 with the slide plate carryin master-pusher 180, it will be seen that the hell crank lever 150, hereinbefore de: scribed as having a pin and slot connection with the inner lever 115, has pivoted toits horizontalarm at 185 a yoked sleevel86 in .which is threadedly engaged the upper end of a long rod 187 which extends downwardly through the magazine and has its lower end em, 179 and 181, respective y.
threaded into a similar ,sleeve 188 pivoted at 189 to the horizontal arm of: bell crank lever 190, fulcrumed at 191 to a lug 192, made fast in radial alinement with the block I 184 to the horizontal partition 27. Pivotally connected at 193 to the vertical arm of bell crank lever 1-90 is a link 194 whose opposite end is pivotally engaged at 195 with a lug 196 upstanding from the slide 10 plate "carrying the master-pusher 180. As will be understood from an inspection of Figs. 2 and 3, the inner levers 113 and 117 are similarly connected with the slide plates carrying their correspondin master-push- It will be obvious that the inward thrust movement of the inner levers 113, 115 and 117 .'will cause their corresponding'master-pushers to be thrust outwardly to engage and actuate the ejectors for the merchandise and coinstacks and thereby effect the delivery of the merchandise and coins, each chain of ,parts being repositioned after each opera tion by the spring 153 which connects the bell crank le'ver 150 with the standard 138. Obviously, additional springs may be added, if found necessary to properly effect the repositioning operations. I
' As shown. in Fig. 14 the casing front each merchandise-stack as well as the pricethereof, and'to this end each merchandise-v stack, in a position to be displayed throughsaid windows, should contain some suitable picture, legend or other characterization.
not shown in the drawings) indicative of t e brand of cigarettes contained therein together with the amount of the purchase price.
amples of the operation of m machine.
Let us assume that a customer as a half dollar and desires to'purchase a package of cigarettes, say of the value of seventeen cents, and letus assume further that themerchandise-stack of group H- contains packages of cigarettes of the branddesired, for'the price of seventeen cents, also that panel 20 has a hingedly engaged door 197,
At this point I will give a number of exof a length to actuate all the ejectors of'a group, effects the delivery of aseventeen cent package of cigarettes from the merchandise-stack, a quarter from stack 30,-
three pennies from stack 31 and a nickel from stack 32. In thisconnection it is to be pointed out that the coin-stacks are pro- I vided with gauge-clamps (Fig. 9). 201 'adjustable thereon to control the number of coins that may be delivered; and that the coin-stack ejectors may be provided with auxiliary ejectors as 202 (Fig. 11) by which to eject a predetermined .number of coins,- the ejectors being of the same or approximately the same thickness as the'coins to be acted on, and it will be understood in this connection that each gauge-clam must be set in reement with the num er of ejectors emp oyed so that the predetermined set in agreement .therewith. With the aux' iliary ejectors-and the gauge-clamp once set in agreement on a coin-stack, the same number of coins will always be ejected from the stack on each outward thrust of the ejector. In the event of any change. in price, the owner of the machine may reset these parts i as may be necessary to give one coin or the proper predetermined number of coins.
Assume that the purchaser has two dimes and desires to purchase a seventeen cent package from group around until the H on cigarettesare behind window 200. %n deposit of the two dimes in slot 123 and on the actuation of button 120,- master-pusher 181 of a length ta operate the ejectors for the merchandisestack and the penny stack only, will effect the discharge of a seventeen cent package and three pennies. If this purchaser has a quarter,-'he steps group H to the window 199, deposits the quarter in-slot 122, thrusts button 119 and master-pusher 180, which is not long enough to engagethe ejector for the quarter stack, will effect the delive -of a seventeen cent package of cigarettes, t ree pennies and one nickel.
By way of'another example, suppose one customer has two dimes, another customer a auarterand still another a half-dollar, each esiring apacka e of cigarettes selling at twenty cents and t at the stack group A contains the brand desired. Now as the cigarettes sell for twenty cents, no ennies will be placed in penny stack 31 0 this group since no pennies in change will be required. On stepping group A to window 200 and depositing his two dimes and thrusting the H. By successive thrusts on button 110, he steps the magazine twenty cent package and a nickel will be delivered, as master-pusher 180 will not operate the quarter ejector and the penny stack is empty. .Next our. third customer moves group A to window 198 and deposits a half-dollar. He will receive a twenty cent package of cigarettes, a quarter and a nickel, since master-pusher 179 is of a length to engage all the ejectors, although the penny stack is empty and nothing is received therefrom. Thus it will be seen that in varying the lengths of the master-pushers difi'erent but predetermined results can be obtained from the same group, and also that by varying the number of auxiliary ejectors and the gauge-clamp corresponding thereto or by removing the coins from one of the coin stacks, other different predetermined results can be obtained from the same group. For instance, suppose the stack group B to contain cigarettes selling at sixteen cents, then in such case the penny stack 31 thereof would be set to deliver four pennies, Similarly, if stack group C contained eighteencent cigarettes, the penny stack thereof would be set to deliver two cents. Similarly, also, if the stack group D contained nineteen cent cigarettes, the penny stack thereof would be set to deliver one cent in chan e.
Suppose the stack group to contain cigarettes selling at fifteen cents. In such case it would be necessary in the present embodiment, to substitute a nickel stack as '32 for the penny stack 31. This combination would give at window 200 a ackage and a nickel, at window 199 a pac a e and two nickels, and at window 198 a pac age with a quarter and two nickels. Suppose further that the stack group E contains cigarettes for twenty-five cents. In this case provision must be made to prevent any operation taking place at the two dimes Window 200. This is accomplished by securing a horizontal stop 203 (see also Fig. 15) at the rear of the merchandise-stack tor this group and above its ejector, and also in providing the master-pusher 181 with an u standing lug 204 to en age said stop and lock the operation of t 9. line so that the deposited dimes will be sustained until a group containing cigarettes selling for twenty cents or less has been moved into position to be operated at the two dimes window 200. In othen words, in the present embodiment, a package of cigarettes worth twenty-five cents cannot be obtained at the two dimes window, but only at the quarter window and at the half-dollar window. The said stop 203 is placed at such elevation that the master-pushers 180 and 179 will come below it when operated and thus function in their usual we In this instance, n'o coins would be place in the penny and nickel stacks of this group, so that at window 199, the pack A age of cigarettes only will'be delivered while at window 198 a package of cigarettes and a merchandise-stack should become exhausted,
provision is made to close each coin deposit slot against the deposit of coins each time the exhausted stack comes into delivery position in connection therewith. As illustrated in Figs. 1, 4 and 5, in each me-rchandise-stack is provided a weight 205, loosely.
fitted therewithin and having a centrally depending pin 206 resting on the top of the last cigarette package as 207 (Fig. 4) so that when the latter is discharged, the weight will drop, thrusting the pin through an opening 208 in the bottom ring plate and onto the free end of a treadle209, ivoted at 210 to a In 211' secured upon the orizontal partition 2 To the opposite endof this treadle is pivoted at--212 a pull rod 213,
which extends upwardly of the casing behind the channelw ay 177 and through the slideway 90 andhas pivotal connection at 214 (for details see Fig. 7 with an angular lever 215 pivoted at 216 to the inner side of the casing front panel. The upper end of this lever has the form of a slot'closure gate 217 adapted when 'thetreadle is depressed, to enter a slot 218 provided in the coin-deposit chute 125, immediately behind the coin deposit slot 122 The portion 219 of said lever 215 is made heavyto constitute- 'a weight so that immediately-the pin 206 slips oil the 'treadle as the .fmagazine .is stepped around, the said lever 215' will swing by gravity withdrawing the gate 217 and opening the coin-deposit slot, and also repositioning the treadle for the next operation. 1
A similar setof mechanism is provided for each of the other coin-deposit'slots123' nism that just prior to the movement of the exhausted stack into delivery position, the
pin 206 will slip off the ledge 221 of the "necessary by means of a liner as 222 (Fig.
. at I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: v
1. A coin-controlled vending and changemaking machine comprising a .casing, a
magazine inclosed b the casing and provided with a series 0 groups of stacks capa- D blo of holding merchandise and difierent de- I nominations of coins, a plurality-of coincontrolled mechanisms, and means operable by each coin-controlled mechanism for effecting the discharge of merchandise and coins from a different predetermined number of stacks of each group.
2. A coin-controlled vending and changemaking machine comprisingacasing,amovable magazine inclosed by the casing and constructed with a plurality of merchandise- ,holding stacks and coin-holding stacks arranged in groups, means arranged within the casing for stepping the magazine, 'a plurality of coin-controlling mechanisms, and
means under the control'of .each coin-controlling mechanism for efiectin the discharge of merchandise and coins rom a predetermined number of stacks in each group.
3. A coin-controlled change-making machine comprising a casing, a movable magazine inclosed by the casing normallylocked therein and constructed with a plurality of coin-holding stacks arranged in groups, means arranged within the casing for. unlocking and stepping the magazine, a plumechanisms, and means under the contro of each coin-controlling mechanism for eifecting the discharge of coins from a predetermined number of stacks in each grou 4. A coin-controlled ven ing and changemaking machine comprising a casing, a movable magazine therein made u of a plurality of merchandise-stacks an coin-stacks arranged in groups, ejector devices asso ciated with said stacks, means for rotating the magazine, com-controlling mechanism comprising a pairof reciprocating members arranged in spaced end to end relation and formed toreceive and sustain a coin between them by which to operate the second member from the first member, and means operated by the second member for actuating the ejector devices.
5. A coin-controlled vending and changemaking machine comprisin a casing, a magazine movably disposed t erein and consisting of a plurality of equi-spaced stack groups, structurally independent ejector devices carried by the magazine in association with the individual members of the stack groups, means for rotating the magazine, coin-controlling mechanism comprisin a pair ofreciprocating members arrange in spaced end to end relation and formed to .receive and sustain a coin between them by which to operate the second member from the first member and means under the control of the second member for actuating a stack group.
6. A coin-controlled vending and changemaking machine comprising a casing, a magazlne movably disposed therein and consisting of a pluralit of equi-spaced stack groups, structurally independent ejector devices'cai'ried by the ma azine in association with individual members of the stack groups, means for rotating the magazine, selective sets of coin-controlling mechanisms comprising a pair of reciprocating members arranged in spaced end to end relation and formed to receive and sustain a coin between them by which to operate the second member from the first member, and independent means under the control of the second member of each set of coin-controllin mechanism for actuating a predetermine number of ejectors in each stack group.
7 A coin-controlled vending and change making machine comprisin a casing, a magazine movably dispose therein and made up of a plurality of merchandisestacks and coin-stacks arranged in a circle dependently operable, means of moving the magazine step by step, selectivev sets of coin-- controlling mechanisms, masterushers operated by the coin-controlling mechanisms, and contact members fixed on the masterpushers and adapted each to engage and simultaneously actuate a different predetermined number of ejectors in each oup.'
8. In a coin-controlled .ven ing and change-makin A machine, a pair of bars mounted to shde in alined end to end relation from one position to another, heads carried by the adjacent ends of said bars, confronting slots in said heads for receiving and sustaining therein a coin to be carried from one position to another during the actuation of said bars, one of said heads being pivoted, and means operable by the actuationof one of said bars for moving said pivoted head.
9. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, the combination with a casing, of a magazine mounted to rotate within the casing and inclosed thereby and comprising a connected series of spaced apart merchandiseholding stacks, a set of coin-holdin stacks in association with each of the merdhandise-holding stacks, the coinholding stacks of each set being capable of holding coins of difierent denominations and each of the merchandise-holding stacks with its accompanyin set of coin-holding stacks jointly comprising a complete vending and change-making unit, and a plurality of controlling mechanisms, each controlled by a different denomination of coin,
' for efi'ecting the discharge of merchandise 7 SBCOII and coins from a different predetermined number of stacks of each unit.
10. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, the combination with a casing, of a magazine arranged within the casing for rotary movement and comprising a top member, a bottom member, article holding stacks connecting the top and bottom members at intervals, a plurality of coin holding stacks associated with each article holding stack, a pair of reciprocating coin-controlling members arranged over the top member and capable of receiving and sustaining a coin between them for establishin a connection whereby to actuate the member from thefirst, a pusher device having support upon the casin for ejecting articles from the article ho ding stacks and change from the coin holding stacks, and operative connections between the second coin-controlling member and said pusher device.
11. The combination with a magazine having a plurality of roups of stacks, an independently operated ejector device for each stack of each group, a plurality of masterpushers, and contact members fixed to the master-pushers and adapted each to engage and simultaneously operate a diflerent predetermined number of ejectors of each group.
12. The combination with a rotary magazine having a plurality of groups of stacks, of stepping mechanism therefor, an ejector device associated with each stack of each group, a pluralit of master-pushers, and contact members ed to the master-pushers and adapted each to engage and simultaneously operate a, different predetermined number of ejectors of each group of stacks.
13. In a vending and change-making ma chine, the combination with a pair of coin chutes representing a deposit chute and a delivery chute'arranged with their adjacent ends out of alinement, of a pair of reciprocating members having means for returning them to normal position when thrust, said members being cooperatively headed to receive and sustain a coin from the deposit chute for establishing a connection whereby to actuate one member from the other, one of the heads being pivoted, and means for tripping said pivoted head to swing the sustained co'in into the delivery chute during the thrusting action of said members.
14. In a combined vending and changemaking machine, the combination with a rotary magazine having a plurality of groups of stacks including merchandise-stacks and coin-stacks, of stepping mechanism therefor, an ejector device associated with each of the merchandise-stacks and coin-stacks, a master-pusher for actuating the ejector devices and located in relation to the magazine so that said groups of stacks may be brought successively therebefore under the operation of the stepping mechanism, means for operating the master-pusher comprising a pair of reciprocating members arranged in spaced end to end relation and formed to sustain a coin between them by which to operate the second member from the first, and an operative connection between the second member and the master-pusher.
15. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, the combination of a pair of reciprocatory coin-controlling members co-operatively headed to receive a coin between them for establishing a connection whereby to actuate the second member from the first, one of the heads being pivoted to swing out of cooperative relation to ermit the discharge of the sustained coin, an means for swinging said head at a predetermined place during the movement of its member 16. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, the combination of a pair of reciprocatory coin-controlling members co-operatively headed to receive a coin between .them for establishing a connection whereby to actuate the second member from the hrst, one of said heads being pivoted to swing out of co-operative relatlon to permit the discharge of the sustained coin means for swinging said head at a predetermined place during the movement of its member, a pivoted kick-out bar, and means forming a connection between one of the members and said kick-out bar for causing the latter to impinge the coin during tee 'able thereinand means-tendin co-operative relation to permit the discharge including a master-pusher under the control of said second coin controlling member for actuating the ejector devices.
18. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, a pair of spaced apart coin-controlling members which tend to return to normal position when thrust, vertically extending heads with co-operative .ooves on the confronting ends of said mem ers, the head on the second member being pivoted, a springnormally maintaining said pivoted head in co-operative relation with the first head, to sustain a coin between them for establishing a connection be tween the members'whereby the second mem ber will be thrust from the thrustin -movement of the first, and a trip locate in the path of the pivoted head to swing the latter on its pivot for the discharge of the coin during the movement of the second member.
19. In a coin-controlled vendin and change-making machine, the combination with stationary frame elements, of a pair of spaced apart coin-controlling members slidto return them to normal position when t ust, vertically extending heads with .co-operative grooves on the confronting ends of said members, the head on the second member bein pivoted, a spring normally maintaining said pivoted'head in co-operative relation with the first head, to sustain a coin between them for establishin a connection between the members where y the second member will be thrust from the thrusting movement of the first, a trip projecting from a frame element to comesin the path of the pivoted head to swing the latter on its pivot-for the discharge of the coin during the movement of said second member, and a kick-out bar pi voted to a frame element and operated by one of said members for impinging said coin'and positively discharging it during theswinging of said pivoted head.
20. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, a plurality of coincontrolling mechanisms 'ada ted to be actuated, a master-pusher un er the control of each coimcontrollin mechanism, a magazine rotatable about said masterushers and constructed with a plurality o stacks arranged in grou s in circular order, a structurally independent ejector device associated with each stack, and a contact member fixed to each master-pusher, said contact members being differentiated and adapted each to en'- gage and operate a different number of the ejector devices of the stack groups.
21. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, a pair of spaced apart coin-controlling members which tend to return to normal position when thrust,
vertical heads with co-operative grooves on the confronting ends of said members and extending downwardly a distance from the center line of thrust, the head on the second -member being pivoted, a spring normally maintaining said pivoted head in co-operative relation with the first head, said heads being adapted to sustain two coins between them, one upon the periphery of the other, the upper coin establishing a connection between the members whereby the second member will be thrust from the thrusting movement of the first member, and a trip located in the path of the pivoted head to swin the latter on its pivot for the discharge 0 the coins during the thrusting movements of the members.
22. In a coin-controlled vending and change-making machine, a pairof spaced apart coin-controlling members which tend to return to normal position when thrust, vertical heads with co-operative grooves on the confronting ends of said members and 'extending downwardly a distance from the center line of thrust, the head on the second member being pivoted, a spring normally maintaining said pivoted head in co-operative relation with the first head, said heads being adapted to sustain a coin between them below the center line of thrust for establishing a connection whereby said ivoted head will be swung on its pivot for t e discharge of the coin during the thrusting movement of the first member.
In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.
CLIFTON W. NIXON.
US577822A 1922-07-27 1922-07-27 Coin-controlled vending and change-making machine Expired - Lifetime US1634679A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2858921A (en) * 1953-10-15 1958-11-04 Nat Vendors Inc Coin apparatus
US3690332A (en) * 1969-12-22 1972-09-12 Rowe International Inc Bill and coin changer

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2858921A (en) * 1953-10-15 1958-11-04 Nat Vendors Inc Coin apparatus
US3690332A (en) * 1969-12-22 1972-09-12 Rowe International Inc Bill and coin changer

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