US1535220A - Heat insulation - Google Patents

Heat insulation Download PDF

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Publication number
US1535220A
US1535220A US739074A US73907424A US1535220A US 1535220 A US1535220 A US 1535220A US 739074 A US739074 A US 739074A US 73907424 A US73907424 A US 73907424A US 1535220 A US1535220 A US 1535220A
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Prior art keywords
walls
heat insulating
material
wall
anchoring
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Expired - Lifetime
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US739074A
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Gallagher Alfred Hugh
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Gallagher Alfred Hugh
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L59/00Thermal insulation in general
    • F16L59/12Arrangements for supporting insulation from the wall or body insulated, e.g. by means of spacers between pipe and heat-insulating material; Arrangements specially adapted for supporting insulated bodies
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/74Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls
    • E04B1/76Heat, sound or noise insulation, absorption, or reflection . Other building methods affording favourable thermal or acoustical conditions, e.g. accumulating of heat within walls specifically with respect to heat only
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S220/00Receptacles
    • Y10S220/09Receptacles insulating materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S220/00Receptacles
    • Y10S220/918Spacing element for separating the walls of a spaced-wall container

Description

A. H. GALLAGHER ApriIZS, 1925 HEAT INSULATION Filed Sept. 22, 1924 VQQVVV' Q o 1 S I H I. I I r I 1 L u X r VVIQU V V U fivemv. n

TOR a? M .(M w/i ATTORNEY5 Patented Apr. 28 1925.

UNITED TA S 1,535,220 PATENT OFFICE.

noon GALLAGHER, or omcne rnLmo'rs HEAT rnsunarron.

Application filed September 22, 1924. Serial No. 739,074..

' 1 in the art to which it appertains to makel and use the same. r

'lhls invention relates to heat insulating structures and more particularly heat insu-,

lating walls, partitions, and the like, such as are used in refrigerating compartments,

refrigerator cars, and for other general purposes in which it is desirable to prevent the transmission of heat through the'wall structure.

0 lln structures-of this character the walls which enclose the space which is to he insulated are ordinarily double in construction. The two facings of each wall are separated a considerable distance, and the space he:

2% tween them may be left as dead air space, since confined air is not a good conductor ot heat, or else, if a more ecient insulating eflect is required, a heat insulating material may be used. For this purpose various maw terials are employed, such, for instance, as kapok, hair, hair felt, mineral wool, and other similar loosematerials through which heat is transmitted only with culty.

lt has been found that when a wall construction such as has just been described is employed in structures which are subject to agitation, as, for instance, refrigerator cars which are continually subject to .jolting and to jarring when in use, the loose heat insulating material which fills the space between the double walls frequently mats or packs together so as to leave air holes. s pack.- ingtogether reduces the heat insulating effia5 ciency of the material, and in addition air holes may result and similarly cut down the.

emciency' of the structure. In order-to prerent this loss of efliciency it is desirable to provide some means for anchoring the loose material and holding it in place so that no such settling effect will result, even though the structure in which the wall is employed is subject to repeated jars. It is further desir-able that any anchoring means used for 5 the purpose should be so formed as not to transmit heat between the walls with rapid-' ings.

' ity, and preferably the anchoring means,

which is usually fixed on one wall or the other, should be insulated from that wall.

The present invention is intended to 'pro- 50 wide a heat insulating structure in which the loose heat insulating material employed between the usual double walls is firmly held in place and prevented from settling by means which do not transmit the heat with rapidityand which are cheap to manufacture and easy toinstall. In the accompanying drawings there is shown that embodiment of the invention which is'now preferred, and in these draw- Fig. 1 shows a face view of a fragmentary portion of a heat insulating structure, showing one ofthe facing walls removed,

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross sectional view through a. complete double wall structure, and I Fig; 3 is a side view, and a 1 Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view. through one of the anchoring devices,

Fig. 5 is a vertical, sectional view through adouble wallastructure in which the anchoring devices are on opposite walls. 7

Referring now to these drawings, the structure consists of a pair of walls 5 and (V which are spaced apart a considerable distance. These walls may be made of any desired material, but are preferably made of wood, since wood transmits heat more slowly than metal. Between the walls is a loosely packed mass 7 of heat insulating material, which may be of various Mnds. I have found kapolr to be especially desirable for the purpose, although many other substances having physical characteristics and heat insulating qualities slmllar to kapok, are also j useful. The kapok or other insulating material is placed inside the double wall in a loosely matted mass, and in order to prevent its settling and packing together, par- 10 ticularly in places where the walls stand vertically, I provide anchoring means, one of which is indicated at 8. This anchoring means may be made in various forms. but

it is preferably in the form of a flat strip 9 t of metal, such as aluminum, the latter being light in weight, comparatively inexpensive, and easily worked. Struck from thestrlp a metal at frequent intervals, are pointed t hgues or barbs 10. IVith anchoring devices of this sort, it will be observed that the material is engaged at a plurality 0t I tween the two facings, but will terminate at some distance from the facing opposite to the one on which the strip is mounted. With this arrangement there can be no direct transmission of heat from wall to wall through the strips and tongues. For mounting the strip, screws such as 11 may be used,

and it is desirable to insulate the strips by means of a thinlayer 12 of a heat insulating material, such as hair felt, which is interposed between the strip and'the wall on which it is mounted. The pointed tongues,

as shown in Fig. 2, will then extend a considerable distance into the loose heat insulating material, and these tongues, by their engagement with the material, will prevent any movement which would result in the material matting together.

In Fig. 1 there is shown a face View of a portion of a wall, showing the strips and the heatinsulating material in place. The wall illustrated is made up of vertically extending compartments, such as 13, although the subdivision of the space within the double walls into compartments is not essential. In the central compartment 13, illustrated, there are live anchoring strips 8, placed in spaced relation. These anchoring strips are preferably put in place on the inside of one of the facings before the other facing is in place. Then the loosely matted mass of heat insulating material is put in place and the other facing secured in position. In securing the stripsto the wall, the strip is insulated by the useof the hair felt insulating layer described, and for the most elfective construction it is desirable to place the adjacent strips so that the tongues struck from them are in staggered relation. Thus jthe insulating material is held in place by anchoring means which enter the;

material at aplurality of spaced points, and since the anchoring devices are insus lated from the wall on which they are mounted, and do not extend across from that wall to the opposite wall, they do not transmit heat to any extent.

Instead of placing all of the anchoring devices on one of the walls, I contemplate that it may be desirable, under certain conditions, to place alternate devices on the opposite walls, again placing the strips so that the tongues of adjacent strips are staggered with relation to each other. Such an arrangement is illustrated in Fig. 5. It may be desirable, also, in some instances, to place the strips horizontally, or in angular relation with respect to the walls, but the mounting of these anchoring devices will be, a

will be determined by the particular loca tion in which they are to be employed, and since they are cheaply and easily made, and tongues of varying lengths may be formed in them, the anchoring devices are suitable for walls of many different dimensions, and that type of device will be selected which is best suited'for the particular conditions in whichfit is to be employed. "By the use of anchoring devices by which the loose-heat insulating material is engaged at a large number of spaced points, the maximum anchoring effect is obtained, and since these tongues are all formed as part of single strips, the labor involved in mounting them in place is a minimum. Also they are inexpensive to manufacture and do not add materially to the. weight of the structure, especially if aluminum is the metal used.

I claim: i

1. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of 'a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and means mounted on the wall for preventing the shifting of the material, this means including a row of spaced projections entering the material, each of which engages the material at a single point.

2. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and means mounted on one of the walls for anchoring the material, the said means including a plurality of projections entering the material at spaced points, these projections being arranged in rows, with the projections of one row staggered relative to those of the; adjacent row.

3. A heat insulating structure comprising'the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and means on a wall for anchoring the material and preventing its shifting, this means including a plurality of rows of projections entering the material and terminating within the material at a distance from the second wall.

4. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and means mounted on one of the walls and insulated therefrom for preventing the shifting of the material, the said means including a plurality of projections entering the material at spaced points.

5. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and a plurality of series of projections mounted on one of the walls and insulated therefrom, these projections entering the material at spaced points for preventing its shifting and being arranged with the projections of one series staggered with rela-. tion tothose of the adjacent series.

6. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls,

a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and a plurality of groups of projections secured to one of the walls, the said projections entering the material and preventing its shifting.

I. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lyin between the walls, and a plurality of-meta lie strips secured to one of the walls, each strip having a series of projections for entering the material to prevent its shifting.

8. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and a plurality of insulated metallic strips secured to one of the walls, each strip having a series of tongues struck from it to enter the material to prevent its shifting.

9. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating material lying between the walls, and a plurality of metallic strips secured to the walls in alternating series, each strip having a plurality of tongues struck from it and entering the materlal to prevent its shifting.

10. A heat insulating structure comprising the combination of a pair of spaced walls, a heat insulating materiallying between the walls, and a lurality of strips secured to one of the wal s and mounted thereon in spaced relation, each strip having a series of projections for entering the 'material to prevent its shifting, and the projections on adjacent strips being placed in staggered relation.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

ALFRED HUGH GALLAGHER, t

US739074A 1924-09-22 1924-09-22 Heat insulation Expired - Lifetime US1535220A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3892396A (en) * 1973-12-26 1975-07-01 Carborundum Co Lining for high temperature furnaces
US4856247A (en) * 1987-04-06 1989-08-15 Georgino John M Article and method for installing insulation
US6634148B2 (en) 2001-11-29 2003-10-21 Edward C. Shidler Insulated poured wall system
US20090049782A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Long Sr Robert T Interior and exterior surface anchoring system
US8621798B2 (en) 2010-12-27 2014-01-07 Lionel E. Dayton Construction insulating panel
US10309100B2 (en) 2016-12-09 2019-06-04 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Mullion cover hanger and curtain wall insulation system incorporating the same
US10370846B1 (en) 2017-02-08 2019-08-06 George M. Neuwirt Framed wall insulation backing device, and related systems and methods

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3892396A (en) * 1973-12-26 1975-07-01 Carborundum Co Lining for high temperature furnaces
US4856247A (en) * 1987-04-06 1989-08-15 Georgino John M Article and method for installing insulation
US6634148B2 (en) 2001-11-29 2003-10-21 Edward C. Shidler Insulated poured wall system
US20090049782A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Long Sr Robert T Interior and exterior surface anchoring system
US8621798B2 (en) 2010-12-27 2014-01-07 Lionel E. Dayton Construction insulating panel
US10309100B2 (en) 2016-12-09 2019-06-04 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Mullion cover hanger and curtain wall insulation system incorporating the same
US10370846B1 (en) 2017-02-08 2019-08-06 George M. Neuwirt Framed wall insulation backing device, and related systems and methods

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