US1410625A - Ridge-ventilator construction - Google Patents

Ridge-ventilator construction Download PDF

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US1410625A
US1410625A US431410A US43141020A US1410625A US 1410625 A US1410625 A US 1410625A US 431410 A US431410 A US 431410A US 43141020 A US43141020 A US 43141020A US 1410625 A US1410625 A US 1410625A
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sections
section
rack
rack bar
ventilator
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US431410A
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Sylvan Joseph
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Sylvan Joseph
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05FDEVICES FOR MOVING WINGS INTO OPEN OR CLOSED POSITION; CHECKS FOR WINGS; WING FITTINGS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, CONCERNED WITH THE FUNCTIONING OF THE WING
    • E05F11/00Man-operated mechanisms for operating wings, including those which also operate the fastening
    • E05F11/02Man-operated mechanisms for operating wings, including those which also operate the fastening for wings in general, e.g. fanlights
    • E05F11/08Man-operated mechanisms for operating wings, including those which also operate the fastening for wings in general, e.g. fanlights with longitudinally-moving bars guided, e.g. by pivoted links, in or on the frame
    • E05F11/12Mechanisms by which the bar shifts the wing
    • E05F11/14Mechanisms by which the bar shifts the wing directly, i.e. without links, shifting the wing, e.g. by rack and gear or pin and slot

Description

1. syn Aw! RIDGE \VENTILATGR CONSTRUCTION. APPLICATION FILED DEC-17. 1920= Pszimbe; 2& 2,922;
3 $HEETSSHEET l- J. SYILVAN.
RIDGE VENTILATOR CONSTRUCTION. APPLICATION FILED DEC. I7. 1920.
Patented Mar. 28, 1922 3 SHEETSSHEET 2.
' entree stares PATENT @FFHCCE.
aosmn SYLVAN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
RIDGE-VENTILATOR (lONSTRUCTION.
Specification of Letters Patent, Patented Mam;28, 1922, I
Application filed December 17. 1920. Serial No. 431,422.
To all whom it may concern: 7
Be it known that I, JOSEPH SYLVAN, a citizen ofthe United States, and a resident of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and 'useful Improvementsin Ridge-Ventilator Constructions; and I'do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact descripthe construction andoperation of that type of ventilator illustrated and described in my pending application for patent, Serial No. 377 ,474, filed April 29, 1920.
The many advantages of theginvention will more fully appear as I proceed with my specification.
In the drawings :'--9
the top part of a skylight to "which my'iinproved ridge ventilatorconstruction has been applied.
Figure. 2 is a horizontal section through the same on theline 2-'2 of Figure 1.
Figure 3 is a vertical detail sectional view on enlarged scale taken onthe line 3-301. Figure 1.
Figure 4 is anothervertical detail sectional view taken onth'e line 4- 1 of Fig-- ure 1 p e Figure 5 is a view similar-to Figure ,1
but with the parts'in a changed relation.
Figure 6 is a horizontal section through the same taken on the line 66 of Figure 5;
Figure 7 is an enlarged detail'view of the parts shown in the middle-ofFigure 6;
Figure-8is a perspective view of a bracket embodied in myimproved construction and which will be more specifically referred to later.
Figure 9 is a view in elevation of one arcuate rack barembodied in my improved construction.
of parts shown in the top end of Figure 1.
Figure 12 is a view showing a modified form of the parts shown in Figure 11.
Referring now in detail to that embodiment of the invention illustrated inF i ures 1 to 11 inclusive of the accompanying rawingsz-15 indicates the downwardl and outwardly inclined rafters of a skylig t, the outer ends of which are connected to a horizontal cross beam 16. Arising from the -middle of the cross beams 16 are standards 17. to which the abutting inner or top ends of the rafters are also secured, the top end of said standards extending. upwardly beyond said abutting ends of the rafters.
The rafters 15 are connected by longitudinally extending angle bars 18 spaced an equal distance on each side of the standards 17 and to said angle bar are fixed the inner top ends of glazing bars 19 which support the skylightpanels 20. It isapparent that an opening 21, is defined at the ridge of the skylight by the angle bars 18 and the top inner ends of the panels 20.
To the top end of each standard 17, em-
' bodied in the skylight, is secured an upright strap 22 which terminates in an eye or Figure 1 is a transverse section. through loop 23 to receive and support a short longitudinal stub shaft 24 arranged in the median line of the skylight.
2526-indicate the ventilator sections or frames which are pivoted on the stub shafts light opening 21. Each ventilator section comprises inner top, and outer bottom, longitudinal angle bars 2728 which arecon nected together by glazing bars 29 providing the support for the usual panels 30 of said sections. Secured to the inner top an is bars 27 of both sections, are straps 31-,wh1ch include eyes 32 that engage the ends of the stub shafts 24, one on each side of the strap eye23. Pins 33 extending through the ends of said shafts lock the straps 31 against .endwise niovementpn the said shaft. Fixedto the outer bottorn'angle bars '28 are inwardly extending. gutter strips 3 1 which catch the Water of condensation forming on the inner surface of the sections or frames p a 25 and 26. Figure 10 is a view in elevation of another 35 indicates a one piece ridge strip which bridges and closes the space or gap between the inner top ends of the sect1ons'2526. In the present instance said ridge strip is made of sheet metal and includes a transversei curved top wall 36, and side walls 37 exten ing parallel with, but spaced from the adjacent flanges of the associated angle bars 27, as shown in Figures 1 and 11. The side walls of the ridge strip are formed to provide longitudinally extending grooves 38 and in each groove is placed an elastic, waterproof material 39 which extends over upon the angle bars 27 as shown in Figure 11. The top marginal ends of the panels 30 extend into the grooves 38 of the ridge strip and engage upon the elastic material 39, the edges of said panels having semi-cylindric metallic protecting strips 40 arranged concentric with the grooves 38. The several] parts are so arranged and so located with respect to the axis of the stub shafts 24, that as the sections 25-26 are being swung from a closed to an' openposition or vice versa,
there will be a slight raising and lowering movement of the ridge strip, equal to the length of the are about which the inner ends of the panels 30 travel, about the shaft asan axis, due to the engagement of the inner ends of the panels in the grooves 38.
The means for operating the sections are as follows z-42-43 indicate arcuate rack bars-one associated with each swinging section. Each rack bar is concentric with the shafts 24 and the rack bar 42 is connected at one end to a clip 42 on the section 25, while the rack bar 43 is connected at the opposite end, to a similar clip 43 on'the section 26. Said clips 42-43 are secured to the outer angle bars 28 inboth instances. sections 25-26 are in their normally closed position, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, said rack bars extend in a plane substantially at right angles to the longitudinal median line of the skylight. I Y
The rack bar 42 has teeth 42, which extend from the free (right hand) end thereof, to almost the middle of said bar where a notch 44 is provided, the purpose of which will appear later. The rack bar 43 has teeth 43", which extend from the free (left hand) end of the rack bar to a point beyond the middle thereof as shown in FigurelO, which point is in line with that tooth 42 of the rack 42 nearest). the notch 44. On the front face ofthe bar 42 is an under cut block or cleat 45, and on the opposite side of said under cut block orcleat 45 before mentioned. On the front surface of the free (left hand) end of said bar 43, which is beveled as shown at 48, is secured a flat leaf spring 49 7 having a hooked end.
The teeth of said rack bars are adapted to mesh with a gear pinion 50, fixed on a longitudinal shaft 51 extending throu h'the uprights or standards-17. Preferab y I secure When both to said standards, bearing boxes 52 for said shaft, and to one face of said boxes are secured bracket yokes orplates 53 (see Figures 4 and 8) which straddle the rack bars and prevent them from jumping out of mesh with the gear pinion. On the front and rear parts of said plates are provided, oppositely facing, stop hooks 54-55, which are adapted to be engaged by the hook 46 on the rack bar 42 and the hook spring 49 on the rack bar 43 respectively. Secured to shaft 51, is a grooved pulley 56, over which is trained an actuating chain 57, which hangs down .in-the usual loop, in a position within convenient reach for the person who is to operate the same.
In Figure 12, I have shown a modified form of ridge strip construction wherein a flexible waterproof covering strip 60 encloses the ridge strip 35, the margins of the strip 60 engaging in the grooves 38 of said ridge strip and there being secured to the angle bars 27. In this construction the clastic material 39 is interposed between the margins of the covering strip and the inner top marginal end parts of the panels. The covering strip 60, being flexible, will readily accommodate itself to such slight movement as is necessary in the raising and lowering of the ridge strip, during the swinging movement of said sections 25-26.
When the ventilator sections 25-26 are in their normally closed position, as shown in Figure 1, the beveled block or cleat 47 on the rack bar 43 is engaged with the under cut block or cleat 45 on the bar 42 so that said sections are connected together therethrough, and counter balance each other. Thus, the outer angle bar 2-8 of both sections 25-26 are normally spaced above, but overhang the angle bars 18 of the skylight, as shown in Figure 1. By reason of the termination of the teeth 42"-43 as before mentioned, the teeth 42 of the rack 42 will be out of mesh with the gear 50 while the teeth 43 of the rack bar 43 will be in mesh with said gear.
Assume that it is desired to open the section 26. A pull on the right hand lap of the chain 57 will rotate the shaft 51 and the gears 50 thereon (when the skylight is of such length requiring more than one set of rack bars 42-43) which will cause said rack bar 43 to move to the right and swing the section into its open position. If it is desired to open said sectiononly a part way,
the pull on the chain 57, is discontinued when the desired position is reached, after which the friction of the shaft 51 in its bearings will be suflicient to overcome the gravity action of said section, and thus hold it in the part way open position. As soon as the block 47 moves away from the block 45, the counter balancing action between the sections is destroyed and the section 25 will as will later be described. It is apparent,
that the notch 44 in the bar42 prevents engagenient with the gear 50 in this slight movement of the said section.
As the pull on the right hand lap of the chain 57 is continued, the said section 26 will continue to swing toward its full open po-,
sition, wherein it will extend into a position slightly inclined upwardly from the horizontal plane of the stub shafts 24. Thus when a wind is blowing over the top surface of the section 26, a partial vacuum is produced beneath its outer margin which will act to establish an up draft through the ventilator opening 21. As this full open position is approached, the spring 49 on the rack bar 43 will engage against the hook 55 on the bracket 53, said spring then acting to swing the beveled free end 48 of said rack bar 43 toward the rack bar42, which beveled end is in a position topass the adjacent end of the under cut block or cleat 45, on the rack bar 42 as shown in Figure 7. When the pull is discontinued, the friction'of the shaft 51 in its bearin prevent theclosing o thesaid'section un der its own weight, As is apparent from Figure 6, when the ventilator section is 1n its full open position, the free end o f 'the rack 42 is flexed rearwardly, by reason of, the engagement of the block 47 on the rack bar 43, thus putting the rack bar 42 under a fiexure stress for a purpose to appear later.
When it is desired to swing both sections 2526 in their open position, as shown in,
dotted lines in Figure 1, this is accomplished as follows :-The section 26. is first swung into its full open position as just above described. This brings the beveled end 48, of the rack bar 43, into a position ready to engage the undercut block or cleat 45 on' the rack 42. The left hand lap of the chain is then pulled downwardly, which will rotate the gear in a counter clockwise direction. This will cause the rack bar 43 which is still in mesh with said'gear to move toward the left, when the beveled end 48 of the rack bar 43 will engage the under cut block 45 on the rack bar 42and impart a similar movement to said rack bar 42. As the rack bar 42 thus moves, thetooth 42 adjacent the notch 44' is brought into mesh with the gear 50 so that thereafterboth racks are positively in mesh with, and are actuated together as one. by said" gear 50. Thepullon the left hand la-p ofthe chain being continued, the section 25 will swing will be sufficient to 25 into open position, a further pull on the left hand lap of the chain 57 will cause the rack bar, 42 to-move toward the left, the rack bar 43. also moving to the left until its innermost tootha43 passes out of mesh with the gear 50 when said section 26 reaches its closed position, the section 25 continuing in its swing towards its full open position until the hook 46 on the rear face of the free 'end of said rack bar 42 engages the hook 54 on the bracket clip 53, and stops the same, the section 25 then being in a position opposite. that of the section 26 as shown in Figure 5. As the section swings toward its full open position, the free end of the rack bar 42 which is under a flexure stress as before described, will act to straighten out by reason of its engagement with the rear wall of the bracket 53 and will then act through the block 47, to move the bar 42 toward the front Wall of the bracket plate so that the beveled end of the said rack bar 43 is out of the lane of the undercut block on the bar hen it is desired to close the section 25, a pullis imparted to the right hand lap of the chain 57 which will swing the rack 42 to the right until the block 45 engages the block 47 when-both sections are again closed and in their counter balancing tooth 42 into engagement with the gear 50 just as the last tooth at the middle of the rack bar 43 leaves the same, the slight movement of the associated section 26 being per- -mitted by reason of the space normally existing between the angle bars 28 and 18 respectively when both sections are closed and counter balanced, A further pull on the left handlap of the chain 57 will cause the rack bar 42 to-grnove to the left, swinging the section 25 with it, until the hook 46 on the rack bar 42 engages the associated stop hook 54 on the bracket 53. When the section 25 is in its full open position, it will extend in a plane, inclined upwardly from the horizontal, the opposite from that position of the section 26, shown in full lines in Figure 5. To again close the section 25, it is only necessary to puil on the right hand lap of the chain 57, the eleat 45 on the rack bar 42 againengaging the block 47 as it ap proaches the same so that both sections are again connected through the rack bars and will then counterbalance each other.
It is apparent, that the sections 25-26 may be opened and closed individually, and that to have both sections open simultaneously, the sections 26 must first be swung into a full open position to connect both sections together, after which a closing movement of the section 26 will impart an opening movement to the section 25.
t is apparent that the improved construction is strong and durable, is simple to operate, and is positive in its operation.
The-ridge construction is leak proof, and
\ oppositely arranged angularly disposed ventilator sections normally closing said opening, said ventilator sections being pivoted at their adjacent margins and being capable of a swinging movement away from and toward said ventilation opening, and an operating mechanism for swinging said sections into open and closed position, said operating mechanism including parts permitting either section to be swung individually or permitting both sections to be swung simultaneously, after one of said sections has been swung into a fully opened position.
2. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing a ventilation opening, oppositelyarranged angularly disposed ventilator sections normally closing said opening, said ventilator sections being pivoted at their adjacent margins and being capable of a swinging movement away from and to.- ward said ventilation opening, a bar con-. nected to each section near its outer margin, an operating device capable of actuating either bar for'swinging'the associated section, said bars-having coacting parts operable in the movement of one barto connect both bars together, so that thereafter both sections swing as one. i
3. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing a ventilation opening, oppositely arranged angularly disposed ventilator sections normally closing said open-- ing, said sections being pivoted at their ad jacent margins and being capable of a swinging movement away from and toward said ventilation opening, an arcuate rack bar connected to each section. near its other margin, and an operating gear capable of being engaged by both rack bars, the rack bar associated with one section automatically engaging the rack bar associated with the other section, as the first section approaches its full 0 en position, so that thereafter both sections are connected together to swing as one.
4. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing a ventilation opening, oppositely arranged angularly disposed ventilator sections normally closing said opening, said ventilator sections being pivoted at their adjacent margins and being capable of a swinging movement away from and toward said ventilation opening, an arcuate rack bar connected to each section near its other margin, a manually operable shaft capable of rotation in either direction, and a gear "on the shaft, capable of being engaged by both rack bars, the rack bar associated with one section automatically engagingthe rack bar associated with the other section, as the first section approaches its full open position so that thereafter both sections are connected together to swing as one.
5. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination withmeans providing a ventilation-opening, opposltely arranged angularly disposed ventllator sections normally closing said opening, said sections being pivoted at their adjacent margins and being capable of a swingingmovement away from and toward said ventilation opening, an arcuate rack bar connected to each section near its other margin, an operating gear capable of being engaged by both rack bars, and a block on one of said rack bars adapted to be engaged by the'end of the other rack bar, as the section associated therewith approaches its full open position so that said rack bars are connected and may be actuated together in the opposite direction.
6. A'ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing a ventilation opening, oppositely'arranged angularl disposed ventilator sections normally closing said opening, said sections being-pivoted at their adjacent margins and being capable of a swingmg movement away from and toward said ventilation opening, an 'arcuate rack bar connected to each section near its other margin, an operating gear capable of being engaged by both rack bars, a block on one of said rack bars, a spring on the end of the other rack bar adapted to shift said end of said last mentioned rack-bar-into engagement with said block as said end approaches said gear, so that said rack bars are connected and may be actuated together in the opposite direction.
7. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing a ventilation opening, oppositely arranged angularly disposed v ntilator sections normally closing said 01.41- ing, said sections being pivote'd at their ads jacent margins and being capable of a swinging movement away from and toward said ventilation opening, an arcu'a'te bar connect;- ed to each section near its outer margin, each rack bar having teeth on its, periphery, a gear-"adapted to be engaged by said teeth, a bracket in which said gear is arranged and guiding said rack bars, the teeth on one of said rack bars terminating short of said gear and the teeth on the otherraclebar terminating beyond said gear so as to be in mesh therewith, an undercut bloclc on that rack bar having its teeth terminating short of said gear, and a beveled block on the opposing face of the other rack bar which has a beveled end, the beveled block on said last mentioned rack bar when moved in one direction, engaging the undercut block in the first mentioned rack bar to cause its teeth to en gage the gear, the beveled end of said rack bar when moved in the other direction, being adapted to engage said undercut block when said end approaches the gear.
, 8. Ina construction of the kind described. the eombinationfof two ventilator sections,
including panels, means providing a pivotal connection for the adj acentspaced apart margins of said ventilator sections, means for swinging said sections into an opening and closed position, a ridge piece closing the space between said sections, said ridge piece having longitudinal grooves in its sides into which the margins of said section panels extend, said grooves being so constructed and so arranged with reference to said pivotal connection of said sections that said rioge piece will rise and fall to accommodate the arcuate movement of said panel margins as said sections move into open and closed positions.
9. A ridge ventilator construction of the kind described, comprising in combination with means providing'a ventilation opening, oppositely arranged angularly disposed ventilator sections normally-closing said opening, said ventilator sections being pivoted at their adjacent margins and-being capable of a swinging movement away from and toward said ventilator opening, adjacent rack bars, one operatively connected witheach section near its outer margin, and a gear pinion associated with both rack bars. said rack bars and gear being so arranged and so positioned with respect to each other that when the gear pinion is rotated in one directionQone rack bar is operatively engaged therewith and the other rack bar is disengagedtherefrom and when said gear pinion is rotated in the other direction, the second rack bai is-opera'tivel engaged therewith and the first one is disengaged therefrom.
1 In a construction of the kind described, the combination of two ventilator sections, including panels, means providing a pivotal connection for the adjacent spaced apart margins ot said ventilator sections, means for swinging .said sections into an open and closed position, a ridge piece closing the space between said sections, the marginal parts of said ridge piece engaging the marginal parts of the ventilator sections in a manner permitting the ridge piece to rise and fall to accommodate the arcuate movement of said marginal parts of said sections as said sections move into open and closed positions.
In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my invention, I ailix my signature in the presence of two witnesses, this 11th day of December, A. D. 1920.
JOSEPH SYLVAN.
Vitnesses:
T. H. ALrRBns, CHRISTINA DEANS.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4201122A (en) * 1978-11-03 1980-05-06 Elixir Industries Snap door vent
US4597324A (en) * 1984-04-13 1986-07-01 Rodney Spilde Active ridge vent
US4928444A (en) * 1987-07-08 1990-05-29 Mitsukazu Horie Solar house with roof board of adjustable inclination
US5147244A (en) * 1991-08-30 1992-09-15 Spilde Rodney L Ventilation system including vent controller apparatus
US20130239488A1 (en) * 2010-10-14 2013-09-19 Filclair Bay-type greenhouse with optimal performance

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4201122A (en) * 1978-11-03 1980-05-06 Elixir Industries Snap door vent
US4597324A (en) * 1984-04-13 1986-07-01 Rodney Spilde Active ridge vent
US4928444A (en) * 1987-07-08 1990-05-29 Mitsukazu Horie Solar house with roof board of adjustable inclination
US5147244A (en) * 1991-08-30 1992-09-15 Spilde Rodney L Ventilation system including vent controller apparatus
US20130239488A1 (en) * 2010-10-14 2013-09-19 Filclair Bay-type greenhouse with optimal performance
US8881449B2 (en) * 2010-10-14 2014-11-11 Filclair Bay-type greenhouse with optimal performance

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