US1299853A - Sound reproducing and recording apparatus. - Google Patents

Sound reproducing and recording apparatus. Download PDF

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US1299853A
US1299853A US7664116A US7664116A US1299853A US 1299853 A US1299853 A US 1299853A US 7664116 A US7664116 A US 7664116A US 7664116 A US7664116 A US 7664116A US 1299853 A US1299853 A US 1299853A
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record
records
sound
stylus
disk
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US7664116A
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Samuel D Mott
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ARTHUR B SULLIVAN
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ARTHUR B SULLIVAN
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B17/00Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor

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  • This invention relates primarily to sound reproducing apparatus of that class whereinthe recorded sound is impressed in a spiral groove on the face of a fiat disk and herein termed a disk record.
  • Thebroad object of the invention is the extension of Uhe field of the sound reproducing machine. industry by. broadening the scope of the apparatus and thereby increasing its utility. This broad object is attended by numerous more specific objects such as increasing the range or time of action of the apparatus by enlarging the range of. sound reproduction'which can be reproduced as a continuous record either to a limited extent or unlimited by continuous repetition.
  • Another object is to maintain the individuality of the various instruments or sounds which are reproduced as a'single concerted composition and'tlhereby increase the accuracy and tonal harmony of the reproduced 30 sound.
  • the reproduced composition may be repeated indefinitely 'Withoutany manual'operation being necessary.
  • a continuously operative orchestra
  • band or concert instrument is attained for use in moving picture theaters, auditoriums, lobbies, dancing halls and public places generally. Given motion, the reproducing instrument will run indefinitely or until wornv out.
  • the invention also attains, in one of its forms, an entirely new result in the phono-' graphic reproduction of sound; to wit, the maintaining of the individuality of each instrument or voice-brought together in concert.
  • the rationale of orchestra or band is variety and volume and this is'not'obtained unless identity is preserved.
  • Each 1nstrument is provided with its ownindividual sound-box and stylus transmitting the sounds to a common exit or horn and the is necessary in the 'phonographp'er se' and sound from any or all instruments or voices may be stopped by lifting it's-' sound-box from the record If a quartet is reproduced, the soprano may sound, then thealto or .the tenor or the bass or all together-or inany combination, for entertainment or teach tongues for comparison and familiarizing.
  • the invention consists'hin, theimproved apparatus for reproducing soundfhereinafter more particularly described and then specified in the claimsj;
  • y F igurel is a plan view-of asound reproducing apparatus in accordance with this invention in one of its forms to wit, that in WlllCh a plurality of disk recordsprovided with sound grooves arranged as a continuation one of the other and provided with a common sound box and stylus. In this form "the composition cannot be repeated except by bringing the stylus back to its initial posi tion manually;
  • Fig. 2 is anenlarged edge elevation of the record disks shown in Fig.1.
  • Fig. 3 is a plan view of the record disks separated from each other andlookingat the bottom of the records, the disks being turned upside down.
  • Fig. 4 illustrates, in plan view, a slight modification in the disks.
  • Fig. 5 is an enlarged cross-section and partial side elevation taken on the line 5-5 Fig. 4.
  • Fig. 6 is a plan view ofa sound reproducingapparatus in accordance with this invention in another of its forms, to wit, one in which a very lengthy produetionmay "be reproduced and repeated automatically any number of times.
  • Fig. isan edge. view of the turntables supportlng'the disks shown in Fig. 6 and illustrates the canted overlapped arrange ment on an exaggerated scale.
  • a F 1g. 8 is a diagrammatic view illustrating a driving means which might be employed for rotating the turntables used in the form shown in Fig. 6.
  • Fig. 9 is a plan view of an arrangement in accordance with this invention in which the records are arranged in group succession, that is, each group has recorded sounds from a single source and each group is procrawings, the invenvided with a sound-box and stylus all of which transmit the recorded sounds to acommon exit.
  • Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 showparatus suitable to produce records for use in the reproducing apparatus shown in Fig. 9 a
  • Fig. 12 is a plan view of the same with the megaphonesand turntables removed.
  • Fig. 13 is a transverse cross-section taken on the line 13- 13 Fig. 12, parts being shown in elevation. I
  • Fig. 14 illustrates a guiding device which might be employed in connection with the stylus toproperly direct the stylus to itsproper groove in a succeeding record.
  • Fig.15 Illustrates the same in passing from one record to another.
  • Fig. ,-16 is a side elevation shown in Figs. 14 and 15. a
  • This invention in all its forms contemplates bypreference the employment of flat of the parts disk records of the usual type in that they are provided withsound grooves spirally arranged and by the rotation of the record .the stylus is caused to travel in the record groove and across the face of the record.
  • the stylus, sound-box and reproducer arm may be of any'desired suitable construction; in the forms shown it is typified as the usual stylus which acts on the diaphragm of the sound-box carried by the usual hollow swinging reproducer arm which transmits the sound to a megaphone or other exit.
  • the sound-box is .pivotally mounted on the end of the reproducer arm so as to engagethe face of the record disks by gravity asis usual.
  • the-record groove starts near the outer edge and terminates at the center whereas in a record disk for use in this invention the record groove starts at the center and runs off into space at the outer periphery so that the stylus travels off the periphery of one record and into the record groove of the next .record.
  • Figs. 1, 2 and 3 three record disks are shown although more or less number may be employed.
  • the record disks. 1, 2 and 3 are mounted above a suitable support such as a cabinet 4.
  • the record disks are .each provided on their upper surface with a spiral record groove, the sound waves of which being by preference located on the side walls although they might be located in the bottom if desired.
  • the record grooves in these as well as the balance of the figures are shown exaggerated for simplicity and clearness.
  • the peripheries of the disks 1, 2 and 3 are preferably each provided with a groove 5 of any desired character.
  • Rotation given to the spindle 7 v is communicated to the disk 1 by pin 8 and in turn transmitted to the disks 2 and 3 by the pinions or'wheels working in the grooves 5.
  • the pinions or wheels serve to support as well as drive the disks 2 and-3 as well as similar pinions would support and drive any additional number of disks which might be added to the series.
  • the disk 1 is driven by the spindle 7
  • the disk 2 is driven by the wheels 12 and 16. receiving power from the wheel 11 and the wheel on the spindlebenea th wheel 16 respectively
  • the disk 3 is driven from the disk 2 by the wheels 15 and 17 receiving power fromthe' wheel 14 and the wheel beneath the wheel 17 respectively.
  • the disk 1 is supported by the spindle 7, the disk 2 is supported at. three points by the wheels 12, l-l a'nd l6 and the disk 3 is supported at three points by the wheels 15,17 and 19.
  • the reproducer arm carries at its I viously described, the stylus and sound-box' 22 vide the lower flange at the periphery of the records formed by thegroove 5 .with cutaway places 20 (see Fig. 3) in such positions that the record disks can only be placed in position over the supporting and driving spindles through these cut-away parts and when so placed the record grooves of each record will form a continuation of the prior one.
  • the record disks 1, 2 and 3 are arranged with their centers in the arc of a; circlein the center of which circle a hollow reproducer arm 21 is 'pivotally mounted to swing outer end the usual gravity soundbox 22 provided with a stylus adapted to travel in the record grooves of the disks.
  • the operation is consideredto be obviousrotation given the record disks as pre- 2 travels across the face of each record and successively from one to the other.
  • the stylus reaches the notch or'shoulder 6 of any record it drops off that record and down onto the next succeeding record and so on.
  • guiding means for the stylus to the proper groove in the succeeding record asshown in Figs. 14, .15 and 16 and subsequently herein described maybe employedi
  • the reproducer arm 21 conducts the re: produced sounds from the sound-box to a born or megaphone of any desired character preferably but not necessarily located in the cabinet 4.
  • the driving and supporting wheels may be toothed pinions engaging "teeth formed in theperiphery of the disks genttothe' grooves as'indicated at 23 in Fig. 1.
  • a positioning finger 24 may be employed. This finger is withdrawn,- In this formvof the invention the disk 2 is slid edgewise against the driv- 1ng p 1n1ons.1-2lfand 16 and an additional p supporting pinion 2,6"is then brought up into operative position.
  • 29 mdlcates a plurality or series of record dlsks partially superposed one above the other and eachprovided with a spiral record groove starting at the center of the disk and running off the periphery at the notch or center to the edge and then drops to the center of the next succeeding record and so on.
  • the tylus can travel continuously around the circle of records an indefinite number of times until stopped or the parts become worn or the driving power g1ves out.
  • a corresponding slant maybe given the sound-box carrying the stylus so the stylus Will enter the groove in a vertical plane.
  • the degree of slant to be given the turntables and records depends on the thickness and diameters, the slant being shown exaggeratedin the drawing for clearness.
  • - 31 indicates a plurality of spindles or shafts suitably mounted on a support 32 and disposed "about justable mou'nt n'giof'p1n1on 26 the traction of the point. If desired power need be-apphed to but one shaft 31- in which casethe-rotation ofto Figs. 6 toll inclusive,
  • the turntables wlll be effected by each trans--
  • the shafts 31[ are. annularl'y the center'of thelturntable turntables 3Q.
  • Each shaft has two driving pinions 33jand 34 fastthereon' Toipreventslippage said pinions are preferably toothedwheels and each engages a toothed rack formed in a a groove 35 in the edge of the turntables 30.
  • the turntables are supported at the outer circle. of the arrangement by pinions 40 a disks 29.
  • the positioning hole in the, disk is so placed that when the disks are properly placed on the turntables the record groove of a disk where it leaves the disk at the shoulder 6 will lead directly to the 'beglnmng of the record in the groove in the next sue-- ceeding disk thus insuring proper continuity of the intended correlation between the records at all times.
  • a single reproducer arm 43 is provided for all records.
  • the arm is freely mounted to swing about the center of the arrangement and 1s provided with the usual gravity sound-box 44 carrying astylus needle adapted to travel across the face of the record disks 29 1n the grooves thereof and successively from one record to another.
  • the rotation given the records 29 by means of the driving pi'nions 33 and 34 acting on the turntables 30 causes the stylus to travel 111 the well known manner.
  • the stylus reaches the end of the groove at the periphcry of one record it drops down into the first groove in the next succeeding record and so on around the complete circle, traveling through the record grooves of each disk successively and then'repeating the cycle any number of times desired.
  • sound-box and stylus are mounted to swing about a common center 49 formed as a common .horn or exit to which the sounds from all the horns are transmitted.
  • reproducer arms travel continuously around 'carrying the sound-boxes and styli successively from one record to another, one sound-box and stylus'engaging a record of each instrument at all times. More or less instruments may be represented, in which case one horn and sound-boigis provided for each instrument;- If desired; to omit any instrument or instruments from the concerted efl'ect, onefor more of the sound-boxes may beturned back out of contact with the face of a the records. It will be understood that othersounds than those indicated may be reproduced in, ac .cordance' with the prinof thestylusand in line with the axis thereof when viewed from the front.
  • a recording apparatus suitable for making records to be used in the forms of this invention shown in Figs. 6 and 9 is illustrated in Figs. 11, 12 and 13.
  • Receivers of sound such as megaphones 60 maybe arranged on a platform above the apparatus or may be locatel in separate rooms or invided.
  • v sound-boxes 61 either directly, as shown in The point at which the stylus engages'the succeeding record may closures.
  • four megaphones are used alt ough it will be un derstood any desired number may. be pro- The megaphones. are connected to two instances or by means of flexible pipes 62 as shown in the other two instances.
  • the megaphones. are connected to two instances or by means of flexible pipes 62 as shown in the other two instances.
  • sound-boxes are provided with the usual recording stylusand are pivotally mounted on the ends of arms 63 mounted stationary on a stationary vertical standard 64. standard is fixedly mounted in a base 80.
  • the ,turntab-les65 are mounted upon and carried by a common turntable 66 by means of pairs of pinions 67 carried by spindles 68 rising from arms 69 projecting outwardly from the turntable 66 and pairs of pinions 70'carried by spindles 71 rising-from the turntable 66, "near the inner edge.
  • the pinions 70 may also be provided with teeth as in the case of the pinions 67
  • Each turntable 65 is provided with centering and positioning pins corresponding to those used on the turntables 30 of'the reproducing apparatus.
  • the turntable 66 is'rotated bodily counterclockwise as indicated by arrows by means of an electric or other motor 73, mounted on the turntable.
  • a shaft 74 driven by the motor and mounted in bearing 75 on the turntable 66 is provided with a worm gear '76 which meshes with a pinion 77 secured to the fixed post or standard 64.
  • Rotation of the shaft 74 rotates the common turntable 66 by the worm 76 traveling around,- the standard 64.
  • I Worm gears 78 on the shaft 74 engage and rotate pinions 79 which in turn rotate the turntables 65, the rotation being transmitted to all the turntables by the pinions 7 O and 67.
  • turntables 65 are rotated individually on the turntable 66 and carried around bodily by the rotation of the common turntable 66-. disks are placed on the turntables 65 and When the recordthe recording styli placed in operative po-- sition the sounds delivered to the mega-' phones 60 will be recorded on the disks in;-
  • the reproducing device is an exact diproper speed being determined by the pitch I..
  • a series of partially superposed disk records the grooves thereof starting at the center of each record and terminating at the outer edge, said disks rotating in fixed relation to each other and a stylus adapted to 'travel in, said grooves, said stylus running ofi said-edge arili engaging the center of the a series of disk records arranged in an arc, the grooves. of weach; record startingat the center and terminating at the outer edge and grooves thereo saidstylus dropping by gravity from the edgebfone disnoch the next succeedin disk.
  • Man apparatus for reproducing sound a series of disk records partially superposed on each other and arranged in a complete circle, the grooves in said recordsstarting at the'centers thereof and terminating at the outer edge and a stylus traveling in said grooves and passing successively and continuously from one record to another.
  • a series of partially superposed disk records :annularly arranged in .a complete circleand each provided witha record groove starting at the center of-the record and going 011? into space at the outer edge, a swinging reproducer arm swinging from the center of the circle formed by the records and a stylus carried by said arm and passing successively and continuously over said records from one to the other.
  • a series of partially superposed disk records each provided with a groove start-' 11.
  • a series of disk records having. sound overlapping the 'next succeeding record, a series of turntables each supporting one of said records, driving means engaging the peripheries of said turntables and a stylus traveling across the records in the grooves thereof and successively passing from one I record to another.
  • a series of partiall superposed disk ing one of said records, driving means for rotating said turntables and engaging the peripheries thereof, said driving means supporting said turntables and a stylus passing successively over said records in the grooves thereof.
  • a series of artially superposed disk records a turntab e for each record, means adapted to both rotate and support said turntables and a stylus passing over said records successively from one to another.
  • a series of disk records arranged consecutively in a complete circle and a stylus adapted to pass over said records and by gravity from One record to another, said records being arranged overlapping each other and slanting from the horizont 1 whereby said stylus may travel continuousl around the circle of records an indefinite umber of times.
  • a series of disk records arranged parallel with each other and at an angle to the horizontal and partially superposed one above the other, said records being arranged in a complete circle, a reproducer arm mounted to swing from the center of said circle of records and a stylus carried by said arm passing over said records and successively from one record to another whereby said stylus may travel continuOuslyfor any number of complete cyclesof the series of records.
  • a plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in group succession and a plurality of styli one for each group of rec-.'
  • the grooves 1n each record starting at the center and terminating at the outer edge and an independent stylus for each group, said stylus traveling in the record grooves from the center to the outer edge and then dropping off the outer edge by gravity onto the next record.
  • a plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in group succession and, a stylus for each group of records, all of said styli being adapted'to travel by gravity from one record to the next succeeding record of the group and transmitting sound to a common megaphone or horn.

Description

S. D. MOTT.
SOUND REPRODUCING AND RECORDING APPARATUS. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 7. I9l6.
1,299,853@ Patented Apr. 8,1919.
5 SHEETS-SHEET I.
. Ill/VE/VTOR Z7 Fa-1211142177 ATTORNEYS S. D. MOTT.
SOUND REPRODUCING AND RECORDING APPARATUS.
APPLICATION FlLD FEB- 7- ISIS.
1,299,53, Patented Apr. 8,1919.
-5 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
IN l/E N TOR I A TTORNEVS S. D. MOTT.
SOUND R EPRODUCING AND RECORDING APPARATUS. APPLICATION FILED FEB- 7. l9l6.
5 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
INVENTOR Patnted Apr. 8,1919.
' Patented Apr. 8, 1919.
5 SHEETS- SHEET 4.
I nwavron v JUI77UE D- mofi ATTORNEYS S. D. MOTT.
SOUND REPRODUCING AND RECORDING APPARATUS.
APPLICATION FILED FEB-7.19m.
Patented Apr. 8,1919.
5 SHEETSSHEET 5.
INVENTOH Jamue/D. 7770/1 ATTORNEYS SAMUEL D. MOTT, F PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO ARTHUR B. SULLIVAN, OF ALLENDALE, NEW JERSEY.
SOUND REPBOIDUCING AND RECORDING APPARAT:D-
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Apr.8, 1919.
Application filed February 7, 1916. Serial a... 76,641.
' To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, SAMUEL D. Mo'r'r,a
'citizen of thef'United States, and a resident This invention relates primarily to sound reproducing apparatus of that class whereinthe recorded sound is impressed in a spiral groove on the face of a fiat disk and herein termed a disk record.
Thebroad object of the invention is the extension of Uhe field of the sound reproducing machine. industry by. broadening the scope of the apparatus and thereby increasing its utility. This broad object is attended by numerous more specific objects such as increasing the range or time of action of the apparatus by enlarging the range of. sound reproduction'which can be reproduced as a continuous record either to a limited extent or unlimited by continuous repetition.
' Another object is to maintain the individuality of the various instruments or sounds which are reproduced as a'single concerted composition and'tlhereby increase the accuracy and tonal harmony of the reproduced 30 sound.
As is well known in this art the utility of the ordinary phonograph of the disk ty e is limited owing to the fact that to properly reproduce the recorded sound it is necessary to maintain some semblance to tangency of the stylus to the groove in which itis traveling and as the most practical manner of operation is by means of a rotating record and a swingingreproducer arm, the size of the record is hmited owing to the stylus canting too much off the tangent when the record is beyond'certain limits. For this reason the size of the compositions which could be reproduced was limited. According to this invention whole operas may be reproduced as a continuous record as well as other lengthy compositions such as lectures, &c.
Also in accordance with one of the forms of the invention the reproduced composition may be repeated indefinitely 'Withoutany manual'operation being necessary. In other words, a continuously operative orchestra,
band or concert instrument is attained for use in moving picture theaters, auditoriums, lobbies, dancing halls and public places generally. Given motion, the reproducing instrument will run indefinitely or until wornv out.
The invention also attains, in one of its forms, an entirely new result in the phono-' graphic reproduction of sound; to wit, the maintaining of the individuality of each instrument or voice-brought together in concert. All doubtless agree that the more familiar w are with the phonographic principle the more amazin it is that a needle and a matrix will recor and repeat the multitude of even the major vibrations of an orchestra, very imperfectly to be'sure' but sometimes recognizable as such. The reproduction is imperfect because the ind1v1dual= ity of the instruments is lost and we get vibrant tone effects with incidental harmony. The rationale of orchestra or band is variety and volume and this is'not'obtained unless identity is preserved. It is evident if a perfect piano record and a perfect violin record were sounded synchronousl-y as originally rendered, a erfect-me chani'cal orchestra with. the indivldual characteristics of each instrument preserved would be attained. Otherwise all of an'invery nature of the materials used these halftones, partials and over-tones, so important i in orchestral and concert harmony and even some of the major vibrations lose their identity, tone, characteristics or timbre. According to this invention, in one of its forms, the loss or mutilation of-these vibrations so they cannot be recognized is prevented by providing all instruments 'with their own records sounding in concert. In the drawings in this application illustrating this part of the invention, four records are shown for each instrument andthe same is shown as arranged for four instruments but the number of instruments may be increased to a full orchestra and more or less records for each instrument may be provided. In other words the apparatus may be constructed for any number of instruments or voices and any length of full-toned music. Each 1nstrument is provided with its ownindividual sound-box and stylus transmitting the sounds to a common exit or horn and the is necessary in the 'phonographp'er se' and sound from any or all instruments or voices may be stopped by lifting it's-' sound-box from the record If a quartet is reproduced, the soprano may sound, then thealto or .the tenor or the bass or all together-or inany combination, for entertainment or teach tongues for comparison and familiarizing.
The invention consists'hin, theimproved apparatus for reproducing soundfhereinafter more particularly described and then specified in the claimsj;
i In the accompanying tion is illustrated in a more. or les's'diagrammatic manner. as very littlestructural change the necessary details of construction. will be readily understood by those skilled'i'n this art.. y F igurel is a plan view-of asound reproducing apparatus in accordance with this invention in one of its forms to wit, that in WlllCh a plurality of disk recordsprovided with sound grooves arranged as a continuation one of the other and provided with a common sound box and stylus. In this form "the composition cannot be repeated except by bringing the stylus back to its initial posi tion manually;
Fig. 2 is anenlarged edge elevation of the record disks shown in Fig.1.
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the record disks separated from each other andlookingat the bottom of the records, the disks being turned upside down.
Fig. 4 illustrates, in plan view, a slight modification in the disks.
Fig. 5 is an enlarged cross-section and partial side elevation taken on the line 5-5 Fig. 4.
Fig. 6 is a plan view ofa sound reproducingapparatus in accordance with this invention in another of its forms, to wit, one in which a very lengthy produetionmay "be reproduced and repeated automatically any number of times.
Fig. isan edge. view of the turntables supportlng'the disks shown in Fig. 6 and illustrates the canted overlapped arrange ment on an exaggerated scale.
a F 1g. 8 is a diagrammatic view illustrating a driving means which might be employed for rotating the turntables used in the form shown in Fig. 6.
Fig. 9 is a plan view of an arrangement in accordance with this invention in which the records are arranged in group succession, that is, each group has recorded sounds from a single source and each group is procrawings, the invenvided with a sound-box and stylus all of which transmit the recorded sounds to acommon exit. Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 showparatus suitable to produce records for use in the reproducing apparatus shown in Fig. 9 a
Fig. 12 is a plan view of the same with the megaphonesand turntables removed.
Fig. 13 is a transverse cross-section taken on the line 13- 13 Fig. 12, parts being shown in elevation. I
Fig. 14 illustrates a guiding device which might be employed in connection with the stylus toproperly direct the stylus to itsproper groove in a succeeding record.
Fig.15-illustrates the same in passing from one record to another.
Fig. ,-16 is a side elevation shown in Figs. 14 and 15. a
This invention in all its forms contemplates bypreference the employment of flat of the parts disk records of the usual type in that they are provided withsound grooves spirally arranged and by the rotation of the record .the stylus is caused to travel in the record groove and across the face of the record.
The stylus, sound-box and reproducer arm may be of any'desired suitable construction; in the forms shown it is typified as the usual stylus which acts on the diaphragm of the sound-box carried by the usual hollow swinging reproducer arm which transmits the sound to a megaphone or other exit.
The sound-box is .pivotally mounted on the end of the reproducer arm so as to engagethe face of the record disks by gravity asis usual. In the record disk as employed in the ordinary single disk machine the-record groove starts near the outer edge and terminates at the center whereas in a record disk for use in this invention the record groove starts at the center and runs off into space at the outer periphery so that the stylus travels off the periphery of one record and into the record groove of the next .record.
Referring particularly to the form shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, three record disks are shown although more or less number may be employed. The record disks. 1, 2 and 3 are mounted above a suitable support such as a cabinet 4. The record disks are .each provided on their upper surface with a spiral record groove, the sound waves of which being by preference located on the side walls although they might be located in the bottom if desired. In the drawings the record grooves in these as well as the balance of the figures are shown exaggerated for simplicity and clearness. The peripheries of the disks 1, 2 and 3 are preferably each provided with a groove 5 of any desired character. The periphery of each record disk or at least all disks exceptthe last of the series'which is indicated at 1. in the drawings is preferably eccentric and provided with a/notch or shoulder 6 where the record' groove leaves the record disk. In the arrangement of the invention shown in these figures the record disks are partially superposed on each other in horizontal planes and in such-position that the notch or shoulder 6 is directly above or the record groove terminating at the shoulder is directly in line with the inner record groove of the next succeeding disk so that the grooves make a practical continuation one or in the cabinet 4 and provided with pinionsor wheels 11 and 12 fast thereon and one above the other in such position that they engage in the grooves 5of the disks 1 and 2. 18 indicates a similar spindle provided with pinions or Wheels 1 1 and 15 engaging in the grooves 5 of disks 2'and'3. Similar spindles and superposed wheels engage in the grooves 5 at the rear edge of the disks, the upper pinion or wheel of each being indicated at 16 and 17. 18 indicates a spindleprovided with a wheel 19-which engages in the groove 5 of the disk 3 at the outer edge.
Rotation given to the spindle 7 v is communicated to the disk 1 by pin 8 and in turn transmitted to the disks 2 and 3 by the pinions or'wheels working in the grooves 5. The pinions or wheels serve to support as well as drive the disks 2 and-3 as well as similar pinions would support and drive any additional number of disks which might be added to the series. Thus the disk 1 is driven by the spindle 7 the disk 2 is driven by the wheels 12 and 16. receiving power from the wheel 11 and the wheel on the spindlebenea th wheel 16 respectively and the disk 3 is driven from the disk 2 by the wheels 15 and 17 receiving power fromthe' wheel 14 and the wheel beneath the wheel 17 respectively. The disk 1 is supported by the spindle 7, the disk 2 is supported at. three points by the wheels 12, l-l a'nd l6 and the disk 3 is supported at three points by the wheels 15,17 and 19.
To positionthe records in this form of the invention in proper correlation so that the reproduced, sound of therecords will successively synchronize, I preferably pro- ,freely. The reproducer arm carries at its I viously described, the stylus and sound-box' 22 vide the lower flange at the periphery of the records formed by thegroove 5 .with cutaway places 20 (see Fig. 3) in such positions that the record disks can only be placed in position over the supporting and driving spindles through these cut-away parts and when so placed the record grooves of each record will form a continuation of the prior one. 1 The record disks 1, 2 and 3 are arranged with their centers in the arc of a; circlein the center of which circle a hollow reproducer arm 21 is 'pivotally mounted to swing outer end the usual gravity soundbox 22 provided with a stylus adapted to travel in the record grooves of the disks.
The operation is consideredto be obviousrotation given the record disks as pre- 2 travels across the face of each record and successively from one to the other. When the stylus reaches the notch or'shoulder 6 of any record it drops off that record and down onto the next succeeding record and so on. If desired, guiding means for the stylus to the proper groove in the succeeding record asshown in Figs. 14, .15 and 16 and subsequently herein described maybe employedi The reproducer arm 21 conducts the re: produced sounds from the sound-box to a born or megaphone of any desired character preferably but not necessarily located in the cabinet 4. This part of sound reproducingapparatus is now so well understood and the present invention not being limited in any of its forms to any particular manner of delivering the reproduced sound from thereproducer arm,- any detailed description of this part of the-apparatusis deemed unnecessary herein. v 1 1 If desired in this and in the succeeding forms of the invention the record groove at the place of transference of the stylus from one to another may be so" arranged that no sounds are reproduced at that point, that is I it may come at a natural pause in thereproduction. Also it will be understoodthat instead of the record disks 2 and 3 being fric- 115 tionally driven .the driving and supporting wheels may be toothed pinions engaging "teeth formed in theperiphery of the disks genttothe' grooves as'indicated at 23 in Fig. 1. In this figure the disks 1 and 2 are shown and instead of the positioning means of the previously described form, a positioning finger 24 may be employed. This finger is withdrawn,- In this formvof the invention the disk 2 is slid edgewise against the driv- 1ng p 1n1ons.1-2lfand 16 and an additional p supporting pinion 2,6"is then brought up into operative position. Instead of engaging the d sks in a grooye 1n the previous form the pm ons are shown; as provlded with flanges whichfengage opposite surfaces of the disk as indicated in connection with the pinion 26 in Fig.1; 5. he pinion 26 as shown more clearly 'in'FigQfiis mounted on and carried by a'slidingstandard 27 reciprocated by an adjusting to bring the pinion into and outwi -engagement with the peri hery of the ;-d1 sk$2'.- Bymeans of this pinions'12and-16 may be adjusted.
Referring arrangement is shown whereby the sounds 25 recorded on the disks mayv be repeated ad g'nfim'tum Without any manual operation being necessary to re-set.
in the forms of the invention illustrated in these figures is the same, the reproducing action and the control of the reproduced sound bemg different however in Fig. '9 than 1n Fig. 6. The action trated in Fig. 9 will be presently described.
29 mdlcates a plurality or series of record dlsks partially superposed one above the other and eachprovided with a spiral record groove starting at the center of the disk and running off the periphery at the notch or center to the edge and then drops to the center of the next succeeding record and so on. By this slant arrangement of the turntables and records the tylus can travel continuously around the circle of records an indefinite number of times until stopped or the parts become worn or the driving power g1ves out. If desired a corresponding slant maybe given the sound-box carrying the stylus so the stylus Will enter the groove in a vertical plane. The degree of slant to be given the turntables and records depends on the thickness and diameters, the slant being shown exaggeratedin the drawing for clearness.
- 31 indicates a plurality of spindles or shafts suitably mounted on a support 32 and disposed "about justable mou'nt n'giof'p1n1on 26 the traction of the point. If desired power need be-apphed to but one shaft 31- in which casethe-rotation ofto Figs. 6 toll inclusive,
the turntables wlll be effected by each trans-- The manner of rmauntmg and pe ating the records employed and principle illus-- disposed per pendicular to; the plane of the.
The shafts 31[ are. annularl'y the center'of thelturntable turntables 3Q.
arrangement and one at each place 'of inter section of the turntables as'clea'rly shown 'in Fig. 10. Each shaft has two driving pinions 33jand 34 fastthereon' Toipreventslippage said pinions are preferably toothedwheels and each engages a toothed rack formed in a a groove 35 in the edge of the turntables 30.
At the lower end of feach'shaft'isa pulley 36 by which rotation is .givento'thes'hafts in 3 any desired manner, aconvem'entconstruction beingshown inQFig: 8 inwh ich' anends. shaft 38 and pulley '39ftravel's around'tjn less belt '37 receiving power-from a motor engagement ,vnth "all the pulleysg on the shafts 7 The'pinions 33. j v
turntables and support the same,- at one mitting its motion to thenext by meansof the pinions. i p
The turntables are supported at the outer circle. of the arrangement by pinions 40 a disks 29. The positioning hole in the, disk is so placed that when the disks are properly placed on the turntables the record groove of a disk where it leaves the disk at the shoulder 6 will lead directly to the 'beglnmng of the record in the groove in the next sue-- ceeding disk thus insuring proper continuity of the intended correlation between the records at all times.
In the form shown in Fig. 6 a single reproducer arm 43 is provided for all records. The arm is freely mounted to swing about the center of the arrangement and 1s provided with the usual gravity sound-box 44 carrying astylus needle adapted to travel across the face of the record disks 29 1n the grooves thereof and successively from one record to another. By this arrangement the rotation given the records 29 by means of the driving pi'nions 33 and 34 acting on the turntables 30 causes the stylus to travel 111 the well known manner. When the stylus reaches the end of the groove at the periphcry of one record it drops down into the first groove in the next succeeding record and so on around the complete circle, traveling through the record grooves of each disk successively and then'repeating the cycle any number of times desired.
In the arrangement shown in Fig. 9 the individual records. 29 in certain groups are each assumed to ha e recorded thereon the sounds from but one instrument, to wit one groupv has notes from a comet, another a piano, another-a clarinet and another'a violin, four record disks being provided to each group. A reproducing device having one reproducer arm for each individual instrument or group of records is provided. The reproducer arms indicated at 45, 46, 47
and 48 are each provided with a gravity.
sound-box and stylus and are mounted to swing about a common center 49 formed as a common .horn or exit to which the sounds from all the horns are transmitted.
By this arrangement the individual notes of each instrument are individually reproduced and brought together at the .eXit thus maintaining the individuality of each instrument embodied in the orchestra. The
reproducer arms travel continuously around 'carrying the sound-boxes and styli successively from one record to another, one sound-box and stylus'engaging a record of each instrument at all times. More or less instruments may be represented, in which case one horn and sound-boigis provided for each instrument;- If desired; to omit any instrument or instruments from the concerted efl'ect, onefor more of the sound-boxes may beturned back out of contact with the face of a the records. It will be understood that othersounds than those indicated may be reproduced in, ac .cordance' with the prinof thestylusand in line with the axis thereof when viewed from the front.
stylus slips off the edge of the record the As the side edge of the guide engages the edge of .the record as shown in Fig. 15 and the stylus drops down onto the next record, it being guided to its proper groove by the side of the guide sliding down the edge of the record. This also serves to break any sudden drop of the stylus.
be adjusted by varying the position of the guide on the stylus by means of the screw 52.
A recording apparatus suitable for making records to be used in the forms of this invention shown in Figs. 6 and 9 is illustrated in Figs. 11, 12 and 13. Receivers of sound such as megaphones 60 maybe arranged on a platform above the apparatus or may be locatel in separate rooms or invided. v sound-boxes 61 either directly, as shown in The point at which the stylus engages'the succeeding record may closures. In the arran ement shown four megaphones are used alt ough it will be un derstood any desired number may. be pro- The megaphones. are connected to two instances or by means of flexible pipes 62 as shown in the other two instances. The
. sound-boxes are provided with the usual recording stylusand are pivotally mounted on the ends of arms 63 mounted stationary on a stationary vertical standard 64. standard is fixedly mounted in a base 80.
65 indicates a series \of partially superposed turntables similar in construction and arrangement to those used in the reproducing, apparatus described in connection with Figs. 6, 7, 9 and 10. The ,turntab-les65 are mounted upon and carried by a common turntable 66 by means of pairs of pinions 67 carried by spindles 68 rising from arms 69 projecting outwardly from the turntable 66 and pairs of pinions 70'carried by spindles 71 rising-from the turntable 66, "near the inner edge. If desired the pinions 70 may also be provided with teeth as in the case of the pinions 67 Each turntable 65 is provided with centering and positioning pins corresponding to those used on the turntables 30 of'the reproducing apparatus.
The
The turntable 66 is'rotated bodily counterclockwise as indicated by arrows by means of an electric or other motor 73, mounted on the turntable. A shaft 74 driven by the motor and mounted in bearing 75 on the turntable 66 is provided with a worm gear '76 which meshes with a pinion 77 secured to the fixed post or standard 64. Rotation of the shaft 74 rotates the common turntable 66 by the worm 76 traveling around,- the standard 64. I Worm gears 78 on the shaft 74 engage and rotate pinions 79 which in turn rotate the turntables 65, the rotation being transmitted to all the turntables by the pinions 7 O and 67.
In this manner the turntables 65 are rotated individually on the turntable 66 and carried around bodily by the rotation of the common turntable 66-. disks are placed on the turntables 65 and When the recordthe recording styli placed in operative po-- sition the sounds delivered to the mega-' phones 60 will be recorded on the disks in;-
the well known manner, the styli successively engaging onedisk after anotherf 'is e the records are rotatively fed beneath them.
When the common turntable has been; ro-
tated so far that a previous recordedidisk'f reaches the nextstylus the recording:
mechanism 'isstopped. The rotationiof the common turntable 66 is naturally very much slower than that given the turntable; 65, the
of the worms 76 and'78.
-The reproducing device is an exact diproper speed being determined by the pitch I..
55 next succeeding disk. A
6. In an apparatus for reproducing sound,
mensional duplicate of the recording device so that the synchronism of the records when limit myself to the construction or operation of recording apparatus as shown and described for making the records to be used in the reproducing apparatus.
What I claim as my invention is 1. In an apparatus for-reproducing sound,
the combination of a plurality of disk records each having record grooves startin at the center and terminating at the outer e ge, means for rotating said records and a stylus traveling in said grooves .from the center to the outer edge of the record and dropping ofl? the outer edge by gravity onto the next record. I
2. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, the combination of a plurality or series of disk records having record grooves starting at the center, means for driving said records simultaneously and continuously and a stylus traveling in said grooves and dropping off the edge of one disk onto the next by gravity. I
3. In an apparatus for reproducing sound,
the combination of a plurality or series of disk records driven simultaneously in fixed relation to each other and each disk provided with a record groove starting at the center and running off the outer edge and a.
" stylus traveling in said groove and dropa stylus passinfg ping from the edge of one disk to the next succeeding one by gravity.
4. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of partially superposed disk records, the grooves of each record starting at the center of the-disk and terminating at the outer edge-and a stylus traveling in said grooves and running 011' the outer edge of each record disk and onto the next succeeding record disk. at the center. I
5. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of partially superposed disk records, the grooves thereof starting at the center of each record and terminating at the outer edge, said disks rotating in fixed relation to each other and a stylus adapted to 'travel in, said grooves, said stylus running ofi said-edge arili engaging the center of the a series of disk records arranged in an arc, the grooves. of weach; record startingat the center and terminating at the outer edge and grooves thereo saidstylus dropping by gravity from the edgebfone diskonto the next succeedin disk. i v
7. In an apparatus for reproducingsound,
over? said records in the the combination of a series of partially superposed disk records annularly arranged in'a complete circle, each disk being provided with .a record groove starting at the center and running oil the outer edge and an annularly swinging stylus adapted to x travel in the grooves of said records and drop by gravity from the edge of one disk onto the. next succeeding disk.
8. Man apparatus for reproducing sound a series of disk records partially superposed on each other and arranged in a complete circle, the grooves in said recordsstarting at the'centers thereof and terminating at the outer edge and a stylus traveling in said grooves and passing successively and continuously from one record to another. 9. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of partially superposed disk records :annularly arranged in .a complete circleand each provided witha record groove starting at the center of-the record and going 011? into space at the outer edge, a swinging reproducer arm swinging from the center of the circle formed by the records and a stylus carried by said arm and passing successively and continuously over said records from one to the other.
10. In an apparatus; for reproducing sound, a series of partially superposed disk records each provided with a groove start-' 11. In an apparatus for reproducing 105 grooves thereon and each record partially sound, a series of disk records having. sound overlapping the 'next succeeding record, a series of turntables each supporting one of said records, driving means engaging the peripheries of said turntables and a stylus traveling across the records in the grooves thereof and successively passing from one I record to another.
12. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of partiall superposed disk ing one of said records, driving means for rotating said turntables and engaging the peripheries thereof, said driving means supporting said turntables and a stylus passing successively over said records in the grooves thereof.
records, a series of turnta' les each support- 13. In an apparatus for. reproducin sound, a series of partially superposed dis records, a series of turntables each supporting one of said records, means for rotating sald turntables, said means also supporting Y said turntables and a'stylus adapted to travel over. the face of records succes- I sively.
14. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of artially superposed disk records, a turntab e for each record, means adapted to both rotate and support said turntables and a stylus passing over said records successively from one to another.
15. In an apparatus for reproducing sound, a series of partially superposed disk records, turntables upon which said recordsar e supportedfxdriving pinions adapted to support said turntables and engaging the peripheries thereof and a vstylus passing over said records successively from one to another. I
7 each other'andnnnularly arranged to form a .complt circle, the grooves of, each record starting at the center and terminating at the =outer edge and a styluspassing over said records andsuccesslvelyfrom one record to another by gravity whereby said stylus may continuousl) travel from one record to another and ,r eproduceflthe resultant sound without interruptiondor an unlimited number of complete cycles.
'cessively-and continubusly from 18; In 'a sound reproducing apparatus, a series of disk records arranged consecutively in a complete circle and a stylus adapted to pass over said records and by gravity from One record to another, said records being arranged overlapping each other and slanting from the horizont 1 whereby said stylus may travel continuousl around the circle of records an indefinite umber of times.
19. Ina sound reproducing apparatus, a series of disk records arranged parallel with each other and at an angle to the horizontal and partially superposed one above the other, said records being arranged in a complete circle, a reproducer arm mounted to swing from the center of said circle of records and a stylus carried by said arm passing over said records and successively from one record to another whereby said stylus may travel continuOuslyfor any number of complete cyclesof the series of records.
20. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in group succession and a plurality of styli one for each group of rec-.'
ords adapted to pass over said records sucone'record to the next succeeding record.
.21'. In a'sound reproducmg apparatus, a.
plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in 'group succession, the grooves 1n each record starting at the center and terminating at the outer edge and an independent stylus for each group, said stylus traveling in the record grooves from the center to the outer edge and then dropping off the outer edge by gravity onto the next record.
22. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in group succession, the grooves in each record starting at the center and termi nating at the outer edge and an independent stylus for each group passing successively over the records of said group and then continuing without interruption on to -the next group, the stylus traveling in the grooves from the center to the outer edge .and then by gravity onto the next succeeding record at the center.
23. In'a sound reproducing apparatus, a plurality of sound reproducing disk records arranged in group succession and, a stylus for each group of records, all of said styli being adapted'to travel by gravity from one record to the next succeeding record of the group and transmitting sound to a common megaphone or horn.
2 1. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
plurality of partially superposed disk records annularly arranged in group succession, a stylus for each 'grou of said records adapted to travel successively and continuously over said records and by gravity from one record to another and a common megaphone or-horn into which each stylus independently delivers its reproduced sound.
25. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
plurality of partiallysuperposed disk records provided with spiral sound grooves starting at the center of each record and running off the edge, a stylus traveling across said records in the grooves thereof and suc-.
cessively and continuously from one record to another and means for guiding said stylus from one record to its proper groove in the next succeeding record.
26. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
plurality of partially superposed disk records provided with spiral sound grooves starting at the center of each record and running 01? the edge, a stylus traveling across said records in the grooves thereof and successively from one record to another 12 and a guideon said stylus adapted tolead said stylus from one record to its proper groove in the next succeeding. record.
27. In asound reprodu-cingapparatus, a
plurality of partially superposed disk rec-" ords provided with spiral sound grooves starting" at the center of each record and running ofl the. edge, a stylus traveling across said 'records in the grooves thereof and successively from one record to another;
, ifllfld an adjustable guide secured at thejside one recordtowanothen "-J 28, Ina sound reproducing. apparatus, a series of partially superposed disk: records having spiral grooves starting at theycenter of each record and running off the edge, said records being plOVidedWith "a shoulder in. the periphery at which shoulder the groove terminates,"a' stylus passing ovrfthe saidrecords in the grooves thereof and succes-I sively from. one
disk after said stylus'leaves said shoulder. and adapted to lead said-stylus properly ,to the groove in the next record; r
ously rotating disk records eachformin gf acontlnuation of the preceding one, each recgroove starting at ord being provided witha I the center and terminating at the outer edge, means for rotatlng said record disks, a common stylus for said records traveling by gravity from one record to the other, and means for positioning said records to secure and maintain proper correlation:
- 30. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
plurality ofpartia'lly superpo'sed continuously rotating-dial: records each forming a continuation of the preceding one, each record being provided with a groove start ing at the center and terminating at the said stylus for guiding ,s'aidstylus from v to the next,
plurality of .ously rotating disk records. eacliforming a record to another andi'ia 1. guide engaging the peripheryoffa recordl.
.tering pin and :1
outer edge, means-for rotating said. record disks, a stylus passing. t lconsecutively ,over said records and by gravity from one record and positioni-ng"means for securlngsand' naintaining' p' oper' correlationor synchronism between said record's.
81. In a sound reproducing apparatus, a
partially superposed continueontinuation of the preceding-one, each record being provided with a groove starting at the center and terminating at the outeredge, a turntable for each record disk "and means associated with said disks and turntables for positioning said disksthereonto secure proper correlation between said'record disks. 29. In a sound reproducingapparatus, a plurality of partially superposed continu a 32; In a sound reproducing apparatus, a plurality of partially. superposed continuously rotating disk records each fprming a continuation :the preceding one, each record being provided with a groove starting at the center andterminatingat the outer edge, a turntable for each recorddisk, a centhe record disks thereon; I Signed at New York, in the county of N ew' York and State of New' York, this 1st day of February'A. D.1 9l6.
' SAMUEL MOTT. Witnesses: I F. B. TOWNSEND, IRENE LEFKOWITZ.
positioningpin on said turntables adapted to engage *and position
US7664116A 1916-02-07 1916-02-07 Sound reproducing and recording apparatus. Expired - Lifetime US1299853A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5214628A (en) * 1989-08-14 1993-05-25 Kirk Langman Compact disc storage and playing apparatus
US5473585A (en) * 1989-12-30 1995-12-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Compact disk player having single pick-up for selectively reading data from either one of two partially overlapped parallel disks

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5214628A (en) * 1989-08-14 1993-05-25 Kirk Langman Compact disc storage and playing apparatus
US5473585A (en) * 1989-12-30 1995-12-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Compact disk player having single pick-up for selectively reading data from either one of two partially overlapped parallel disks

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