US1339870A - Internal-combustion engine - Google Patents

Internal-combustion engine Download PDF

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Publication number
US1339870A
US1339870A US763466A US1913763466A US1339870A US 1339870 A US1339870 A US 1339870A US 763466 A US763466 A US 763466A US 1913763466 A US1913763466 A US 1913763466A US 1339870 A US1339870 A US 1339870A
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Prior art keywords
cylinder
piston
chamber
compression chamber
air
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US763466A
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John S Taylor
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PREMIER MOTOR Corp
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PREMIER MOTOR CORP
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Priority to US763466A priority Critical patent/US1339870A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B25/00Engines characterised by using fresh charge for scavenging cylinders
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B2720/00Engines with liquid fuel
    • F02B2720/13Two stroke engines with ignition device
    • F02B2720/131Two stroke engines with ignition device with measures for removing exhaust gases from the cylinder

Definitions

  • JOHN S. TAYLOR OF NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, ASSIGNOR, BY MESN E ASSIGNMENTS, TO PREMIER MOTOR CORPORATION OF AMERICA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.
  • This invention relates to improvements in internal combustion engines.
  • the object of the invention is to provide an engine of the two-cycle type, in which comparatively heavy hydrocarbon oil, such as kerosene, may be ecconomically and efficiently used.
  • the invention consists in the main, of surrounding the compression end of the cylinder with a jacket through which the exhaust gases pass, so that this portion of the cylinder will be kept at suitable temperature to heat up, and maintain the incoming charge at proper temperature for ready ignition.
  • the invention further consists in a construction, whereby the air drawn into the carbureter, will be heated before reaching the carbureter, where it is combined with the oil, to form the mixture before passing into the base or compression end of the cylinder, all as will now be described.
  • Figure 1 is a vertical central section of a cylinder of a two-cycle engine, with carbureter attachment, and in elevation; and Fig. 2 is a transverse section taken about on line aa of Fig. l;
  • the numeral 1 designates the cylinder, which is provided with a long hollow piston 1, which is preferably connected to the connecting rods by means of trunnions passing through elongated slots in the sides of the cylinder, the slots being of such length as never to be uncovered by the piston in its reciprocations.
  • the cylinder is provided at its upper end with combustion chamber 2, and at its lower end with a compression chamber 3, the two chambers being connected by a transfer passage 4, the lower end 5 of which being adapted to register with the port 6 in the upper part of the piston, when said plston is at the limit of its downward stroke, as shown in the drawing.
  • the upper port 7 of the transfer passage is adapted to be uncovered when the piston is in this position, so that the charge which has been drawn into the compression chamber upon the last upward stroke of the piston, will be transferred under compression, from the compression chamber to the explosive chamber, where it is compressed upon the upward stroke of the piston, preparatory to ignition.
  • the numeral 8 designates the exhaust port, which is uncovered at the lowermost point of the stroke of the piston. This port communicates with a jacket 9 extending entirely around the lower part of the compression chamber of the cylinder, and communicates with the exhaust outlet 10.
  • the numeral 11 designates the intake from the carbureter and leads into the bottom of the cylinder above the lower end of the piston, when it is at the limit of its down stroke.
  • I provide a hot air duct 12, open to the outer air at its upper end as indicated at 13, and this duct communicates, near its lower end through an intake port 1a, with the pipe 15 leading to the carburetor, so that the air which is to be mixed with the oil will meet the same in the carburetor, in a highly heated condition, the air having passed over the highly heated jacket 9 which surrounds the lower part of the cylinder.
  • the upper or explosion chamber is surrounded by the usual water jacket 16, and it will be understood that any suitable spark plug or ignition apparatus may be provided in the combustion chamber.
  • the up-stroke of the piston will draw in through the duct 12 and intake 11, the fuel charge, which charge will be compressed in the base of the cylinder upon the oown stroke of the piston, the compression continuing until the port 6 in the piston registers with the port 5 of the transfer passage l, and the port 7 is uncovered, the charge will be transferred from the lower part of the cylinder to the upper part, to be compressed preparatory to firing upon the up stroke of the piston.
  • the lower end of the cylinder is closed, and compression takes place between the piston and the base of the cylinder and it will also be noted that the piston in its lowermost position, closes the intake opening 11, so that at the point of transfer of the charge, the momentum of the moving charge from the lower end of the cylinder to the upper end, will not draw in an additional or complicating charge of fuel.
  • An internal combustion engine having in combination a compression chamber; a combustion chamber; a carbu'reter connected with the compression chamber; an air intake communicating at one end with the at mosphere and at the other end with the carbureter; a piston; means for transferring the fuel charge from the compression chamber to the explosion chamber, and an exhaust chamber substantially and directly surrounding the compression chamber, the duct of the air intake being positioned im mediately adjacent the outer wall of the exhaust chamber whereby the air entering the intake is heated during its passage through the intake and delivered into the carburetor in a heated condition.
  • An internal combustion engine having.
  • the combination with a cylinder having an explosion chamber at one end, and a compression chamber at the other end, a piston operating in the cylinder, a jacket surrounding the compression chamber for receiving the exhaust gases from the explosion chamber to heat the same, the compression chamber having an intake port leading thereto, a carbureter in communication with the interior of the compression chamber through the intake port, an air duct extending substantially the length ofthe jacket, and positioned immediately adjacent the latter, said duct having an open and a closed end, the closed end stopping at a point short of the intake port, means provided adjacent the intake port and closed end of the air duct for afiording communication from the air duct throughthe carbureter to the intake port to the compression chamber, whereby operation of the piston in one direction will draw air through the duct and over the heated jacket, thus heating the air previous to the passage thereof into the compression chamber.

Description

J. S. TAYLOR.
iNTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. APPLICATION FILED APR. 24. 1913. RENEWED AUG. 22. I918.
Patented May 11, 1920.
. O 1 i 5 r 6 I1 Jifllflllii ,l 1 1 m R Q TITQTTED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
JOHN S. TAYLOR, OF NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, ASSIGNOR, BY MESN E ASSIGNMENTS, TO PREMIER MOTOR CORPORATION OF AMERICA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.
INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented May 11, 1920.
Application filed Apri1'24, 1913, Serial No. 763,466. Renewed August 22, 1918. Serial No. 251,008.
To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, JOHN S. TAYLOR, a citizen of the United States, residing at Norfo 1:, in the county of Norfolk and State of Virginia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Internal- Combustion Engines, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to improvements in internal combustion engines.
The object of the invention is to provide an engine of the two-cycle type, in which comparatively heavy hydrocarbon oil, such as kerosene, may be ecconomically and efficiently used.
The invention consists in the main, of surrounding the compression end of the cylinder with a jacket through which the exhaust gases pass, so that this portion of the cylinder will be kept at suitable temperature to heat up, and maintain the incoming charge at proper temperature for ready ignition.
The invention further consists in a construction, whereby the air drawn into the carbureter, will be heated before reaching the carbureter, where it is combined with the oil, to form the mixture before passing into the base or compression end of the cylinder, all as will now be described.
In the drawings- Figure 1 is a vertical central section of a cylinder of a two-cycle engine, with carbureter attachment, and in elevation; and Fig. 2 is a transverse section taken about on line aa of Fig. l;
7 Referring to the drawings, the numeral 1 designates the cylinder, which is provided with a long hollow piston 1, which is preferably connected to the connecting rods by means of trunnions passing through elongated slots in the sides of the cylinder, the slots being of such length as never to be uncovered by the piston in its reciprocations.
The cylinder is provided at its upper end with combustion chamber 2, and at its lower end with a compression chamber 3, the two chambers being connected by a transfer passage 4, the lower end 5 of which being adapted to register with the port 6 in the upper part of the piston, when said plston is at the limit of its downward stroke, as shown in the drawing.
The upper port 7 of the transfer passage is adapted to be uncovered when the piston is in this position, so that the charge which has been drawn into the compression chamber upon the last upward stroke of the piston, will be transferred under compression, from the compression chamber to the explosive chamber, where it is compressed upon the upward stroke of the piston, preparatory to ignition.
The numeral 8 designates the exhaust port, which is uncovered at the lowermost point of the stroke of the piston. This port communicates with a jacket 9 extending entirely around the lower part of the compression chamber of the cylinder, and communicates with the exhaust outlet 10. The numeral 11 designates the intake from the carbureter and leads into the bottom of the cylinder above the lower end of the piston, when it is at the limit of its down stroke. At one side of the cylinder, adjacent to the intake 11, I provide a hot air duct 12, open to the outer air at its upper end as indicated at 13, and this duct communicates, near its lower end through an intake port 1a, with the pipe 15 leading to the carburetor, so that the air which is to be mixed with the oil will meet the same in the carburetor, in a highly heated condition, the air having passed over the highly heated jacket 9 which surrounds the lower part of the cylinder.
The upper or explosion chamber is surrounded by the usual water jacket 16, and it will be understood that any suitable spark plug or ignition apparatus may be provided in the combustion chamber.
In operation the up-stroke of the piston will draw in through the duct 12 and intake 11, the fuel charge, which charge will be compressed in the base of the cylinder upon the oown stroke of the piston, the compression continuing until the port 6 in the piston registers with the port 5 of the transfer passage l, and the port 7 is uncovered, the charge will be transferred from the lower part of the cylinder to the upper part, to be compressed preparatory to firing upon the up stroke of the piston. When the piston is in its lowermost position, or the position from the outside does not pass directly into the carbureter, but is conducted through the duct 12, where, by contact with the outer surface of the jacket 9, it will become hot and thereafter it is passed to the carbureter, where it mixes with the oil and is drawn into the compression chamber, where it is, due to the heat of the lower part of the cylinder, quickly and properly vaporized, preparatory to passage to the explosion chamber.
As shown in the drawings, the lower end of the cylinder is closed, and compression takes place between the piston and the base of the cylinder and it will also be noted that the piston in its lowermost position, closes the intake opening 11, so that at the point of transfer of the charge, the momentum of the moving charge from the lower end of the cylinder to the upper end, will not draw in an additional or complicating charge of fuel.
Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim is 1. An internal combustion engine having in combination a compression chamber; a combustion chamber; a carbu'reter connected with the compression chamber; an air intake communicating at one end with the at mosphere and at the other end with the carbureter; a piston; means for transferring the fuel charge from the compression chamber to the explosion chamber, and an exhaust chamber substantially and directly surrounding the compression chamber, the duct of the air intake being positioned im mediately adjacent the outer wall of the exhaust chamber whereby the air entering the intake is heated during its passage through the intake and delivered into the carburetor in a heated condition.
2. An internal combustion engine having.
carburetor and extending longitudinally of the compression chamber; means for transferring the fuel charge from the compression chamber directly into the combustion chamber, and an exhaust chamber partially surroundingthe upper portion of the compression chamber and entirely surrounding the lower portion'of the same; whereby the air entering the air duct is heated during its passage through the duct to the compression chamber and delivered to the carbureter in a heated condition, said exhaust chamber opening into the combustion chamber and into the outer air.
3. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with a cylinder having an explosion chamber at one end, and a compression chamber at the other end, a piston operating in the cylinder, a jacket surrounding the compression chamber for receiving the exhaust gases from the explosion chamber to heat the same, the compression chamber having an intake port leading thereto, a carbureter in communication with the interior of the compression chamber through the intake port, an air duct extending substantially the length ofthe jacket, and positioned immediately adjacent the latter, said duct having an open and a closed end, the closed end stopping at a point short of the intake port, means provided adjacent the intake port and closed end of the air duct for afiording communication from the air duct throughthe carbureter to the intake port to the compression chamber, whereby operation of the piston in one direction will draw air through the duct and over the heated jacket, thus heating the air previous to the passage thereof into the compression chamber.
In testimony whereof Iaffix my signature in presence of two witnesses.
JOHN S. TAYLOR. itnesses FRANCIS B. DAVIS, ALICE R. KIRBY.
US763466A 1913-04-24 1913-04-24 Internal-combustion engine Expired - Lifetime US1339870A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3717993A (en) * 1970-11-02 1973-02-27 Gen Motors Corp Preheater assembly for stirling engine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3717993A (en) * 1970-11-02 1973-02-27 Gen Motors Corp Preheater assembly for stirling engine

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