US1001213A - Car-replacer. - Google Patents

Car-replacer. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1001213A
US1001213A US63243411A US1911632434A US1001213A US 1001213 A US1001213 A US 1001213A US 63243411 A US63243411 A US 63243411A US 1911632434 A US1911632434 A US 1911632434A US 1001213 A US1001213 A US 1001213A
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United States
Prior art keywords
replacer
plates
track
car
wheel
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Expired - Lifetime
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US63243411A
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Jeremiah A Moynihan
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61KAUXILIARY EQUIPMENT SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR RAILWAYS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B61K5/00Apparatus for placing vehicles on the track; Derailers; Lifting or lowering rail vehicle axles or wheels
    • B61K5/04Devices secured to the track
    • B61K5/06Derailing or re-railing blocks

Definitions

  • the replacer for one side of the track may be made of the same shape as that used for the other side thereof, and 1 whereby the parts may be rapidly adjusted to accommodate cars on either side of the track, or moving in either direction, and also whereby cars may be replaced on rails of diflerent heights whether above the ground level or on the same plane therewith.
  • My improvements are embodied in a coinbination replacer for the purposes above specified, and which is so constructed that the wheels bear on their treads instead of on their flanges, asis commonly the case, the construction being such that after the wheels have thus traveled on their treads they will, when they come close to the rails, slide laterally on to the rails.
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of a portion of a railway track with my improved car replacer in position and this figure also shows a car axle and a portion of two wheels engaging the replacers.
  • Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of the replacers with the approach block detached.
  • Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the approach block.
  • Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the coupling pin which connects the approach block with the replacer.
  • Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the hooked bar which connects the replacer withthe track.
  • Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the key which looks the hooked bar in place. i Fig.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view illustrating how the approach block may be separately vusedto replace a car on the track when the top of the rail is on a level with the platform, ground or crossing.
  • Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing how the replacer is connected to a track when the car is moving in one direction.
  • Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the position of the parts when a car ,is mov-.
  • FIG. 10 is an end view of the parts shown in Fig. 9.
  • Fig. 11 is a side elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 9, the outer side plate of the replacer being broken away.
  • a pair of replacers is, of course, always used. They are of precisely the same con- ,struction and each consists of an outer plate A and an inner plate B, spaced apart, and rigidly connected together by cross pieces C and D.
  • the plates A and B are slightly inclined to each other, as shown in Fig. 1, converging toward their inner ends a", m which are in use near the rails.
  • the outer plate A is somewhat longer than the inner one B. At their outer ends the plates A and .B have their vends in substantially the same plane but at their inner ends or the ends.
  • the outer plate A extends a considerable distance beyond the inner end of the plate B while the cross piece D extends beyond the inner end w of the plate B but terminates before reaching the outer end of the plate A.
  • the plates A and B extend some distance above-and below the upper and lower sides of the cross pieces C and D so that when the treads of the wheels ride on the edges of the plates they will not come in contact with theicross pieces.
  • the construction of the upper and lower parts of the replacer is precisely the same so that they can be reversed.
  • I employ a hooked bar E, the hook of which is adapted to engage -a rail, as illustrated in Fig. 9 while the straight part extends through one of the slots F, F in the replacer.
  • the hooked bar When the hooked bar is thus inserted it may be locked in place by a wedge or key G.
  • the slots F and F are considerably deeper than the thickness of the hooked bar so that this bar may be tilted or adjusted to engage rails of difierent heights.
  • the hooked bar is always placed through the top slot.
  • the bottom slot is used when the replacer, is reversed or turned over for replacing cars coming in the opposite direction.
  • the cross piece G merely serves to connect the plates A and B at their'upper ends while the cross piece D serves this purpose and in addition serves to guide the wheels on to the tracks when they have reached the ends of the replacer.
  • the cross piece D extends beyond the end of the plate B and is inclined downwardly and inwardly toward thetrack so that when the wheel on the inside of the track leaves the upper edge of the plate B its flange will engage the inclined portion Z of the cross piece D and the wheel will slide laterally into engagement with the track.
  • the wheel on the outside of the track also rides on the inner plate'B, the flange of the wheel being between the plate B and the adjacent rail. When this wheel reaches the end of the plate B it will pass over the track rail following the movement of the wheel on the opposite side of the track.
  • the plates .A act at all times as guard plates.
  • H indicates an approach block. This is formed with a straight or horizontal undersurface it and an inclined upper surface it.
  • the approach block is divided by a central space h but the two parts are connected by a cross piece If and another cross piece 71
  • the cross piece If is arranged below the inclined surface of the block so as not to touch the wheel flange and the cross piece it is grooved for a similar purpose.
  • H indicate arms projectingfrom the approach block which are formed with vertical slots 71.
  • Fig. 8 I have indicated how the replacer is set for cars to be moved in one direction
  • Fig. 9 I have shown how the replacer is set for cars to be moved in the opposite direction. This is done by removing the approach block from the position shown in Fig. 8, turning the replacer over bodily and then connecting the approach block, in the manner indicated in Fig. 9, the inclined face of the approach block being always uppermost and for this reason it is necessary to disconnect it from the plates A and B when reversing.
  • the approach block may be detached from the plates A and B and used in the manner indicated in Fig. 7 to guide the wheels on to the track.
  • Fig. 7 indicates the position of the approachv block when used to guide a wheel on the outside of the track. The flange of the wheel in such case would be at the left of the approach block.
  • This combination car replacer in which the wheels ride on their treads rather than on their flanges, can be economically constructed.
  • the approach blocks of each pair are of precisely the same construction as are also the other parts of each replacer. This is a matter of great importance in the economy of manufacture, and not only is this the. case but the construction is such that the replacer may be adjusted to wheels having various relations with the track and will at all times guide the wheels properly into place on the track.
  • a car replacer comprising an inner and an outer plate, cross pieces connecting these plates, one of which is provided with an inclined upper surface extending inwardly and downwardly from the outer plate, and an approach block hinged to one end of the replacer and having a free vertical movement relatively to the replacer at its hinged end independent of or in addi- 1 tion to its hinged movement.
  • a car replacer comprising an inner and an outer plate on the edges of which the tread of a wheel is adapted to ride, cross pieces connecting the plates one of which ex- 1 tends beyond the inner edge of the inner plate and is inclined downwardly therefrom, and an approach block hinged to the oppo- Tsite ends of the plates.
  • a car replacer comprising an inner 12 and an outer plate, each of which has a tread-receiving edge on its upper and lower sides, cross pieces connecting the plates arranged inside the edges so as not to contact with the flange of a wheel, and an approach 12 block having an inclined upper surface and which is slotted to receive a wheel flange and has a hinged connection with saidplates.
  • a reversible car replacer having an inner and an outer plate with tread-receiv- 130 from said plates may be employed to replace a wheel on a track.

Description

J-. A. MOYNIHAN.-
GAR BEPLAGEE.
APPLICATION FILED JUNE 10, 1911.
Patented Aug. 22, 1911.
MBIA PLANDGRAPH (20., WASHINGTON, D c
u L O c J. A. MOYN'IHAN.
Patented Aug. 22, 1911.
2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
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JEREMIAH A. MOYNIHAN, 0F MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA.
CAR-REPLAOER.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Aug. 22, 1911.
Application filed June 10, 1911. Serial No. 632,434.
struction whereby the replacer for one side of the track may be made of the same shape as that used for the other side thereof, and 1 whereby the parts may be rapidly adjusted to accommodate cars on either side of the track, or moving in either direction, and also whereby cars may be replaced on rails of diflerent heights whether above the ground level or on the same plane therewith.
My improvements are embodied in a coinbination replacer for the purposes above specified, and which is so constructed that the wheels bear on their treads instead of on their flanges, asis commonly the case, the construction being such that after the wheels have thus traveled on their treads they will, when they come close to the rails, slide laterally on to the rails.
My improvements are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of a portion of a railway track with my improved car replacer in position and this figure also shows a car axle and a portion of two wheels engaging the replacers. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of the replacers with the approach block detached. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the approach block. Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the coupling pin which connects the approach block with the replacer. Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the hooked bar which connects the replacer withthe track. Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the key which looks the hooked bar in place. i Fig. 7 is a perspective view illustrating how the approach block may be separately vusedto replace a car on the track when the top of the rail is on a level with the platform, ground or crossing. Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing how the replacer is connected to a track when the car is moving in one direction. Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the position of the parts when a car ,is mov-.
ing in the opposite direction. Fig. 10 is an end view of the parts shown in Fig. 9. Fig. 11 is a side elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 9, the outer side plate of the replacer being broken away.
A pair of replacers is, of course, always used. They are of precisely the same con- ,struction and each consists of an outer plate A and an inner plate B, spaced apart, and rigidly connected together by cross pieces C and D. The plates A and B are slightly inclined to each other, as shown in Fig. 1, converging toward their inner ends a", m which are in use near the rails. The outer plate A is somewhat longer than the inner one B. At their outer ends the plates A and .B have their vends in substantially the same plane but at their inner ends or the ends.
next the rails the outer plate A extends a considerable distance beyond the inner end of the plate B while the cross piece D extends beyond the inner end w of the plate B but terminates before reaching the outer end of the plate A. The plates A and B extend some distance above-and below the upper and lower sides of the cross pieces C and D so that when the treads of the wheels ride on the edges of the plates they will not come in contact with theicross pieces.
The construction of the upper and lower parts of the replacer is precisely the same so that they can be reversed. In order to connect the replacer with the track, I employ a hooked bar E, the hook of which is adapted to engage -a rail, as illustrated in Fig. 9 while the straight part extends through one of the slots F, F in the replacer. When the hooked bar is thus inserted it may be locked in place by a wedge or key G. The slots F and F are considerably deeper than the thickness of the hooked bar so that this bar may be tilted or adjusted to engage rails of difierent heights. The hooked bar is always placed through the top slot. The bottom slot is used when the replacer, is reversed or turned over for replacing cars coming in the opposite direction.
The cross piece G merely serves to connect the plates A and B at their'upper ends while the cross piece D serves this purpose and in addition serves to guide the wheels on to the tracks when they have reached the ends of the replacer.
It will be observed that the cross piece D extends beyond the end of the plate B and is inclined downwardly and inwardly toward thetrack so that when the wheel on the inside of the track leaves the upper edge of the plate B its flange will engage the inclined portion Z of the cross piece D and the wheel will slide laterally into engagement with the track. The wheel on the outside of the track also rides on the inner plate'B, the flange of the wheel being between the plate B and the adjacent rail. When this wheel reaches the end of the plate B it will pass over the track rail following the movement of the wheel on the opposite side of the track. The plates .A act at all times as guard plates.
H indicates an approach block. This is formed with a straight or horizontal undersurface it and an inclined upper surface it. The approach block is divided by a central space h but the two parts are connected by a cross piece If and another cross piece 71 The cross piece If is arranged below the inclined surface of the block so as not to touch the wheel flange and the cross piece it is grooved for a similar purpose.
H indicate arms projectingfrom the approach block which are formed with vertical slots 71.
Vertical slots I are formed in the ends of the plates A and B, as indicated in Fig. 2. These are adapted to register with the slots 2' of the approach block which latter is connected with the plates A and B by means of a coupling pin J. This connection is a loose one and the approach block thereby has a hinged connection with the plates, permitting it to move freely about the axis of the coupling pin vertically and the connection is such that the inner end of the approach block may, in addition to its pivotal or' hinged movement, have a vertical movement. In this way the approach block may be turned tobring its outer edge close to the wheel, as illustrated in Fig. 1 and alsoin Fig. 11. Should the approach block extend over the edge of a tie there would be a tendency for the outer portion of the block to be tilted downward and this would tend to raise the opposite end of the replacer to an objectionable extent, but by providing for a vertical movement of the inner end of the approach block relatively to the adjacent end of the replacer this objectionable feature is avoided.
As before stated the replacer is reversible in order to accommodate cars to be moved in opposite directions. In Fig. 8 I have indicated how the replacer is set for cars to be moved in one direction, and in Fig. 9 I have shown how the replacer is set for cars to be moved in the opposite direction. This is done by removing the approach block from the position shown in Fig. 8, turning the replacer over bodily and then connecting the approach block, in the manner indicated in Fig. 9, the inclined face of the approach block being always uppermost and for this reason it is necessary to disconnect it from the plates A and B when reversing.
'It will be observed by reference to Fig. 11 that the lower edges of the plates A and B are straight, while the upper edges are inclined upwardly from their outer ends next the approach block to their inner ends next the rails. This is to avoid any danger of the wheels moving sidewise away from the rails. If the wheels should be on a level with the top of the rails, as on a platform or at a crossing, the approach block may be detached from the plates A and B and used in the manner indicated in Fig. 7 to guide the wheels on to the track. Fig. 7 indicates the position of the approachv block when used to guide a wheel on the outside of the track. The flange of the wheel in such case would be at the left of the approach block.
This combination car replacer, in which the wheels ride on their treads rather than on their flanges, can be economically constructed. The approach blocks of each pair are of precisely the same construction as are also the other parts of each replacer. This is a matter of great importance in the economy of manufacture, and not only is this the. case but the construction is such that the replacer may be adjusted to wheels having various relations with the track and will at all times guide the wheels properly into place on the track.
I claim as my invention:
1. A car replacer, comprising an inner and an outer plate, cross pieces connecting these plates, one of which is provided with an inclined upper surface extending inwardly and downwardly from the outer plate, and an approach block hinged to one end of the replacer and having a free vertical movement relatively to the replacer at its hinged end independent of or in addi- 1 tion to its hinged movement.
2. A car replacer, comprising an inner and an outer plate on the edges of which the tread of a wheel is adapted to ride, cross pieces connecting the plates one of which ex- 1 tends beyond the inner edge of the inner plate and is inclined downwardly therefrom, and an approach block hinged to the oppo- Tsite ends of the plates.
3. A car replacer, comprising an inner 12 and an outer plate, each of which has a tread-receiving edge on its upper and lower sides, cross pieces connecting the plates arranged inside the edges so as not to contact with the flange of a wheel, and an approach 12 block having an inclined upper surface and which is slotted to receive a wheel flange and has a hinged connection with saidplates.
4. A reversible car replacer having an inner and an outer plate with tread-receiv- 130 from said plates may be employed to replace a wheel on a track.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name.
JEREMIAH A. MOYNIHAN.
Witnesses:
FREDERICK B. RICHARDS, Mrs. D. J. MOYNIHAN.
ing upper and lower edges, cross pieces connecting the plates one of which has an inclined surface extending beyond the end of the inner plate, and an approach block detachably connected with the opposite ends of the plates which has a tread-receiving surface and a slot to receive a wheel flange, and which approach block when detached Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.
US63243411A 1911-06-10 1911-06-10 Car-replacer. Expired - Lifetime US1001213A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2593956A (en) * 1945-02-06 1952-04-22 Harry M Alderman Car replacer
US5423267A (en) * 1993-12-30 1995-06-13 Eklund; Byron G. Pocket rerailer

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2593956A (en) * 1945-02-06 1952-04-22 Harry M Alderman Car replacer
US5423267A (en) * 1993-12-30 1995-06-13 Eklund; Byron G. Pocket rerailer

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