US1421081A - Island - Google Patents

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US1421081A
US1421081A US1421081DA US1421081A US 1421081 A US1421081 A US 1421081A US 1421081D A US1421081D A US 1421081DA US 1421081 A US1421081 A US 1421081A
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fabric
cords
feeding
roll
warp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29DPRODUCING PARTICULAR ARTICLES FROM PLASTICS OR FROM SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE
    • B29D30/00Producing pneumatic or solid tyres or parts thereof
    • B29D30/06Pneumatic tyres or parts thereof (e.g. produced by casting, moulding, compression moulding, injection moulding, centrifugal casting)
    • B29D30/38Textile inserts, e.g. cord or canvas layers, for tyres; Treatment of inserts prior to building the tyre

Description

F. c.' HALL. LOOM FOR WEAVING CORD TIRE FABRICS. APPLICATION FILED OCT. I2, 1921.

Patented June 27, 1922.

' 3 SHEETS-SHEET I.

w Ax L? F. C. HALL.

LooII/I FOR WEAVING com) TIRE FABRICS.

APPLICATION FILED 00T. I2. 1921.

' Patented June 27, 1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

m E) Invenw:

- A M 2 M2 .wh/@5.528 wghm vF. c. HALL.

l LOOM `FOR WEAVKING CORD TIRE FABRICS.

APPLlcArlpu FILED ocT. 12. 192|..

1,421,081'. Patenteuune 27, 1922.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

Y Learner;

UNITED STATE@ PREDENrcK o. HALL, OP PAWTNOKET,

SPINNING COMPANY, RHODE `JISLAND.

Param" ori-ics.

RHODE ISLAND, AssIoNoE To JENoKEs OP PAWTUQKEP,.EHODErsLANne A CORPORATION OP Looivr POR WEAvrNGJcORn-rrnn Pennies.

, Specification of Iietters 1*?aten-tt 'Pace'nted 1111 27, 1922.

Application filed October 12V, 1921. Serial No,r 507,283;

To allwhomz'tmag/ concern:

Be it known that I, FREDERICK C. HALL, a citizen of the United States,.residing,at Pawtucket, in the 'county of Providenceand State of Rhode Island, have invented .cer-

, tain new and useful Improvements Looms for Weaving Cord-Tire Fabrics; andI do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear,gand exact description of the invention7 such as will enable others skilled'in theV art to which it appertains to make andquse'the same. f

The invention relates to looms for, weaving cord tire fabric, L

Cord tire fabric consists of comparatively heavy warpA threads or cords bound together by very fine and weak filling threads which are widely separated and serve merely l to retain the cords inclose parallel relation.

In rubberizing this fabricpreparatory to incorporating it in tires it issubjected to the action of heavy calender rolls .to which it is fed vunder heavy tension. Owing to the weakness and wide spacing of the fine filling threads the action .of the rolls will cause any comparatively loose cords or series of ,cords to creep along the fabric and bank up at the'point where the fabric enters the rolls until sufficient slack accumulates to` cause a fold which will enter the rolls and cause a rupture of the fabric at this point. Comparatively slack cords or Zones of slack cordsin ,the fabric are therefore not only highly objectionable but may render a piece of fabric wholly unfit for use.v While`looseness or under tensionof the cords is objectionable in any part of the fabrioit is more serious toward the center than at the edges since the center is better adapted to distribute and withstand the entra` 4strain to Whieh these parte ef the .febrie in whieh the tension ef the Corde lie .up te Standard neeeeeei'ily eiibieeied l.iii @eee efieeeeiieee ,in other parts of the fabric.

*.FOr the` above reasons it has heretofore, 'been the ultimate aim 0f manufeetiirereei .00rd feleiie te Weave e febiie .in which the cords are under the same uniform tension .sidered ideal land isbetter adapted to meet the requirementsv incident to its rubberiza- .tion `and incorporation in tires. I have also found that a slight progressive increase ,'inthetensionwof the cords from eachedge .towardsthegcenter gives the best results. iVljThen vafabric of this 4clmracter is led from fthe supply rollto ythe, rubberizing calender rollslvunderla 4slight tension the center will be taut, while there will be a slight and gradual droop Vlor rniiling toward the edges. 'Uponfanvincrease inv thetension, however, willdisappear :as theicenter lcords are stretched and the fabric will lie'flat and taut from, side to ,side and will run uniformly end snloothly to, the. rolls. Owing to the tight ,center vand the decrease in the tension 'of the cordStoward each edge .the strain on the fabric duel to the tensionunder which it is fed to the rolls is so distributed across the vfabric that vthe greater strain comes on the stronger center -while the least strain comes ,on the weaker edges. The fabric may, therefore, not only be maintained in a smooth flatcondition with less Vtension than heretofore, but the danger of breaking cords at the edges and thus causing the fabric to tear across is eliminated. i

The weaving of; this fabric involves the accurateregulation of the tension on each warp cord entering vrthe successive sheds so ythat the ,tension on each cord may be uniform throughout the weaving and so that .the ieneien'ef the different Corde ,may i11- v.crease from the edges toward the Centerp lhe requisite V,aceurate regulation of the @ed Asieri 011 eeeh Werp ,Cord may be lSecured by l* ,feeding in to the shed fonrningl harness a ydefi'nite and uniform length of .each cord J during-,each evele 0f the leem which bears definite reletieiiie the length ef movement .0f the 'febrile .take-unmeeheriism- To ,insure .e .iiiiiferm teileien .each Werp @0rd Atlfieeiisheiii the weaving .e rie-determined ,and Substantially usiferm-teiieien iS mail tained eiieeeh Eeifd tebefed in., Y

A' leem .adeptes ,for the'prediinetien of the liisiit ,center fabric is :iedieeted diesreem- .Inaiiflzelgly .inFis .lef the drawings; F is 2 =`is" ev side elevation `partly in Section 0f the l.,lo`om, Fig, y3 is a plan View showing the mechanism for eetiietingthe feeding in r011 and Fig, t is a detailed view of the feeding .inielll .f .Y

of leash rods l() and are thus brought intoV position side by side. From the leash rods y the cords pass to a second set of leash rods 1 2 and thence between the thin plate of a reedV 14 which keep them properly separated and spaced and direct them side by side to the feeding-in mechanism. A substantial] uniform tension is maintained on the cor s leading to the feeding-in mechanism by take-up weights suspended on the cords and guided in the plates 18 and 20. The weights play freely through the guide plates, thus taking up vany temporary slackness which might otherwise occur between the supply spools and the feeding-in mechanism and maintain a substanially uniform light tension on each of the cords. The cords are, therefore, uniformly taut when engaged by the feeding-in mechanism and will be uniformly acted on thereby.

The feeding-in mechanism comprises a feeding-in roller 22 which may be covered with sand or otherwise roughened to prevent slipping of the cords thereon and two cooperating guide rolls 24 and 26 which cause the cords to wrap nearly around the roll. The cords lead from the roll 26 through a reed 27, through the usual leash rods 29 to the harness 4. From the harness the cords pass through the lay 2 to the previously woven fabric vwhich passes over the breast beam 28, around the fabric take-up drum 30, over guide rolls 32, 34 and 36 to the cloth roll 38 upon which it is wound.

` The feeding-in roll is positively driven to feed forward a definite length of each warp cord and its actuating mechanism is so timed and proportioned with relation to the actuating mechanism of the fabric takeup drum that each warp cord is held under a predetermined tension between the feeding-in roll and the already woven fabric during each cycle of the loom. Since the .warp cords are uniformly taut as they come to the feeding-in roll and are positively held and controlled thereby each thread will be under a certain tension between the Woven fabric and the feeding-in roll determined by the relation between the movements given to the feeding-in roll and to the fabric takeup drum. If the feeding-in drum is of the same diameter throughout its length and the take-up weights 16 are proportioned to maintain substantially the same light tension on all of the cords leadin to the roll equal lengths of all cords willi will be produced in which the cords are under the same uniform tension throughout the Width Qt the fabric,- In order that the @enf e fed in by the roll for the formation of each shed and a fabricy ter cords may be held under greater tension than the edge cords during each pick of the loom it is preferred to so shape the roll 22 that it feeds in lengths of cord which are slightly less at the center than at the edges, the variation in the lengths of cords being well wit-hin their elastic limits. To secure a gradual decrease in the feed from the edge of the fabric toward the center and consequently a gradual increase in the tension of the cords from the edges toward the center the roll is preferably so shaped that it is slightly smaller in diameter at the center and gradually increases in diameter toward each end as indicated in Fig. 4. With the roll thus shaped a farbric will be produced having a tight center and one in which there is a slight progressive increase in the lengths of the cords from the center toward each edge. Consequently there will 'be a progressive increase in the tension on the cords from the edges toward the center when the fabric is led to the rubberizing calender rolls and is stretched sufficiently to put all of the cords under tension with the resulting advantages already set forth.

The rotation of the feeding in roll is preferably intermittent and so timed that there is no feed of the threads during the passage of the shuttle through the sheds formed by the harness. As shown the feeding in roll is connected through gearing 40 with a ratchet wheel 42, which is engaged and actuated by a pawl 44 connected with the eccentric strap 46 engaging an eccentric 48 carried by the lay operating shaft 50. The eccentricy strap is formed on the end of a link 52 connected to the lever 54, which carries the pawl 56 for actuating the ratchet wheel 58 on the end of the cloth shaft 38. The fabric take-up drum 30 is continuously driven through gearing 60 connecting the drum with a worm wheel 62, which is engaged by a worm 64 on a shaft 66 driven through beveled gears 68 from the cam shaft 7 0 of the loom. The worm and worm wheel drive insures a uniform pull on the fabric and also positively holds the drum against reverse movement under the tension on the fabric and warp threads.

What is claimed is: y

1. In a loom for weaving cord tire fabric the combination with the harness and lay of mechanism for feeding from the warp thread supply to the harness for each shed lengths of warp threads which progressively increase from the center of the fabric toward the edges and for taking up the fabric to hold all the warp threads in each shed under tension. Y

2. In a loom for waving cord tire fabric the combination with the harness and lay of an individual supply from which each warp thread is drawn. and mechanism forpfeeding from the thread supplies to the harness for each shed lengths of Warp threads Which progressively increase from the center of the fabric toward the edges and for taking up the fabric to holdv all the warp threads in each shed under tension.

3. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination with the harness and lay of mechanisms for feeding in to the harness for each shed lengths of Warp threads which progressively increase from the center of the fabric toward the edges7 and for taking up a uniform length of fabric.

4. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination With the harness and lay of mechanism uniformly feeding in to the harness for each shed a definite length of each Warp thread# the length of different threads fed in progressively increasing` from the center toward the edges of the fabric, and mechanism for taking up a uniform length of fabric for each shed. i

5. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination With the harness and lay of an individual supply from Which each Warp thread is draWn,'a feeding in mechanism for positively holding all of the warp threads between the thread supply and the harness throughout the Weaving and for feeding in lengths of threads which progressively increase from the center toward the edges, and mechanism for actuating the feeding in mechanism to feed in a definite length of each Warp thread for each shed.

6. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination with the harness and lay of a feeding in roll, the diameter of Which gradually increases from the center toward each end, means for directing the Warp threads side by side to the roll and from the roll to the harness, and mechanism for actuating the roll to feed a definite length of each Warp thread for each shed.

7. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination with the harness and lay of a feeding roll about which all of the Warp threads Wrap, the diameter of which gradually increases from the center toward each end, guides for directing the threads side by side to the roll and from the rolls to the harness, mechanism for actuating the roll to feed in a definite length of each Warp thread for each shed, and a fabric take-up mechanism for taking up a definite length of fabric during each cycle of the loom.

8. In a loom for Weaving cord tire fabric the combination With the harness and lay of a feeding-in roll, the diameter of which gradually increases from the center toward each end, means for equalizing the tension on the Warp threads and directing them side by side to the roll, means for directing the threads from the roll to the harness, mechanism for actuating the roll to feed in a definite length of each warp thread for each shed, and mechanism for taking up a definite length of fabric during each cycle of the loom.

FREDERICK C. HALL.

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2654936A (en) * 1952-04-22 1953-10-13 Us Rubber Co Ribbon rubber thread splitter
US4825912A (en) * 1987-07-23 1989-05-02 Ciba-Geigy Corporation Apparatus for weaving spheriodially contoured fabric

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2654936A (en) * 1952-04-22 1953-10-13 Us Rubber Co Ribbon rubber thread splitter
US4825912A (en) * 1987-07-23 1989-05-02 Ciba-Geigy Corporation Apparatus for weaving spheriodially contoured fabric

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