US1583238A - Heating method and device - Google Patents

Heating method and device Download PDF

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US1583238A
US1583238A US69327A US6932725A US1583238A US 1583238 A US1583238 A US 1583238A US 69327 A US69327 A US 69327A US 6932725 A US6932725 A US 6932725A US 1583238 A US1583238 A US 1583238A
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air
furnace
combustion
flow
heating
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US69327A
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Lawrence W Scudder
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Lawrence W Scudder
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/02Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation
    • F24H3/06Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being kept separate from the heating medium, e.g. using forced circulation of air over radiators

Description

May 4 1926. v 1,583,238

' w. scuDDER HEATING METHOD AND DEVICE Filed Nov.' 16, 1925 i A 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jazareece Wcadier @MLM May 4 1926.

l.. W. SCUDDER HEATING METHOD AND DEVICE 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 16'

Patented May 4, 1926.

UNITED STATES P ATENT OFFICE.

LAWRENCE W. SCUDDER, F CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

HEATING METHOD AND DEVICE'.

Application led November 16, 1925. Serial No. 69,327.

To all w/o'm t may concern.

Be it known that I, LAWRENCE W. SCTJD- nanfa citizen of the United States, residlng at Chicago, in the county of Cook andl Statei of Illinois, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Heating Methods and Devices, of which the following is a specification.

- My invention relates generally to a hot air heating installation and to a method of heating. I illustrate it as applied to an oil burning installation including a furnace and an oil burner, but it may be used equally advantageously with other fuels. One obl'5 ject of my invention is the provision of such a hot air heating method and plant which is articularly adaptable for domestic dwelling iiouseuse. Another object is the provision of such a plant in which the flow of air through the" air heating jacket or chamber about the furnace vis positively and thermostatically controlled. Another object is the` provision. of means for simultaneously controlling thel flow of air through the air jacket and about the furnace, the flow of air to the burner itself and the ilow of fluid fuel to la burner. Other objects will appear from time to time in the course of the specication and claims. 80 I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings wherein- Figure 1 illustrates a vertical section through my installation shown as used with an oil burner; and f Figure 2 is a similar section through an installation in which coa'l is burned.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification anddrawings. 40

consisting of three separate sections A-1 A2 A3 although any suitable structure might be employed. Said sections are mounted upon a lower section A4 A5 is a door giving access to the furnace proper.

B is an air jacket surrounding and enclosing the furnace and forming about it the air chamber B1.. Through it penetrates the flue passage A1o which extends from the upper furnace section A3. B2 B1 B* are'any suitable air ducts or passages leading to the roomsto be heated and Bs 4is a returning air A generally indicates any suitable furnacel within which is en- 4.5 closed the oil burner later to be described.

Icates with the carburetor casing and has the control valve duct or passage adapted to deliver to the air chamber B1 the cool air returned from the room or rooms. i

Positioned within the passage B5 isany suitable air impelling means herein diagrammatically illustrated as a fan C adapted to be actuated by an electric motor C1, driven from any suitable electric power source not herein shown.

Referring to Figure 1, K K1 are electric conductors in circuit with the motor C1 and extending to any suitable electric power source. Kzvis any suitable switch lever pivot as at K3 and adapted to be thermostatically controlled for example by means ofthe stem K4 actuated by the thermostatically responsive element K5. K6 are a rality of abutments or contacts adapte to be engaged by the outer end of the switch K2. Referring to Figure 2, I have illustrated a hand control switch K1".U

In the form herein shown I position the fan C well within the termination of the passage B1 thus forming a relatively restricted air or compression chamber C3. One portion of the chamber is more or less segregated by the downwardly and inwardly projecting flange C1, the bulk of the air to pass however through the opening C11.

D generally indicates a repot or burner structure including a central combustion chamber D1 surrounded by a circumferential wall D2 penetrated by a plurality of relacate with the outer circumferential air chamber D4 which is closed by the circumferential wall D5. Communicating with the air chamber D1 is a pipe D8 having the control valve D7, extending to the air chamber C3 within the flange Cf. IThe bottom of the combustion chamber is arcuately formed as at D8 and is preferably filled with a bed of sand or similar ,finely divided material D9.

E is a vfuel supply line from any suitable fuel storage supply source which communigenerally indicated as E1 E2. The casing is provided with a lat chamber .E3 and the lioat E", the float; controllino' the lever E5 pivoted as at Ee and. provided with the valve member E7 which seats as at E8 at the inlet of the fuel passage E. E is a fuel line from the float chamber to the bottom of the combustion chamber where it los vio

wardly through the flue A1".

discharges as at E1 to the sand bed. E11 is an a1r line extending from the pressure chamber C2 land the flange C4 to the carbureter casing, discharging downwardly as at E12 in line with the float. The air line E11 has the control valve E12.

A Referring to Figure 2 the air delivered by the fan C circulates through the air chamber B1 past the walls of the frebox or furn-aee A2. However in place of the oil burner illustrated in Figure l I employ any suitable grate arrangement G adaptedto support a bed of coal or other suitable solid fuel. The wall of the lower section A1 is penetrated by a plurality of apertures G1 whereby air from the air chamber B1 is permitted to circulate upwardly through the grate bars G and out- It will be realized that whereas I have illustrated a practical and operative devicethat nevertheless many changes might be made in the size, shape, number and disposition of parts and that I wish my description and drawings to be taken as in a broad sense diagrammatic or illustrative .rather than as limiting me to my specific showing.- p

The use 'and operation of my invention are Iv employ any suitable type of furnace adaptable for A'usewith a hot air heating system; I surround the furnace with a hot l'air jacket or housing B adapted to permit or4 cause the heating bythe furnace of theair passing therethrough. The air is drawn off by the usual vents or ducts B2 B2 and B4 for heating use. I provide a main return duct or return flow B5 which receives the cool air from the house. Obviously I might use more than one of such ducts but I find one suiiicient and preferable. In such duct I position any suitable means, for example, the fan C, for drawing or forcing a iiow of air therethrough.

'. It is perferably made thermostatically re.

sponsive to the house temperature, the particular thermostat and electrical connectlon 'A therefor forming no part of the present invention. Any means suffices whereby the fan will be actuated when the house temperatur'e at a given pointl or points falls to or below a predetermined norm or sub-norm.

However I have diagramm-atically illustratedj. in Figure 1,'a thermostatic arrangef ment 'whereby the switch K2 in the circuit K K1 is actuated bythe thermostatically responsive element K5; yIt may be either moved intomoperative position, as shown in the drawing, or may be positioned upon one of the'contacts K6, a'plurality of contacts being provided to permit of the actuation of the fan C1 at varying speeds. In Figure 2l I illustrate a manually 'operated switch member, K1.

"My invention may -be most broadly stated tion can be controlled by varying the supply of/air. particularly happy use of my invention 1s lts application to the utilization of a fluid fuel, for example oil or gas. In such 'case I may control in proportion not merely the circulation of the air to be heated and the fiowof the air for combustion, but also the iiow of the fuel itself.

Referring to Figure 1, by providing thc separate air connection between'such blowerv and the air chamber D1L surrounding the oil burner' combustion chamber I insure an increase in the supply of air to said combustion chamber in response to the thermostatic actuation of the blower. At the same time, the blower, through the `air line E1, directs a pressure upon the float of the carbureter and thus it causes or permits an increased flow of fuel to the oil combustion chamberthrough the lifting of the carbur'eter valve.

The result of .the simultaneous increase of the fuel and oil supply'is a much increased ame and a greater heating of thefurnace wall. Since this heating is accompanied by an increased flow of cold air about the furnace and across the wall, the increased heat is absorbed by the air. portioning furnace and combustion chamber and by proper adjustment of the air and oil passages;y I am able toincrease the flame and to increase the temperature of the outer wall of .the furnace and thus to increase the temperature ofI the flowing air and ofthe house without 'substantially increasing the By properly proj temperature of the exhaust gases passing' upwardly through the ue.'

Referring' to Figure 2 I illustrate a variant form of my device in which there is a normal flow of air from'the air jacket to the zone beneath the bed of coal in the combustion chamber. This flow is through' apertures in the air jacket at a level lower than the grate bars.4 When the air circulation about the `combustion chamber is increased, as by the employment of a fan or blowers,

the flow of air into the combustion zone itself is increased and an increased air pressure 1s caused beneath the bed of coals, or beneath the level of combustion of the substance being burned. The result is an upward draft and a consequent increase in the activity vof combustlon.

lao

I claim 1. The method of hot air heating which includes the provision of a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, and the provision of anl air supply to the zone of combustion and thle unitary Variation and control of such air circulation and air supply.

2. The method of hot air heating which includes the provision of a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, and the provision of an air supply to the zone of combustion and the provision of unitary means for sin'lultaneously increasing or diminishing such air circulation and .air suppl 3. The method of hot air heating which includes the provision of a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, and the provision of an air supply to the zone of combustion and the provision of unitary means for simultaneously increasing or diminishing such air circulation and air supply, in response to variations inthe temperature of the ,area to be heated.'

4. The method of hot air heating which includes the provision of a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, the provision of a supply of fluid fuel to'such zone of combustion, the provisionof an air supply to the zone of combustion, and the pro- Vision of unitary means for simultaneously increasing or diminishing the air circulation, the 'fuel supply and theair supply.

5. The method of hot air heating Which includes the provision of a circulation of air lto and past a zone of combustion, the -provision of a supplyof fluid fuel to such zone of combustion, vthe provision of an air sup-l ply to the zone of combustion, and the provision of unitary means for simultaneously increasing or diminishing the air circulation, the fuel supply and the air supply, in response to variations in the temperature of vthe area to be heated.

6. The method of het air heating which includes the provision of a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, and the` provision of an air supply to the vzone of combustion and the provision of unitary means for simultaneously and proportionately1 varying such air circulation and air sup 7. The method of hot air heating which includes the provisionof a circulation of air to and past a zone of combustion, the provision of a lsupply of fluid fuel to such zone of combustion, the provision of an air supply to the zonev of combustion, and the provision of unitary means for simultaneously and proportionately Varying the air circulation, the fuel Ysupply and the air sup- P In an 'oil burning installation, a furnace, a burner associated with said furnace, means forl supplying air thereto, an air jacket about said furnace, air discharge' means leading thence and air return means extending thereto', means for sin'uiltancously increasing the flow of air-to said burner and for proportionately increasing the flow of air through said air jacket and about said furnace.

9. ln an oil burning installation, a furnace, n burner associated with said -furnace, means for su'j'iplying air thereto, means for supplying a fluid fuel thereto, an air jacket about said furnace, a plurality lof air ducts leading thence and a return air duct thereto, and means for simultaneously and proportionately increasing the llow of fluid fuel to the burner, the flow of air to the burner, and tl-recirculation of air through the ail" jacket and about the furnace.

10. In an oil burning installation, a furnace, a burner associated with said furnace, means for supplying' air thereto, an air jacket about said furnace, a plurality of air ducts leading thence and a return air duct thereto, means for simultaneously increasing the flow of air to said burner and for/ proportionately increasing the flow of air through said air jacket and about said furnace, in-l cluding a fan assoclated with the return air duct.

11. In an oil burning installation, a furnace, a burner associated with sald furnace; means for supplying air thereto, means for supplying a fluid fuel' thereto', an air jacket about said furnace, a plurality of air .ducts leading thence and a return air duct thereto, and meansfor simultaneously and proportionately increasing the flow of fluid fuel to the burner, the How of air to the burner, and the circulation of air through the air jacket and about the furnace, including a fan associated with the return air duct.

12. In a heating installation, a furnace, an air jacket surrounding it, a .plurality of air ducts leading thence, a return air duct thereto, a fan in the line of said return duct and a thermostatic connection therefor, anl oil burner in said furnace comprising a com-- bustion chamber and air chamber surrounding said combustion chamber, the circumferential Wall of the combustion chamber being penetrated by a plurality of apertures, communicating with said air chamber, an oil line extending to said combustion chamber, a

carbureterin said oilline and an air connection between said fan and said circumferential air chamber and said fan and said carbureter.

,13. In a heating installation, a furnace', an air jacket surrounding it, a plurality of air ducts leading thence, a retnr air duct thereto, a fan in the line of said return duct, a burner in said furnace, a fuel line extending to said combustion chamber, a'control Valve in said oil line, and an air connection bethe flow of air within said air jacket about said furnace, increasing the How of air from said air chamber to said combustion chamber and f or increasing the flow 'of oil along said oil line.

15. In a heating installation, a furnace,.a burner, associated with said furnace, including a combustion chamber, an oil line to said oil burnerl and flow controlling means therein, an air jacket about said furnace and a plurality of air ducts leading thence, a return duct to said air jacket, means for simultaneously increasing the flow of air Within said air jacket about said furnace, increasing the flow of air from said air chamber to said combustion chamber and for increasing the flow of oil along said oil line, comprising air impelling means associated with the Y j means for'supplying air thereto, an air jacket about said furnace, a plurality of air ducts leading thence and a return air duct thereto, and means for simultaneously increasing the flow of oil to said oil burner increasing the flow of air to said oil burner and increasing the flow of air through said air jacket and about `said furnace.

17. In a heating installation, a furnace, an oil burner associated with said furnace, means for supplying air thereto, an air jacket about said furnace, a plurality of air ducts `leading thence and a return air duct thereto, and means for` simultaneously increasing the flow of oilvto said oil burner increasing the flow of air to said oil burner and increasing the flow of air through said air jacket and about said furnace, comprising a fan' in the line of said return air duct.

Signed at Chicago, county of Cook and State of Illinois, this 11th` day of November LAW'RENCE WV. SCUDDER.

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2431772A (en) * 1944-12-22 1947-12-02 Kephart P Russell Downflow forced draft air heater
US2432143A (en) * 1943-11-13 1947-12-09 Miller Co Liquid fuel feeding and burning apparatus
US2446677A (en) * 1945-04-25 1948-08-10 Metals & Controls Corp Heating control system
US2447373A (en) * 1944-05-27 1948-08-17 Anchor Post Prod Oil burner system comprising a vaporizing block
US2451760A (en) * 1943-08-02 1948-10-19 Stewart Warner Corp Aircraft heater with combustion air control
US2452779A (en) * 1943-02-19 1948-11-02 Stewart Warner Corp Combustion heater having air preheating and carbureting means
US2454511A (en) * 1944-04-13 1948-11-23 Stewartwarner Corp Combustion air heater having variable output with constant temperature
US2460207A (en) * 1944-05-15 1949-01-25 Bendix Aviat Corp Heating system
US2486156A (en) * 1943-10-01 1949-10-25 William D Hall Heater
US2502345A (en) * 1945-10-15 1950-03-28 Stewart Warner Corp Heater
US2503261A (en) * 1947-03-20 1950-04-11 William D Hall Control system for heaters
US2507119A (en) * 1946-03-14 1950-05-09 Stewart Warner Corp Heater control
US2509334A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-05-30 Stewart Warner Corp Heater control
US2511932A (en) * 1950-06-20 Liquid fuel stove with simultaneous
US2529942A (en) * 1946-02-28 1950-11-14 Vapor Heating Corp Fuel feed control for oil burners
US2561106A (en) * 1945-01-20 1951-07-17 Detroit Lubricator Co Fuel feeding control means responsive to air blower pressure
US2586779A (en) * 1946-10-05 1952-02-26 Breese Burners Inc Pot type burner with overhead feed
US2620787A (en) * 1946-10-28 1952-12-09 John S Zink Forced air flow unit air-heating furnace
US2654422A (en) * 1943-07-26 1953-10-06 Fred B Aubert Combustion heating apparatus and controls therefor
US2656112A (en) * 1949-07-07 1953-10-20 Don Mfg Company Automatic conditioned air system with compensation for clogging filter
US2656884A (en) * 1950-12-13 1953-10-27 Philip S Russel Draft responsive safety control for oil burners
US2685917A (en) * 1950-03-10 1954-08-10 Perry Stanley Oil burner
US2690766A (en) * 1949-12-12 1954-10-05 Breese Burners Inc Valve assembly for modulating burner control system
US2700537A (en) * 1951-06-29 1955-01-25 Robert H Henley Humidity changer for air-conditioning
US2752912A (en) * 1954-06-08 1956-07-03 Jet Heet Inc Forced air flow air heating furnace
US2768675A (en) * 1953-07-27 1956-10-30 Canadian Patents Dev Temperature responsive apparatus for operating an oil burning system
US2876762A (en) * 1956-05-21 1959-03-10 Meat Packers Equipment Company Sawdust burning pot for smoke generators
US2904107A (en) * 1954-12-20 1959-09-15 Sr Harry B Holthouse Fluid metering device
US3017877A (en) * 1958-04-21 1962-01-23 American Air Filter Co Apparatus for heating air
US3726473A (en) * 1970-04-23 1973-04-10 Itt System for heating or air conditioning
US4019492A (en) * 1975-02-04 1977-04-26 Rush Joseph A Method and apparatus for automatic furnace

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511932A (en) * 1950-06-20 Liquid fuel stove with simultaneous
US2452779A (en) * 1943-02-19 1948-11-02 Stewart Warner Corp Combustion heater having air preheating and carbureting means
US2654422A (en) * 1943-07-26 1953-10-06 Fred B Aubert Combustion heating apparatus and controls therefor
US2451760A (en) * 1943-08-02 1948-10-19 Stewart Warner Corp Aircraft heater with combustion air control
US2486156A (en) * 1943-10-01 1949-10-25 William D Hall Heater
US2432143A (en) * 1943-11-13 1947-12-09 Miller Co Liquid fuel feeding and burning apparatus
US2454511A (en) * 1944-04-13 1948-11-23 Stewartwarner Corp Combustion air heater having variable output with constant temperature
US2460207A (en) * 1944-05-15 1949-01-25 Bendix Aviat Corp Heating system
US2447373A (en) * 1944-05-27 1948-08-17 Anchor Post Prod Oil burner system comprising a vaporizing block
US2431772A (en) * 1944-12-22 1947-12-02 Kephart P Russell Downflow forced draft air heater
US2561106A (en) * 1945-01-20 1951-07-17 Detroit Lubricator Co Fuel feeding control means responsive to air blower pressure
US2446677A (en) * 1945-04-25 1948-08-10 Metals & Controls Corp Heating control system
US2502345A (en) * 1945-10-15 1950-03-28 Stewart Warner Corp Heater
US2509334A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-05-30 Stewart Warner Corp Heater control
US2529942A (en) * 1946-02-28 1950-11-14 Vapor Heating Corp Fuel feed control for oil burners
US2507119A (en) * 1946-03-14 1950-05-09 Stewart Warner Corp Heater control
US2586779A (en) * 1946-10-05 1952-02-26 Breese Burners Inc Pot type burner with overhead feed
US2620787A (en) * 1946-10-28 1952-12-09 John S Zink Forced air flow unit air-heating furnace
US2503261A (en) * 1947-03-20 1950-04-11 William D Hall Control system for heaters
US2656112A (en) * 1949-07-07 1953-10-20 Don Mfg Company Automatic conditioned air system with compensation for clogging filter
US2690766A (en) * 1949-12-12 1954-10-05 Breese Burners Inc Valve assembly for modulating burner control system
US2685917A (en) * 1950-03-10 1954-08-10 Perry Stanley Oil burner
US2656884A (en) * 1950-12-13 1953-10-27 Philip S Russel Draft responsive safety control for oil burners
US2700537A (en) * 1951-06-29 1955-01-25 Robert H Henley Humidity changer for air-conditioning
US2768675A (en) * 1953-07-27 1956-10-30 Canadian Patents Dev Temperature responsive apparatus for operating an oil burning system
US2752912A (en) * 1954-06-08 1956-07-03 Jet Heet Inc Forced air flow air heating furnace
US2904107A (en) * 1954-12-20 1959-09-15 Sr Harry B Holthouse Fluid metering device
US2876762A (en) * 1956-05-21 1959-03-10 Meat Packers Equipment Company Sawdust burning pot for smoke generators
US3017877A (en) * 1958-04-21 1962-01-23 American Air Filter Co Apparatus for heating air
US3726473A (en) * 1970-04-23 1973-04-10 Itt System for heating or air conditioning
US4019492A (en) * 1975-02-04 1977-04-26 Rush Joseph A Method and apparatus for automatic furnace

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