US1389244A - Means for stacking sheet material - Google Patents

Means for stacking sheet material Download PDF

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Publication number
US1389244A
US1389244A US39740720A US1389244A US 1389244 A US1389244 A US 1389244A US 39740720 A US39740720 A US 39740720A US 1389244 A US1389244 A US 1389244A
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
frame
sheet
means
pawl
position
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
John W Free
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Jones and Laughlin Steel Corp
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Jones and Laughlin Steel Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H29/00Delivering or advancing articles from machines; Advancing articles to or into piles
    • B65H29/50Piling apparatus of which the discharge point moves in accordance with the height to the pile
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H29/00Delivering or advancing articles from machines; Advancing articles to or into piles
    • B65H29/26Delivering or advancing articles from machines; Advancing articles to or into piles by dropping the articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2403/00Power transmission; Driving means
    • B65H2403/40Toothed gearings
    • B65H2403/47Ratchet
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2511/00Dimension; Position; Number; Identification; Occurence
    • B65H2511/10Size; Dimension
    • B65H2511/15Height
    • B65H2511/152Height of stack
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2511/00Dimension; Position; Number; Identification; Occurence
    • B65H2511/20Location in space

Description

J. W. FREE. MEANS FOR S-TACKING SHEET MATER'IAL. APPLICATION FILED JULY 19, I920.

ly a gg wh Patented Aug. 3a, 1921 5 SHEETS-SHEET I.

FEEDI= J. W. FREE.

MEANS FOR STACKING SHEET MATERIAL.

APPLICATION FILED JULY I9, 1.920.

5 SHEETSSHEET 2.

Patented Aug. 3%, 1921.

M! VE/I/ TOR EHWZIMU J. W. FREE.

MEANS FOR STACKING SHEET MATERIAL.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 19,1920.

"Paiam'tw Aug". 36?, 1921;

5 SHEETSSHEET 3.

VITA/535253 J. W. FREE. MEANS FORSTACKING SHEET MATERIAL. APPLICATION FILED JULY 19.1.920.

1,389,244. Patented Aug. 30,1921.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

WITNESSES lA/VEWTOK J. W. FREE.

MEANS FOR STACKING SHEET MATERIAL.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 19,1920

Patented Aug. 30, 1921.

5 SHEETSSHEET 5- vv/ TA/EsaEs it/M pile-floats above mg at one side the sheets fed in horizontally,

G sum MATERIAL.

Imus Ion sncxm Specification of LetteraPatent.

Patented Aug. 30, 1921.

Application cleanl 19, mo.- Serial 1 -39am.

To all whom it may concern: I Be it known that I, JOHN W. FREE, residing at Woodlawn, in the county of Beaver and State of Pennsylvania, a citizen of the United States, have invented or discovered certain new and useful Improvements in Means for Stacking Sheet Material, of which improvements the following is a speci- -fication.

My invention relates to apparatus for l stacking sheet material and, while not limited to any s ecific use, or to any specific kind of material, I have developed it as apparatus for use in a tin-plate mill, for stacking or, in mill parlance, pack1ng z. e., making up into packs-the sheet steel, as it comes from the cold rolling mill, and before it is annealed and pickle preparator to tinning.

he machine is illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Figure I is a view of the machine in Ian; Fig. II a view in side elevation; Fig. II is a view to larger scale, in horizontal section, looking down, the plane of section being indicated by the line III-III, Fig. II; F1 IV is a view to the same scale with Fig. II in vertical section, on the plane indicated at IV-IV, Fig. I; Fig. V is a view in side elevation and to larger scale of the means for controlling the rise of the vertically moving carriage; Fig. VI is a view in side elevation and to larger scale than in Fi II of the sheet piling members, a detail being shown in end elevation in Fig. VII.

The stacking apparatus consists essentially of a frame which overhangs the growing it,and which, receivand under some momentum, brings them to rest, each successive sheet truly placed and alined on the top of the pile.

The frame here alluded to is shown at 1 in Figs. I and .II. Secured to it on the side opposite that at which the successive sheets enter, is a cushioning device adapted to bear the im act of the entering sheets and to bring t iem successively to rest. This cushionin device convenientl consists of resilient ngers 2 (of. Fig. VI). These fingers extend vertically in a position to sustain the im act of the advancing sheet. On either side of the path of the advancing sheet or approximately so,

Elva tes 3, the shape and the frame is provided with flariu ition of w st shown in Figs. V and serve to aid in bringing the sheet accurately to place. The frame is further rovided with a usher 4, best shown in ig. IV. This pus er isborne in bearings for oscillation in the direction of sheet advance, and oscillation is imparted to it by means of ink connection to crank 5 home on a shaft 6, which shaft is journaled in the frame, and has-further uses presently to be described.

The pusher is situated on that side of the ide ici are VII, and which frame upon which the sheet enters, and is arranged beneath the path of sheet advance. Its forward face is downwardly inclined, as indicated at a, to the end that a sheet advanclng over it descends the inclined face a by gravity, sliding in the direction indicate by the arrow, Fig. II. -This advance of the sheet is aided tooby the oscillation of the pusher. The sheet advancing passes beyond the pusher, and then the end of the pusher abutting in its oscillation against the rear edge of the sheet; and the sheet, being so urged forward from behind, and being guided on either side by the. downwardly converging plates 3, and being-restrained from further advance by the cushioning fingers 2, comes accurately to place on the top of the pile.

I shall describenext the means employed for causing the. frame'to whatever be the height of the pile, theframe is always ready to receive the sheet and bring it to position on the top. The frame is mounted to rise and descend between vertical guides 7, and is counterweighted by weights 8, so that always it tends to rise to the upper limit of its range. It is restrained in this tendency by a pawl 9 which it bears and which tends always to swing into position of engagement with the successive teeth of a rack 10 with v 7 is provided. Pawl 9 extends from a horizontally extending shaft, pivoted in frame 1, from which shaft extends also a finger 11, so shaped and disposed as to constitute a trigger, tripped by the rise of the height of the pile of sheets beyond a critical point, relatively to frame position. When this critical point is reached, pawl 9 is released from the tooth of rack 10 which it had up to that instant engaged, and frame 1 rises until the pawl engages the next higher tooth of the rack. For, immediately frame 1 begins to rise, the shaft which bears both pawl 6 9 and finger 11 begins to turn, the weight of the long-extending finger tending alwaysto cause this shaft to turn anti-clockwise (Fig. II).

This operation will be clearly'understood by referring to Fig. II. There is shown a stack of sheets 8 built up on the platform of a car placed to receive them. This stack, as the machine continues to operate, grows higher and higher. As its height increases (frame 1 remaining stationary so long as pawl 9 continues in engagement with any particular tooth of rack 10) finger 11 1s raised, for it rests on the pile by gravity, and each succeeding sheet, as it slips beneath, raises finger 11 somewhat. As this finger rises, the shaft from which it extends turns, and this shaft in turning turns also pawl 9. At last pawl 9 is carried beyond the edge of the tooth with which it has been in engagement. At once the counterweights 8 become effective to raise frame 1. But, as frame 1 rises, finger 11 swings down, and so pawl 9 returns at once to a position such that it engages the next succeeding tooth of rack 10. It holds frame 1 at that station till with the accumulation of more sheets on pile s the critical point already mentioned is again reached and the operations described recur.

In order to prevent pawl 9 from clattering over the teeth of the rack when the frame after rising to the upper end of its range is drawn down again to the position for beginning again to build up a new pile, the shaft which carries pawl and finger has a further clockwise range of turning, and this turning, which carries the pawl clear of the teeth, may be effected by a suitable handle. A latch 12 is provided, to engage the pawl 9 (it might engage any convenient projection from the shaft) and hold it in this extreme swing to inactive position. A trip 13 may be provided, mounted on a stationary'part of the machine which shall open latch 12 and release the pawl when the frame 1 being drawn downward comes again to the lower limit of its range.

Next in order to be described is an end less belt conveyer 14 (conveniently two narrow parallel bands), borne by frame 1, and adapted by position and direction of movement to carry sheets delivered to it into the portion of the frame defined by guide plates 3, cushion fingers 2 and pusher 4, already described. This endless conveyer is borne upon rollers 15 and 16, one of which is driven from asuitable source of power, such as a motor 17 through a belt 18, mounted in familiar manner, to permit of the vertical frame movement described, without inter- 65 mission of rotation.

I come now to describe the portion of the mechanism which brings it into coiirdination and operative relationship to a rolling mill. M, M are the rolls of the final pass of the cold-rolling mill for tin plate. On the delivery side of the pass and on opposite sides are set standards 19, in which are pivoted brackets 20, which brackets 20 are provided with socketed bearing blocks 21. A frame 22 is provided with a series ,of rollers 23 and these carry an-endless belt 24 (here again, the belt conveniently takes the form of parallel strips). At one end the axles of the terminal roller 23 are extended, to rest in the sockets in blocks 21, and at the opposite end the frame is provided with ways 25 adapted to rest upon collars borne by shaft 16. By these means frame 22 is hung, supported on one end on standards 19 and on the other end by frame 1. Furthermore the enga ement of this frame 22 with frame 1 in sue that there is pla between, and, as frame 1 .moves vertlcal frame 22 swings pivotally in the sockets in bearing blocks 21. The terminal roller of frame 22 adjacent frame 1 is provided with a pinion 26, and roller 16 also is provided with a pinion 27, and borne between on pivoted links is a third pinion 28, and by these means the belt 24 on frame 22 is driven from the same source of power which drives belt 14, and the driving is continuous, whatever he the vertical position of frame 1. Of course the upper load-carrying reaches of the two belts 14 and 24 advance in the same direction, from right to left, Fig. II.

The gearing preferably is such that belt 14 moves somewhat faster than belt 24 (the ratio may be 6 to 5, for example). The purpose here is that, in case successive plates are slightly overlapped, as sometimes happens, the one in advance overlying the one. in the rear, the plate in advance may as it passes from belt 24 to belt 14 be drawn more rapidly forward, to break such overlap, and to insure the advance of the following plate on top of its predecessor when the stack is reached.

The conveyer 24 maybe set on either side with guides 29 to properly aline the plates on the conveyer, so that they shall come with accuracy of position into frame 1.

The end 30 of frame 24 adjacent the mill M M is pivoted, and adjacent the pivot point are standards 31 upon which frame 24 may rest when the end 30 is swung upward. Normally the whole frame 24 with its extension 30 is bolted by bolts 32 so that it is rigid, and is supported on standards 19; but when bolts 32 are loosened the main portion of frame 24 rests upon standards 31 (slightly lower than the normal position of frame 24) and then the end 30 may be swung upward. Thiilprovision is to afford access to the rolls M for grinding, as is frequently necessary. The arms 20 are pivoted in standards 19 to give access on occasion (of. Fig. I) to the roll throughout its length, unobstructed from housing to housing.

Operation has been made plain, and requires but brief review. The apparatus being in the position shown in Figs. I and II, it is to be understood that the mill is in operation and the plates as they are delivered are being conveyed one by one and automatically piled on the car C standing in position to receive them.

by aid of the guides 29; it enters frame 1, passes to conveyer 14 (where its speed is, for the reasons given, slightly accelerated) and thence down the inclined face of pusher 4 to the pile s. It is kept in line by side guides 3, and impelled as it lies on the pile by the oscillating pusher and restrained bythe cushioned fingers 2, it comes accurately to place.

As the stack mounts in height, frame 1 automatically adjusts itself to maintain its effective position at the top of the pile.

When the upper limit of frame rise is reached (or at any earlier stage) the stack may be removed, a new receiving support provided, and the frame drawn down to suitable relative position. In the descent of the frame 1, the pawl 9 may be turned aside, so as not to clatter over the rack, and there are means for automatically bringing the pawl back to operative position when the lower limit is reached again.

The frame 22 is so hung on frame 1 as to allow free vertical movement of frame 1 while frame 22 swings pivotally. At the same time plate travel is always uninterrupted, and the belt drive is not disturbed.

When the rolls are to be ground (the conveyor being then idle) the proximate end of frame 22 is swung aside. If the whole space between the housings is to be cleared, arms 20 also may be swung out of the way. I

In the ensuing claims I define what is of the essence of the invention. So long as this be present, my invention will be enjoyed; in other respects, the showing of the specification is exemplary and admits of variation.

I claim as my invention:

1. Means for arresting a succession of horizontally advancing sheets and for superposing them in a vertical pile, said means including a space confined by narrowing side walls into which the individual sheet descends by gravity to rest on the sheet below, an oscillating pusher on the near end and a cushioning stop on the far end of said space.

2. Means for arresting a succession of horizontally advancing sheets and for superposing them in a vertical pile, said means consisting of a frame in which are carried opposite guide (plates, and transverse to said guide plates, at one end a yielding stop at the other an oscillating pusher with inclined upper surface, the said members defining a guiding space into which the plates descent by gravity, substantially as de- Each plate as it advances upon conveyerfl 24: is brought to true position, if necessary, 5

scribed.

3. In sheet piling mechanism a counterweighted piler floating in vertical guides and provided with ment and means for operating the escapement, itself operated by the increase in the height of the pile of sheets gradually built up, substantially as described.

at. In sheet piling mechanism the combination of two frames one movable vertically the other supported at opposite ends on the first frame and on a fixed support, the engagement of the second frame upon the first being by means of sliding ways, endless belt conveyers upon each of said frames and a common source of power driving both conveyers, substantially as described.

5. In sheet piling mechanism the combination of two frames one movable vertically and the other supported at opposite ends on the first frame and on a fixed support, endless belt conveyers upon each of the said frames, a common source of power driving both conveyers and driving them at unequal speeds, substantially as described.

6. In combination with a rolling mill, a

sheet piling mechanism arranged on the delivery side thereof, said mechanism' including a frame provided with an endless belt conveyer, said frame being pivoted at a oint intermediate its length, whereby the section of the frame adjacent the mill may be swung away and permit access to the rolls, substantially as described.

In combination with a rolling mill, pilmechanism arranged on the delivery side thereof, said mechanism including a standard with arms pivoted upon it, and with a frame pivoted at a point intermediate its length and extending away from said mill, and normally resting at its end adjacent the mill upon the arms pivoted in the standards, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

JOHN W. FREE.

ing

Witnesses:

H. S. SPENCER, A. S. WATKINS.

pawl and rack escape-

US1389244A 1920-07-19 1920-07-19 Means for stacking sheet material Expired - Lifetime US1389244A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2613077A (en) * 1949-01-13 1952-10-07 Florez Company Inc De Folding and gathering means for books
US2642221A (en) * 1949-01-21 1953-06-16 Owens Illinois Glass Co Truck indexing mechanism
US2644685A (en) * 1950-09-23 1953-07-07 Robert P Gantenbein Feed delivery device for newspaper sections and the like
US2660432A (en) * 1948-09-04 1953-11-24 Owens Illinois Glass Co Apparatus for conveying and stacking box blanks
US2665633A (en) * 1947-11-21 1954-01-12 Plywood Res Foundation Panel brander
US2723851A (en) * 1950-01-09 1955-11-15 Camerano Sebastian Stacking device

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2665633A (en) * 1947-11-21 1954-01-12 Plywood Res Foundation Panel brander
US2660432A (en) * 1948-09-04 1953-11-24 Owens Illinois Glass Co Apparatus for conveying and stacking box blanks
US2613077A (en) * 1949-01-13 1952-10-07 Florez Company Inc De Folding and gathering means for books
US2642221A (en) * 1949-01-21 1953-06-16 Owens Illinois Glass Co Truck indexing mechanism
US2723851A (en) * 1950-01-09 1955-11-15 Camerano Sebastian Stacking device
US2644685A (en) * 1950-09-23 1953-07-07 Robert P Gantenbein Feed delivery device for newspaper sections and the like

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