US1024396A - Bobbin-clutching spinning-spindle. - Google Patents

Bobbin-clutching spinning-spindle. Download PDF

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US1024396A
US1024396A US60056211A US1911600562A US1024396A US 1024396 A US1024396 A US 1024396A US 60056211 A US60056211 A US 60056211A US 1911600562 A US1911600562 A US 1911600562A US 1024396 A US1024396 A US 1024396A
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bobbin
spindle
arms
clutching
shell
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US60056211A
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John V Cunniff
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JAMES K LANNING
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JAMES K LANNING
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments

Description

J. V. CUNNIFF.
BOBBIN GLUTGHING SPINNING SPINDLE.
APPLIUATION FILED JAN. 3, 1911.
Patented Apr.23, 1912.
UNTTED sTATEs PATENT onirica.
JOHN V. CUNNIFF, OF FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR T0 JAMES K. LANNING, 0F BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
BOBBIN-CLUTCHING SPINNING-SPINDLE.
VSpecification of Letters Patent. l
Patented Apr. 23, 1912.
Application led January 3, 1911. Serial No. 600,562.
To all `whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, JOHN V. CUNNIFF, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Fall River, in the county of Bristol and State of Massachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Bobbin-Clutching Spinning-Spindles, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like letters on the drawings representing like parts.
This invention relates to bobbin-clutching spinning spindles. In order that the principle thereof may be readily understood, I have disclosed a single embodiment thereof in the accompanying drawing, wherein- Figure 1 is a side elevation of a spindle embodying my invention, the bobbin being in position thereon and in section; Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal se-ction of the spindle shown in Fig. 1 with-the bobbin thereon; Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional detail through the spring arms, and representing the spindle at rest and the bobbin removed; and Fig. 4 is a transverse section taken through the spindle upon the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.
The purpose of my invention is to provide effective means for clutching the bobbins upon spinning spindles.
Attempts have been made heretofore to provide spinning spindles with bobbinclutching devices, but so far as I am aware without complete success. It has been proposed to provide the spindle with a Xed, non-yielding base to enter the enlarged, lower portion of the bobbin, but in such constructions the bobbin has been held in position either too loosely or too tightly, the former condition resulting from the application of too little force in positioning the bobbin, and the latter condition resulting from forcing the bobbin down upon the spindle too violently. In the former case the bobbin works loose during the spinning operation, and in the latter case it is difficult to remove the lled bobbin in dofling. Attempts have also been made to provide spindles with spring arms or other spring devices to engage the interior of the bobbin, but it has been necessary to modify the structure of the spindle by boring or grooving the same, which seriously interferes with its operation, or to provide a structure which quickly clogs with lint and dirt, and thus interferes not only with the proper running of the spindle but prevents the intended operation of the bobbin clutching elements.
During recent years many attempts have been made to provide an effective bobbin clutching spindle having centrifugally acting arms or members, which when the spindle is at rest are not in bobbin driving gripping engagement with the bobbin, but which when the spindle is driven are intended to move radially outward and to clutch the interior of the bobbin. These devices are not etlicient.` They do not center and position the bobbin when the latter is rst applied thereto and the spindle is at rest, but such partial centering of the bobbin as can occur must take place only after the spindle has acquired momentum in rotation. It is exceedingly important that t-he bobbin be accurately centered when first positioned upon the spindle and the latter is at rest. The radially movable blades of centrifugally acting spindles are peculiarly liable to become clogged and necessitate frequent cleaning. When clogged they lose their capacity for centrifugal action and become fixed in a position where they present either too small a peripheral surface to clutch the bobbin effectively or too large a surface to receive the bobbin. If the blades become clogged at their upper ends, then they are Xedly held in an unduly expanded condition and the bobbin cannot be placed thereon. If, on the contrary, the blades become clogged at the bottom, then they present too small a peripheral surface to clutch the bobbin. In certain centrifugally act-ing spindle clutching devices, the centrifugally acting blades are rigid with the 'spindle and weighted or enlarged at their lower end in order to increase the centrifugal action. They are therefore very liable to snap offr1 when the spindle is rotating at speed, inasmuch as the blades are weakest at the point where they are rigidly connected with the spindle.
So far as I am aware, all spindles provided with centrifugally acting clutching blades have a tendency to throw off the bobbins in starting. This is owing to the fact that when power is applied to the spindles and they start to move from a position of rest, the bobbins are not held thereon but merely rest loosely about the spindles. Therefore, until the spindles have acquired sufiicient momentum to cause the blades to be thrown out under centrifugal action, the bobbin is not held with a driving grip and the rotation of the spindle will therefore frequently throw the bobbin A from the spindle. Moreover, centrifugally acting blades cut into the interior face of the bobbin and roughen or splinter the same and 'in time render them useless.
When a spindle is doffed, the yarn is customarily broken at the top of the doed bobbin and the end extending from the drawing rolls is wrapped about the spindle at about the point where the lower end of the bobbin is received thereon, so that when the empty bobbin is positioned upon the spindle, the end may be gripped between the spindle and the inner face of the bobbin. This yarn end will not be securely held by the centrifugally acting blades for the reason that while the spindle is at rest, the centrifugally acting blades are so far removed from the interior of the bobbin that they cannot at such time grip the end.
My invention, as hereinafter set forth, is radically distinguished from structures wherein the sleeve whirl is longitudinally slitted to provide resilient arms. In such cases, the slits cannot extend to the extreme lower edge of the whirl, and therefore free, stiiiy resilient arms cannot be thus provided. Moreover, such devices rely for their gripping engagement with the bobbin upon centrifugal action and do not occupy their extreme outward, radial position when the spindle is at rest. Therefore they do not effectively grip and center the bobbin when the latter is positioned thereon in a condition of rest of the bobbin. Moreover the slits in order to provide resilient arms must extend well below the lower edge of the bob bin, and therefore permit the introduction of lint and dust to the interior of the sleeve whirl.
I have overcome the objections incident to the several types of bobbin-clutching spindles by providing a set of stifliy resilient spring arms which center the bobbin immediately as it is received thereon and while the spindle is still at rest. The spring arms are so constructed that they exclude all lint and foreign matter from that portion of the spindle enveloped by them, and they occupy their maximum outward position when the spindle is at rest and the bobbin removed,
so that they are slightly compressed by the bobbin when positioned thereon, this resulting in an immediate driving grip between the bobbin and the spindle. Moreover, the construction of parts is such that the invention may readily be applied to existing driven thereon.
Yof the bobbins.
Referring more particularly to the drawing, the spindle blade is represented at 1, it being of any suitable construction, and preferably formed of the usual spindle steel. The whirl is represented at 2 and isA rigid withthe spindle blade, it being provided with a preferably tapered, upwardly eX- tended head 3. Near the upper end of the whirl, I preferably rigidly apply thereto or form integral therewith a collar 4. At a suitable point above the whirl, near the base of the bobbin 5, when in position upon the spindle, I apply a metallic sleeve or shell 6 rigid with the spindle, being preferably This shell may be formed of any suitable material, but preferably of so-callcd brown spring steel. The sleeve or shell 6 is of a general tapering form and is extended downward to a point 7 preferably vslightly below the lower end of the bobbin `clogging and from being tampered with.
The collar 4 constitutes a bobbin-seat for the reception of the lower end of the bobbin when the latter occupies its lowermost posiktio-n.
In order to cause the sleeve or shell G to clutch t-he bobbin 5, I slit the shell longitudinally at a plurality of points as indicated at 10 to provide arms 1l, the number' of spring arms into which the shell is thus divided being preferably four, but two or even eight arms might be provided. I have, however, obtained the best spindle centering effects with four spring arms, as illustrated. It will be noted that the slits 10 are narrow and that the spindle is wholly enveloped by said arms 11 and that lint and foreign matter cannot find its way between said arms and the portion of the spindle surrounded thereby. The said arms 11 extend to substantially the base of and envelop the head 3 of the whirl from which they are slightly spaced, as indicated at 12 in Fig. 2, when .the spindle is at rest and the bobbin is removed therefrom. In positioning the bobbin upon the spindle, the mere weight of the bobbin compresses said arms 11 inwardly from their maximum outward, radial position to a sufiicient extent to cause an effective clutching or gripping action to take place between said arms and the interior of the bobbin. This slight compression of the arms 1l need not be suicient to cause the said arms to move into contact with the head 3 of the whirl. The described compression of the arms ll not only results in the immediate gripping engagement of said arms with the interior of the bobbin, but the bobbin is immediately centered when applied to the spindle and before power is applied to drive the spindles. rI`hus, when the spindle rotation commences, there is no tendency to throw the bobbins therefrom, as they have been already effectively gripped by the arms 11. The said arms 1l are stify resilient and can yield but very slightly when the bobbin is applied thereto.
As shown clearly in Figs. l, 2 and 3, the shell is of gradually increasing diameter from its upper to substantially its extreme lower end, so that the point of greatest and most effective gripping action is at the bottom of the bobbin, or in other words, is at that portion of the bottom of the bobbin chamber that is of the greatest diameter and preferably at the extreme lower edge of the bobbin chamber, whether the bobbin be forced fully down to its lowest level or whether it be stopped at a higher level. Because of the fact that the point of most effective gripping action is at the point described, the bobbin is driven evenly and smoothly, whereas, were the bobbin most tightly gripped at a point substantially above its bottom, the bobbin would wabble when driven at a high speed. The spring arms 1l are of greatest radial extent at their lower ends, and when they are at restthe diameter of the lower end of the sleeve or shell is slightly greater than the diameter of the bobbin chamber. It is highly important that the clutching sleeve or shell be such that it will effectively grasp bobbins not only of a normal diameter of chamber, but of less than such normal diameter of chamber, caused by wetting'. The arms 1l of the gradually enlarging sleeve or shell effectively grip the bobbin preferably at its extereme lower edge as above described, whether the chamber be of normal diameter or of less than normal diameter. If in attempting to apply a bobbin to the spindle,
it be found that the chamber thereof is of greater diameter than the normal diameter of the lower end of the sleeve, such bobbin is for best results at once discarded, because an important feature of my invention is the centering and gripping of the bobbin upon the spindle when the latter is in a state of rest. nasmuch as the spring arms engage with a driving fit that portion of the bottom of the bobbin chamber that is of the greatest diameter, my invention is especially useful with that type of chambered bobbin having a metallic ring or band at the extreme lower portion of the inner face of the bobbin chamber. Bobbins having such metallic bands have repeatedly been tried, but have never been successfully used, because it has not been possible to grip the inner face of said band with a solid sleeve. Bobbins with such rings or bands are desirable inasmuch as the bobbin at its bottom is always of the same size, the swell of the wood not affecting said ring, thus permitting the bobbin always to go down to the same level. More over, the ring protects the wood of the bobbin. The spring arms herein disclosed grip against such a ring when the bobbin is dropped thereunto and while the spindle is in a state of rest.
Inasmuch as the blades 11 occupy substantially their extreme outward radial position when the spindle is at rest, I do not need in practice to rely upon centrifugal action of said blades to secure a driving` engagement with the bobbin. Preferably the said blades 1l are thickest at their upper ends, as illustrated at 18 in Fig. 3, and taper down to a thin edge 7 as there shown. The effect of this construction is to make the arms stronger and less liable to snap at the point where there has been the greatest tendency to snap in ccntrifugally acting blades.
An important object of the invention is to provide an economical and cheaply made spinning spindle having a clutching device, and as a part of this object, to provide means whereby existing spindles may be readily improved by the addition of the herein described shell, device or member thereto, without slotting or cutting the spindle structure or without the loss of existing parts.
The shell, member or device is downwardly flaring and is inherently expansive. That is, upon bobbin removal, the arms of the shell inherently and normally expand, even with the spindle in a condition of rest. This is not the case with those bobbin clutching devices relying upon centrifugal action for their clutching effect and which are therefore normally contractile. The shell or member is of increasing expansive resiliency toward and to its open lower end -and is provided with an upper band portion exteriorly and rigidly engaging the spindle structure. It will be observed that the spring arms ll have their outer surfaces normally spaced diametrically in excess of the diameter of the bobbincase chamber, that is when the spindle is at rest and the bobbin is removed, so that the lower portion of these arms flares into the path of the bobbin-chamber wall upon bobbin placement. It will further be observed that the arms l1 at their lower ends extend into close proximity to the whirl and the bobbin seat, whereby resilient contraction of said arms is limited to an extent slightly in excess of bobbin-caused contracting movement and whereby the said shell or device and the bobbin seat coperatively form a guard about their inclosed spindle-surrounding chamber to restrict lint entrance thereinto.
The structure and operation of the spring arms 11 are such that they effectively bind between them and the interior of the bobbin the end of the yarn customarily wrapped about the spindle between the lower end of the same and the empty bobbin. This is important and is a res-ult not obtained in centrifugally acting spindles so far as I am aware.
A spindle constructed in accordance with my invention always remains balanced and runs true. The weight of the bobbin is sufficient to cause: a driving engagement between the spring arms and the bobbin, and t-he bobbin remains tightly gripped while the rotation of the bobbin continues. The structure of the arms is such that existing types of bobbins can readily be applied thereto, so that the invention is susceptible of application not only to existing spindles but also to standard types of bobbins, and therefore may be applied at a minimum of expense.
It will be evident from the foregoing description that the bobbin is clutched instantly upon the application of the bobbin to the spindle and by the mere weight of the bobbin, though if desired slight force may be employed in positioning the bobbin. The bobbin is immediately centered and while the spindle is at rest, thus preventing any possibility of the bobbin being thrown from the spindle upon applying power to the latter. Moreover, the bobbin is accurately centered and hence the spindle runs smoothly and true.
Having thus described one illustrative embodimentof my invention, I desire it to be understood that although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invent-ion being set tort-h in the following claims.
Claims:
l. 'A spindle comprising a spindle blade; a whirl unyieldably mounted thereon; a downwardly Haring, open-ended, inherently expansive and divided bobbin supporting and centering shell, independent of said whirl, also rigidly mounted on said spindle blade, said shell being of increasing expansive resiliency toward and to its lower open end; and a fixed bobbin seat adjacent the lower end of said shell to determine the lowermost position of a bobbin pressed downward thereon and over and to contract said supporting shell.
2. In combination with a spindle struc-V ture having a blade and a whirl unyieldably mounted thereon; a downwardly flaring, open-ended, inherently expansive and divided bobbin supporting and centering member rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above the driving portion of the whirl, said member being of increasing expansive resiliency toward and to its lower open end, and a fixed bobbin seat adjacent the lower end of said member to determine the lowermost position of a bobbin pressed downward thereupon and over and to contract said supporting member.
3. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade and a whirl unyieldably mounted thereon; a downwardly flaring, open-ended, inherently expansive bobbin supporting and centering device rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above the driving portion of the whirl, said device being of increasing expansive resiliency toward and to its lower open end, and a fixed bobbin seat adjacent the lower end of said device to determine the lowermost position of a bobbin pressed downward thereupon and over and to contract said supporting device, the latter extending into close proximity to said seat and having narrow slots eX- tending to its lower end, thereby substantially to exclude lint.
4L. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade, a band-whirl unyieldably mounted thereon and a fixed seat above the band receiving portion of the latter to limit the lowermost position of a carried bobbin; a downwardly flaring, clutching and centering device to engage the bobbin interiorly at the lower portion, rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above said seat, said device having an upper band portion exteriorly engaging said spindle structure and also having a plurality of radially symmetrically arranged members dependent from said upper band portion and free at their lower ends and of increasing resiliency downward, and inherently expansive to clutch and center a bobbin pressed downward thereover toward Vsaid seat.
5. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade, a band-whirl unyieldably mounted thereon, and a fixed seat above the band receiving portion of the latter to limit the lowermost position of a carried bobbin, a downwardly flaring, clutching and centering device, open at its lower end, and adapted interiorly to engage the bobbin-case chamber wall, said device having an upper band portion rigidly mounted on said spindle structure and also having a plurality of radially symmetrically arranged members dependent therefrom, with their outer surfaces normally spaced diametrically in excess of the diameter of said bobbin base chamber, and of increasing resiliency downward to clutch and center a bobbin pressed 6. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade, a band-whirl unyieldably mounted thereon, and a iXed seat above the band receiving portion of the latter to limit the lowermost position of a carried bobbin; a downwardly flaring, clutching and centering device to engage the bobbin chamber wall interiorly at the lower portion, rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above said seat, said device being formed as an open-ended shell having an upper band por# tion engaging said spindle structure and also having a downwardly extended portion normally flaring into the path of the bobbin chamber wall upon bobbin placement, but being symmetrically slotted to permit resilient contraction, thereby to clutch and center the.bobbin when pressed downward thereover toward said seat.
7. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade, a bandewhirl unyieldably mounted thereon, and a iiXed seat above the band receiving portion of the latter to limit the lowermost position of a carried bobbin; a downwardly flaring clutching and centering device to engage the bobbin interiorly at the lower portion, said device being rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above said seat, and formed as a shell open at the lower end, having an upper band portion engaging said spindle structure and also having a portion depending therefrom, progressively thinner downward, symmetrically slotted to its lower end, and resiliently yieldable to clutch and center a bobbin pressed downward thereover toward said seat.
8. In combination with a spindle structure having a blade, a band-whirl unyieldably mounted thereon, and a fixed seat above the band receiving portion of the latter to limit the lowermost position of a carried bobbin; a bobbin clutching and centering device rigidly mounted on said spindle structure above said seat, said device being formed as a downwardly flaring, open-ended shell having an upperband portion engaging said spindle structure and also having a portion dependent therefrom into close proximity to said whirl and seat, said dependent portion being normally disposed to intersect the path of the bobbin chamber wall upon bobbin-placement, but symmetrically and narrowly slotted toward and to its lower end, whereby resilient contraction of said shell is limited to an extent slightly in eX- cess ot bobbin-caused contracting movement, and whereby said device and seat coperatively form a guard about their inclosed spindle-surrounding chamber to restrict lint entrance thereinto.
In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
JOI-IN V. CUNNIFF.
Witnesses:
CHAs. S. NENESAY, NICHOLAS HATHEWAY.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2674415A (en) * 1953-02-27 1954-04-06 John J Lyth Bobbin clutching spindle for spinning frames
US3384315A (en) * 1965-06-21 1968-05-21 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Apparatus for driving filamentary material collectors

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2674415A (en) * 1953-02-27 1954-04-06 John J Lyth Bobbin clutching spindle for spinning frames
US3384315A (en) * 1965-06-21 1968-05-21 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Apparatus for driving filamentary material collectors

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