US14448A - Improvement in grain and grass harvesters - Google Patents

Improvement in grain and grass harvesters Download PDF

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US14448A
US14448A US14448DA US14448A US 14448 A US14448 A US 14448A US 14448D A US14448D A US 14448DA US 14448 A US14448 A US 14448A
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bar
wheel
frame
pole
finger
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01DHARVESTING; MOWING
    • A01D57/00Delivering mechanisms for harvesters or mowers
    • A01D57/18Bunching devices, e.g. with tipping bars

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  • Thenature of my invention consists, first, in attaching the draft-pole to the axle of the d riving-wheel in order to allow the frame of the machine to balance freely on the axle of the driving-wheel independent of the pole or the draft of the horses; second, in making ajointed connection of the pole to the axle of the driving-wheel in such a manner as to allow the pole'to swing under the axle and extend back tar enough'to meet the rear cross-timber of the frame, so that in backing the end of the pole will strike the frame (orthe bumper fixed there for that purpose) and the power of theteam be applied to the frame in rear of and below the axle of the driving-wheel, and when moving forward the draft will be directly upon the axle.
  • journal-box To work upon the axle of the driving-wheel, and to which the draft-pole or tongue is attached.
  • nal-box should be about three inches in diameter and about six inches in its cylindrical length. Its bore is about two inches in diameter, and slips onto the axle of the driving-wheel and allows the axle to turn freely and smoothy within it;
  • This journal-box is represented in its place on the axle of the driving-wheel at a b, Figure I. It has two arms dropping down about six inches, and leaving a space offour inches between them to receive the draft-pole.
  • An end view of the journal-box and arm is given in Fig. IV, (ab,journal-box; a,arm.) The pole I?
  • the arms are four inches apart.
  • the pole also extends back sufficiently far to meet the rear cross-timberof theframe or the bumper h h, which is bolted to the cross-tim her 0 n, as represented at s, Fig. IV.
  • the main body of the bumper which comes in contact with the timber, is four byithree and one-half inches, and half an inch thick. Its two arms are four inches wide on their face, and half an inch thick. They are about six inches long, and branch off from their main body in opposite directions, and are circular in form, as repre- I sented at h h, Fig. IV.
  • On the end of the pole is a, roller two and one-half inches in diameter, and three and three-quarters inches in length,
  • the power ex erted by the team in backing has a tendency to press the driving-wheel and the finger-bar on the dri ving-wh eel and finger-bar when backing, and the machine is' thereby moved back with much greater ease and facility.
  • theframe is left free to balance upon the axle of the driving-wheel, and the cutter-bar and cutters at liberty to follow the surface of the ground over which the machine passes, without being affected by the tread of the driving-wheel, the pole, or th draft of the team.
  • the stirrup extends above and below the front end of the frame, so as to al' low the frame to. balance its proper distance either way.
  • the upper or bonnet part is about five inches wide, and so constructed that it may be bolted to the side timber, H, of the frame with two or more bolts, so as to hold it firmly to the frame. These bolts pass through the cross-timber on the side timber, H, and the bonnet, one of which bolts is shown'at L, Fig. II. It might properly be made longer, so as to receive another bolt through the timber E. It is made so as to form a joint or hinge with the under or runner part, as seen at L at, Fig. II.
  • the under or runner part, c e is about five inches wide on the bottom and connects with and forms ajoint or hinge with the upper part, as shown at L n, Fig. II.
  • the middle or compressing part, 0 o 0, looks into the runner, as shown at V.
  • a bolt passes through these two parts behind the finger-bar, as seen at :20.
  • An arm, 3 2 about five inches wide, rises from this to the height of about eight inches, to connect with the arm t r of the bonnet.
  • this arrangementofthe adjustable shoe or runner the finger-bar,cutters, and platform maybe beveled and kept in a horizontal position, although they are elevated and depressed through the segment of a circle described from the axle of the driving-wheel as a center. They can also be set at any desired pitch or angle at the different heights it may be required to work the cutters.
  • the finger-bar passes through this shoe and connects with a goose-neck runner at. the outer corner of the frame, as hereinafter described.
  • the slit in the arm tr is about five inches long. A slit is made in the runner part for the heel of the cutter-bar and cutters to work through, as represented at g h.
  • the divider T is made sufficiently strong to support one end of the cross-bar e, which carries the caster-wheel d.
  • On the rear corner of the platform is a standard framed into the timbers of the platform and strengthened by a casting. This standard supports the other end of the cross-bar e, and is marked R. There are several bolt-holes through this standard, and also through the divider. The cross-bar size and proportions of the other wheel.
  • This cross-bar is on a line with the point of the divider.
  • the socket in which the swivel of the caster-wheel works is bolted to this cross-bar, so that the cutter-bar, cutters, and platform may be raised and lowered by varying the cross-bar into the different bolt-holes in the standard and divider.
  • the wheel is twelve inches in diameter, and made suf ficiently strong to carry the platform, and the swivel and socket correspond thereto in strength and size.
  • the linger-bar F passes through the adjustable shoe E, and connects with a goose-neck runner near the outer corner of the frame, as represented at G, Fig. V.
  • This runner is made rounding on the bottom, so that it will form a runner, whether the machine is progressing forward or turning at the corners.
  • 1t is bolted to the end of the fingerbar, and connects with the outside timber of the frame H h.
  • a slit is made inthe neck of this runner through which a bolt passes to fasten it to the frame. This slit is represented at 4, Fig.
  • V and in shape corresponds to the segment ot'a circle such as the goose-neck describes when bolted to the finger-bar and moved by the adjustable shoe turning in its joint L n, Fig. II. It slides on the ground when mowing, and supports the end of the finger-bar and the corner of the frame. In reaping it will of course be elevated above the ground. When reaping the caster-wheel d d carries this part of the platform and frame.
  • the wheel, swivel, and socket are the same in The wheel is attached to the end of the lever y n at a sufficient distance from the finger-bar to allow it to turn round without coming in contact with the finger bar.
  • the leveryn is connected to asmall casting on the frame by means of a bolt, and also to a standard rising from the finger-bar, (represented at hg, Fig. I.)
  • the standard h g is bolted to the fingerbar, and rises about eighteen inches, so that it may be bolted to the lever y a at whatever height the finger-bar may be placed.
  • Several bolt-holes should be made through this standard, so as to receive the bolt from the lever at whatever height the finger-bar maybe placed.
  • the platform, fingerbar, and cutters can be carried at any desired height, as they are sustained and carried entirely by the arrangement of the two casterwheels when reaping. These wheels should run as nearly on a line as may. be.
  • a pin, 1? holds the swivel in its socket. This pin can be removed from the wheel 61 d and the Wheel taken out, leaving the lever 3 n in its place when mowing.
  • The'gearing and driving shafts are supported upon the frame on the outside of the driving-wheel, in order more equally to balance the frame upon the axle of the driving-wheel.
  • the driving-shaft is represented at G H, Fig. V, and the large bevel-wheel at H a, Fig. I.
  • Fig. V is a plan view of the frame.
  • front timber, z a is represented as running across the frame; but when the guide stirrup B B, Fig. I, is put in this timber stops short, and is bolted to the flange or short arm ofthe stirrup, as shown at g, Fig. I.
  • the timbers H h and H y and 0 n may be three by three and one-haltinches in size, thefront timber, z a, three by five, and the side timber, H, three by live at the end where the adjustable shoe is bolted and taper to three inches.
  • the proportions herein given may be varied as cir cu mstances require without affecting the prinelple of the improvements herein described.
  • the dividing-board B b, Fig. 1 being set upon an angle inward, and the bar a being on a line with the point of the divider, several inches of space exist between them, affording room for the caster-wheel to turn as much as required.
  • the adjustable shoe E for the purpose of leveling the platform, constructed and arranged substantially as herein described.

Description

2 8h et-Sh t E. Bi FORBUSH. e S 1 Harvester.
Patented March 18, 1856..
2 Sheets-Sheet 2.
E. B FOR BUSH.
Harvester.
No. 14,448. Patented March 18, 1856.
IINTTED STATES PATENT @rrrce. I
ELIAKIM B. FORBUSH, OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK.
IMPROVEMENT IN GRAIN AND GRASS HARVESTERS.
Specification forming part of Letters Patent No. 14,448, dated March 18, 1856.
lowing is a full and exact description thereof,
referen cc being had to the accom panying drawin gs, and to'the figures and letters of reference marked thereon.
Thenature of my invention consists, first, in attaching the draft-pole to the axle of the d riving-wheel in order to allow the frame of the machine to balance freely on the axle of the driving-wheel independent of the pole or the draft of the horses; second, in making ajointed connection of the pole to the axle of the driving-wheel in such a manner as to allow the pole'to swing under the axle and extend back tar enough'to meet the rear cross-timber of the frame, so that in backing the end of the pole will strike the frame (orthe bumper fixed there for that purpose) and the power of theteam be applied to the frame in rear of and below the axle of the driving-wheel, and when moving forward the draft will be directly upon the axle.
of the driving-wheel; third, in providing a guide-stirrup, which is fastenedto the front part of the frame and binds it together, and through which the pole plays freely up and down, and at the same time giving the pole perfect control to guide the direction of the machine and the frame liberty to balance on the axle independent ofthe pole; fourth, in providing a hinged 'or jointed adjustable-shoe to.
hold the finger-bar so that the finger-bar and cutters maybe maintained in a horizontal position, or placed in a slanting position at what'- ever height the cutters may be required for cutting grass or grain fifth, in the combination of two caster-wheels with the finger-bar and platform when reaping, and one caster-wheel with the finger-bar when mowing, as hereinafter more fully set forth; sixth, in providing a goose-neck shoe or runner for the purpose of carrying the outer end of the finger-bar and the outer corner of the frame, the finger-bar being extended beyond the adjustable shoe and in rear of the driving-wheel.
To enable others skilled in the art to make and use my invention,I will proceed to describe'its construction and operation.
I make a metallic journal-box to work upon the axle of the driving-wheel, and to which the draft-pole or tongue is attached. nal-box should be about three inches in diameter and about six inches in its cylindrical length. Its bore is about two inches in diameter, and slips onto the axle of the driving-wheel and allows the axle to turn freely and smoothy within it; This journal-box is represented in its place on the axle of the driving-wheel at a b, Figure I. It has two arms dropping down about six inches, and leaving a space offour inches between them to receive the draft-pole. An end view of the journal-box and arm is given in Fig. IV, (ab,journal-box; a,arm.) The pole I? is placed between the arm a and its opposite arm, the bolti passing through the arms and pole, and allowing the pole to swing on the bolt. The arms are four inches apart. The pole also extends back sufficiently far to meet the rear cross-timberof theframe or the bumper h h, which is bolted to the cross-tim her 0 n, as represented at s, Fig. IV. The main body of the bumper, which comes in contact with the timber, is four byithree and one-half inches, and half an inch thick. Its two arms are four inches wide on their face, and half an inch thick. They are about six inches long, and branch off from their main body in opposite directions, and are circular in form, as repre- I sented at h h, Fig. IV. On the end of the pole is a, roller two and one-half inches in diameter, and three and three-quarters inches in length,
and is marked 1" in Fig. I and r in Fig. IV,
and is connected with the pole by means of straps. bolted to the pole, (represented at s t s t, Fig. IV.)
When it is required to back the machine the horses press backward in the harness, the pole swings upon the journal-box, the end of the pole or the roller 1' strikes againstthe bumper, so that the whole backing-power of the team is exerted upon the bumper, and through it upon the frame of the machine in rear of the driving-wheel and below the axle, and the machine thereby moved back with much greater case. -When the team moves forward, the pole swings forward, so as to bring'the draft through thejournal-box directly from the axle. Thus when backing the point of draft is from the frame .in rear of the driving-wheel and below the axle,and when moving forward it is. directly from the axle. When the draft-pole is attached in the common way permanently to This joura Figs. I and III.
the frame, or by a hinge on the frame in front of the axle of the driving-wheel, the power ex erted by the team in backing has a tendency to press the driving-wheel and the finger-bar on the dri ving-wh eel and finger-bar when backing, and the machine is' thereby moved back with much greater ease and facility. With this arrangement, also, theframe is left free to balance upon the axle of the driving-wheel, and the cutter-bar and cutters at liberty to follow the surface of the ground over which the machine passes, without being affected by the tread of the driving-wheel, the pole, or th draft of the team.
I make a guide-stirrup of cast-iron and connect with the frame in front. It has a flange or short arm upon either side, through which it is bolted to the frame, as represented at 99, This stirrup is represented at B B, Figs. I and III. It is about four inches wide, nineteen inches in height, and aboutfive and one-half inches in breadth across its upper and lower ends, and has a space through which the draft-pole passes of four by eighteen inches, as seen at y in Figs. I and III. This allows the pole to move up and down in the stirrup, while it fills the space sidewise, so as to guide the direction ofthe machine, while it permits the frame to vibrate and balance on the axle, and the finger-bar and cutters to conform to the uneven surface of the ground without being aflected by the pole or the draft of the team. This arrangement also relieves the horses necks from undue pressure, such as is occasioned by the oscillations of the machine when the draft-pole is attached permanently to the frame. The stirrup extends above and below the front end of the frame, so as to al' low the frame to. balance its proper distance either way.
I make an adjustable or jointed shoe for the purpose of connecting the finger-bar and cutters to the frame and for holding the same in a horizontal or slanting position at whatever height it may be required to work the cutters for grass or grain. The adjustable shoe as combined and put together is referred to by the letter E and represented by Fig. II.
When the finger-bar and cutters are attached to the frame in rear of the drivingwheel, and raised and depressed by the frame in turning upon the axle of the driving-wheel as a. center, the cutters and the platform are brought into :a slanting position, insomuch so as to make it impracticable to work the machine without some arrangement by which the cutters and the platform may he placed in a horizontal position at any height it may be desired to work the cutters. This adjustable shoe is intended to remedy this difficulty. It is made in three parts-the upper or bonnet part, (marked 0 in Fig. 11,) the shoe or inner part, (marked a 0,) and the upper or compressing part, (marked 0 c c.) The upper or bonnet part is about five inches wide, and so constructed that it may be bolted to the side timber, H, of the frame with two or more bolts, so as to hold it firmly to the frame. These bolts pass through the cross-timber on the side timber, H, and the bonnet, one of which bolts is shown'at L, Fig. II. It might properly be made longer, so as to receive another bolt through the timber E. It is made so as to form a joint or hinge with the under or runner part, as seen at L at, Fig. II. It extends about twelve inches from this joint on an angle upward of about thirty-five degrees, more or less, and then drops down about eight inches, more or less, as represented at t i. The under or runner part, c e, is about five inches wide on the bottom and connects with and forms ajoint or hinge with the upper part, as shown at L n, Fig. II. The middle or compressing part, 0 o 0, looks into the runner, as shown at V. A bolt passes through these two parts behind the finger-bar, as seen at :20. An arm, 3 2, about five inches wide, rises from this to the height of about eight inches, to connect with the arm t r of the bonnet. These two arms are curved, making the segment of a circle such as would be described at their distance from thejoint L n as a center. A slit is made in the arm tr, and a bolt, 1) t, passes through the slit and the arm 8 z. As the runner turns in thejoint L n the runner is raised or lowered, as is also the finger-bar F, and by means of the bolt 1) t, passing through the arms .9 z and t 1', may be held as desired in reference to a slanting or horizontal position. The arm .9 2 could be cast and made permanent with the runner, and the part which compresses the finger-bar left off, in which case the finger-bar would be bolted to the runner. WVith this arrangementofthe adjustable shoe or runner the finger-bar,cutters, and platform maybe beveled and kept in a horizontal position, although they are elevated and depressed through the segment of a circle described from the axle of the driving-wheel as a center. They can also be set at any desired pitch or angle at the different heights it may be required to work the cutters. The finger-bar passes through this shoe and connects with a goose-neck runner at. the outer corner of the frame, as hereinafter described. The slit in the arm tr is about five inches long. A slit is made in the runner part for the heel of the cutter-bar and cutters to work through, as represented at g h.
I have also made animprovement in the construction of the platform and in the combination of a caster-wheel therewith. The divider T, Fig. I, is made sufficiently strong to support one end of the cross-bar e, which carries the caster-wheel d. On the rear corner of the platform is a standard framed into the timbers of the platform and strengthened by a casting. This standard supports the other end of the cross-bar e, and is marked R. There are several bolt-holes through this standard, and also through the divider. The cross-bar size and proportions of the other wheel.
is bolted to this standard and to the divider, and by means of the bolts and the several bolt-holes may be raised and lowered at'pleasure. This cross-bar is on a line with the point of the divider. The socket in which the swivel of the caster-wheel works is bolted to this cross-bar, so that the cutter-bar, cutters, and platform may be raised and lowered by varying the cross-bar into the different bolt-holes in the standard and divider. The wheel is twelve inches in diameter, and made suf ficiently strong to carry the platform, and the swivel and socket correspond thereto in strength and size. The Wheel, swivel, and socket are combined in the usual manner, and nothing new is claimed therein except their combination for the purposes herein. nerdividing-board, B I), anglesinward from the cross-bar, as does also the timber and end of the platform upon which it stands. This affords sufficient room for the wheel to turn to the right or left as much as may be required, in harvesting grain.
The linger-bar F, Figs. I and II, passes through the adjustable shoe E, and connects with a goose-neck runner near the outer corner of the frame, as represented at G, Fig. V. This runner is made rounding on the bottom, so that it will form a runner, whether the machine is progressing forward or turning at the corners. 1t is bolted to the end of the fingerbar, and connects with the outside timber of the frame H h. A slit is made inthe neck of this runner through which a bolt passes to fasten it to the frame. This slit is represented at 4, Fig. V, and in shape corresponds to the segment ot'a circle such as the goose-neck describes when bolted to the finger-bar and moved by the adjustable shoe turning in its joint L n, Fig. II. It slides on the ground when mowing, and supports the end of the finger-bar and the corner of the frame. In reaping it will of course be elevated above the ground. When reaping the caster-wheel d d carries this part of the platform and frame. The wheel, swivel, and socket are the same in The wheel is attached to the end of the lever y n at a sufficient distance from the finger-bar to allow it to turn round without coming in contact with the finger bar. The leveryn is connected to asmall casting on the frame by means of a bolt, and also to a standard rising from the finger-bar, (represented at hg, Fig. I.) The standard h g is bolted to the fingerbar, and rises about eighteen inches, so that it may be bolted to the lever y a at whatever height the finger-bar may be placed. Several bolt-holes should be made through this standard, so as to receive the bolt from the lever at whatever height the finger-bar maybe placed.
The in-- With this arrangement the platform, fingerbar, and cutters can be carried at any desired height, as they are sustained and carried entirely by the arrangement of the two casterwheels when reaping. These wheels should run as nearly on a line as may. be. When mowing the platform and both wheels may be removed, so as to allow the finger-bar to slide on the ground; A pin, 1?, holds the swivel in its socket. This pin can be removed from the wheel 61 d and the Wheel taken out, leaving the lever 3 n in its place when mowing.
The'gearing and driving shafts are supported upon the frame on the outside of the driving-wheel, in order more equally to balance the frame upon the axle of the driving-wheel. The driving-shaft is represented at G H, Fig. V, and the large bevel-wheel at H a, Fig. I.
Fig. V is a plan view of the frame. The
front timber, z a, is represented as running across the frame; but when the guide stirrup B B, Fig. I, is put in this timber stops short, and is bolted to the flange or short arm ofthe stirrup, as shown at g, Fig. I. The timbers H h and H y and 0 n may be three by three and one-haltinches in size, thefront timber, z a, three by five, and the side timber, H, three by live at the end where the adjustable shoe is bolted and taper to three inches. The proportions herein given may be varied as cir cu mstances require without affecting the prinelple of the improvements herein described.
The dividing-board B b, Fig. 1, being set upon an angle inward, and the bar a being on a line with the point of the divider, several inches of space exist between them, affording room for the caster-wheel to turn as much as required. This barealso affords a support for a reel-post in such a position as to bring. the reel-post out of the way, so that the out grain will not lodge against it.
I claim as my inveution- 1. The adjustable shoe E for the purpose of leveling the platform, constructed and arranged substantially as herein described.
2. suspending the pole to which the team is attached from a hinged journal upon the axle of the driving-wheel, in order that the draft of the team when moving forward may be directly from the axle of the driving-wheel, leaving the frame tinger-bar, and cutters free to oscillate, and independent of the pole and the draft or the team, and also when backing the power of theteam may be exerted upon the frame in rear of and below the axle of the driving wheel, substantially as herein described.
ELIAKIM B. FORBUSH. Witnesses:
G. O. BRISTOL, WM. H. ANDREWS.
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