US1271857A - Process of treating fiduciary papers for the purpose of preventing fraud. - Google Patents

Process of treating fiduciary papers for the purpose of preventing fraud. Download PDF

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US1271857A
US1271857A US329915A US1271857A US 1271857 A US1271857 A US 1271857A US 329915 A US329915 A US 329915A US 1271857 A US1271857 A US 1271857A
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paper
process
papers
treating
purpose
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Charles Andre Coppier
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Charles Andre Coppier
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31FMECHANICAL WORKING OR DEFORMATION OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31F1/00Mechanical deformation without removing material, e.g. in combination with laminating
    • B31F1/07Embossing, i.e. producing impressions formed by locally deep-drawing, e.g. using rolls provided with complementary profiles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/916Fraud or tamper detecting

Description

c. A. COPPIER. PROCESS OF TREAHNG FIDUCIARY PAPERS FOR THE PURPOSE OFPREVENTING FRAUD.

APPLICATION FILED MN. 20. I915- Patented July 9, 1918.

111: nmzyus PETERS 1n. mmmunm. wAsumcmn. a. c.

UNI E STATES FFICE.

cnantnsannan cornea, oF'rARIs, FRANCE.

PROCESS OF TREATING FIDUCIARY PAPERS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PREVENTINGFRAUD.

To all whom it may concern: Be it known that LCHA LEs ANDRE Corrmn, of 1 'Rue de Pontoise, Paris, France, engraver, have invented a new and useful Improvement LiIi Processes of Treating Fiduciary Papers for the Purpose of Preventing Fraud, which improvement is fully setforth in the following specification.

It is known that important papers are very easily falsifiedand that criminal frauds are committed which consist mainly' (1) In forging or altering bank. note bills, stamps, trade marks, etc. 7

(2) In scratching or washing out the numbering or names after theft, I

(3) In altering the value of a check, etc.

Such frauds are facilitated by the elementary processes at present employed in the preparation of' documents.

Most indeed are printed or typographically printed in two or three shades on paper watermarked in thepulp. In this manner dull tints of the same colon-shade and intensity are obtained which it is easy to reproduce by photomechanical processes or in other known ways;

I When the foundation .for the subsequent printing or writing consists in combinations of letters or small "ornamentalfdesig'nsrepeated in series in such a manner as to produce a tint which is usually light blue it forms only an illusory guarantee, for with a little trouble it is easy to copyla fragment comprising the complete series of the letters or ornamentsand thus be enabled torepeat it indefinitely. I V

If therefore a number, or writing u on such special foundation is erased or .was ed out it will be easy to reprint the'foundation where erased or washed outandthen write a newtext or other number.

,A watermark in the pulp can, also be produced by anyone who knows how to draw a monogram with copper'wires or model a figure in relief, then usinglinena'nd' paper pulp which is easily procurable A watermark may moreover be forged easily by erasure or by vanormal impression .with the aid of an original matrix copied upon "the model of the-original document.

-Moreoyer, watermarks made with the paper have a soft and colorlessappearance and may substantially vary sizeor be deformed on account of thesu'bsequent drying Specification of Letters Patent the body of the Patented July 9, 1 918.

Application filed January 2 0, 1915. Serial N 0. 3,299.

of the paper; vignettes for this reason can 'never'tally with precision in the prints.

I ,Many notes or documents are, however, printed by copper plates but are made and executed by semi. mechanical and commercial engraving with foundations such as obtained in Russian notes ,or .by other processes which offer premiums on forgery.

This invention has for its object to provide a process for treating paper suitable for documents of all kinds and shapes such as checks, stamps, titles, coupons, trade marks, bank notes, railway tickets, certificates of ownership of stocks, diplomas, etc., insuch a manner as to render it impossible to forge such documents without the aid of original parts or the machine pieces which have been used to prepare them. The paper cannot be successfully photographed owing to the special gray shades which are obtained without" the employment. of colors, oil, paraiiin, petrol, wax, etc.

Paper treated according to this process has a peculiar and novel appearance on the surface, in the body of the paper itself, in its opaqueness or transparency, and in the brilliant mat or semi mat appearance of its surfaces (whether paper already transparent be modified on both' sides. at once or on one side only; the whole. surface may be'modified or a portion onlyofthe surface and in shapes or figures which may vary indefinitely.

The appearance of the prints, whether copper plateylett er press or colorfprinted, etc., and the appearance of the outer surfaces of the paper (or of the inner suror opaque be employed) these surfaces may p faces in the case, ofan impression sunk unto paper) can both be altered as desired, v

By this process impressions which are visible without holding the paper tof the light and of extreme fineness in details may be produced before, during or after printing and in the'body of the paper. The impressions may be isolated in the harmony of the printed document with the image plainly visible on the special gray shade produced inthe processes abovejmentioned. p i I Asprinting. takes-placerin the dry and cold the impressions can be, laced accu rarely regards any ether prmted matter produced with greasy ink by copper plate, letter press or lithography, etc. The impressions may play a part in letter press and copper plate printing orpther processes by produeing a tone impossible to obtain bythe usual processes andl this may be carried out on both sides of the paper at nce which, h w oses n ne of its qualities of resistance or lasting. They may be impressed simultaneously upon both surfaces of the paper and thus increase the varietyof efi'eets.

I The'pro'cess Whieh' forms the -siibject of this invention consists in impressing paper by'lainiiiation striking in a stamping press, or in any other'inaniier after having interposed one or botli surztaces of the paper matrices of metal 'or other hard substance iiiodeledahd ehased or engraved after the model oi other objeot to be obtained;-

' These ma rices may 'he made any'of iii'echaii ical or photom'echanieal at present in use for cutting metal In place of matrices there maybe emfp jdii fl i' f o r pi r, et 0 g atin,

etcywhieh are laced in layers, eaeh layer bar ng fi be e iie 'd' o unseen priesis process effects the combination of copper' late or likeprin'ting Without ink iiie'da striking With special models of the med-211 s reduced to the least possible thickn ss.-

T P p P two matr'iiwhose hollows or projections ubjected to impression be- "or H 3 n t coi c de has a 'Q'loss tr n parent appear g; in the compressed parts to vegeta le acing pap r, a

, a'i e Who e tr ns'fa e be mes .1. s in are rafts mo e rl-e s 00 1.

-pf 'e a pr s r esi orig n l appearan' e,.i1; remaining mitts f the ma ix or stenc1l. The '11nage,'ob ect or it desi d to r produ s o tal u liu a Qf one tarti g fr m ,a grey t' ansparept in; the parts most com- 9 he oh jo k l l ary p per in he ssdiiflifts- "paeuaionj l lii lhove f -iiii (i 1: 1:11-

pressi on upo'n paper already Water; arked E in the firtthe paper increases still'lifurth t ulti e of im ation- H Y pinpa y ng fl awihg illustrates th 1v tion eii e ialnplie illus rat s he treatm it. Qf. P6 hi h i supposed to be I I lQQflIl he :ObYP 'SQ and Ill? I ve Figure 1 shows the result of an impress. In; 0 Whit? e pe nf the m r x prepared for the obverse side and having numb r 111 four cor rs thereof 0b- 112 i similar mp essioilj e repar'ed for the reverse side,

een matrix and a fiat base or between verse and the reverse portion of the paper.

the shaded portions, here asin Fig. 1, representing the parts made transparent or translucent by the 1111131'GSS101L. Figs. 3 and 2* Show rliespectively the obverse and reverse side ofthe paper to be treated, the vignette b ing P e e alwit l d Fis 5 an 6 ,shoW respectively the obverse and reverse ,sideogtthe paper of Figs. 3 and 4 -after treatment by the matrices Whose impressionsare individually illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 7 is an enlarged cross section on line A -B of Fig. 1. "This treatment produces more or less gray or transparent L ones which are 'directly visible on the ebblue design, While some otthe blue effect appears in the resultant red design.

In order to obtain "extremely fine impres- 'sionsimat-rices engraved and chased for this purpose are employed.

will easilybe understood that it is impossible'to' imitate papers Without the aid of the original matrix "orto' reproiduee them by 1 the usual photomeehanioal processes owing to this transpai'ency of the" paper which all'oivs'the'ima'ge printed on the other In prderl'to ln's'ure the greatest security to Sine side'ot the paper to appear simultaneously a d in'i aq lythe issuers and possesso'rs of fiduciary pa- {p'ers the pro'cessinay be combined with the toll operations:

I lheiimpi es'slon of papermay be employedj'oinuy Witheopper plate or simiprinting wher by the texture of the i 1 ill benio diiied because the. ink in the p a diiarge cuts W111 "be expelled at'th'e a'noe andrelietioif the'cooper plate print is main ai ed 1 the l ifif 'iffii iis l ei i p causes supplemental-y impossible o meantime bu i ri l'aga d fy in el cted pag s t ime t e ex afol the hai i t n which it 1 t us e e der d i 'ip ds fsi'ble of and reproducti0n.-.,

n the White nprint d Porti ns, his mpression may cause a whole gamut of tones .125

. "table 1 Fig, 2

an apu rah s ,i'nf fetid depth n'i With u h o i m rries-we ine t e ng ph tog -"aphed as has been exp alq V A single Gripper plarep'risung at as back 'igmpiesi e parts 'iiihilethe sharp appear-J15 and the obverse of the paper combined with an impress printing can produce nine different color tones without taking note of the shades of these tones, or the variable appearance of the three combinations.

(2) This process may be combined with watermarking in the paper pulp, above which is printed an impress which will modify the original appearance of the first watermark in such a manner as to prevent reproduction.

(3) In letter press printing an impres sion of this sort causes the first impression to be altered by difference in the coloration of the impress and allows a second impression upon the relief thus produced in the paper to be efiected.

(4) The same arrangement may be employed with polychromatic lithographic printing in algraphy in the Rembrandt process, etc.

(5) Impressing by compression allows the use of movable figures or signs which are interchangeable or can be displaced axially and this may form a secret means of control.

(6) The impression may thus form the ground of different shades upon paper colored in the pulp and which receives at the surface an impression of covering color above an impression with transparent inks.

(7) In the case of deep impressions, or those introduced into the body of the paper, the impression may cause the image invisible beneath the opaque paste of the paper to become visible more or less at the surface of the paper.

This process may also be employed with all types of paper marks with images of all kinds, portraits, etc.

Claims 1. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises 7 compressing the papers while dry with the interposition of a matrix having elevations of varying height to produce varyingly-translucent portions over the impressed area.

2. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises compressing the papers between opposed matrices having elevations of varying height to produce "over the impressed area varyingly-translucent portions partaking of the combined effects of both matrices.

3. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises printing thereon with colored ink, and compressing the printed papers with the interposition of a matrix having elevations of varying height to produce over the impressed area varyingly-translucent portions modified by the color effects of said ink.

4. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises printing on the opposite sides thereof with colored ink, and compressing the printed papers between matrices having elevations of different height to produce over the impressed area varyinglytranslucent portions partaking of the combined effects of both matrices and modified by the color eflects of said ink.

5. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises printing on the opposite sides thereof with inks of different color, and compressing the printed papers between matrices having elevations of different height to produce over the impressed area varyingly-translucent portions partaking of the combined effects of both matrices and modified on each side by the color effects on the opposite side.

6. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises giving the papers an initial watermark, and compressing thepapers with the interposition of a matrix or matrices having elevations of difierent height to produce over the impressed area varyingly translucent portions modified by the initial watermark.

7. The process of treating fiduciary papers which comprises giving the papers an initial watermark, printing on one or both sides thereof with colored ink, and compressing the papers with the interposition of a matrix or matrices having elevations of different height to produce over the impressed area varyingly-translucent portions modified by the initial watermark and the color effects of said ink.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CHARLES ANDRE OOPPIER.

Witnesses:

Du Wrr'r G. PooLn, J12, Gnonsns DELOTE.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.

US1271857A 1915-01-20 1915-01-20 Process of treating fiduciary papers for the purpose of preventing fraud. Expired - Lifetime US1271857A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3015267A (en) * 1956-12-04 1962-01-02 Dashew Business Machines Inc Identification and printing devices

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3015267A (en) * 1956-12-04 1962-01-02 Dashew Business Machines Inc Identification and printing devices

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