US1234095A - Vacuum cleaning apparatus. - Google Patents

Vacuum cleaning apparatus. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1234095A
US1234095A US174069A US17406917A US1234095A US 1234095 A US1234095 A US 1234095A US 174069 A US174069 A US 174069A US 17406917 A US17406917 A US 17406917A US 1234095 A US1234095 A US 1234095A
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United States
Prior art keywords
casing
dust
receptacle
tube
suction
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US174069A
Inventor
John J Duffie
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VACUUM SPECIALTY Manufacturing Co
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VACUUM SPECIALTY Manufacturing Co
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US1797015A priority Critical patent/US1230827A/en
Application filed by VACUUM SPECIALTY Manufacturing Co filed Critical VACUUM SPECIALTY Manufacturing Co
Priority to US174069A priority patent/US1234095A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1234095A publication Critical patent/US1234095A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/28Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle

Description

J. 1'. DUFFIE.
VACUUM CLEANING APBARATUS.
APPLICATION FILED JUN E 11.1917.
- rammed July 17, 1917;
2 SHEETSSH EET 1- J. J. DUFFIE.
VACUUM CLEANING APPARATUS.
APPLICATION FILED JUNE 11, mm.
1,234,095. A Patented J1'11y17,1917.*
2 SHEETSSHEET z.
E wuemto'z UNITED STATES" PATENT oFFIoE.
JOHN J. DUFFIE, OF BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR 'IO. VACUUM SPECIALTY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORATION OF ARIZONA.
VACUUM CLEANING APPARATUS.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented July 17, 1917.
Original application filed March 30, 1915, Serial No. 17,970. Divided and this application filed .Tune 11,
v Y 1917. Serial No. 174,069.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, JOHN J. DUFFIE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Berkeley, in the county of Alameda and State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Vacuum Cleaning Apparatus, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to portable pneumatic cleaners which are adapted to be moved over the object to be cleaned, as
for example, a floor or carpet, the cleaningbeing effected by a suction. device which is preferably driven by an electric motor contained within the casing of the cleaner. This case is a division of my application,
Serial Number 17,970, filed March 80, 1915.
One object of my invention is to provide a portable pneumatic cleaner in which the dust-separator comprises a casing which is preferably swiveled to the casing containing. the suction producing apparatus, and which is attached. to or constitutes a portion of the operating handle. Portable vacuum cleaners of the motor-operated type, are usually provided with a dust-separating bag of textile material attached to the operating handle, into which the dust-laden air is introduced, the dust and dirt being retained and the air passing out through the pores or interstices of the bag. The bag is subjected to. rough usage and rapidly deteriorates when in constant use and moreover the walls of the bag which constitute the separating medium become impregnated with the dirt and impalpable dust drawn from the carpets. To overcome this unsanitary feature and the rapid wear of the bag separator and also to provide a more efficient apparatus I employ a tubular casing, constructed of metal or other suitable material, which forms the dust-collecting receptacle and contains a filtering medium which is readily removable for the purpose of being cleansed or replaced, the casing forming a part of or being attached to the operating handle by which the apparatus is moved over the caret. In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of a pneumatic cleaner embodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the dust receptacle casing partly in longitudinal section; Fig. 3 is an a front elevation of the lower portion of the cleaner shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 7' is an enlarged sectional detail of the lower part of amodified form of the dust-receptacle; and
Fig. 8 is a perspective view of another modification of my invention.
I prefer to employ a suction creating apparatus of the electric motor-driven type and which is inclosed in a casing suitably supported so that it may be pushed to and fro over the floor or carpet. I have illustrated such an apparatus in which a fan is mounted within the casing portion 1 the motor in the portion 1", the suction tool 2, being carried by a removable plate 3, and the whole being mounted upon supporting wheels or casters 5. 'A removable cap 6, closes the connection for the hose attachment for cleaning curtains, furniture, etc.
' I provide a dust-receptacle in the form of a tubular casing 10, which may be made of sheet metal, papier mach, fiber or other suitable material. This is shown in the ac companying drawings as forming a part of the-operating handle by -whioh'the cleaner is actuated, but it is evident that it may be merely secured tothe handle in a manner to make it rigid therewith. It is desirable that there should be a flexible connection between the suction apparatus which moves over: the floor and the casing 10, so that the latter may oscillate or rock with respect to the fan .and motor casing to permit the handle, including the dust casing as a part thereof, to accommodate itself to the movement of the operators hand as the cleaner is moved to and fro. I accomplish this purpose in my preferred form by connecting the dust conduit pipe 12, with the outlet of the fan As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the dust separator tube 10 is secured to the plate 15 by swinging bolts 18, and locked in position with wing-nuts, the marginal flange on the ticles and cause them to fall to the bottom of the tube as indicated at 24.
The top of the dust separator tube is closed by a perforated or apertured cap 25, and may be removably secured by swinging bolts 26 provided with wing-nuts, which fasten the abutting flanges together. The deflector plate 23 is carried by arms 27, carried by the lower rim of the cap. Below the perforations in the cap there is a filtering medium such as a cloth diaphragm 28, held in position by a ring 29 sprung under the lugs 30. Projecting upwardly from the cap is a handle 32 adapted to be grasped by the operator and which may carry a switch 34 to which the electric cable 35 is connected, so that the motor operating the.
fan may be controlled by the hand. An inspection glass 36 inserted in the casing wall enables one to observe the operation of the to serve as a deflector, thereby causing the air to form eddies within the separatori which assists in depositing the heavier particles and prevents a direct impact against the filtering medium.
Instead of fastening the separator to a supporting plate 15 carried by the outlet tube 12, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the tube 12 may be extended upwardly so that it will perform the functlon-of the pipe 21, and the separator tube 10 may be slipped down over the pipe and carried directly thereby. I have shown how' this may be accomplished in Fig. 7, in which a thimble 40 surrounding the pipe supports the tube and may be threaded to an internal nipple 10 projecting upwardly from the bottom of the separator 10.
The operation will be readily understoodthe outlet pipe 12 and the attached dust receptacle or separator tube 10, rock on the swivel joint 14 to accommodate the movements of the operators hand. The dustladen air drawn through the nozzle 2 by the fan is forced through the outlet pipe 12 and the pipe 21, into the separator tube, the deflector receiving the impact and causing the air to eddy downwardly, depositing the coarser particles in the bottom of the tube, the air then passing outwardly through the filtering medium which thoroughly cleanses it before passing through the perforations in the cap 25.
When it is desired to empty the receptacle and cleanse the filter, the nuts on the bolts 26 are loosened and the cap is removed, with the filter attached, which can then be taken out. In the form shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the bolts 18 are loosened from the bottom flanges and the tube 10 can then be removed and emptied. In the form shown in Fig. 7 the tube 10 is unscrewed from the thimble 40 and slipped over the end of the tube 12. The dust receptacle may be hinged at one side as at 20 in Figs. 4 and 6, and may then be swung downwardly to discharge the dirt without removing it from the plate 15.
Instead of swiveling the dust conduit pipe 12 to the side of the fan-casing, I may use a flexible hose or tube 12, of rubber, canvas, or other flexible material as illustrated in Fig. 8. In this case the dustreceptacle 10 is supported upon the fan casing by making the strap 17 the same length as 16, and swiveling it to the opposite side of the casing, moving the dust outlet connection l to a different position and conmeeting the casing and the receptacle by a flexible hose 12. 'I have shown the dust outlet 14* at the rear of the fan casing, but it may be placed at any convenient point. The flexible hose or tube 12 accommodates itself to the oscillating movements of the handle and receptacle, and may be readily withdrawn when it is desired to detach the receptacle.
The advantages of my invention will be appreciated by those familiar with portable motor-operated pneumatic cleaners of the type in which the suction-creating appa-' ratus is supported uponthe floor and movable thereover. The construction of the dust separator prevents any contamination by contact therewith, and is exceedingly compact, the flexible connection between the parts of the apparatus providing for the easy operation of the cleaner, and maintainin a rigid connection between the handle an the receptacle. In all of the modifications illustrated, the pivotal movements of the handle and the receptacle about the fan casing are coaxial.
I claim:
1. A pneumatic cleaner, comprising a casing adapted to move over a surface to be cleaned and having a suction-nozzle, and provided with suction-creating apparatus, a tubular dust-receptacle pivol'all connected to said casing, an outlet conduit noval'ilii connected to said casing and conneeting with said receptacle, and filtering means within said receptacle.
Q. A pnenn'iatie cleaner. comprising a ea$ ing havinga suction-nozzle, and n'ovided with suction-creating apparatus, a tuhnlai' diist-receptaclemeans for miiainlingi said receptacle for pivotal nmvomvni upon said casing, a handle rigidly connected to the reevptawha and a dust (-ondnit movahly eon- .nm-fing said easing and RfllCl IPCOPHHJli. and
permitting co-axial pivotal movement' of the handle and receptacle upon the casino.
3. A pneumatic cleaner, comprising :1 casing adapurd to move over a Slll'flUQ to he cleaned and having a suction-nozzle, and provided with SlllTtlOll-Clfiflll-lHQ apparatus, a snppmLing niemher pii'olallv connected to said on sing. a tubular duslreeeptacle rigidly secured to said member to cause a coaxial lll( )\'(3l1lll.l'- of the receptacle and snl'iporting member, an outlet conduit, swim-led f1. s aid (a ing and connoeting with said i'i. eept-a :le, and filtering means within said reey-ptachie.
ln testimonywhereof lf aflix my i nalnre.
Mill-1N J. l l FFI li.
US174069A 1915-03-30 1917-06-11 Vacuum cleaning apparatus. Expired - Lifetime US1234095A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1797015A US1230827A (en) 1915-03-30 1915-03-30 Vacuum cleaning apparatus.
US174069A US1234095A (en) 1915-03-30 1917-06-11 Vacuum cleaning apparatus.

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US174069A US1234095A (en) 1915-03-30 1917-06-11 Vacuum cleaning apparatus.

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2847084A (en) * 1954-09-15 1958-08-12 Edna M Wolfskill Dust collecting receptacle for vacuum cleaner
US3150405A (en) * 1962-05-05 1964-09-29 Fakir Werk Wilhelm Kicherer Carpet cleaner
US3903565A (en) * 1973-12-05 1975-09-09 Littleberry T Hicks Leaf and grass cart bagger
US4405346A (en) * 1981-05-13 1983-09-20 The Hoover Company Cleaner with dirt cup
US20030204930A1 (en) * 2000-01-14 2003-11-06 Thomas Hawkins Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air path
US20030233938A1 (en) * 2000-01-14 2003-12-25 Sepke Arnold L. Bagless dustcup
US20040034962A1 (en) * 2002-08-20 2004-02-26 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner having hose detachable at nozzle
US20040068828A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2004-04-15 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6735815B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2004-05-18 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6745432B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2004-06-08 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US6829804B2 (en) 2002-03-26 2004-12-14 White Consolidated, Ltd. Filtration arrangement of a vacuum cleaner

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2847084A (en) * 1954-09-15 1958-08-12 Edna M Wolfskill Dust collecting receptacle for vacuum cleaner
US3150405A (en) * 1962-05-05 1964-09-29 Fakir Werk Wilhelm Kicherer Carpet cleaner
US3903565A (en) * 1973-12-05 1975-09-09 Littleberry T Hicks Leaf and grass cart bagger
US4405346A (en) * 1981-05-13 1983-09-20 The Hoover Company Cleaner with dirt cup
US20050183232A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2005-08-25 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US7131165B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2006-11-07 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US7117558B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2006-10-10 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US20040068828A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2004-04-15 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6735815B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2004-05-18 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6735817B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2004-05-18 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6745432B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2004-06-08 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US20040205929A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2004-10-21 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US7117557B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2006-10-10 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6848146B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2005-02-01 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US20050028318A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2005-02-10 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US7134166B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2006-11-14 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US20050217066A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2005-10-06 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US20050055796A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2005-03-17 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US20050091786A1 (en) * 1998-01-09 2005-05-05 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US6901626B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2005-06-07 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6944909B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2005-09-20 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US6857164B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2005-02-22 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air flow
US7146681B2 (en) 1998-01-09 2006-12-12 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic airflow
US6910245B2 (en) 2000-01-14 2005-06-28 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air path
US6863702B2 (en) 2000-01-14 2005-03-08 White Consolidated Ltd. Bagless dustcup
US20030233938A1 (en) * 2000-01-14 2003-12-25 Sepke Arnold L. Bagless dustcup
US20030204930A1 (en) * 2000-01-14 2003-11-06 Thomas Hawkins Upright vacuum cleaner with cyclonic air path
US6829804B2 (en) 2002-03-26 2004-12-14 White Consolidated, Ltd. Filtration arrangement of a vacuum cleaner
US20040034962A1 (en) * 2002-08-20 2004-02-26 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner having hose detachable at nozzle
US6951045B2 (en) 2002-08-20 2005-10-04 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner having hose detachable at nozzle

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