US1600385A - Pumping system - Google Patents

Pumping system Download PDF

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US1600385A
US1600385A US49976021A US1600385A US 1600385 A US1600385 A US 1600385A US 49976021 A US49976021 A US 49976021A US 1600385 A US1600385 A US 1600385A
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valve
main
chamber
pump
pipe
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Burton S Aikman
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Nat Brake & Electric Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04FPUMPING OF FLUID BY DIRECT CONTACT OF ANOTHER FLUID OR BY USING INERTIA OF FLUID TO BE PUMPED; SIPHONS
    • F04F1/00Pumps using positively or negatively pressurised fluid medium acting directly on the liquid to be pumped
    • F04F1/06Pumps using positively or negatively pressurised fluid medium acting directly on the liquid to be pumped the fluid medium acting on the surface of the liquid to be pumped

Description

- Sept; 21 ,"1926. 1,600,385

B. S. AIKMAN PUMPING SYSTEM Filed Sept- 10, 1921 SSheets-Sheet 1 "se tz 21 1926.

. B. s. AIKMAN PUMPING s s'rspa Filed Sept. 10 1921 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 II M 5 v M 6 2 w. W r .0 Aug 'IIII Sept. 21', 1926.

' B. S- AIKMAN PUMPING sYs'rEI 5- Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 10 1921 -./L2& (fi JD elm.) burl-ow .5. dikmmrv Patented Sept. 21 1926.

UNITED STATES PATIENT OFFICE. Y

BURTON s. AIKMAN, or MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOR T0 NATIONAL BRAKE a ELECTRIC COMPANY, or MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF wrsooNslN .PUMPING SYSTEM.-

Application filed September 10, 1921. Serial No. 499,760;

My. invention relates to pneumatic pumps and pumping systems, and particularly to pumps and systems of the fi'esh watei" type wherein the pump is submerged in the llquid to be pumped such. as the water at the toot ot the well or other source of supply, and is connected to a normally closed distributing system, such as the pipes and fixtures out a dwelling or the like, the operation of the pump being automatically controlled by the opening and closing of the faucets or fixtures. Such systems are also characterized as iaucet controlled or closed systems.

Zhi'le my invention is particularly useful in faucet controlled systems itis also usefill .in open pumping. V

in recent years single cylinder pumps for use in such systems have been developed and have become popular largely because of the cheapness and simplicityot structure. .ln systems employing a single cylinder p1; 1p an air spring or reservoir often termed a steady flow chamber, is employed to provide the flow of water between'the strokes of the pump. In carrying out my invention I employ in one form thereof an air spring as the means for equalizing the pressure in the consumption system and for controllingthe valve which admits and ex hausts motive fluid to and tromthe pump at each stroke.

Broadly the control of the main air valve" for the main pump cylinder 1s disclosed 1nmy prior applications in which I have shown various methods of control exercised from the auxiliary pumping chamber or steady flow, chamber.

In the present invention I control the nuriu air valve preferably in accordance with the direction of flow exhibited by 'theliquid with respect to the steady flow or auxiliary pumping chamber. The main and auxiliary chambers are connected together and to the distribution system. The main pump chamor displace a certain quantity of water.

After the level in the main pump chamber} drops'to a certain minimum level the main chamber is shut oftv from both the steady low chamber and from the distribution/systern. henflow from the main chamber ceases this is a manifestation"which 1 cmploy as a control of means for shift ng the main air valve to dlsconnect thej sourceof motive fluid and to connect the main pump chamber to exhaust. itslliquid at this time from the steady flow chamber I employ'this flow also as a con-' trol. in connection with the cessation of flow from the main chamber as governing the air valve as above stated. The auxiliarychamber now suppliesthe distribution "system untila certain low' level of liquid is attained in said chamberat which time the main valve is shifted to: close the exhaust admit motive fluid to the main chamber. The main chamber fills during the interval that the auxiliary chamber is supplying the distribution system.

Thus the two chambers alternate ing and discharging.

All the motive: fluid. valve mechanism may If desired a niotor' and' relay valve mechanism may be employed in order to w re wasting a pipetulof air at'each stroke.

the two chambers are'each provided with low level' check valves that prevent'the' exit and Tvalves'and in case of repairs required by. the motive-fluid valve, much less work nd ditliculty is involved. v I

I believe that I am the first to provide a stroke responsivemeans for governingthe of fluid. I 1

ln ordcr to apprise those skilled int-he air valve governed by the directionof flow" art how to practice my invention Ishall de scribe a specific embodiment or thesame in connection with the accompanying draw her so constructed that'it tends to throw ings, which form part o t t-h e present-specifiCttillOIl.

As the system draws iii an H be put above the liquid ina'rea'dily accessible position such as at thehead of the well.

Consequently better attention can be given to the working parts of the pump The-pump cannot possibly blow over as" loo Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view ot'jia" system embodying my invention, in which 7 the valve at the head or" the well directly l controls the admission and exhaust ofino} tive fluid to the worlring cylinder of the pump, control exercised by'the' flowfogt'j I the 'liquid p Figure 21is a similar diagrammatic view fluid.

tive fluid to the pump cylinder controlled illustrating a modified form of structure employed, in which the valve at the head of the well works through one form of motor and valve, for controlling the admission and exhaust of motive fluid to and from the main pump cylinder;

Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary cross section with parts broken away showing the modified form of structure illustrated in Figure 2;

Figure i is a diagrammatic illustration of a modification in which the valve at the head of the well operates through a liquid column to operate a motor and a relay valve which controls the admi sion and exhaust of motive fluid to and from the main pump cylinder; I

Figure 5 is an enlarged rear elevation of said motor and valve; employed in the modification of Figure l; V

-Figure 6 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the same motor and valve taken on line 66 of Figure 4;

.Figure '7 is a longitudinal sectional View of the main pump cylinder with parts broken away showing-the low level check valve;

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic illustration indicating the uppermost position of the n1otive' fluid valve at the head of the Well, during the time that the main pump chamber is discharging;

Figure 9 is a similar diagrammatic illustration indicating the intermediate position of the said valve during the time that the motive fluid is exhausting from the pump;

Figure 10 is a similar diagrammatic view illustrating the lowermost position of the said valve whenthe main pump chamber has refilled and motive fluid is being admitted;

Figure 11 is a longitudinal cross section of the valve section taken on the line 1111 of Figure 10; V

Figure 12 is a fragmentary longitudinal section of the main valve structure as employed in the system illustrated in Figure 1 Figure 13 is a View similar to. Figure 12 with the valve in another position.

The main pump cylinder 1 is submerged in the waterin the well 'so that, when the exhaust of the motive'fluid occurs or when no pressure is on the pump the water Will fill the cylinder by gravity or what is termed submergence pressure. K

The system which is shown in Figure 1 comprises the main pump cylinder 1, the

steady flow chamber or air spring 2 and the tank 3, for compressed air or other motive In this embodiment-the flow of moby the valvernechanism 4t disposed adjacent to and in communication with the lower part ofthe tank 5. The steady flow chamber may be'termed an auxiliary pumping device because of the function Which it performs as will be described later. The valve mechanism l controls the operation of the ports governing the flow of motive fluid to and from the pump chamber 1.

Motive fluid such as compressed air may be -iurnished from any suitable source, as the tank 3. The tank 3 may be suitably recharged periodically by means of the 00111- pressor 6 operated by a suitable motor 7. Means may be provided for automatically recharging the tank 3 when the pressure head therein falls below a predetermined point. The compressed air is supplied to the main pumpingchamber in this case at \3 full tank pressure as indicated by gauge 9 by way of pipe 8, valve mechanism 4 and pipe 10. If desired a reducing valve may be placed in the pipe 8. The main pump cylinder 1 is provided with the water discharge pipe 11 which is connected to the auxiliary pumping chamber or air spring 2 at the head of the well, which air spring provides the flow of water through the pipe 12 and the faucets during the intervals between strokes of he main pumping cylinder The pipe 12 leads to distribution system such as that of a residence or the like. Opening of the faucets permits the discharge ofwater through the pipes 12 or 11 and out the faucets. As hereinbefore pointed out, the auxiliary pumping chamber or air spring 2 consists of a tank of suitable capacity, the upper part of which is filled with compressed air, as by means of'the pipe 13, valve 1d and gauge-15, which connect to the compressor tank 3. The valve 1% is employed to admit suflicient compressed air to the top of the air spring 2' to cause proper operation of the air spring. If desired, a re-.

ducing valve 16 for automatically admitting air to the tank may be employed. The pres sure applied to the main chamber 1 is great enough to V the highest point in the system and provite at such highest point a satisfactory pressure, plus the friction head of the liquid flowi in the pipes. A pressure reducing valve may also be employed in pipe 8. The pressure in the tank 5 is less than that applied to the main chamber 1 so that the water may be driven from the well into the auxiliary chamber or tank 5 as will be describedlater The 7 air spring operates as an auxiliary pumping device to the extent of providing satisfactory discharge pressure curing the intervals or gaps between the successive strokes. of the main pump chamber 1.

The auxiliary pumping chamber 5 isof such a size with respect to the main chamer 1 that it will supply asatisfactory flow for a time vintervalgreat enough to permit capacit raise the water from the well to The pump vl comprises a head member and a foot member 21 having between communicates at the lower end .with the axial pipe 24 through which the water is discharged from the barrel 22.. At the lower end of the pipe 24 a valve casing 26 issecured, this valve casing being in turn connected to the foot member 21 by'means of .a central bolt 25. The valve casing 26 contains a valve member 27 which serves as a check valve for the pipe 24 and the pipe 11. Passageways 27 in the valve casing '26 communicate with the lower end 'of the pump barrel .22. The foot member 21 comprises a foot valve 28 controlling the annular passage 29, communicating with the outside of the pump cylinder through the conical screen 30 -which is held in place by the central bolt 25;

The valve casing 26 has a head member 31 joined at its periphery to the barrel by means ofthe packing 32 and the riveted annular ring 33,. and which head member 31 has the passages 34. A float valve 35 is adapted to co-operate with the valve passages 34 to close off the same at the end of each stroke of the main pump chamber 1.

The float valve is normally submerged in the water in the barrel 22 and is held against rising by means of the pins 36. As will be hereinafter explained, the fioat valve member during the filling stroke and the greater part of the discharge stroke periods of the pump is held against the pins 36 'and' the passageways 34 are permitted to remain open. During the discharge periods of the main chamber the valve 4 permits compressed air to flow by way of the pipelO into the upper part of the barrel 22, driving the liquid .out by way of valve 27, pipe 24 and pipe 11., until the float valve 35 lowers to its seat and closes the passage 34. This .stops further flow from the main chamber and results in reversal of the main air valve as Will be described later. Immediate- 1y upon exhausting 'of the motive fiuid in the pipe 10 and main chamber 1., by the valve 4. the Water'entermg the lower part of the barrel 22 will cause the float valve 35 to rise and hold against the pins 36. In the case of failure of the water in the well the valve 35 closes off the valve passages 34, preventing any loss of air.

As previously stated, the valvel4 is the means for admitting and exhausting motive fluid to and from the main pump chamber, This valve is governed by a movable member operated by the liquid in accordance with the direction of flow of the liquid. This movable'member is subject on one side to pressurefrom themain chamber and on the faucet).

other from the auxiliary chamber. So long as the main chamber is-discharging the pressure on the one side of the movable member is in areponderanfce. As soon as the float valve 35 closes due to the water being lower-ed in the main chamber, the pressure upon the one side of the movable member drops (due to withdrawal of water via the main valve to exhaust to permit the inain chamber to fill with water. The main chamber should be given ample time to fill. This! period is provided for by the auxiliary chamber which provides the discharge pressure at the faucets during the filling period of the main chamber. As soon as the supply f liquid in the auxiliary chamber is. exhaus ed the valve is shifted to the admission position'to cause the discharge of liquid from the main chamber. This raises the pressure upon the said one side of the movable element but no shifting of the main valve is thereby occasioned. f In carrying out the above functions I provide an auxiliary valve' mechanism in connection with said movable member gov- This results in aishifting of the Referring to Figures 8 to 12, the valve i by the wall 44 through which wall 44 the valve rod 45 projects. A stuffing box seals theopening through which the piston rod. 45 pro ects. The movable member f'or'shift ing the main air valve mechanism comprises a valve rod 45 having operable connection. with the sleeve valve member 49 working in the cylindrical, passageway 46, which valve member 49 is connected to the piston 50 disposed in the cylinder 51. The cylinder 51 is open to the interior ofthe tank 5 and the upper surface 'of the piston 50 is The port the upper end the chamber 43 is closed off therefore subject to't'he pressurev in said tank 5. sageway 46 andthe tank 5 and is subject on opposite sides'to the pressures prevailing in the passageway and in the tank. The port The piston 50 lies between'the pas- 47 communicates with the lower end of the passageway 46 and has connection water discharge pipe 12.

with the The interior of the cylindrical sleeve valve 49 communicates through the lower end 52 with the passageways 46%? The ports 53 permit the water to flow into the lower coni'ined portion of the cylinder 51, which is between the under side 01 the piston and the passageway iti. This arrangement ati'ords an eii'ect-ive pressure area cnthe under side of the piston 50 substantially equal to that of the top side of the piston 50. 'lhc,

underside of the piston 50 is subjected to the pressure of the water discharge line 12 and the top side oi the piston is subjected to the pressure inthe tan 5.

The side walls of the cylindrical valve member 49 are provided with ports as: adapted to regist .r with the passageways which lead to the interior of the tank 5 by 7 vaives 5'? and 57 which permit n'iovement of liquid in one direction only, the way opening toward the tank 5 and the passageway 56 opening away from the tank 5. The piston valve 49 selects the proper passageway to register with the port and in making such selection it shifts the motive fluid valve proper that controls admission and XlliZUSt of the main pump chamber. The float valve 58 controls the application of pressure to the'pi ten 50 for the purpose of shifting the sleeve or piston valve 19 and the main motive fluid valve. 1 have shown the piston rod 15 threaded into the sleeve valve 49, but it is apparent that any suitable connection may be employed.

The air control valve controlling the admission and exhaust of motive fluid'to the pump cylinder 1, as shown in igures 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, comprises the movable valve members 60 and 61, the movement of which is a sed by the valve rod l5 controlled by the piston 50. The valve. member 60 has a motio-i with. respect to the member 61, which latter has motion with respect to the seat 67. This relation is secured by providing lower the lower valve member 61 with a face seating onthe valve seat 6'? andufi" member 60. v The diiiferent degrees 1% ment of the two members 1s secured by connecting the upper member 60 directly to the valvestemflfi without lost motion and by connecting the lower valve member 61 to the stem by a lost motion connection. The

stem 45 has the projections 70-41 between which the lower valve 61 is located and by which it is moved.

The valve seat 67 has three ports 64, 65 and 66, of which the port 6% opens to exhaust, port 65 communicates with the main pumping chamber as shown in Figure 1 (or it may communicate with the motor cylinder of a relay valve structuresuch as shown at the left oti igure 3 andFigures 5 and 6) sun the portfixileads to the inside of the casing 10 which casing is under pressure of the motive fluid supplied by way of pipe-8 and inlet 4-2.

The valve member 61 contains on its lower face a recess 133 adapted to communicate with the port 65 in all positions of the valve member 61. A lateral branch from the recess forms a port- 66 which in one position is adapted to put the recess 133 into communication with'the port 55. The valvemember also contains a passageway 13% adapted at the extreme upper position of the said valve member to communicate with the. port o l in the seat This passageway 134; terminates in the upper side of the member The recess 133 communicates with the upper side of the member 61 by'a short passageway 63, these passageways 63 and 13s: terminating closely adjacent each other so that the Y can be controlled by the member 60, which forms a B slide valve member having a recess 62 on its lower face. The valve member 61 is seated between guiding flanges 68 and the valves are held in ilace for shipment and idle condition by a suitable spring 69.

'lhe operation of the system as shown in l 'ure l and in the details of Figures 7 to 1 12 inclusive is as follows: Assuming that the submerged in the liquid to be pumped as in r a suitable well or other suitable source of supply, the auxiliary pumping chamber being located above the liquidpre'ferably at the, head of the well as shown in Figure 1 and the proper supply of air furnished as by means of the compressor 6 and the stor age tank 3, the operation of the system may be started by connecting the pipe 8 with the pipe 10 n'ianually by means of temporary valve connection (not shown) until the pipes 12, and the auxiliary pumping chamber 2 i i v .1w "4-1 f1 'l l 1 am pi opeil n ec with iiqnic. ie an may be permitted to escape at one ofthetaucets while the system is filling with liquid. Sev-' eral strokes 01" the main pumping chamber 1 may thus bemade to charge the system with liquid and thereafter the operation will be automatic. Air at reduced pressure is sup plied to the top of the aux liary pumping chamber5, as previously indicated. Ase suming that the main pumping chamber has just completed a stroke by discharging water into the au xiliarychamber '5; the pisnain pumping chamber 1 is properly ton 50 with its attached valve 49, stem and air valve members 60 and 61 will have been moved to the extreme upward position as shown in Figure 13 and also as illustrated in theupper right hand corner of Figure 13. The water whi h is discharged frointhe main pumping chamber 1 will pass up through the pipe 11 through the pipe 12, passageways 1-7 and 46 to the interior of the sleeve valve. 1-9, through the port 54 and the passageway 55, past the check valve 57 which opens to permit this operation and upwardly through the commonport 59 into the interior o1 the auxiliary pumping chamher or air spring 5. This discharge of I water into the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 raises the pressure of the air which is trappedin the top of the same. The further discharge of water is stopped by either the equalization of pressure in the chambers 1.

and 5 orby the float valve 35 dropping down and closing the port 34 so that no further discharge of water from the main pumping chamber 1 can occur, In either event the system then stands stationary so long as no water withdrawn from the system. If any water is now withdrawn from one of the faucets by opening of the same, water (ill be discharged either from the main pumping chamber 1, it it had not previously been emptied, until the floatvvalve 35 closes oil the port 3 1. As soon as the float valve has closed the port 34 and furtherwater 'is permitted to escape from the system,

pressure in the pipe 12 and below the piston will be lowered immediately. It will be that it is impossible for water to flow baclr'trom the auxiliary pumping chamber to the passageway because the check valve 57 will not permit such action. The consequence is that as soon as the pressure lowers, due to the withdrawal of waterafter the main pumping chamber 1 is emptied, the pressure in the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 will force the piston 5O down until the ports 5 1 in the sleeve valve 19 come into register with the'passageway 56, whereupon water will be discharged from the air spring to provide at the faucets for'discharge. 'As previously explained, during the time of discharge of the water from the main pumpiug chamber 1 the valve means 60 and 61 stands in the uppermost position as shown in Figure 8. The-motive fluid at this time entering byway 01 the opening 12, as shown in Figure 11, into the interior of the valve box 10, passes down through the passageway 68 through the passageway and pipe 10 to the main pumping chamber 1.

As soon as the reversal of flow occurs as above indicated, that is, as soonas water flows from the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 to supply the discharge pressure at the faucet, the upper valve member 60' will be shifted into the position shown in Figure 9.

.haust port 6 1 to atmosphere.

lVhen the piston 50 moves downward to shift the valve 60 to permit exhaust, of the main 1311111131119; chamber 1 the sleeve valve 4:9 is shifted to permit the'water from the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 to flow into the distributionsystemby way of the openings 61, port 60, passageway 56 past the check valve 57 through the ports 54, passagewaysf16 and 17 and out by way or" the pipe 12. The piston 50 will, as above explained, move downward only until the port 54 is in register with the passageway 56 and this movement is just suttlcient to shift the valve ,60'to the'exhaust position as above explained.

The'auxiliary pumping chamber 5'then continues to supply liquid to the distribution system until the liquid therein'is lowered to a predetermined minim-um, w hereupon the float valve 58 will close the port- 60. This immediately creates a difference in pressure on the two sides of the piston 50 as the Water escapes from the lower side thereof out by way of the discharge system. The piston 50 will thereupon move downwardto its lower most position, carrying the sleeverva-lve 4:9

downward so that the ports 54 are below the passageway 56 and carrying thevalves' 60 and 61 to the lowermost position, as shown" in Figure 10. It will be'seen that movement of the valve member 61 first closes ofi'the exhaust passageway 6% and thereafter connects the recess 133 in the valve member 61 by means of the-lateral branch 66 with the passageway 66 so that motive fluid is admitted from the interior of the valve box 40 through the passageway. 66 in the valve seat 67 through a recess 133 to thepassageway 65 which'leads by way of pipe 10 to the main pumping chamber 1.' This admission of air As the sleeve valve 19 passes upwardly the ports'tit will first be brought into register with the passageway 56, but the check valve 57 prevents the disc arge ot'liquid through said passageway and the sleeve valve is carriedupwardl-y until the ports 54 register with the passageway 55, whereupon the vliquid from the main pumping chamber 1. will stem 45 moves the D valve 60' to uncover the Cid port 63, thus permitting the motive fluid to enter and pass to the main pumping chamber 1. This movement of the valve member 60 first cuts off the exhaust passageway 64 before opening the admission passageway 63. Upon further movement of the rod 45 the valve member 61 is moved upwardly, disconnecting the recess 138 from the admission passageway 66, but as motive fluid is permitted to enter the passageway 63 the supply of motive fluid is thus continuous from the time thatthe valve stem reaches its lowermost position to the time that it reaches its uppermost position and is started back again.

The faucet may be opened and closed at any stage of the above operations without atfecting the previously described cycle.

Figures 2 and 3 illustrate a system where the valve 4 operates through the operating element to work the controlling valve 7 6. In this case the controlling element 75 consists. of a small cylinder 77 communicating by way of the pipe 10 with the valve ,The cylinder 77 is provided with a lining 78 that has a seat 79 at the upper end as will be explained later. A movable piston member 89 is adapted to slide into the cylinder 77. A

rod 81 is. connected by means of a spring connection 82 with the piston and extends down through the pipe to the controlling valve body 84 which is preferably locateo adjacent the head of the pump 1.

The pipe 83 communicates by means of a T connection 85 with the pipe 86 which is connected in turn to the pipe 13 co; imunicating with the compressed air tank 3. It can thus be seen that the piston 80 is subjected on the one side to the pressure prevailing in the pipe 10 and'on the other side to the pressure of the motive fluid admitted through the pi )e 86. The oiston 80 is arovided'at its 1.

upper surface with a valve seat 87 adapted to engage the seat 79 to prevent any leakage past the piston 80 when the piston is moved to its uppermost position.

Thecontrolling valve 76 comprises a substantially cylindrical body provided with a transverse exhaust passage 87 and axial passageway 88, which communicates by way ot the reduced portions 89 with the pipe 90 leading to the cylinder head 20, and the interior t' the main pumping chamber 1. The portion 89 of the valve member 84 and the pipe 90 are joined together by a union which has a flared funnel shaped member 91, at its upper edge for directing the reduced parts 89 of the valve body 84 to the threaded part of the union. By this means if any disarrangement of the valve within the valve body 84 should occur the same may be unthreaded at the union and raised to the surface. The reduced portion 89 may again be threaded into the union without ditliculty because of the funnel shape guiding member 91 which directs it into the threaded portion. The tunnel shaped member 91 is substantially of the same diamete as the pump 1 and embraces the water pipe 11, hence it is easy to cause engagement ofthe screw threads.

The valve body 84 has a head member 92 provided with a port 93. .21 valve guiding member 94 passesthrough said por 93 and guides the valve body in opening and closing said port. The valve guiding member 94 is connected to the rod 82 which, as previously explained, is connected to the piston 80. The valve member 95 comprises an outer shell having a yieldable face 96 at its upper surface. A screw plug 97 enters the bottom of the shell or" the valve member 94 and embraces the cylindrical part 98, which has an annular shoulder 99 at its upper end. The cylindrical part 98 slides in the ring 97. A yieldable valve face 100 co-operates with the 6X iaust port 101, which valve face 100 is secured to the cylindrical member 98. It can thus be seen that the cylindrical member 98 with its shoulder 99 forms a lost motion connection withothe rod 81 to the various parts previously described.

The operation of the system shown in Figures 2 and 3 is substantially the sameas that.

shown in Figure 11 with the exception that the motor 75 and valve 76 operate as a re lay tor controlling the admission and e" haust of motivefluid to and from them-ainpumping chamber 1; hen the flow con trolled valve moves to the position shown in Figure 10 to start the admission of air to the pipe 10, the piston 80 is moved downwardly inthe cylinder, moving the rod 81 and the valve member 97 downwardly to open the port 93which admits motive fluid to the main pumping chamber 1 and closing the port, 101 to exhaust. The water then discharges from the main pumping chamber into the distributing system and i nto the auxiliary pumping chamber 5. the re versal of flow at this time causing the rise llll of the piston 50 and the connected sleeve 'to the position where the valve 49 places tie ports 54 in communication with the passageway 56 and connects the main pumping chamber to exhaust as shown in Figure 9., whereupon the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 PIQVlClQ S'thQ supply to the distributing rail llltli system until the float valve 58 closes oil? the 7 port 60, whereupon the'piston 50 is forced 'tive fluid to the main pumping chamber.

When the valvemember 60 is moves 'to the position shown in Figure 9, the pressure in the top of the cylinder 77 is exhausted to atmosphere, whereupon the pressure prevailing on the under side of the piston 80 forces the same upward, raising the rod 81 and taking up the lost motion between the "member and the stem 98, compressing the spring 82 and then pullingthe valve member 97 from the exhaust port 101 and closing the admission valve 95 against the admission port 93. At the same time the yieldable seat 87 engages the metallic seat 79 to seal oif'the chamber 77'to prevent the escape of live air around the piston 80.

The relay mechanism 7576 may be operated by liquid from the distributing sys tem or from the auxiliary pumping chamber 5, the valve mechanism 1 being modified as shown in Figure 13 and as will be described in detail in connection with the embodiment shown in Figure 4:.

In the system shownin Figure 4 the float controlled valve mechanism at operates through a relay mechanism comprising a motor and valve governing the admission and exhaust'of motive fluid to andfrom the main pump chamber 1. In this system the motor and valve mechanism is combined in a simple, compact structure 106, adapted to be placed adjacent the main pumping chainber as shown in Figure 41. This motor and valve unit 106 comprises a diaphragm chamber 109 communicating by way of the pipe with the passageway 65 shown in the valve seat of the valve mechanism 1 in Figures 8, 9, 10 and 11. The diaphragm chamber has a diaphragm 111 to which. are clamped suitable diaphragm plates 110, the inner one of which has the yieldable face 119 adapted to co-operate with the exhaust port 118. -The pipe 105 is constantly full of liquid and the weight of this liquid column pressing against the diaphragm 111 tends to force the valve 119 to the closed position. However, this tendency is balanced by 'means of a su-itablespring 122 interposed between the lowerdiaphragnrplate and the casing.

The body of the valve mechanism comprises a cylindrical member 115 having the exhaust port 118 and the admission port 116. The admission port 116 is controlled the valve 117 and leads to an inlet member 112 connected by way of the pipe 108 and the pipe 86 to the pressure tank 3. The barrel or cylinder 115 has a central portion 114 which communicates with the main pumping,

chamber 1" way of the ump connection 113 andpipe 90. The diaphragm plates 110 have connected t'o'them the valve rod 120 provided witlrthe'guiding wings 121. Upon the rear end of the valve 'rod120 is connected the admission valve 117 Thus when the valve member 1 is operated to admitpressure to the pipe 105, the diaphragm 11.1 is pushed downwardly as viewed in Figure 6, opening the admission valve 117 and admitting compressed air or other motive fluid to themain pun'iping'c'hamber 1, causing the same to discharge liquid therefrom. The

flow responsive mechanism of the valve member 1 is actuatcdas soon as the main pumping chamber 1 iscemptied to exhaist the pressure in the pipe 105, permitting the spring 122 to move the diaphragm 111 upwardly as viewed in F igure 6, closing off the admission port and opening the exhaust port. Thereafter the main pumping chamber 1 fills and the auxiliary pumping chamber 5 supplies the discharge pressure until this auxiliary pumping j chamber is emptied, whereupon the valvemember 4 is again shifted to atmit pressure to thediaphragm chamber 109 to close the exhaust port and open the admissionport As previously explained, the pipe 105is always full of liquid, consequently there is no wastage of compressed air or other moblVGilHltl. The valve mechanism tin this form 'oftlie device is illustrated in Figure In this case the interior of the valve be 13 is open to the passageway 16-l7 sothat the prcss'ureof the liquid prevailing in the discharge system or pipe 12 is admitted to the valvechamberr This liquid pressure is employed to operate the relay device 106 above described The operation of the valve mechanism shown in Figure 1.3 is identical with that described'in connection with Figures 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, with the exception that the motive fluid in this case is water under pressure instead, of compressed air. Consequently the exhaust which occurs from the valve shown in Figure 18 1s the discharge ot a small amount of water winch, of course, may be run through a suitable drain.

One particular advantage of employlng a system of this type is the fact that under no conditions can the compressed air flow over i due to a shortageof water in the well. Thus, if the water supply in the well should fail the float valve 35 shuts, off the passageway 34: and as soon as the water is exhaustedfrom theauxiliary pumping chamber 5 the float valve 58 shuts off the passageway 60 and no escape of air ispossible.

The control of the air valve in accordance with the direction offiow is ideal in that it is not dependent upon the pressures and leakage of the parts consequently does not affect the control. Furthermore, the control,- ac'cord'ing to the flow, permits of greater economy in separate head pumps than any .the main pumping chamber 1.

other scheme or" operation with which I am 'tamiliar. Thisis apparent when it is con sidered that filling ot' the auxiliary chamber 5 does not entail an immediate exhaust of The main pumping chamber 1 invariably makes a full stroke betore reversal occurs, and consequently the eiliciency will be high. The provision of the float control valve 58 in the auxiliary pumpingchamber also insures that this chamber will do the proper amount of work and it consequently gives a maximum amount of time for the filling; ot' the main chamber 1. The valves will not center on dripping service because the piston member and sleeve valve a9 must move a definite distance betore water can be discharged from t is system and this invariably opens the controlling ports of the valve mechanism t or closes them and the valves (30 and 61 are so arranged that the ports thereof are blanked during intermediate stages.

I now wish to call a tention to the fact that the piston 50, together with the check valve passageways and 56, constitute a flow meter device which is sensitive to direction of flow.

The passageway 55, for example, exerts a restrictive ettect upon the liquid flowing therethrough to produce a difference in pres sure upon opposite sides of the piston 50, the preponderance of pressure being then upon the lower side. But this alone would merely a flow meter sensitive to rate of flow 7 only.' F or my purposes, the device must be sensitive to change in direction of flow. It make the deviceresponsive to change in directionot flow by blocking off all flow through the sleeve valve 49 until the main air valve 4-3 is shifted, that is, until the sleeve valve 49 opens the port or passageway 55. Thereafter, the variable rate of flow exerts a variable difference of pressure upon the piston 50, but that is unimportant so long the preponderance is all in one direction.

As soon as it is necessary for the water to flow out of the air spring to supply the demand of the system, the flow tends to reverse through the common connection 12. But outflow is blocked by check valve 57 and sleeve valve 49. Hence, the difference in pressure which tends to set up flow out of the air spring 5 exerts a great enough difference in pressure upon the piston 50 to push said piston 50 and sleeve valve 49 together with main control valve 48 downwardly, and as long as there is an outflow from the air spring 5 the preponderance of pressure is maintained on top of the piston 50.

.Thus it will be seen that I have provided a flow meter device sensitive to reversals of flow; this device comprising an orifice and a pressure responsive device subjected to ditterences in pressure, which tend to set up flow.

.1 do not intend to be limited to the precise details of construction shown or described.

l claim.

i. in combination, a distribution system, a main pumping chamber and an auxiliary pumping chamber connected to said distribution system, means responsive to the flow of ii uid from oneot said chambers to'said di tilbuti'n system and a valve for motive fluid controlled by said means governing the exhaust oil? motive fluid from the other of said pumping chambers. f

2. in combination, a normally closed distribution system, a pair of pumping chamoe". connected to said system, one of said .iers being submerged in the liquid to ce pumped the other of said chambers being above the liquid, means responsive to the ow ct liquidtroin the other of said chambers to the system for governing the exhaust of motive fluid from one of said pumping chambers.

'3. In combination, a closed distribution atom, a pair of pumping chambers, one of id chambers only being submerged in the liquid to be pumped, said system and said chambers having a common junction point,

exhaust 0t motive fluid to and from one oft said chambers, and means responsive to flow of liquid'atsaid junction for shifting said valve,- saidmeans moving with flow until the valve is shifted.

l. in a system of the class described, a

main pumping chamber adapted to be submerged in the liquid, an auxiliary pumping ber above the liquid, a passageway con .necting said chambers, a normally closeddischarge system communicating with said pas sa eway, means tor supplying motive fluid controlled by the change of flow of liquid in said passageway governing the exhaust .ot motive fluid from said main pumpingchamber.

5. In combination, a main pumping cham ber aadapted to be submerged in theliquid to be pumped, an auxiliary pumping chamber adapted to receive liquid from the main pumpingchamber and to discharge the same during filling; strokes of the main pumping chamber, a discharge pipe having connection with both 05? said chambers, and valve means controlled by emptying oi the mainpumping chamber chamber t i a t motive fluid to the chamber,

6. In combination, a pump cylinder havlio'uid inlet and discharge valves, a discharge pipe, a pipe for conveying motive fluid to the pump, an auxiliary pumping de vice, a valve controlled by the change in direction of flow of liquid into and out of the main pumping o means for controlling the admission to the main pumping chamber, and means to connect said main piunping oi the auxiliary pumping'chamber to ing liquid inlet and discharge valves, a dis a plpe for admitting and ex- 'hausting motive charge pipe,

fluid to and from the pump, an accumulating chamber, a device actuated by the change ot-directi'on of flow of liquid to and from said chamber independently of the amount of liquid therein, a valve having connection with said device controlling the adjacent-the pump, source of motive fluid, said master valve admission and exhaust of motive. fluid to and from the pump. I

M 8. In combination, a pump cylinder having inlet and discharge valves, a discharge pipe, a motive fluid pipe, a valve governing the flow of motive fluid in said pipe, an auxiliary pumping device having an accumulating chamber and a movable stroke responsive element, said stroke responsive element being controlled by the change of direction of flow of water to and from the accumulating chamber independently of the contents thereof,. a valve operated by the movement of the stroke responsive element controlling the operation of the pump.

9. In combination, a pump adapted to be submerged in water at the foot of the well, a water discharge pipe, a motive fluid pipe leading from the pump, a motive fluid valve, an air spring adapted to accumulate Water upon each stroke of the pump, a control valve having a motor element moved by difterences of pressures in the air spring and discharge pipe, element being governed by the flow of water in the air spring.

10. In combination, a pump cylinder adapted to be submerged in water at the foot of the well,a discharge pipe leading from said welland communicating with an auxiliary pumping device, a motive fluid pipe, a valve at the root oi the well adjacent the pump cylinder, a master valve governed by the reversal of the flow of the water to or from the auxiliary pumping device inclependently of the contents thereof, an operatin g element at the head of the well controlled by said master valve for admitting and exhausting motive fluid to and from said motive fluid pipe.

11. In combination, a pump cylinder adapted to be submerged in water at the foot of a Well, a discharge pipe leading from said cylinder and communicating with an accumulating chamber, piston means governed by the flow of water from said chamber controlling a master valve connected therewith, a valve at the foot of the well an operating element, a

adapted to exhaust water under pressure from said controlling element to cause the valve at the foot of the well to exhaust motive fluid from said pump.

the movement of the motor 12. In combination, a pump cylinder adapted to be submerged in water at the foot of a well, a discharge pipe leading from said well, an air pipe, a controlling valve governing'the air pipe comprising admission and exhaust valves, a lost motion connection between said valves, means supplying air under pressureto said valves, an operating piston. at the head of the Well controlling said valves, one side of said piston being subjected to the pressure of water in said discharge pipe. r

13. In combinatioma pump cylinder hav ing a liquid discharge pipe,'a motive fluid pipe, a check valve for said discharge pipe and afloat valve in the pump cylinder, a main valve governing the flow of motive fluid in said pipe, said float valve adapted to seat when the liquid in the cylinder reaches a predetermined level to prevent further displacement of liquid'from said pump cylinder, and means controlled bythe drop in pressure created in the discharge pipe for governing the operation or said main valve. 1 V v 14; In combination, a pump, adapted to be submerged in a well, a water discharge pipe, a steady flow chamber, a stroke responsive element communicating with the water discharge pipe and with the chamber, a valve member having connection with the stroke responsive element shifted by the movement of said element, said stroke responsive ele ment being moved when the. pressure in the discharge pipe lowers.

15. In combination, a, discharge pipe, an accumulating chamber having a reciprocable piston, said piston communicating on one side with saidchamber and on the other side with said distributing pipegmeans for causing the piston to be forced outward, a pump discharging water into the chamber and moving the piston inwardand a valve operatedbythe movement of the piston, said valve governing the operation of the pump; I

16. In combination, a discharge pipe, an auxiliary. pumpingdevice having an accumulating chamber connected to said pipe and a reciprocable pressure piston one side or" which communicates with the interior of the accumulating chamber, a pumpdischarging water against the'other'side of said piston and into said chamber, said device being adapted to discharge the water upon lowering of thepressure in the discharge pipeand a valve operated upon the reversal of the flow of water governing the operation of the pump. r I V 17. In combination, a distribution system, a main pumping chamber, an auxiliary pumping chamber, chambers,a movable member lying in said connection and subjected to the differencein pressure which results in changing the direction of flow of the liquid, a valve governing the flow of liquid around said movable memher, and a main valve governed by the operation of said movable member for controlling the application of motive fluid to the main ling the operation of the main pumping device.

19. I11 combination, an air displacement pump, a pressure system connected thereto, an air spring, a connection between the air spring and the system comprisinga boreopen at one end into the air spring and at the other into the pressure system, a piston slidable in said here, said piston being moved upon the initiation of a change or" flow between the system and the air spring,

' and an air valve for the pump actuated by the piston.

20. In combination, a pressure system, a pump, an air spring, a connection between the pump and the air spring, a pressure operated element subject to the pressure of the liquid in the air spring in one direction and to the pressure of the liquid in the comma tion in the other direction, a valve governing the creation of differences in pressurein the air spring and in the connection, and main valve operated by said element governing the operation of the pump. 7

21. In combination, a distribution system, a pump, an air spring, a connection between the pump, the air spring and the system, a movable element in the connection exposed on one side to the liquid in the system and on the other side to the pressure in the air spring, said pump being adapted to discharge water to the system and to the air springy and acontrolling valve for the pump governed by the movable element.

22. In combination, a delivery system, 5 pump, an air spring, a movable element in the connection between the pump and the air spring, means for causing the movement of the element in one direction when the pump discharges into the air spring, means for causing the movement of the element in the reverse direction when the liquid flows out of the air spring at the end of the pump stroke, means for causing further movement of the element in said reverse direction, when the liquid in the airspring has reached a predetermined low level, and a main valve operated by said movable element governing the operation of the pump.

23. In combination, a pressure delivery system, a main pumping chamber, an auxiliary pumping chamber, a connection between the main pumping chamber and the auxiliary pumping chamber, said connection communlcating with thesystem, a motive fluid control valve for the main pumping- 24. In combination, a pump, an air spring,

a distribution system connected to the pump and to the air spring, a motive fluid control valve adjacent the pump for controlling admission and. exhaust of motive fluid to and from the pump, a motor element for said main valve, movable element controlled bythe emptying of the air spring for applying liquid under pressure from the air spring to said motor element for operating the main valve.

25. In combination, a main pumping chamber, an auxiliary pumping chamber, a connection between them,a closed delivery system communicating with'said connection, a motive fluid valve for the main pumping chamber, a lowlevel float for shutting off the discharge oi liquid from the main pumping chamber and a How responsive means gov erned by flow of liquid from the air spring into the system for operating said main valve to connect the main pumping chamber to exhaust. r

' 26, In combination, a main pumping chamber, an auxiliary pumping chamber, a connection between said chambers, a delivery system communicating with said connection, a main motive fluid valve governing the main pumping chamber. a movable element subject to difference in pressure bet-ween the discharge side of the main pumpingchamher and the pressure in the auxiliary pump ing chamber for'operating said main valve to connect the main pumping chamber to exhaust.

27. In combination, a main pumping chamber, an auxiliary pumping chamber, a connection between said chambers, a closed distribution system communicating Wll'/l1 said connection, a low level' float valve for shutting off the discharge of liquid from the main pumping chamber, a low level valve for shutting ott the discharge from the auxiliary pumping chamber and a main motive fluid valve for the main pumping chamber con trolled'by' said low level valve.

' 28. In a pumping system, the combination of a pumping chamber adaptedto be filled with liquid and then emptied of liquid by air displacement, valve means con trolling the movement of air into and out of the pumping chambers and means controlled by cessation of flow of liquid from the pumping chamber for shifting said valve means.

29. In a pumping system, a pumping chamber adapted to be filled alternately with liquid and with motive fluid, a. main valve for motive fluid and means controlled at each stroke by cessation of fluid flow "from the pumping chamber for shifting the main valve.

30. In combination, a pumping chamber, an air spring, a normally closed distributing system connected to said air spring and said pumping chamber, an air valve for admitting and exhausting air to and from the pumping chamber, flow responsive means actuated by change in direction of flow of liquid in the connection between the air spring and the system independently of the amount of liquid contained in the air spring for operating said air valve.

31. In combination, a pumping chamber, an air spring, a normally closed, distributing system connected to said air spring and to said pumping chamber, an air valve for admitting and exhausting air to and from the pumping chamber, and flow responsive means for actuating said air valve, said flow responsive means cutting oli" said air spring from the pumping chamber and the distributing system upon the cessation of a discharge stroke of the pumping chamber.

32. In combination, a pumping chamber, an air spring, a normally closed system connected to said air spring and said pumping chamber, an air valve for admitting and exhausting air to and from the pumping chamber to make the pumping stroke, a common junction point between the air spring, the system and the pumping chamber, check valves between the air spring and said common junction point, and means for disabling said check valves one at a time, said means being connected to said air valve.

33. In combination, a pump, an air control valve therefor, an air spring, a discharge pipe from the pump to the air spring,

a distributing pipe leading from the air spring and communicating with said discharge pipe, and means actuated to shift the air valve to exhaust position as soon as the rate of flow from the distributing pipe exceeds the rate of flow from the discharge pipe.

34:. In combination, a pump, an air control valve therefor, an air spring, a discharge pipe from the pump of the air spring, a distributing pipe leading from the air spring and communicating with the said discharge pipe, and flow responsive means to shift said air control valve to exhaust position when the rate of flow from the distributing pipe exceeds the rate of flow from the discharge pipe and means governed by emptying of the air spring for shifting the air control valve to admission position.

35. In a pneumatic displacement pump, a pumping chamber, a main air control valve therefor, a distributing pipe, an air spring, I

a common passageway connecting the air spring with the pumping chamber and the distributing pipe, and a flow meter device sensitive to change in direction of flow in said common passageway for controlling said air control valve.

36. In a pneumatic displacement pump, a pumping chamber, a main air control valve, a distributing pipe, an air spring connected by a common passageway to the pumping chamber and to the distributing pipe, and a flow meter device sensitive to change in direction of flow in said common passageway for controlling said air control valve to make the strokes of the pumping chamber, said device comprising a movable piston member sensitive to fluid pressures at different points in said passageway, a valve means connected to the member for blocking the passageway until the piston member is moved, and a connection from the member to the main valve for shifting the main valve when sald piston member moves the valve means to uncover the fluid passageway.

In witness whereoI, I hereunto subscribe my name this 7th day of September, 1921.

BURTON S. AIKMAN.

Certificate of Correction.

It is hereby certified. that in Letters Patent No. 1,600,385, granted September 21, 1926, upon the application of Burton S. Aikmanyof Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for an improvement in Pumping Systems, an error appears in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 11, line 60, claim 34:, for the Word of read to; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 9th day of November, A. D, 1926.

[SEAL] WM. A. KINNAN,

Acting Commissioner of Patents,

US1600385A 1921-09-10 1921-09-10 Pumping system Expired - Lifetime US1600385A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2957726A (en) * 1953-06-18 1960-10-25 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Load supporting structure and attachment means for a tractor
US5141404A (en) * 1990-06-25 1992-08-25 Q.E.D. Environmental Systems, Inc. Pump apparatus
US5655430A (en) * 1995-06-26 1997-08-12 Imo Industries, Inc. Helm pump

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2957726A (en) * 1953-06-18 1960-10-25 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Load supporting structure and attachment means for a tractor
US5141404A (en) * 1990-06-25 1992-08-25 Q.E.D. Environmental Systems, Inc. Pump apparatus
US5655430A (en) * 1995-06-26 1997-08-12 Imo Industries, Inc. Helm pump

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