US1531678A - Metallurgical furnace - Google Patents

Metallurgical furnace Download PDF

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US1531678A
US1531678A US578585A US57858522A US1531678A US 1531678 A US1531678 A US 1531678A US 578585 A US578585 A US 578585A US 57858522 A US57858522 A US 57858522A US 1531678 A US1531678 A US 1531678A
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air
flame
furnace
uptake
gas
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US578585A
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Millward William
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Millward William
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F27FURNACES; KILNS; OVENS; RETORTS
    • F27BFURNACES, KILNS, OVENS, OR RETORTS IN GENERAL; OPEN SINTERING OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • F27B3/00Hearth-type furnaces, e.g. of reverberatory type; Tank furnaces
    • F27B3/10Details, accessories, or equipment peculiar to hearth-type furnaces
    • F27B3/20Arrangements of heating devices

Description

` 1,531,678 W.VM|LLWARD METALLURGI CAL FURNACE March 31, 1925.

Filed July 31, 1922 Patented Mai. 31,1925.

. UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM MILLWARD, OF PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA.

METALLURGICAL nUnNAcE.

Application led July 31, 1922. Serial No. 57,585.

thereof. These ports, particularly the gas port, have always been a source of trouble and annoyance and required close application and-watching for the reason that they rapidly burn out and it is and was a common occurrence to have vthem collapseand fall in. Therefore, it is a principal object of my in# vention lo-eliminate entirely all these ldifficulties by providing a new and novel roofless port furnace of this type which is highly efiicient, practical and durable. and other features of novelty, advantages and ca abilities will become apparent from a detai ed description of theaccompanying drawings in which I have illustrated one form of my invention, there shown is to be understood as illustrative only, and not as defining the limits of my invention.

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of a portion of an open hearth regenerative furnace, embodying one form of my inventlon and Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional View taken substantially on the line 2'2 of` Fig. 1, looking` inthe direction indicated by the arrow.

Referring to 'the drawings -in detail, while I have only shown one end of the furnace, theother end in ractice will'be substantially identical an as is well known to those skilled in the art, this furnace in practice, as' is common to all open hearth furnaces, is provided with the usual lgas and air checker chambers, and the usual reversing valve mechanism for reversing the flow of air and gas and products of combustion through the i furnace.

I have entirely disposed of the usual air and gas ports in each end of the furnace, leaving the entire end of the furnace open and substituted in lieu of the old trouble- :some air and gas ports a comparativelyv small .block 10, extending across fthe furnace pro- 5 vided with a semi-elliptical cavity or deor pre-heated air is tom or lower portion The above but the construction pression 11, concentric with the axis of the furnace which chamberfrom a pointintermediate its ends extend downwardly and outwardly, discharging into the melting chamber 12 ofthe furnace. The opposite end of the depression l1 is likewise downwardly and outwardly inclined, but more abruptly and opens into the air uptake 13 leading from the air slag pocket 14 through which flue and slag pocket the regenerated admitted. The gas flue 1G leads from a checker chamber,.not shown,

and admits the pre-heated gas to-the goose l neck 1T which goose neck is provided with a nozzle 18 set at such a position as to cause the flame from, the gas inlet to envelop 'the bottom and lower portion of the sides-of the intake end of the chamber 10 overlapping the edges in such a manner so thatno air is admitted from the air of the sides of the'depression 1l, thus vforcing all the-air vfrom said uptake to pass on the top of the flame and hold, it down against the metal lin the bath and away from the roof."

VIn order to afford a major pressure to the gas o'r flame being discharged from the goose neck I have provided a booster'fan 20, which draws' preheated air through the pipe 21 from the checker chambers or slag pocket into the fan and forces it through the pipe 22 to the booster` nozzle 23, terminating just inside the-goose neck where it is discharged,`

uptake 13 at the botthusaffording a forced pressurev on the gas and emitting from the gas nozzle a well directed and Vcontrolled flame. The pipes 2l and 22 extend to both ends of the furnace and are similarly connected, as best indicated in Fig. l which pipes are provided with suitable .valves for making and breaking the operative connection with either end of the furnace las desired. As now shown in. Figure 1, the valves are set so that the fan 20 is drawing preheated air from the left hand slag pocket and discharging it into the left -to thebottoms of from the air uptake is diverted above the extending and means making for the fast'and sharp working of the furnace. y

I have successfully operated and demon# strated an open hearth, regenerated furnace embodying this invention and find from acthat it embodies to the fullest tual practice extent, all of the'foregoing-and many other inherent advantages.

Having thus describedv my invention, I

claim 1. -In an openhearthfregenerative fui'- nace, the vcombination of a block having a gas nozzle, so arranged sides and bottom, as to cause the. flame from the nozzle to 1mpinge4 the' sides and bottom of the intaking opening of said block. I

2. In an open hearth regenerative furnace, the' combinationof an air uptake, a rooflessI conduit intermediate said uptake and the melting chamber, a gasfnozzle -ar ranged to discharge across the uptakeand into said conduit, and a booster nozzle for discharging fluid under major pressure into the gas nozzle. A,

3. In an open hearth regenerative .furnace, the combination of a gas uptake, an air uptake, canals :extending to the air uptake and a source of flame pressure to direct the flame said canals whereby vair flame.

et, In an open hearth regenerative fur-4 vvnace, the combination of a gas uptake, an air and a melting chamber having canals to the air uptake, each of which has a sloping bottom with a raised portion subject to flame pressure, whereby air is excluded and operates to. form ascreen above the flame, and means for directing flame upon said Araised portions. 7 l

5'. In an open hearth regenerative furnace, the combination ofa gas uptake, an airuptake, and a melting chamber having U-shape conduits leading to the' air uptake, for directing a gas flame upon the bottom and sides of the conduits.

6. In an open hearth regenerative furnace, the combination of a gas uptake, an air uptake, and a meltingl chamber having U-shape conduits leading to the air uptake, and means for directing a gasflame upon the bottom and sidesof the conduits to vthe substantial exclusion of' air, which is thereby uptake,

y caused to seeka path above the flame.

7. The method of operating an open hearth regenerative furnace, which consists and a melting chamber having va block provided elements ranging crosswise having cavities leading to the melting cham-l in directing the flame through substantially U-sh'ape conduits` in a mannerto substantially exclude air fromthe of the conduit, and supplying air above the flame.

8. In an open hearth regenerative furnace whereinU shape conduits supply combustible media to the melting chamber, the method which consists .in .directing flame through said conduits andutilizing fluid to hold the flame in itstr'avel to substantially the bottoms and sides of the conduits. 9. In `an open hearth regenerative furnace wherein U shape conduits supply combustible media to the melting chamber, the method which consists in directing the flame the sides of the con- GS- downwardly and upon duits to substantially exclude air', and tablishing an air barrier above the flame..

10. The method of operating lan open., hearth regenerativel furnace wherein combustible media is supplied to the 'melting chamber through open canals, which consists in flooding the canals-with llame to the vsubstantial exclusion lof air, and introducing c a protective blanket of air above the flame.

l1. An open hearth regenerative fur nace, including the following elements, in combination, a melting chamber, an air up take, a block provided with a cavity or. depression ranging from the air uptake to the melting chamber, arranged to discharge, under major pressure, across the air uptake and into and against the bottom and sides of the intake portion of the. cavity or depression, and

means for'imparting majorpressure to the discharge from said nozzle.

12. A11 open hearth regenerative furnace, including the following elements, in combination, a meltingjchamber, an air uptake, sion ranging from the air uptake to the melting c amber, 'a gas nozzle having its end depressed whereby it is adapted to discharge across the air uptake and into and against the bottom land sides of the intake portion of the cavity or'depression, vwhereby air is compelled to travel above the flame, and means for imparting major pressure to the discharge from said nozzle.

13,. An open hearth regenerative furnace free fromv the usual supply ports, whereby it is of substantially open end construction, the furnace and means for supplying flame along said ber'.

i for supplying air above cavities, and means the flame.

14. An open hearth regenerative furnace free` from the usualsupply ports, whereby it is substantiallyopen at the ends, elements .A

extending crosswise the open ends and hav ing U shape passages leading to the melting chamber, air and. gas uptakes, and means bottom and. sides agas nozzle adapted and with a cavity or depresv Cil vrelation to the hearth regenerative furnace melting chamber, elements extending crossivise thereof and having substantially U shape conduits leading to the melting chamber, said conduits having sloping bottoms, means for causing flame to travelv along the' bottom and sides of -the conduits to the substantial exclusion of air, and means for supplying banks of air above the flame. j

16. An open hearth regenerative furnace of substantially open end-construction with extending crosswise thereof and having sub; stantially U shape conduits leading to the melting chamber, said conduits ing ends, means for causing` flame to travel along `the bottom and sides ofy the conduits to the substantial exclusion of air, and means for utilizing air pressure to hold the flame upon the metal of the bath.

17. An open hearth regenerative furnace having air and gas uptakes, aiiopen-top canal leading from said uptakes, and means for directing flame against the bottom of such canal, the canal bottom being formed to cause the flame to exclude air from such 18. An open hearth regenerative furnace having air and gas uptalres, an open top canal leading from said luptakes, and means open end construction with melting chamber, elements having flar for directing flame under pressure into and along such canal With the flame serving to exclude air from the canal.

19. An open hearth regenerative furnace having air and vgas uptakes, means for delivering gas under pressure across the air y uptake, and means for directing the flame of such gas to the melting chamber of the furnace under an overlying screen of air from the air uptakes.

20. An open hearth regenerative furnace having air and gas uptakes, means for delivering gas under pressure across the air uptake, and means for directing the flame of such gas to the melting chamber of the fur-- nace under an overlying 'screen of air'from the air uptakes, the flame cooperating With the directing mea-ns to exclude air therefrom during passage of the flame.

21. An open hearth regenerative furnace having air and'gasA uptalres, means for delivering flame under pressure across the air uptake and to the melting chamber of the furnace, and means for directing the flame under an overlying screen of air, the directing means being maintained clear of the direct passage of air by the passage of the flame therethrough.

In Witness whereof I hereunto subscribe myk name to this application in thepresence of two Witnesses.

WILLIAM MILLWARD. Witnesses:`

O. H. DAvisoN, FRED H. LoFTUs.

US578585A 1922-07-31 1922-07-31 Metallurgical furnace Expired - Lifetime US1531678A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3127156A (en) * 1964-03-31 Figure
US3895906A (en) * 1972-03-24 1975-07-22 Liquid Air Canada Heating process and apparatus using oxygen

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3127156A (en) * 1964-03-31 Figure
US3895906A (en) * 1972-03-24 1975-07-22 Liquid Air Canada Heating process and apparatus using oxygen

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