US1428238A - Submersible pump and the like - Google Patents

Submersible pump and the like Download PDF

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US1428238A
US1428238A US45830421A US1428238A US 1428238 A US1428238 A US 1428238A US 45830421 A US45830421 A US 45830421A US 1428238 A US1428238 A US 1428238A
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Prior art keywords
casing
motor
pipe
pressure
oil
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Expired - Lifetime
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John B Keating
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John B Keating
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D13/00Pumping installations or systems
    • F04D13/02Units comprising pumps and their driving means
    • F04D13/06Units comprising pumps and their driving means the pump being electrically driven
    • F04D13/08Units comprising pumps and their driving means the pump being electrically driven for submerged use
    • F04D13/10Units comprising pumps and their driving means the pump being electrically driven for submerged use adapted for use in mining bore holes
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D29/00Details, component parts, or accessories
    • F04D29/08Sealings
    • F04D29/086Sealings especially adapted for liquid pumps
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S415/00Rotary kinetic fluid motors or pumps
    • Y10S415/901Drilled well-type pump

Description

1.18. KEA TING. SUBMERSIBLE PUMP ANDTHE LIKE. APPLICATION FILED APR. 4. 1921;

Patented Sept. 5, 1922.

fl itorneys Patented Sept. 5, 1922.

UNITED STATES JOHN B. xun'rme, or PIEDMONT, camromvia.

SUBHERSIBLE PUMP AND THE LIKE.

Application filed it 4,

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, JOHN B. KEATING, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Piedmont, Alameda Count California,

have invented new and useful mprovements suited to other wells not cased 'or wells where the casing is perforated above the pump, and in such cases is referably to be provided with a suitable casing or discharge pipe connected to the said pump and immediately surrounding the motor.

In pumps of thisgeneral type it has heretofore been customary to extend a vert'cal operating shaft from" said pump upw rd through the casing to a suitable motor or driving means located above the well or at least above that portion of the \well subject to water overflow during the operation of the pump, or when it is stopped and water rises around the .pumping end of the unit. Such construction is expensive, bothas to first installation and operation and these disadvantages increase as the depth of the well .or distance through which the water is to be pumped increases. Moreover, to

" remove such pump from the well, to repair and replace, becomes a costly process and the maintenance of lubrication to the bearings, of which a number are necessary on account of the long driving shaft, is expensive and inefiicient and requires special attention in'operation and ex ensive additional supporting structure. iii such bear ings lubrlcation is not infrequently destroyed and they become flooded with water;

whereas in the pump and motor of my invention thebearmgsflare kept free from con tamination with pressure water and adequate lubrication is maintained throu h a counterbalancing or excess pressure be ind the oil feed so that no leakage of water into the motor bearings occurs. Moreover, the,

motor is enclosed in a. sealed com artment .of smooth exterior from which t e water.-

1921. serial-1n. 458,304..

'is kept excluded by internal pressure, thus securing at all times a free running, sub- ;merged pump'of minimum weight, requir- -ing a minimum of power, more easily accessible for repairs and replacement and cheaper in first cost and maintenance.

By referring to the accompanying drawings my invention will be made clear.

Figure 1 is a vertical cross section through a pumping unit of my invention, as positioned within a well casing and showing one form of sealing means.

Fig, 2 is similar to Fig. l'with certain of theportions shown in full lines and with a diagrammatic showing of the oil feeding system and the delivery pipe.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of certain of the parts of Fig. 2 wherein I. employ a separate discharge column in place of the sealing means of Figs.- 1.and'2. Fig. 4 is a sectional view of the upper part of the motor casing of Fig. 1 showing a portion of the casing and the suspension member and withv pipe and electrical connections passed into the motor casing through. sealing means. I

Throu' holit the figures similar numerals delivery pipe from which the water pumped may flow to any desired point of delive 5. A suitable suspension member 6- an support 7 carry, the weight of the parts. The suspension member 6 carries on its lower end the motor casing 9 which s hermetically sealed. Betweenthe pump casing. 11' and motor 9 is a shaft bearing 12 and the packing 13, v thereby sealing the joint between the pumpxand ing against water ingress under ordinary conditions. Between the ,:bear1ng 12' and gland means I form the'chamber 16 into which flows any water that leaks from thepressure side of the pump rimner 17 through the sleeve bearing 12 and whlch water w1ll I be discharged therefrom freely; through 1pc the motor casor channel 18, back to the suction side 0 the 1pump at 21 or there maybe substituted a ollow shaft or any pipe or conduit connecaccount of the static pressure that will then exist due to the higher level of the water table at 2. It is clear that any flooding of the motor casing 9 will be fatal to successful operation and therefore to insure the operation at any and all times it is essential to keep the said casing and bearings free' from water. plained below.

In the operation of a submerged pump such as I have here shown I may employ the space between the motor casing 9, ump casing 11 and well casing 1 as the disc arge column of the pump as shown in Figs. 1, 2 or discharge column 8 may be employed separate from the well casing as in Fig. 3, in either case the discharge will take place in the direction of the arrows 22 and be delivered through the outlet 4, at such times reducing the water level on the suction side within the casing 1 to some point such for example as that indicated by the line 23, Fig. 1. During pumping the water will be delivered normally through the outlet 4 under some discharge pressure determined by local conditions and the characteristics of This I accomplish as exthe pump. The excess pressure in the delivery column over that in the suction column of the casing makes necessary a seal between the two which I accomplish either by a separate discharge pipe to the surface as 8, Fig. 3; or by the cup leather 27, within which there may be an expansion ring member 28 to insure its contact with the walls of the casing, see Fig. 2, or the said expansion member may consist of an air expansion tube having an air supply connection at 30; or an inflatable tube 31 with an air connection at 32 may be employed as in Fig. 1. In either case the discharge column will be sealed from the suction column either by separate discharge pipe or by the expansion of the member 27 or 31 between the pump casing 11 and the well casing 1.

While I have shown a tubular or pipe member 6, from which is suspended the motor casing 9, and within which are carried the electric conductors 34, 35 and the -oil pipe 37 it will be obvious that these may be separately conveyed to the motor casing 9 and the latter may be suspended with a cable or in any other well known way. In the construction I have shown these conductors and oil pipe are adapted to pass through sealing means 10, preferably lo:

cated at the top of the motor casing 9. The oil pipe 37 is adapted to be passed in any Well known way through the motor casing 9 to its delivery end, 38 Fig. 1. The upper end of the pipe 37 is connected to a reservoir 42 and is fitted with a control valve 43 whereby oil may be fed from a point above the ground surface 3 to the interior of thesubmerged motor casing 9, see Fig. 1.

I have also shown .an air pipe 44 which is connected through a suitable cover 46 on the oil reservoir 42 from a source of compressed air or gas shown diagrammatically at 45. A sight gauge at 47 on the reservoir 42 indicates the oil level at all times and a pressure gauge at 48 indicates the pressure in the motor casing 9.

To insure against the formation of an explosive mixture within the motor casing 9 a neutral gas may be supplied from the compressor 45 as an initial charge in the motor casin 9. This neutral gas may with advantage be air from which the oxygen has been burnt and therefore consist of nitrogen; or of carbonic acid gas, or any other inert gas may be employed not detrimental to the apparatus, and in such case I recommend the primary abstraction of air from the casing 9. This may be done by blowing the air from the casing through a separate pipe 51 and valve 52.

The assembled pump and motor are first let down into the well casing 1 by the suspension member 6 to the desired depth, and if the depth is sufiicient to make it necessary, air or inert gas is forced into the motor casing 9 as from the compressor 45 through valves 49 and 50 and pipe 37, so that an internal pressure in the casing 9 is indicated on the gauge 48 sufficient to more than com- Y pensate for any contraction of the normal air within9 due to the external water pressure on account of the elevation of the water table- 2 above the said casing 9. This will prevent the ingress of any possible water into the pump casing. A small quantity of oil is permitted to flow through the pipe to the outlet 38, lubricating the bearings and packings andoiLsealing the motor "housing 9 between the outside liquid and the inside gas; that 'is, the leakage through the said gland, if any, will be a-very gradual outflow of oil which is constantly replenished from an external source. Lubrication is thus established and thereafter maintained during the pump operation. The water table'drops withinthe casing to the line 23 and the water is delivered through the outlet 4 to the reservoir 5. The pressure conditions within the motor casing 9 are indicated on the gauge 48 and this is balanced by the column of oil rising to 47. The running condition will therefore at all times be one of perfect lubrication of the bearings insured by a slow leakage of oil there- -through.

If the pump is to be shut downfor-any considerable time oil leakage may be pre-- vented by closing the valve 43.

I am well aware of the explosive nature of hydrocarbon gases mixed with air and of the sparking possibilities in and about electrical apparatus and thatin'some cases crude oil from which the lighter hydrocarbons have not been entirely extracted may be employed as a lubricant for the pump,

hence the necessity of employing a neutral gas within the pump caseJ In practicing my invention it is to be noted that I employ a low pressure atthe suction side of, the pump anda discharge pressure at the outlet of the pump and a pressure in themotor casing equal to or in excess of suction pressure whether above or below that of the atmosphere, by which latter the entry into the motor casing or bearings of any-other fluid than oil as set forth is prevented. Also I preferto introduce through the motor casing and under the said equal or higher pressure a lubricant for the bearings ofthe moving'parts. In maintaining this equal or higher pressure .in the motor casing, lubrication may be secured in other ways and I may introduce into the motor casing a fluid in which air may be insoluble and which, lying between the zone ,of air or gas pressure in the motor housing and the liquid outside ofthe motor housing will act as an imprevious strata to the air or gas and prevent the absorbtion of thelatter in the water and therefore act as a seal to maintain the said air or gas intact withinthe motor chamber and consequently retain the motor at all times under proper running condition.

It will also now be seen that instead of introducingair or gas into the motor chamber through the pipe 37, it may beintroduced through the pipe 51 either before of after the oil from 42 is" fed therethrough, as claiming all' and I desire to be understood such variations.

While I have described my invention as particularly adapted to a pumping-unit it is to be noted that it may also be employed in hydraulic turbines driving generators or in other submerged machinery and hydraulic devices generally and I' desire to be understood as claiming all such variations,

In speaking of suction pressure I am we'll aware that this may be negative, that is, below the atmospheric pressure and in such case is to be considered as referred to the absolute zero of pressure.

I claim:

1. In a vertical pumping unit, a motor, an annular casing of smooth exterior, a motor within said casing and a shaft extending through a gland in said casing, an impeller adapted to be driven by said said shaft, an

oil pipe extending from a remotepoint to the lower part of the interior of said casing and adapted to deliver oil to said gland and means adapted to establish anoil pressure through said pipe. I

2. In a vertical pumping unit, a motor inclosed .in a circular casin of smooth exterior and having a sha t and agland in saidcasing, an impeller operable by said shaft, an oil pipe extending from a remote point to the lower part'of the interior of said casing and adapted to deliver oil to said gland, and "means adapted to establish an oil pressurethrough said pipe, in combination with a housing for said impellerprovided with inlet and outlet passages, the last named passage constructed and adapted to direct water pumped by said impeller over the smooth exterior of said casing.

3. In a vertical pumping unit, a motor in- I closed in a circular casing of smooth exterior, a'motor shaft and a gland in said casing, an impeller operable by said shaft, an oil pipe extending from a remote point to the lower part of the interior of said casing and adapted to deliver oil to said gland, and means adapted to establish an oil pressure through said pipe, in combination with a housing for said impeller provided with inlet and outlet passages, the last named passage COIlStFllCtGd and adapted to direct water pumped by said impeller over the a gas pressure in said casing.

"5. Ina vertical pumping unit, a motor and a gas tight/casing in'cl'osing saidmotor, a shaft driven by said motor and passin through packing means insaid casing an adapted to drive an impeller, a pipe passing through and terminating in the lower inside of said casing and an oil reservoir feeding lubricant through said pipe under pressure, means including a second pipe by which a predetermined gas pressure may be established and maintained in said casing, in combination with ahousing about said impellerand provided with inlet and outlet passages, the last named passage constructed and adapted to direct water pumped b said impeller over the smooth exterior o saidcasing.

6. In a vertical pumping unit, a motor and a gas tight casing inclosing said motor, a shaft driven by said motor and passing through packing means in said casing and adapted to drive an impeller, a pipe passing through and terminating in the lower inside of said casing and an oil reservoir feeding a fluid of low gas solubilitythrough said pipe under pressure, means including a second pipe by which a predetermined gas pressure may be established and maintained in said casing, in combination with a housing about said impeller and provided with inlet and outlet passages, the last named passage constructed and adapted to direct water pumped by said impeller over the smooth exterior of said casing, and a tubular suspension member constructed and adapted to inclose power wires to said motor and t0 inclose said pipes.

7. In a vertical pumping unit, a motor and a gas tight casing inclosing said motor, a shaft driven by said motor and passing through packing means in said casing and adapted to drive an impeller, a pipe passing through and terminating in the lower inside of said casing and an oil reservoir feeding lubricant through said pipe under pressure,

pipes. v

. JOHN B. KEATING.

US45830421 1921-04-04 1921-04-04 Submersible pump and the like Expired - Lifetime US1428238A (en)

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430509A (en) * 1943-11-06 1947-11-11 Electrical Engineering And Mfg Shaft seal for submersible pumps
US2470563A (en) * 1944-01-03 1949-05-17 Irving C Jennings Pump
US2492141A (en) * 1945-03-26 1949-12-27 Byron Jackson Co Submersible motor
DE932593C (en) * 1949-10-13 1955-09-05 Pleuger & Co Propeller and engine pod containing the propulsion of ships
US2764943A (en) * 1951-10-13 1956-10-02 Surface Combustion Corp Pump system
US2896544A (en) * 1956-04-19 1959-07-28 W H Hinton Deep well pump
US2924936A (en) * 1954-12-29 1960-02-16 Thiokol Chemical Corp Propellant propulsion system for helicopters
US2935025A (en) * 1950-09-26 1960-05-03 Tokheim Corp Liquid fuel pumping apparatus
US3000322A (en) * 1957-08-27 1961-09-19 Fostoria Corp Motor driven pump
US3168870A (en) * 1962-12-12 1965-02-09 Ingersoll Rand Co Centrifugal pump with adjustable capacity
US3296971A (en) * 1963-01-21 1967-01-10 Axel L Nielsen Mounting means for sub-floor pump
US3369715A (en) * 1966-05-10 1968-02-20 J C Carter Company Submerged pumping system
US3384382A (en) * 1965-09-21 1968-05-21 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Flexible and circumferential seal for rotating shafts and the like
US3853430A (en) * 1972-08-08 1974-12-10 Trw Inc Cable-suspended, liner-supported submersible pump installation with locking discharge head
US4057366A (en) * 1976-02-02 1977-11-08 Niemann Fred T Portable water evacuator
US4152097A (en) * 1977-01-12 1979-05-01 Karl Woodard Deep well pump adapter with inflatable seal means
US4372389A (en) * 1977-06-06 1983-02-08 Well-Pack Systems, Inc. Downhole water pump and method of use
US4541782A (en) * 1982-02-19 1985-09-17 Framo Developments (Uk) Limited Pump system
US5271725A (en) * 1990-10-18 1993-12-21 Oryx Energy Company System for pumping fluids from horizontal wells
US5538396A (en) * 1994-10-24 1996-07-23 Meierhoefer; Ned S. Water pumping system
US20050207272A1 (en) * 2004-03-18 2005-09-22 National-Oilwell, L.P. Mud tank with pressurized compartment
RU2621851C2 (en) * 2012-10-02 2017-06-07 Даб Пампс С.П.А. Centrifugal electrically-driven pump

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430509A (en) * 1943-11-06 1947-11-11 Electrical Engineering And Mfg Shaft seal for submersible pumps
US2470563A (en) * 1944-01-03 1949-05-17 Irving C Jennings Pump
US2492141A (en) * 1945-03-26 1949-12-27 Byron Jackson Co Submersible motor
DE932593C (en) * 1949-10-13 1955-09-05 Pleuger & Co Propeller and engine pod containing the propulsion of ships
US2935025A (en) * 1950-09-26 1960-05-03 Tokheim Corp Liquid fuel pumping apparatus
US2764943A (en) * 1951-10-13 1956-10-02 Surface Combustion Corp Pump system
US2924936A (en) * 1954-12-29 1960-02-16 Thiokol Chemical Corp Propellant propulsion system for helicopters
US2896544A (en) * 1956-04-19 1959-07-28 W H Hinton Deep well pump
US3000322A (en) * 1957-08-27 1961-09-19 Fostoria Corp Motor driven pump
US3168870A (en) * 1962-12-12 1965-02-09 Ingersoll Rand Co Centrifugal pump with adjustable capacity
US3296971A (en) * 1963-01-21 1967-01-10 Axel L Nielsen Mounting means for sub-floor pump
US3384382A (en) * 1965-09-21 1968-05-21 Nordberg Manufacturing Co Flexible and circumferential seal for rotating shafts and the like
US3369715A (en) * 1966-05-10 1968-02-20 J C Carter Company Submerged pumping system
US3853430A (en) * 1972-08-08 1974-12-10 Trw Inc Cable-suspended, liner-supported submersible pump installation with locking discharge head
US4057366A (en) * 1976-02-02 1977-11-08 Niemann Fred T Portable water evacuator
US4152097A (en) * 1977-01-12 1979-05-01 Karl Woodard Deep well pump adapter with inflatable seal means
US4372389A (en) * 1977-06-06 1983-02-08 Well-Pack Systems, Inc. Downhole water pump and method of use
US4541782A (en) * 1982-02-19 1985-09-17 Framo Developments (Uk) Limited Pump system
US5271725A (en) * 1990-10-18 1993-12-21 Oryx Energy Company System for pumping fluids from horizontal wells
US5538396A (en) * 1994-10-24 1996-07-23 Meierhoefer; Ned S. Water pumping system
US20050207272A1 (en) * 2004-03-18 2005-09-22 National-Oilwell, L.P. Mud tank with pressurized compartment
RU2621851C2 (en) * 2012-10-02 2017-06-07 Даб Пампс С.П.А. Centrifugal electrically-driven pump

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