US1081703A - Musical instrument. - Google Patents

Musical instrument. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1081703A
US1081703A US59619610A US1910596196A US1081703A US 1081703 A US1081703 A US 1081703A US 59619610 A US59619610 A US 59619610A US 1910596196 A US1910596196 A US 1910596196A US 1081703 A US1081703 A US 1081703A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
valve
duct
air
passage
organ
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US59619610A
Inventor
Joseph Schwertner
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HEERWAGEN Co
Original Assignee
HEERWAGEN Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by HEERWAGEN Co filed Critical HEERWAGEN Co
Priority to US59619610A priority Critical patent/US1081703A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1081703A publication Critical patent/US1081703A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS, HARMONIUMS OR SIMILAR WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ASSOCIATED BLOWING APPARATUS
    • G10B1/00General design of organs, harmoniums or similar wind musical instruments with associated blowing apparatus
    • G10B1/02General design of organs, harmoniums or similar wind musical instruments with associated blowing apparatus of organs, i.e. pipe organs
    • G10B1/06General design of organs, harmoniums or similar wind musical instruments with associated blowing apparatus of organs, i.e. pipe organs with pneumatic action

Description

Y J. SGHWERTINBR. I
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLICATION FILED nno.s, 1910.
1,081 ,703 Patented Dec. 16, 1913.
3 SHEET S-SHBET 1.
////////////Z /////////////////////A A -.fl v 159 N I, 134 170 169 /z'46 "i 7 7 V i I 171 wi/bmwow COLUMBIA PLANOGIAPH C0.,WASHINOTON, D.
J. SGHWERTNEE.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLIGATION FILED DEC. 8, 1910.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
COLUMBIA PLANOGIAPH c0.. WASHINDTON, D. c.
J. SGHWBRTNER.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLICATION FILED DEC. 8, 1910.
Patented Dec. 16, 1913. s SHEEN-sum 3.
W 4 l\ m i k Q .J 32 A V 1 57L A I 191 7 w W Y J .193 193 31 .30 15 6 194- Swine/14 F01 COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH CO-.\VASHINGTDN, 0. cv
\ H W v UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
JOSEPH SCHWERTNER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR, BY DIRECT AND MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO HEERWAGEN COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Dec. 16,1913.
Application filed December 8, 1910. Serial No. 596,196.
To all whom it may concern Beit known that I, Josnrrr SoHwER'rNnR, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of New York, county of New York, and
State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Musical Instruments, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to improvements 1n musical instruments.
Although more especially directed to 1mprovements in organs with automatic playing attachments, various features of my 1nvention may be found useful in other situations.
In organs of the class mentioned, it has been usual to provide coupling devices in order to couple up various speaking devices thereof so that when one is caused to operate or speak, another will be caused to simultaneously speak. These devices, however, have been large, clumsy, heavy and complex, and one object of my invention is to so improve them and rearrange their connectlons with other parts of the instrument that the devices will be light, simple, efficient in operation, may be operated with a single pres sure in the instrument and take up very little space. These advantages are very impor tant and especially so is the consideration of space.
Further objects, features and advantages will more clearly appear from the detailed description given below, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.
Referring to the drawings, Figures 1, 2 and 3 are vertical sections, somewhat diagrammatic, taken through certain parts of an automatic playing organ action embodying one form of my improvements. If F g. 2 be placed directly beneath Fig. 1 and Fig. 3 directly beneath Fig. 2, a complete sectional diagram will result, since the ducts broken away at the upper part of Fig. 2 are designed to be connected to the ducts broken away at the lower part of Fig. 1, and the ducts broken away at the upper part of Fig. 3 are designed to be connected to the ducts broken away at the lower part of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a top plan view of a portion of the reversing slide valve shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a detailed side View of one of the cou pling valves shown in Fig. 2. F 6 is a top plan View of the same. Fig. 7 1s a vertical section through the swell action main controlling valve, shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 8 is a vertical section through the great action main controlling valve shown in Fig. 1.
Referring to Fig. 1, 1 represents one of the great organ keys operating on a lever 2. 3 is a suitable wind-chest supplied with air under pressure. 4 is an opening leading from the wind-chest 3 to the outside atmosphere. The outside end of the opening 4 is arranged to be closed by a valve closure 5, and the inside end of the opening 4 is arranged to be closed by a valve closure 6, both valve closures 5 and 6 being rigidly connected to the same operating spindle 7. Leading out of the bottom of the wind-chest 3 is a plurality of air ducts connecting with and forming part of flexible air ducts 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. These air ducts extend up through the base 14 of the wind-chest 3 and terminate in the top horizontal plane thereof. \Vithin the wind-chest 3 is arranged a movable member or pallet 15 of the pallet rail carrying on its underneath side a strip of felt 16 which acts as a valve closure for the controlling ends of the ducts 8, 9, 10, ll, 12 and 13. The movable member 15 is arranged to be moved by means of a pneumatic motor 17, consisting of two members 18 and 19 connected with the usual flexible membrane or other suitable material. The mem ber 18 is rigidly connected with the member 15 to move the same, while the member 19 is rigidly connected with the frame of the chamber 3, as shown in the drawings. A duct 20 leads from the air passage 4; to the interior of the pneumatic 17. 21 represents one of the swell keys operating pivoted lever 22. 23 represents a wind-chest for the swell action. 24 represents an air duct or passage connecting the interior of the chest 23 with the outside atmosphere. 25 is a valve closure for closing the outside end of said air duct, and 26 is a valve closure for closing the inside end of said air passage. The valve closures 25 and 26 are rigidly connected to a movable spindle 27. lVind chest 23 through its lower member 28 has an air passage forming part of a controlling air duct 29. The air duct 29 is arranged to be closed by a valve closure or pallet 30 of the swell organ pallet rail which valve closure is of felt or other suitable material fixed to a movable member 31. The movable member 31 is arranged to be operated by means of a pneumatic motor 32 having one member fixed to the movable member 31, and another member fixed to the frame of the wind-chest 23, said last mentioned members being connected by flexible membrane or other suitable material in a well known manner. 33 represents an air passage connecting the air passage 24 with the interior of the pneumatic motor 32.
Referring to Fig. 2, the air duct 8 leads to a chamber 34 of an intermediate pneumatic. The upper part of the chamber 34 is covered with a flexible membrane 35 and secured to the membrane 35 is a valve stem 36. Secured to the upper part of the valve stem 36 is a valve closure 37 operating within a chamber 38. 39 represents a windchest situated above the chamber 38 and connected therewith by means of an air passage 40. An air passage 41 connects the chamber 38 with the external atmosphere, Then in its lower position the valve closure 37 is arranged to close the passage 41 and when in its upper position it is arranged to close the passage 40. Leading from the chamber 38 is an air duct 42 extending to a chamber 43, covered by a flexible membrane 44. The membrane 44 has secured to it a valve stem 45. 46 represents another windchest having an air passage 47 connecting the same with the external atmosphere. An air duct 48 connects the wind-passage 47 with suitable controlling pneumatics to cause the operation of one of the speaking devices of the great organ in any usual or well known manner. Secured to the valve stem 45 is a valve closure 49 arranged to close the upper end of the air passage 47 and to the lower part of the valve stem 45 is secured a valve closure 50 arranged to close the lower end of the air passage 47. The controlling air duct 29 leads from Fig. 1 to Fig. 2 and into a chamber 51 covered by a flexible membrane 52 which is secured to a valve stem to operate the same. Secured to the valve stem 53 is a valve closure 54 arranged within a chamber 55. Situated above the chamber 55 is a windchest 56 connected with the chamber 55 by means of an air passage The chamber 55 is connected with the external atmosphere by means of an air passage 58. When in its upper position the valve closure 56 is arranged to close the air passage 57 and when in its lower position it is arranged to close the air passage 58. Leading from the chamber 55 is an air duct 59 connecting with a chamber 60 covered by a flexible membrane 61 having secured to it for operation a valve stem 62. 63 represents another wind-chest, having an air passage 64 leading to the external atmosphere. An air duct 65 connects the passage 64 with a suitable operating or controlling pneumatic to cause one of the speaking devices of the swell organ to operate in any usual or well known manner. The valve stem 62 carries at its upper end a valve closure 66 arranged to close the upper end of the passage 64 when in its lower position and also carried by the valve stem 62 is a valve closure 67 arranged to close the lower end of the air passage 64 when in its upper position.
Referring to Fig. 3, 68 represents a pedal key for the organ, operating a lever 69, held in its normal position by a spring 70. 71 represents a wind-chest and 72 an air passage connecting the wind-chest 71 with the external atmosphere. 7 3 represents an air passage connecting the air passage 72 with an air duct 74 which leads to any well known form or suitable operating or controlling pneumatic having a pedal speaking device. The lever 69 carries a valve stem 75, having secured to it at its upper end a valve closure 76 arranged to close the upper end of the air passage 72. The valve stem 75 has also secured to it a valve closure 77 arranged to close the lower end of the passage 72 when the valve closure 77 is in its upper position.
The operation of the parts so far de scribed is as follows: Upon depression of one end of the pivoted great key 1, the lever 2 is raised, thus allowing the wind pressure within the chest 3 to raise the valve stem 7, thereby closing the lower end of the opening 4 and opening the wind-passage 20 to the outside atmosphere. This reduces the pressure within the pneumatic motor 17, and the wind-pressure within the chest 3 causes the motor 17 to be collapsed, thereby raising the valve closure 16 from its seat. This opens the controlling end of the duct 8, to the wind pressure within the chest 3 so that air rushes into the duct 8 and thence to the chamber 34, causing the membrane 35 to be pushed upwardly. This raises the valve closure 37, thus closing the wind-passage 40 and opening the passage 41 so that the air duct 42 is connected to the atmosphere and the wind pressure which formerly existed therein due to its connection with the chest 39, is reduced. This reduces the wind pressure within the chamber 43, allowing the membrane 44 to drop, thus closing the air passage 47 from the wind-chest 46 and opening the air duct 48 to the atmosphere to reduce the pressure therein. This reduction in pressure then acts through suitable intermediate devices to cause one of the great organ speaking devices to operate in any usual or well known manner. In a similar manner, upon depression of the swell key 21 the lever 22 is raised, thus allowing the valve closures 25 and 26 to be raised under the action of the pressure within the wind-chest 23. This action closes the lower end of the passage 24 and opens the passage to the outside atmosphere, thus reducing the pressure within the motor 32, so that the same collapses by the action of the pressure within the Wind-chest 23. The collapsing of the pneumatic motor 32 raises the valve closure 30 from its seat, thus opening the air duct 29 to the pressure within the chest 23. Air then rushes into the air duct 29 and into the chamber 51, causing the flexible membrane 52, to be raised and with it the valve closure 54, so that it closes the air passage 57 and opens the air passage 58. This connects the air duct 59 with the outside atmosphere, thus reducing the pressure within the duct 59, which had previously been maintained by its connection with the wind-chest 56. The re duction in pressure in the air duct 59 causes a corresponding reduction of pressure in the chamber 60, thus allowing membrane 61 to drop and with it the valve 66, to close the upper end of the air passage 64. At the same time the valve closure 67 drops, so that the air duct 65 is connected with the external atmosphere, thus causing a reduction in pressure therein which actuates any usual or well known intermediate controlling or operating device to cause one of the speaking devices of the swell organ to operate.
In order that one or more speaking devices of the swell organ may be caused to speak when one or more of the speaking devices of the great organ are caused to speak and merely by the operation of one of the great organ keys, the air duct 11 (Fig. l) is suitably connected with an air duct 70 (Fig. 2) which leads into the chamber 51 above described. The air passages 11 and 70 form an air duct and between them I provide a suitable coupling valve. For this purpose the air duct 11 leads into a block 71 of a coupling valve structure, upon which block is secured a lower member 72 of a motor operated valve. The air duct 11 leads up through the member 72 and terminates at the top thereof to form a suitable valve seat. Upon the member 72 I place a piece of leather, or other suitable material 73, upon which is secured a lever member 74, the felt 73 serving as a fulcrum therefor. As shown in Fig. 2, the block 71 and the valve carried thereby are shown in section and the short arm of the lever member 74: at the left of the fulcrum 73 carries a piece of felt 75 which acts as a valve closure for the end of the air duct 11. Upon the rocking of the lever 74 and raising its short arm, the valve closure 75 will be raised. The air duct 70 also leads up through the block 71 and through the member 72 so that when the valve closure 75 is raised the two ducts 11 and 70 will be put into communication to form a single air passage. The members 72 and 74 are connected by a flexible membrane in a well known manner, the membrane extending entirely around the same. It will thus be seen that two air chambers and pneumatic bellows are formed, one at the left of the felt 73 and the other at the right thereof. Within the right-hand part of the block 71 is a chamber 7 6 which is supplied with air under pressure when desired in a manner to be hereafter described. A duct 77 (see Fig. 5) passes from the air chamber 76 up through the right-hand portion of the mem; ber 72 and into the right-hand air chamber thereby. It will thus be seen that the parts above described form a coupling valve located in the air duct 11, 70, which is operated by a pneumatic motor formed by the right-hand portions of the members 72 and 74; and the surrounding membrane, so that if air is admitted under pressure to the chamber 7 6, it will cause the right-hand end of the lever member 74 to be raised and the left-hand end to be lowered, thus closing the valve within the air duct 11, 7 0. Like wise, if the air pressure within the chamber 76 be removed, the pressure within the duct 11 will cause the left-hand end of the lever member 7 4: to be raised, thus forming a continuous duct through 11 and 70 to the chamber 51 from the chest 3, so that the corresponding speaking device of the swell organ will be operated. In other words, if air pressure exists within the chamber 76 the two speaking devices mentioned will not be coupled, but if the air pressure be reduced within the chamber 76, the two speaking devices mentioned will be coupled. The pneumatic on the right-hand end of the lever 74 being larger and at a greater distance from the fulcrum, the valve will be closed whenever the same pressure is exerted in one pneumatic as in the other, thus avoiding the use of two or more different pressures in the apparatus. In order to provide for this operation at the will of the operator, a block 78 is provided as shown, in Fig. 1, having an air passage 79 extending to the upper face thereof. A manually operated valve closure 80 is arranged to close the upper end of this air passage, as will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. For this purpose the valve closure 80 may be operated in any usual or well known manner, which will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. The lower end of the air passage 79 is connected with an air duct 81, which leads to a chamber 82, having its bottom portion covered by means of a flexible meml'irane 83. Below the membrane 83 is a windch-est 84 having an air passage 85 connectthe same with the external atmosphere. A wind duct 86 connects the air passage 85 with the chamber 76 previously mentioned. The membrane 83 has secured to it a valve stem 87 so that the valve stem will be moved by the membrane 83. Secured to the valve stem 87 is a valve closure 88 arranged to close the upper end of the passage 85 when said closure is in its lowermost position. Also secured to the valve stem 87 is a valve closure 89 arranged to close the lower end of the passage 85 when said closure is in its uppermost position. The valve stem 87 extends upwardly through a small bleed hole in a metal plate 90 into a chamber 91 and an air passage 92 connects the chamber 91 with the wind-chest 8 1.
It, now, it is desired that the swell organ action be coupled with the corresponding great organ action, the valve closure 80 is pushed so as to close the upper opening of the air passage 79. This allows the air or wind within the chest 81 which passes through the bleed hole in the plate 90, to increase the pressure within the chamber 82 until the pressure in the chamber 82 has become equal to that in the chamber 8-1, thus causing the membrane 83 to drop and with it the valve closures 88 and 89. This closes the upper end of the passage 85 and opens the lower end thereof to the external atmosphere, thus reducing the pressure in the air passage 86 and likewise in the air chamber 76, so that the pressure within the air duct 11 causes the valve closure 75 to rise, thus connecting the air duct 11 through the air duct 7 0 with the chamber 51 and causing the corresponding swell organ speaking device to operate in the well known manner.
If it is desired that the great organ action be coupled with the swell organ action, say an octave above, the air duct 9 is utilized. For this purpose a duct 93 extends into a chamber similar to 51 but corresponding to a speaking device, say, an octave higher. The ducts 93 and 9 are connected to form a single air passage by the opening of the valve similar in all respects and in its connecting and operating mechanism to the valve 75. If it is desired that the great organ action be coupled with the swell organ action, say an octave lower, the air duct 10 is used. For this purpose an air duct 95 is provided which is connected to a chamber similar to 51 but corresponding to a speaking device on the swell organ, say an octave lower. A valve closure 90 acts to connect the ducts 10 and 95 to form a single air passage with the coupling valve therein, which, when the valve is open, couples up the speaking device as described and when it is closed prevents the coupling up of these devices. The operation of the valve closure 96 and its connecting and operating parts is in all r spects similar to that of the valve closure 75.
If it is desired to connect or couple a great organ action, say an octave lower than that corresponding to key 1 with the action of key 1, a. duct 97 is provided which is arranged to be operatively connected with a duct 98, which latter duct leads into the chamber 34 previously described. And to couple the action of key 1 with a great organ action an octave lower the duct 12 is provided. For coupling the air passages 97 and 98 to form a continuous controlling duct, valve closure 99 is provided which operates in all respects similar to the valve closure 75. In a similar manner, it it is desired to connect a great organ action, say an octave higher than that corresponding to the key 1 with the action corresponding to the key 1, a duct 100 is provided, arranged to be operatively connected with a duct 101, which duct likewise leads to the chamber 3-1 previously described. And to couple the great organ action of key 1 with a great organ action an octave higher the duct 13 is provided. A valve closure 102 is provided for the coupling valve located in the duct 100, 101, which operates similar to the valve closure 75.
It may also be desirable to provide coupling means whereby when one of the pedal keys is operated, corresponding actions in the great and swell organ will be operated. For this purpose the chamber 74 (Fig. 3) has above it two openings 103 and 10 1. Covering the opening 103 is a flexible membrane 105 operating a alve stem carrying a valve closure 100 located within a chamber 107. 108 represents a wind-chest and 109 an opening from the wind-chest into the chamher 107. An air passage 110 extends :lrom the chamber 107 to the external atmosphere. Opening 104; has a flexible membrane 111 carrying a valve stem having secured thereto a valve closure 112 situated within a chamber 113. An air passage 11% connects the chamber 113 with the wind-chest 108 and an air passage 115 connects the chamber 113 with the external atmosphere.
When the pedal key 68 is depressed and the reduction of pressure of the wind duct 73 takes place the members 10 1 and 105 drop, thus opening the chambers 107 and 113 to the wind chest 1.08 and closing the openings 110 and 115, which lead to the external atmosphere. 110 represents an air duct connected to the chamber 107 and 117 represents an air duct connected with the chamber 113. Therefore, on depression of the pedal key 68 and lowering of the valve closures 106 and 112, the ducts 110 and 117 are supplied with wind from the chest 108. The duct 116 leads into a block 118 similar to the block 71, while the duct 117 leads into a block 119, also similar to the block 71. Leading from block 118 is a duct 120 connecting with the chamber 51 of the swell organ action, and a valve closure 121 and its connecting and operating parts, similar to the valve closure 75, is arranged to regulate the connection between the ducts 116 and 120; so that, if desired, and upon the raising of the valve closure 121 the pedal action may be coupled with the swell organ action. In a similar manner, the duct 122 leads from the block 119 to the chamber 34 of the great organ action and the valve closure 123 is provided for controlling the connection between the 'air ducts 117 and The valve closure 123 and its connecting and operating parts are similar to the valve closure 75 and its connecting and operating parts, so that upon the raising of the valve closure 123 when desired, the pedal organ action is coupled with the corresponding great organ action.
In order that the organ or other instrument may be automatically operated, the same is provided with a tracker board 124 (see Fig. 1), over which a perforated music sheet 125 is arranged to pass by means of reels 126 and 127 in any usual or well known manner. The parts 124, 125, 126 and 127 are inclosed within a wind-chest or suitable chamber 128 having a glass front at 129. Any well known means may be provided for producing suitable wind pressure within 128. A tracker board 124 is provided with the usual series of tracker openings and with ducts 130, one connecting with each tracker opening. At the point 131 the duct 130 splits into two separate ducts 132 and 133 respectively. The duct 133 is arranged to be connected with a duct 134 to form a continuous air passage by means of a coupling valve having a valve closure 135. For this purpose the ducts 133 and 134 extend into a block 136, valve closure 135 being arranged to cover the end of the duct 134. The valve closure is operated by a lever member 137, which, in all substantial respects is similar to the arrangement shown in Fig. 5 and previously described. The right-hand chamber in the device, however, is continuously supplied with air under pressure by means of a duct 138 connected with the chest 128. The valve closures 135 are arranged to be oper ated in any well known manner. These valves 135 are normally arranged to control the swell organ action when the instrument is being automatically played and by means thereof any note or notes may be accented by means of the swell organ action, as desired, and at the will of the operator.
lVhile such a coupling device as shown at 135, 136, forms an important element in some combinations which are improvements claimed herein, nevertheless many of the specific features of construction of this device are not claimed herein, and for this reason it is only shown more or less diagrammatically. A good form of device to be used in this connection, however, is clearly shown and described in my co-pending application, Serial No. 535,585, filed December 30, 1909.
The ducts 132 and 134 lead into one end of a block 144, forming the base of a reversing slide valve. Leading from the other end of the block 144 are corresponding ducts 145 and 146. Opening into the top face of the block 144 are passages 146, 147, 148, 149, 150 and 151. The passage 146 is connected with the duct 132 and the passage 147 is connected with the duct 134. The passages 148 and 151 are connected with the duct 146 and the passages 149 and 150 are connected with the duct 145, as clearly shown. The passage 150 is in the form of a tube passing through the passage leading to the duct 145, and connecting with the passage 148, a space being left about the sides of the tube so that the passages 149 and 150 are connected with the duct 145. Upon the block 144 is arranged the slide valve 152, having air passages 153 and 154. Stops 155 and 156 are provided at either end of the block 144 to limit the extreme positions of movement of the slide valve 152. hen in the 1efthand position, as shown in the drawing, the reversing slide valve connects the duct 132 with the duct 145 and the duct 134 with the duct 146. If, now, the slide valve 152 be moved to its position to the right, the duct 132 will be connected to the duct 146 and the duct 134 will be connected to the duct 145, itbeing understood that there is a plurality of slide valves 152, one corresponding to each tracker opening. It will be seen that there are provided two sets of air ducts 132 and 134 connected to the tracker board 124 and two other sets of air ducts 145 and 146 and a set of reversing valves for connecting the ducts of one of said first mentioned sets with the ducts of one of said second mentioned sets, and the ducts of the other of said first mentioned sets with the ducts of the other of said second mentioned sets in direct and reverse manner.
The top plan view of a portion of the slide valves 152 is shown in Fig. 4. Each slide valve 152 is independent of its neighbor and these valves are therefore independently movable across their seats. In order to properly guide them in their movement pins 157 are driven into the block 144 between the sliding parts 152. In order to more perfectly cause the sliding parts or valves 152 to rest upon their seats and prevent leakage, each one is weighted upon its top by means of a piece of metal 158, preferably lead. A groove 159 is provided in the top of each of these sliding parts 152 and a single metal bar 160 has its lower edge resting within all of said grooves 159. The bar, or plate 160 is secured to a rotating rod or pipe 161 having at one end secured thereto a handle 162, so that upon moving the handle 162 all of the sliding valves or members 152 may be moved into one position or the other, thus reversing the connections between the ducts 132 and 134 and 145 and 146. In order to more firmly press the sliding members 152 to their seats, each is provided with a flat spring 163 having at one end an aperture therethrough, through which ext-ends one end of the link 16-1. The link 16 1 has a collar near said end in order to properly position the end of the spring on the link 16 1. The other end of the link 16 1 extends into a groove or depression in the member 152, so as to form a sort of pivotal connection therewith. Each member 152 is provided with an independent spring 163 and all of these springs are secured to a bar 165 by means of screws 166, as clearly shown in Fig. 1. From a further consideration of Fig. 1, it will be seen that in the position shown, the spring 163, acting through the link 164 tends to force the member 152 toward the left or into its left-hand position. Upon moving the handle 162 and forcing the member 152 to the right and after the same has passed a predetermined point in its movement it will be clear that the spring 163 in pressing downwardly and acting through the link 16% will tend to move the member 152 into its right-hand position. That is, after the dead center has been passed, the springs 163 tend to move the various slide valves into their right-hand or left-hand positions, as the case may be.
The duct 1 16 leads to a chamber 167, covered by a suitable membrane operating a valve spindle carrying valve closures 168 and 169. 170 represents a wind-chest having an air passage 171 leading therefrom to the external atmosphere. When the valve closure 168 is in its upper position it closes the lower ends of said opening 171 and when the valve closure 169 is in its lower position, it closes the upper end of the opening 171. 172 represents a bellows or pneumatic of any well known form which, when subjected to air aressure therein acts upon the lever 22 to move the same as does the key 21. The interior of the bellows 172 is connected with the passage 171 by means of a duct 173.
The duct 1 15 connects with the chamber 173 covered by a flexible membrane carrying a valve spindle having secured thereto valve closures 17 1- and 175. 17 6 represents a. windchest in which the valve closure 175 is located. 177 is a passage leading from the wind-chest 176 to the external atmosphere. When the valve closure 175 is in its lower most position it closes the upper end of the passage 177 and when the valve closure 17 1 is in its uppermost position it closes the lower end of the passage 177. 178 is a bellows or pneumatic similar to 172 and operates upon the lever 2, in the same manner as the bellows 172 operates upon the lever 22, thus upon expansion of the bellows 178 the lever 2 is operated in the same manner as it would be operated upon by depression of the key 1. A duct 179 connects the interior of the bellows 178 with the passage 177.
The operation of the features just above set forth may be described as follows: Upon the opening in the tracker sheet 125, registering with one of the ducts 130, air will be forced into the duct 130 in the usual manner. Assuming that it is desired that both the corresponding great and swell organ actions are oesired to be operated in order to accent the note corresponding to the registering aperture; then the air will pass through the duct 130, duct 132, passage 1 1-6, passage 153, passage 150, duct 1 15 and into the chamber 173 so as to raise its covering membrane. This causes valve closures 17a and 175 to rise, thus opening the passage or duct 179 to the wind chest 176 and causing the wind from the chest 17 6 to rush into the bellows 178. The bellows 178 thus expands, operating the lever 2, which, in turn, causes the great organ action to be set in motion and the corresponding great organ speaking device to be sounded, as previously described. For the swell organ action the air under pressure passes through the duct 130, through the duct 133, through the coupling valve formed by valve closure 135 and its seat, through duct 1.3 1, passage 1 17, passage 15 passage 1 18, duct 1 16 and into chainher 167, thereby causing its covering membrane to be raised. This raises the valve closures 168 and 169, thus allowing the air under pressure to be supplied to the bellows 172 from the wind chest 170. This causes the bellows 172 to expand and operate the lever 22, which sets in motion the swell organ action to cause the swell organ speak ing device to be sounded, as previously described. If on the other hand, the valve closure 135 be in its lower position, thus closing the valve in the ducts 133, 13 1, the air from the ducts 130 and 133 cannot rush into the ducts 13st and 1 16 and therefore under these conditions the swell organ speaking device would not be sounded.
in order that a corresponding pedal note may be sounded when a great organ speakdevice is sounded automatically, as just described, I provide a duct 180 leading from the passage 177 (Fig 1) to a valve block 181 (see Fig. 2). The valve block 181 is provided with chambers 182, into one of which the duct 180 enters. A back pressure valve 183 is provided over the end of the duct 180. Leading from one of the chambers 182 is a duct 184:, which connects with the chamber 185 (see Fig. Over the chamber 185 is a flexible membrane 186, carrying a valve stem, upon which is secured a valve 187. The valve 187 is arranged to normally close an opening 188 leading from a passage 74" to the external atmosphere. When the valve closure 187 is in its uppermost position it is arranged to close the passage 7 3 to the passage 7% and thus prevent waste of wind from the chest 71. The operation of these features is as follows: Upon the automatic operation of the great organ action, as above described, the passage 177 (Fig. 1) is opened to the wind chest 17 6. Therefore wind rushes into the duct 180 and from beneath the valve 183 into the chambers 182, through the duct 18% and into the chamber 185 (Fig. This raises the membrane 186 causing the valve closure 187 to close the passage 73 and open the passage 188 to the passage 74. This causes a reduction of pressure in the passage 74, which causes the actuation of the pedal organ sounding device as previously described. In a simi lar manner, a duct 189 (Fig. 1) connects the passage 171 with the chambers 182, a back pressure valve 190 being provided over the end of the duct 189, as shown in Fig. 2. Thus, upon the automatic actuation of the swell organ mechanism, as above described, and the connection of the passage 171 with the wind-chest 170, air will likewise rush through the duct 189 into the chambers 182 and thence through the duct 184 and cause the actuation of the corresponding pedal organ speaking device, as just pre viously described.
It will, of course, be understood that there is a valve closure 16 (Fig. 1) corresponding to each of the great organ keys and a valve closure 30 corresponding to each of the swell organ keys. It will also be understood that there is a coupling device indicated at 75, etc., corresponding to each of the great organ keys which it may be desired to couple with the swell organ direct. It will also be understood that there are a plurality of coupling devices indicated at 9 1-, etc., corresponding to the great organ keys which it is desired to couple with the swell organ an octave higher, and that there are a plurality of coupling devices indicated at 96, etc, corresponding to each of the great organ keys which it is desired to couple to the swell organ an octave lower, and that there are a plurality of coupling devices indicated at 99, etc. corresponding to great organ keys, which it is desired to couple to great organ keys or devices an octave higher and that there are a plurality of coupling devices indicated at 102, etc., corresponding to those great organ keys which it may be desired to couple to those great organ keys an octave lower. There are also a corresponding plurality of sets of coupling devices, as indicated at 121, etc. and 123, etc, their number being suflicient for the purposes desired. The coupling devices indicated by 121, 12 94, 96, 75, 99 and 102 are preferably arran 'ed in rows, only one of each row being shown, as seen in Fig. 2. However, each row of said coupling devices has only one main conduit 86, although if desired the couplers may be much more complicated by providing separate air supply pipes 86, etc. for various sections of these rows. Likewise, unless thus modified, there will only be one slide valve 80 (Fig. 1) corresponding to each of said rows of couplers. These coupling devices are especially simple and efficient in construction and operation. As shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the top member thereof acts as a lever having two chambers on each side of its fulcrum point. The pressure area in one chamber, that is, at the left of the fulcrum being much smaller in effective pressure area than that on the right-hand side of the fulcrum point. It will be understood, of course, that the pressure exerted within the chamber at the left of the fulcrum point corresponds to that in the duct 11. The right-hand arm of the lever member 74 is much longer than the left-hand arm, so that with an equal wind pressure on both sides of the fulcrum point the right-hand arm will overcome the pressure exerted upon the left-hand arm under normal conditions and cause the valve closure to rest upon its seat. In other words, with the same pressure in the duct 11 and in the conduit 86 it will be seen that the valve closure will be securely held down. If the pressure areas within the chambers on the two sides of the fulcrum point were of the same effective area and at the same distance from the fulcrum point the lever member would be as liable to tilt one way as the other, but by increas ing the effective pressure area on the righthand side and increasing its distance from the fulcrum point, that is, making the righthand side of the lever member longer, the valve is effectively closed, under normal conditions. Furthermore, I prefer to taper off the lever members 7% and base members 72 on their sides from the fulcrum along both arms so that they may be placed closely together without interfering with one another. The advantage of this will be readily seen. As the right-hand ends of the members 72 and H approach one another the intermediate membrane will be forced in different directions, both outwardly and inwardly, and if these coupling devices were not so tapered and were placed closely together, thus forcing the membranes outwardly would cause one coupling device to interfere with another. However, by tapering off the arms, as described. ample space is given for the movement of the intervening membranes. The movable members 74:, with the members 72 and the intervening membranes therefore form independent pneumatic motors for operating the various valve closures. These features have been tried out and found to give great satisfaction and to be much more eflicient and economical in the construction and operation and also to take up much less space and are much light r than those hitherto known.
From the above it will be seen that I have provided two controlling air ducts as at 8 and 11-70 for different speaking devices, a valve 16 for openin the controlling ends of said ducts, a coupling valve 7 5 in one of said ducts and means for pneumatically operating said last mentioned valve. This forms an especially simple and efficient combination for the purposes desired and l have found that it is also most conducive to reduction of space and weight in the apparatus.
The pneumatic motor operated valve closures 16 and 30 are similar in every respect, except that 16 is longer in order to cover up the controlling ends of the various air ducts 8, 9, 10, 11, etc. These closures 16 and 30, with their operating pneumatic motors, are shown in detail in Figs. 7 and 8. As shown in Fig. 8, upon the decrease in pressure within the motor, the increased pressure outside remaining the same, the membrane between the members 18 and 19 is caused to callapse and the valve closure 16 raised. The valve closure 16 and its supporting member 15 are raised vertically and, in order to keep it in proper alinement pins 191 are driven into the top member 192 of the device and extend through slits 193 in the member 15. Pins 191 operating in the slits 193, therefore, keep the valve closure 16 in proper alinement, so that they will always properly seat upon their valve seats. In order to cause the members 15 with the valve closures 16 to return promptly to their seats after being pneumatically raised, a suitable depression is made in the wooden member 18, which is shown at 19 1. This depression is filled with lead 195, which acts as a weight to cause the valve closure 18 to promptly return to its seat after the key 1 or the automatic controlling mechanism has been released. It is important that the valve closure 16 move in a substantially vertical direction or in such a direction that it will move away from said ducts so that the latter will be uncovered simultaneously, and the movement of the valve to be in such a line that at any instant the valve closure will be at the same distance from all of the controlling ends of the ducts 8, 9, 10, 11, etc. This is important in order that the simultaneous opening of the controlling ends of these valves may be assured. It has been suggested that hand operated valve closures be used, which valve closures are pivotally mounted so that that part of the closure falling over one of the controlling ducts 8, 9, 10 or 11, etc. will be moved farther away therefrom than that part of the closure falling over another of the controlling ends of said ducts. A valve closure operating in this manner will open one duct before it does another, thus causing one spca ring device to be sounded before another. Such an arrangement therefore obviously very disadvantageous and this disadvantage l have overcome as above pointed out.
Although I have described my improve ments with respect to one particular embodiment thereof, and in great detail, nevertheless T do not desire to be limited to such details, since it is obvious that many changes and modifications may well be made without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention and improvements. But,
Now having thus fully and clearly de scribed my improvements, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent,
1. In an organ coupler combined with suitable speaking devices, two sets of con trolling air ducts for controlling two sets of speaking devices, a set of valves, one valve for opening the controlling ends of one duct of each set of ducts simultaneously, a separate pneumatic motor for operating each valve, a separate coupling valve in each duct of one set, and a separate pneumatic motor for operating each coupling valve, a third set of air oucts for controlling the same set of speaking devices as the ducts in which the coupling valves are situated, a separate valve for opening the controlling end of each of said third set of ducts, and a separate pneumatic motor for operating each of said last mentioned valves.
2. In an organ, the great organ key and swell organ key, corresponding great organ speaking device and swell organ speaking device, two controlling air ducts for the swell organ speaking device, a valve for opening the controlling end of one of said ducts, means including a pneumatic motor for operating said valve, said motor being controlled by the swell organ key, a coupling valve in the other of said ducts, a pneumatic motor for operating said coupling valve, a controlling duct for the great organ speaking device, and a valve for opening the controlling end of said last mentioned duct and said coupling duct simultaneously, a pneumatic motor for operating said last mentioned valve, said last mentioned motor bein controlled by the great organ key.
0. In a coupler, two sets of controlling air ducts for different speaking devices, a set of valves, one valve for opening the controlling ends of one duct of each set of ducts simultaneously, a separate pneumatic motor for operating each valve, a separate coupling valve in each duct of one set and separate means mechanically connected to each coupling valve for mechanically operating the same.
t. In an organ coupler or the like combined with suitable speaking devices, two
sets of controlling air ducts for controlling two sets of speaking devices, a set of valves, one valve for opening the controlling ends of one duct of each set of ducts substantially simultaneously, a separate coupling valve in each duct of one set and separate mechanical means mechanically connected to said cou pling valves for operating the same, a third set of air ducts for controlling the same set of speaking devices as the ducts in which the coupling valves are situated and a separate valve for opening the controlling end of each of the ducts of said third set.
5. In an organ, the great organ keys and swell organ keys, and corresponding great organ speaking devices and swell organ speaking devices, two sets of controlling air ducts for the swell organ'speaking devices, a separate valve for opening the controlling end of each of said ducts, means including a pneumatic motor for operating each of said valves, said motor being controlled by the swell organ key, a coupling valve in each of the ducts of the other set, separate means mechanically connected to each coupling tioned ducts and the corresponding coupling duct simultaneously, a pneumatic motor for operating said last mentioned valve, said last mentioned motor being controlled by the great organ key.
In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
JOSEPH SCHVVERTNER.
Witnesses GORHAM CROSBY, EDWIN SEGER.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C."
US59619610A 1910-12-08 1910-12-08 Musical instrument. Expired - Lifetime US1081703A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US59619610A US1081703A (en) 1910-12-08 1910-12-08 Musical instrument.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US59619610A US1081703A (en) 1910-12-08 1910-12-08 Musical instrument.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1081703A true US1081703A (en) 1913-12-16

Family

ID=3149936

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US59619610A Expired - Lifetime US1081703A (en) 1910-12-08 1910-12-08 Musical instrument.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1081703A (en)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1081703A (en) Musical instrument.
US1082655A (en) Organ-coupler.
US394006A (en) Pneumatic wind musical instrument
US1195536A (en) Fobnia
US1120775A (en) Combination grand piano.
USRE13536E (en) Automatic playing apparatus
US1011920A (en) Interior-player piano.
US1267719A (en) Control-chest.
US671691A (en) Automatically-operated organ.
US638615A (en) Automatic musical instrument.
US394005A (en) Pneumatic action for musical instruments
US760115A (en) Pneumatic-coupler for pipe or reed organs.
US1071888A (en) Organ.
US850303A (en) Expression mechanism for self-playing musical instruments.
US743065A (en) Mechanism for accentuating one or more notes in mechanically-actuated musical apparatus.
US1041179A (en) Automatic playing instrument.
US368165A (en) parker
US809565A (en) Self-playing mechanism for instruments.
US1068509A (en) Player-piano.
US1066632A (en) Player-piano.
US1601432A (en) Expression mechanism for player musical instruments
US558562A (en) Musical instrument
US1224693A (en) Automatic music-playing instrument.
US816605A (en) Automatic piano-player.
US751808A (en) Automatic musical instrument