US134066A - Improvement in dyeing black with aniline colors - Google Patents

Improvement in dyeing black with aniline colors Download PDF

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US134066A
US134066A US134066DA US134066A US 134066 A US134066 A US 134066A US 134066D A US134066D A US 134066DA US 134066 A US134066 A US 134066A
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improvement
aniline
material
dyed
dyeing
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06PDYEING OR PRINTING TEXTILES; DYEING LEATHER, FURS, OR SOLID MACROMOLECULAR SUBSTANCES IN ANY FORM
    • D06P1/00General processes of dyeing or printing textiles, or general processes of dyeing leather, furs, or solid macromolecular substances in any form, classified according to the dyes, pigments, or auxiliary substances employed
    • D06P1/32General processes of dyeing or printing textiles, or general processes of dyeing leather, furs, or solid macromolecular substances in any form, classified according to the dyes, pigments, or auxiliary substances employed using oxidation dyes

Description

' UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

LEON JAROSSON, OF LILLE, FRANCE, AND JEAN JACQUES MULLER-PACK, OF BASEL, SWITZERLAND, ASSIGNORS TO WILLIAM MORGAN BROWN,

OF LONDON, ENGLAND.

IMPROVEMENT IN DYEING BLACK WITH ANILINE COLORS.

Specification forming part of Letters Patent No. 134,066, dated December 17, 1872.

on the 3d day of June, 1872,) of which the following is a specification:

Prior to the date of this invention it has been the practice to fix or develop fast colors derived from coal-tar products, such as aniline black or naphthylamine chocolate, in animal or vegetable fibers, fabrics, or yarns, or in mixtures of the same by the process known as aging, which consists in hanging them in an open room. after having been dyed with the proper chemicals, and in there exposing them to the action of the atmosphere at a temperature usually ranging from 16 to 21 centigrade, whereby the required oxidation of the aniline, naphthylamine, or kindred coaltar products, is gradually effected; but such process has been attended with considerable inconvenience in order to produce the result desired.

The invention herein set forth is designed to facilitate the chemical changes which take place in the fibers, textile fabrics, or yarns so dyed, and to materially lessen the inconvenience consequent upon the usual process of aging; and it consists substantially in placing such dyed fibers, fabrics, or yarns within a close vessel so constructed and operated as to keep them in motion while subjecting them to a temperature exceeding that of the ordinary aging-room, but not so high as to generate chemical action injurious to the quality or strength of the fiber, fabrics, or yarns themselves.

In order to more clearly make known the nature of this improvement, we will describe it in connection with the process of dyeing fibers, textile fabrics, or yarns aniline black.

We prepare, in the first place, a solution com- I posed of chloride of iron thus: Boiling water,

ten liters; hydrochloric acid, ten kilograms;

in which we dissolve about three kilograms of clean iron turn in gs. We treat the cloth or m aterial to be dyed, after the usual preparation, in a bath of this chloride of iron reduced to 12 Baum. We work the material, if yarn, upon battens for a couple of hours, or if tissues in bundles, and we leave the mordant on them for twelve hours then press out the excess. It

is then ready for dyeing. For thirty kilograms of the material to be dyed we take thirty kilograms of boiling water, in which two and onetenth kilograms of chlorate of potash is dissolved, or chlorate of soda or chlorate of ammo nia. In another vessel we take three kilograms of aniline and five kilograms of hydrochloric acid, or an equivalent of hydrochlorate orother salt of aniline suitable for dyeing. Into this we immerse the material to be dyed, after adding the chlorate-of-potash solution. We now place the said material in a closed vessel, which is rotated and also heated exteriorly. A convenient form of such vessel is a cylinder of, say, four feet in length and two feet in diameter, made of sheet-iron or other material, supported at each end by an axis, and turning on its axis in suitable bearings. It can be driven by either hand or power, by a handle or pulley.

It should be fitted with a large man-hole and tight-fitting cover and a small spring safetyvalve if excess of pressure is feared. It may revolve in an outer case or cistern supplied with hot water kept at the proper temperature by a jet of steam or other suitable means. We subject the material to be dyed to from three to five hours treatment in this cylinder, according to the material being dyed, and durin g this time we heat the apparatus, commencing at 30 centigrade, gradually up to 50 centigrade. After the oxidation and the formation of the color which has thus been produced in the vessel, we withdraw the material, and we leave it in a heap several hours, during which the fixing of the color is complete. We then pass the material into a weak bath of acidulated bichromate of potash, heated to 50. centigrade, from twenty to thirty minutes, and afterward wash in running water. Lastly, we give it a softening bath (called a white bath) composed of a salt of soda and olive-oil, in the ordinary 2 1 at ,oee

and Well-known proportions for weak solution of soap. The temperature of this bath should be about 50 centigradc, and the time from twenty to thirty minutes. The material is then well washed in cold Water, hung to dry, and the operation is finished.

To freshen orgive a slight shade of blue, We give a Weakly acid bath of sulphuric acid, and wash cold, neutralizing the acid with the Water slightly alkaline.

We have described our invention as applied to aniline black, but other fast colors derived from coal-tar products may be dyed in the same manner; for instance, the fast chocolate obtained by using hydrochlorate of naphthaline in place of hydrochlorate of aniline.

WV e claim- The improved mode of fixing'or developing

US134066D Improvement in dyeing black with aniline colors Expired - Lifetime US134066A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016201301A1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-12-15 Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Complement component c5 irna compositions and methods of use thereof

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2016201301A1 (en) 2015-06-12 2016-12-15 Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Complement component c5 irna compositions and methods of use thereof

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