TWI593198B - Coaxial cable connector with integral continuity contacting portion - Google Patents

Coaxial cable connector with integral continuity contacting portion Download PDF

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Publication number
TWI593198B
TWI593198B TW102105865A TW102105865A TWI593198B TW I593198 B TWI593198 B TW I593198B TW 102105865 A TW102105865 A TW 102105865A TW 102105865 A TW102105865 A TW 102105865A TW I593198 B TWI593198 B TW I593198B
Authority
TW
Taiwan
Prior art keywords
contact portion
connector
coaxial cable
coupler
post
Prior art date
Application number
TW102105865A
Other languages
Chinese (zh)
Other versions
TW201340502A (en
Inventor
布利斯當諾安德魯
Original Assignee
康寧吉伯特公司
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201261601821P priority Critical
Priority to US13/652,969 priority patent/US9407016B2/en
Application filed by 康寧吉伯特公司 filed Critical 康寧吉伯特公司
Publication of TW201340502A publication Critical patent/TW201340502A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of TWI593198B publication Critical patent/TWI593198B/en

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Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact, i.e. touching one another; Means for effecting or maintaining such contact; Electrically-conductive connections having two or more spaced connecting locations for conductors and using contact members penetrating insulation
    • H01R4/28Clamped connections, spring connections
    • H01R4/30Clamped connections, spring connections utilising a screw or nut clamping member
    • H01R4/304Clamped connections, spring connections utilising a screw or nut clamping member having means for improving contact
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R13/00Details of coupling devices of the kinds covered by groups H01R12/70 or H01R24/00 - H01R33/00
    • H01R13/62Means for facilitating engagement or disengagement of coupling parts or for holding them in engagement
    • H01R13/622Screw-ring or screw-casing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R2103/00Two poles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R9/00Structural associations of a plurality of mutually-insulated electrical connecting elements, e.g. terminal strips or terminal blocks; Terminals or binding posts mounted upon a base or in a case; Bases therefor
    • H01R9/03Connectors arranged to contact a plurality of the conductors of a multiconductor cable, e.g. tapping connections
    • H01R9/05Connectors arranged to contact a plurality of the conductors of a multiconductor cable, e.g. tapping connections for coaxial cables
    • H01R9/0521Connection to outer conductor by action of a nut

Description

Coaxial cable connector with integral coherent contact portion [related application]

The present application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/601,821, filed on Feb. 22, 2012, which is hereby incorporated by reference. This is incorporated herein by reference.

The present application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Application Serial No. 13/652,969, filed on Oct. 16, 2012, the entire content of The manner of reference is incorporated herein.

This application is related to U.S. Application Serial No. 13/198,765, entitled,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, In this article.

The present disclosure is generally directed to a coaxial cable connector, and in particular, the present disclosure relates to a coaxial cable connector having an integral contact portion that is integrally formed with another coaxial cable connector component, and And to provide continuity between the radio frequency interference (RFI) and the grounding shield between the coaxial cable and the electrical equipment port, rather than by a separate coherent component, regardless of the tight coupling of the coaxial cable connector to the electrical device port. And does not limit the movement of the coupling of the coaxial cable connector when the coaxial cable connector is attached to the electrical device.

The coaxial cable is attached to another object or appliance using a coaxial cable connector such as an F-type connector (eg, a television, DVD player, data modem, or other electronic communication device having terminals adapted to engage the connector). The terminals of the appliance include inner conductors and surrounding outer conductors.

The coaxial cable includes a center conductor for transmitting signals. The dielectric material surrounds the center conductor and the dielectric material surrounds the dielectric material. The outer lead can be in the form of a conductive foil and/or a braided sheath. The outer lead is typically maintained at ground potential to mask the signal transmitted by the center conductor from stray noise and maintain a continuous, desired impedance in the signal path. The outer conductor is usually surrounded by a plastic cable jacket that electrically isolates and mechanically protects the outer conductor. Prior to mounting the coaxial connector to the end of the coaxial cable, the end of the coaxial cable is typically prepared by stripping the end portion of the sheath to expose the end portion of the outer conductor. Similarly, it is common to strip a portion of the dielectric to expose the end portion of the center conductor.

Coaxial cable connectors of the type well known in the art as "F-type connectors" typically include a tubular post that is designed to slide over the dielectric material and under the conductors outside the coaxial cable at the end of the preparation of the coaxial cable. If the wire outside the cable includes a braided sheath, the exposed braided sheath is usually in the cable guard The sleeve is folded in half. The cable jacket and the folded outer conductor extend generally around the exterior of the tubular post and are typically received in a body other than the connector. The body outside the connector is typically fixedly secured to the tubular post. The coupler is typically rotatably secured about the tubular post and the coupler includes an internally threaded region for engaging an external thread formed on the outer lead of the electrical terminal. Alternatively or additionally, the coupler can be friction fit, screwed and/or latched onto the wires outside the electrical terminals.

When connecting the end of a coaxial cable to the terminals of a television, equipment box, data machine, computer or other electrical appliance, it is important to achieve a reliable electrical connection between the conductors outside the coaxial cable and the conductors other than the electrical terminals. Typically, this goal is typically achieved by ensuring that the coupler of the connector is fully secured over the port of the appliance. When fully secured, the head of the tubular post of the connector directly engages the edge of the outer lead of the appliance, thereby forming a direct electrical ground connection between the lead and the tubular post outside the appliance. The tubular post is engaged with the outer conductor of the coaxial cable.

The increased use of self-installation kits provided by some CATV system operators to homeowners has resulted in customer complaints attributed to poor picture quality in video systems and/or poor data performance in computer/internet systems. In addition, CATV system operators have found upstream data problems induced by interfering RF signals entering their systems. Such complaints have caused CATV system operators to dispatch technicians to solve the problem. Frequently, the cause of the problem reported by the technician is due to the loose F-type connector mating, sometimes due to improper installation of the homeowner's self-installing kit. Because the electrical path along the device is inconsistent, improperly mounted or loose connectors can cause undesirable signal transmission, resulting in the entry of undesired radio frequency ("RF") signals. RF energy from an external source or source can enter the connector/cable configuration, resulting in a signal-to-noise ratio problem that results in unacceptable picture or data performance. Many of the current state of the art F-type connectors rely on the close contact between the F-type male connector interface and the F-type female connector interface. If, for some reason, the connector interfaces are allowed to be pulled apart from each other (such as in the case of a loose F-type male coupling), an interface "gap" can be created. If not otherwise protected, this gap can be the point of RF entry as described above.

As described above, the coupler is typically rotationally fixed about the head of the tubular post. The head of the tubular post typically includes an enlarged shoulder, and the coupler typically includes an inwardly directed flange for extending over the shoulder of the tubular post and around the shoulder of the tubular post. In order not to interfere with the free rotation of the coupler, manufacturers of such F-type connectors routinely make the outer diameter of the shoulder (at the head of the tubular post) smaller than the inner diameter of the central bore of the coupler. . Likewise, the manufacturer routinely makes the inner diameter of the inwardly directed flange of the coupler larger than the outer diameter of the non-shoulder portion of the tubular post to again avoid interfering with the rotation of the coupler relative to the tubular post. . In a loose connection system in which the coupler of the coaxial connector is not dragged tightly to the appliance connector, the alternative ground path may occasionally result from contact between the coupler and the tubular post, especially if not The coupler is centered over the tubular post and the coupler is not axially aligned with the tubular post. However, this alternative ground path is unstable, and this alternate ground path can be interrupted due to vibration, movement of the appliance, movement of the cable, and the like.

Alternatively, if the outer body is formed of a conductive material, there are some cases in which an alternate ground path is provided by accidental contact between the coupler and the body other than the coaxial connector. This alternate ground path is similarly unstable and can The relative movement between the appliance and the cable (or by vibration) is interrupted. Furthermore, if the body other than the coaxial connector is constructed of a non-conductive material, this alternative ground path is completely absent. Such unstable ground paths can cause intermittent faults, and diagnosing such intermittent faults is expensive and time consuming.

Coaxial cable connectors have attempted to solve the above problems by incorporating a coherent element into a coaxial cable connector as a separate component. In this regard, FIG. 1 illustrates a first prior art, the connector 1000, the connector 1000 has a coupler 2000, a single column 3000, a single coherent body element 4000 and 5000. In the connector 1000 , a separate coherent element 4000 is captured between the post 3000 and the body 5000 , and the individual coherent element 4000 contacts at least a portion of the coupler 2000 . The coupler 2000 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as nickel. The post 3000 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as tin. The individual coherent elements 4000 are preferably made of a metal such as phosphor bronze and plated with a conductive material such as tin. The body 5000 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as nickel.

Embodiments disclosed herein include a coaxial cable connector for coupling the end of a coaxial cable to a terminal. The connector has a coupler adapted to couple the connector to the terminal, a body that is assembled with the coupler, and a post that is assembled with the coupler and the body. The post is adapted to receive the end of the coaxial cable. The coupler, body or post has an integral contact portion. At least a portion of the contact portion and at least one of the coupler, the body, and the post are monolithically unitary. When the connector is coupled to the terminal and receives the coaxial cable through the body, the contact portion The electrical continuity of the wires from the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminals is provided regardless of the tightness of the coupling of the connectors to the terminals. Electrical continuity means that the DC contact resistance from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the device is less than about 3000 milliohms. In addition, the electrical continuity of the outer conductors from the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminals can be provided rather than by a separate coherent assembly. The contact portion is constructed of a material having elastic/plastic properties that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact even when there is any gap between the components of the connector when assembled. The contact portion is formable and formed as a contour of at least one of the body and the coupler when the body is at least partially assembled with the coupler. The contact portion may be formed in an at least partially arcuate shape.

In another aspect, embodiments disclosed herein include a coaxial cable connector having a coupler having a central bore and adapted to couple the connector to the terminal; The body has a central passage assembled with the coupler; and a post that is assembled with the coupler and the body. The post is at least partially disposed within the central passage of the body and at least partially disposed within the central bore of the coupler. The body and the post are adapted to receive the end of the coaxial cable. The post has a contact portion that provides uninterrupted electrical continuity of the wires from the connector received by the body and the post through the connector to the terminals coupled by the coupler, regardless of the connector and the terminal The tightness of the coupling. Electrical continuity means that the DC contact resistance from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the device is less than about 3000 milliohms. The contact portion is constructed from a single piece of material and a portion of the column. The contact portion is constructed of a material having elastic/plastic properties that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact even when there is any gap between the components of the connector when assembled. The contact portion is formable and The post is formed, at least in part, when assembled with one of the body and the coupler as a contour of at least one of the body and the coupler. The contact portion may be formed in an at least partially arcuate shape. The contact portion may be a protrusion and may protrude radially. Alternatively or additionally, the contact portion can have a polygonal configuration. The contact portion can be formed in response to the forming tool. The contact portion can be segmented.

In another aspect, embodiments disclosed herein include a method of providing uninterrupted continuity in a coaxial cable connector. The method includes providing an element of a coaxial cable connector. At least one of the elements has a formable coherent portion that is monolithically integral with at least one of the elements. The method also includes assembling components to provide a coaxial cable connector. Assembly forms the electrical continuity portion into the contour of one of the other components. The component can be composed of a group of free couplers, bodies and columns. Electrical continuity means that the DC contact resistance from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the device is less than about 3000 milliohms. The method further includes receiving a coaxial cable by one of the components and coupling the coaxial cable connector to the terminal by one of the components. The contact portion provides continuity from the wire beyond the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminal rather than through separate components, and the contact portion provides continuity regardless of the tightness of the coupling of the connector to the terminal. The contact portion is constructed of a material having elastic/plastic properties that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact even when there is any gap between the components when assembled.

In another aspect, embodiments disclosed herein include a coaxial cable connector for coupling an end of a coaxial cable to a terminal. The connector has: a coupler adapted to couple the connector to the terminal; and a body, the The body is assembled with the coupler and is adapted to receive the end of the coaxial cable. The coupler or body has an integral contact portion. Constructing a contact portion by at least a portion of at least one of the coupler and the body or a portion of the coupler and the body, and wherein the contact portion and at least a portion of the coupler and the body are coupled to the coupler and The part of the main body is monolithic. When the connector is coupled to the terminal and the coaxial cable is received by the body, the contact portion provides continuity from the connector of the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminal rather than by separate components, regardless of the connector and the terminal The tightness of the coupling. Electrical continuity means that the DC contact resistance from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the device is less than about 3000 milliohms. The contact portion is constructed of a material having elastic/plastic properties that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact, regardless of any gaps between the components of the connector when assembled. The contact portion is formable and formed as a contour of at least one of the body and the coupler when the body is at least partially assembled with the coupler. The contact portion may be formed in an at least partially arcuate shape.

Additional features and advantages are set forth in the description which follows, and in the <RTIgt; </ RTI> <RTIgt; </ RTI> <RTIgt; </ RTI> <RTIgt; </ RTI> <RTIgt; These features and advantages are understood by way of example, including the embodiments, the scope of the claims, and the accompanying drawings.

The above general description and the following detailed description are intended to be illustrative only and A further understanding of the present specification is included with the accompanying drawings, and is incorporated in the specification, The drawings illustrate one or more embodiments, and the drawings together with the description Principle and operation of the example.

100‧‧‧ coaxial cable connector

105‧‧‧ front end

110‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

111‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

112‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

113‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

114‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

115‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

116‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

117‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

118‧‧‧Coaxial cable connector

195‧‧‧ Backend

200‧‧‧coupler

202‧‧‧ facing part

205‧‧‧ front end

210‧‧‧Central passage

215‧‧‧Lip

216‧‧‧ forward surface

217‧‧‧Back surface

220‧‧‧through hole

230‧‧‧ hole

231‧‧‧ Undercut

295‧‧‧ Backend

300‧‧ ‧ column

305‧‧‧ front end

310‧‧‧Contact section

311‧‧‧Indentation

313‧‧‧Bow shape

320‧‧‧ collar part

325‧‧‧through hole

330‧‧‧Backward annular surface

335‧‧‧With barbed parts

340‧‧‧Magnified shoulder

395‧‧‧ Backend

400‧‧‧ Conductive components

402‧‧‧ retaining ring

410‧‧‧Contact section

500‧‧‧ subject

505‧‧‧ front end

510‧‧‧Contact section

525‧‧‧Central passage

595‧‧‧ Backend

600‧‧‧shell

605‧‧‧ front end

625‧‧‧Central passage

695‧‧‧ backend

700‧‧‧Clamping elements

705‧‧‧ front end

725‧‧‧ center passage

795‧‧‧ backend

800‧‧‧Seal ring

805‧‧‧ overall sales

900‧‧‧Forming tools

1000‧‧‧Connector

2000‧‧‧ Coupler

3000‧‧‧single column

4000‧‧‧Separate coherent components

5000‧‧‧ Subject

FIG. 1 is a side cross-sectional view of the prior coaxial cable connector of the art; FIG. 2 is a side cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial connector, the coaxial connector comprising a column, which has provided integrally RFI and a ground contacting portion of the mask; FIG. 3A a side cross-sectional view of FIG. 2 for the first coaxial cable connector of the coaxial cable connector in a partially assembled state; FIG. 3B is a second coaxial cable connector of FIG column a partial cross-sectional detailed view, and the contact portion of the illustrated post begins to form a profile of the coupler, the coaxial cable connector being in a further assembled state as compared to the state illustrated in FIG. 3A ; 3C detailed view of a portion of a cross-sectional view of the second column of FIG coaxial cable connector, and the contact portion is formed as illustrated in the column was continued for coupling the profile, as in figure 3A and the state illustrated in FIG. 3B the compared to the coaxial cable connector is assembled in a further state; cross-sectional detail view of a portion of the first column in FIG. 3D is a second coaxial cable connector of FIG. 2, and the contact portion formed to the contour of the illustrated post coupler, the and as Compared to FIG 3A, and the first state illustrated in FIG. 3C of FIG. 3B, the coaxial connector further in the assembled state; part of the column cross-sectional view of FIG. 4A is a second coaxial cable connector, wherein the pillar portion inserted into the shaping tool; Figure 4B is a detailed cross-sectional view of a portion of a coaxial cable connector post of Fig. 2, where used as compared with the illustrated forming tool of FIG. 4A, the column further inserted into a forming tool, and Figure 4B illustrates the contact portion of the column began to form a shaped profile of the tool; FIG. 4C is a portion of the post of a coaxial cable connector the second cross-sectional detail view of FIG, wherein as the first and 4A Figure 4B and FIG compared illustrated, the column is further inserted into the molding tool, and FIG. 4C illustrates the contact portion of the column formed to continue the forming tool contour; FIG. 4D is a section of the second coaxial cable connector of FIG. the cross-sectional detailed view of the portion of the post, wherein the post is fully inserted into the forming tool, and the contact portion of FIG. 4D illustrates a shaped profile formed of a column of the tool; FIG. 5A through FIG 5H is a contact portion of the column Positive example of an exemplary embodiment And a schematic side view; FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector comprising a pin integrally, the coaxial connector is assembled state of the body, the body is formed to be coupled with the contact portion of the profile of the connector; Figure 6A is a cross sectional view of a coaxial cable connector illustrated in FIG. 6 of the coaxial cable connector in a partially assembled state, Figure 6A illustrates the main body and the contact portion adapted to form the contour of the coupling; FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector comprising a pin integrally, wherein the coupling body around the post, rather than rotated, and the contact moiety is press-fit to a portion of the main body member and formed to the contour of the coupling; FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector in a partially assembled state, and The coaxial cable connector includes an integral pin, wherein the coupler rotates about the body rather than the post, and the contact portion is a portion of the component that is pressed into the position in the body and is formed as a contour of the coupler Figure 8A is a front and side view of the detail of the element, the element having a contact portion of the coaxial cable connector of FIG. 8; FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial connector configuration and no column comprising a body having a contact portion is formed as a contour of the coupling; FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector comprising a main body and a hexagonal crimp column, and the column of the body having a contact portion is formed as a contour of the coupling; FIG. 11 is a schematic isometric view of a coaxial cable connector post of Fig. 2, wherein the post has a contact portion formed state; 12 isometric cross-sectional view illustrating the column and forming coupler is a coaxial cable connector of FIG. FIG. 2 is a profile of the contact pins of the coupling portion; FIG. 13 is a coaxial cable connector according to an exemplary embodiment cross exemplary embodiment of FIG. 14 is a coaxial cable connector; a cross-sectional view of the embodiment, the coaxial cable connector has a coupling, the coupling having a contact portion is formed as a column of contours Side view of the coaxial cable connector has a post, the post having a contact portion is formed as a contour of the coupling; FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector having posts the column has a contact portion, the contact portion is formed behind the lip of the profile after the coupling portion towards the coaxial cable connector; FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable the connector has a post, the post having a contact portion, the contact portion is formed behind the lip of the profile after the coupling portion towards the coaxial cable connector; FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector the coaxial cable connector having a body, the body having a contact portion, the contact portion is formed behind the lip of the profile after the coupling portion towards the coaxial cable connector; FIG. 18 is an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector In cross-sectional view, the coaxial cable connector has a post having a contact portion formed as a contour of the coupler, the coupler having a bottom Cut; of FIG. 18A is a partial cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector has a post, the post having a contact portion is formed as a contour of the coupling, the coupling appliance undercuts the coaxial cable is inserted into the prepared coaxial cable connector; FIG. 19 is an exemplary partial cross sectional view of an embodiment of a coaxial cable connector, the coaxial cable connector having a movable post, the post having a contact portion wherein the column in the forward position; partial cross-sectional view of FIG. 20 and FIG. 19 is a connector of a coaxial cable, the coaxial cable connector having the movable column by column and movable in the rearward position, the contact In part, the contact portion is formed as a contour of the coupler.

Reference will now be made in detail to the embodiments, For example, some but not all of the embodiments are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. In fact, the concept of the invention may be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limiting the invention. Rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will satisfy applicable legal requirements. Wherever possible, the same element symbols will be used to refer to the same elements or parts.

The coaxial cable connector is used to couple the end of the coaxial cable to the threaded device connection port of the appliance. The coaxial cable connector can have a post, a movable column, or can be columnless. In each case, the coaxial cable connector provides a ground path from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable to the device connection, except that electrical and mechanical connections are provided between the conductors of the coaxial connector and the conductors of the parent device. The outer lead can be, for example, a conductive foil or a braided sheath. Maintaining a stable ground path protection from the entry of undesired radio frequency ("RF") signals, the entry of undesired radio frequency ("RF") signals can reduce the performance of the appliance. This is particularly useful when the coaxial cable connector is not fully secured to the device port (or because it was not fixed at the time of initial installation or due to looseness after installation).

For the purposes of this description, the term "forward" will be used to refer to the direction of the portion of the coaxial cable connector to which the portion of the coaxial cable connector is attached (such as an electrical device). The term "backward" will be used to refer to the direction of the portion of the coaxial cable connector that receives the coaxial cable. The term "terminal" shall be used to mean any type of connection medium that can be coupled to a coaxial cable connector, such as an electrical device, any other type of port or intermediate termination device. In addition, for the purposes of this article, electrical continuity shall mean the DC contact from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable to the equipment. The resistance is less than about 3000 milliohms. Therefore, a DC contact resistance of more than about 3000 milliohms should be considered to indicate electrical discontinuity or disconnection in the path between the outer conductor of the coaxial cable and the device turns.

Embodiments relate to a coaxial cable connector for coupling an end of a coaxial cable to a terminal. The connector has a coupler adapted to couple the connector to the terminal, and a body assembled with the coupler and adapted to receive the end of the coaxial cable. The coaxial cable connector can also have a post. One or more of the contact portion and the coupler, body and/or post may be unitary. Furthermore, the contact portion and the element may be unitary, and as a non-limiting example, the element may be one or more of a coupler, body or post, either alone or in combination. Further, the contact portion can have a one-piece construction that is formed or constructed in a unitary manner from the monolithic material along with portions of the or each element. In other words, and as a non-limiting example, if the contact portion has a one-piece construction with the post, the contact portion can be constructed from a monolithic material with portions of the post or post. Furthermore, the contact portion can have or can be any shape, including a shape that can be flush or aligned with the coupler, body, post or other portion of another component of the coaxial cable connector, or the contact portion can be self-coupled Another component of the main body, post or coaxial cable connector protrudes.

If electrical continuity is maintained beyond the coaxial cable through the connector to the device, any portion of the coupler, body or post may be formed from any electrically conductive material (metal or non-metal). Further, a non-conductive material (as a non-limiting example, a polymer) may be used with a conductive coating or plating layer on one portion of the non-conductive material. Furthermore, the body can be completely non-conductive and can be via one or more of the other components of the coaxial cable connector The components are maintained from the electrical continuity of the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the device.

The contact portion can have any number of configurations, as a non-limiting example, partially or wholly circular, single-angled or multi-angled. When the coaxial cable connector is assembled, coupled to the terminal, and received by the body, the contact portion provides electrical continuity from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminal rather than by separate components, and regardless of The tightness or suitability of the coupling of the connector to the terminal. The contact portion may, but need not, protrude at least partially radially. The contact portion can be formable and formed as a contour of at least one of the body and the coupler. The contact portion may be formed in an at least partially arcuate shape. Additionally and/or alternatively, the contact portion can be formed in response to the forming tool. Further, a lubricant or an ointment (especially a conductive lubricant or ointment) may be applied to the contact portion.

Embodiments are also directed to a method of providing uninterrupted electrical continuity in a coaxial cable connector. The method includes providing an element of a coaxial cable connector. At least one of the elements has a formable electrical continuity portion. The method also includes assembling components to provide a coaxial cable connector. Assembly forms the electrical continuity portion into the contour of one of the other components. A group of components that can be freely coupled, a body, and a column. The method further includes receiving a coaxial cable by one of the components and coupling the coaxial cable connector to the terminal by one of the components. The contact portion provides electrical continuity from the connector outside the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminal rather than through separate components, and regardless of the tightness or fit of the connector to the terminal.

Referring now to Figure 2 , an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 100 is illustrated. The coaxial cable connector 100 has a front end 105 , a rear end 195 , a coupler 200 , a post 300 , a body 500 , a housing 600, and a clamping element 700 . Coupler 200 includes a front end 205 at least partially, a rear end 295, central channel 210, lip 215, the through hole 220 and the hole 230; 217 to the surface 216 and the rear surface of the lip portion 215 having a front; through-hole 220 of the The lip 215 is formed. The coupler 200 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as nickel. Alternatively or additionally, selected surfaces of the coupler 200 may be coated with a conductive or non-conductive coating or lubricant, or a combination of conductive or non-conductive coatings or lubricants. The post 300 can be tubular, at least partially including a front end 305 , a rear end 395, and a contact portion 310 . In FIG. 2, the contact portion 310 is illustrated as a protrusion is formed integrally with the column 300 and the column 300 as a single piece. Contact portion 310 can, but need not, protrude radially. Column 300 may also include an enlarged shoulder portion 340, collar portion 320, the through hole 325, annular surface 330 and rearward barbed portion 335, 335 adjacent to the rear end of the barbed portion 395. The post 300 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as tin. Moreover, in an exemplary embodiment, the material may have suitable spring features that allow the contact portion 310 to be flexible, as described below. Alternatively or additionally, selected surfaces of the column 300 may be coated with a conductive or non-conductive coating or lubricant, or a combination of conductive or non-conductive coatings or lubricants. As described above, the contact portion 310 and the post 300 are monolithic and provide electrical continuity through the connector 100 to the device 埠 (not shown in FIG. 2 ), and the connector 100 can be coupled to the device 埠. As such, the post 300 provides a stable ground path through the connector 100 and thereby provides an electromagnetic shield to protect against RF signal entry and exit. The body 500 includes, at least in part, a front end 505 , a rear end 595, and a center channel 525 . The body 500 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as nickel. The housing 600 at least partially includes a front end 605 , a rear end 695, and a central passage 625 . The housing 600 is preferably made of a metal such as brass and plated with a conductive material such as nickel. The clamping element 700 at least partially includes a front end 705 , a rear end 795, and a central passage 725 . Clamping element 700 is preferably made of a suitable polymeric material such as acetal or nylon. Resins can be selected from thermoplastics that have the following characteristics: good fatigue life, low moisture sensitivity, high resistance to solvents and chemicals, and good electrical properties.

In FIG. 2 , the coaxial cable connector 100 is illustrated in an unattached, uncompressed state in which the coaxial cable is not inserted into the coaxial cable connector 100 . The coaxial cable connector 100 is coupled to the end of the coaxial cable to the terminal (such as a threaded device electrical connection (not shown in Figure 2 )). This will be discussed in more detail with reference to Figure 18A . After the body 500 of the housing 600 at the end 595 is slidably attached to the body 500. The coupler 200 is attached to the coaxial cable connector 100 at a rear end 295 of the coupler 200 . When the body 500 is engaged by means of a press fit, the coupler 200 is rotatably attached to the front end 305 of the post 300 . Column 300 of the channel 210 in the center of the front end 305 is coupled to the controller 200, and the column 300 has a rear end 395, 395 adapted to extend into the rear end of the coaxial cable. Adjacent the rear end 395, the post 300 has a barbed portion 335, which extends radially outwardly from the column portion 300 with barbs 335. The enlarged shoulder 340 at the front end 305 extends into the coupler 200 . The enlarged shoulder 340 includes a collar portion 320 and a rearward annular surface 330 . The collar portion 320 allows the coupler 200 to rotate by a clearance fit with the through hole 220 of the coupler 200 . The rearward annular surface 330 defines forward axial movement of the coupler 200 by engaging the lip 215 to the front surface 216 . The coaxial cable connector 100 also includes a sealing ring 800, the seal ring 800 to form a seal between the coupler 200 and the body 500 is fixed to the coupler 200.

Contact portion 310 can be monolithic with post 300 or can be an integral part of post 300 . As such, the contact portion 310 and a portion of the post 300 or post 300 can be constructed from a single piece of material. The contact portion 310 can contact the coupler 200 at a position forward of the surface 216 before the lip 215 . In this manner, the contact portion 310 of the column 300 in the column 300, 500 provide a conductive path between the coupler 200 and the body. This applies to the conductive path from the coaxial cable through the coaxial cable connector 100 to the terminal, which provides electrical grounding and a mask for RF entry and exit. The contact portion 310 is formable such that when the coaxial cable connector 100 is assembled, the contact portion 310 can be formed as a profile of the coupler 200 . In other words, the coupler 200 forms or shapes the contact portion 310 of the post 300 . Forming and shaping of the contact portion 310 may have a certain elastic / plastic properties based on the contact of the material portion 310. After assembly of the components of the coaxial cable connector 100 , the contact portion 310 is deformed; alternatively, the contact portion 310 of the post 300 can be pre-formed or partially pre-formed to mate with the coupler 200 in electrical contact, as described below with reference to FIG. 4A The 4D figure is explained in more detail. In this manner, the post 300 is secured within the coaxial cable connector 100 and the contact portion 310 establishes a conductive path between the body 500 and the coupler 200 . Further, the conductive path remains established regardless of the tightness of the coaxial cable connector 100 on the terminal due to the elastic/plastic properties of the contact portion 310 . This is due to the mechanical and electrical contact between the contact portion 310 maintaining the component (in this case, the post 300 and the coupler 200 ), regardless of the size of any gap between the components of the coaxial cable connector 100 . In other words, if the coupler 200 has some contact with the device ,, the contact portion 310 is integral to the post 300 and the coupler 200 even when the coaxial cable connector 100 is loose and/or partially disconnected from the terminal. A conductive path established between the post 300 and the coupler 200 is maintained. Although the coaxial connector 100 of FIG. 2 is an axial compression type coaxial connector having a post 300 , the contact portion 310 can be integral with any other type of coaxial cable connector and any other component of the coaxial cable connector. Any other components of any type of coaxial cable connector and coaxial cable connector are monolithic; examples of any type of coaxial cable connector and any other component of the coaxial cable connector discussed herein with respect to embodiments. However, in all of these exemplary embodiments, the contact portion 310 provides electrical continuity of the outer conductor of the coaxial cable received by the free coaxial cable connector 100 through the coaxial cable connector 100 to the terminal without the need for a separate component. In addition, contact portion 310 provides electrical continuity regardless of how tight or loose the coupler is to the terminals. In other words, the contact portion 310 provides electrical continuity from the wires to the terminals outside of the coaxial cable, regardless of and/or regardless of the tightness or fit of the coupling of the coaxial cable connector 100 to the terminals. Only the coupler 200 is required to be in contact with the terminals.

Referring now to FIG. 3A, FIG. 3B, FIG. 3C and FIG. 3D second column 300 illustrated in a different state of the coupler assembly 200 and the body 500. In FIG. 3A, the column 300 as illustrated by 200 in contact with the outer front coupling portion 310 of the post 300 and coupling 200 and the partially assembled body 500, the contact portion 310 of the post 300 is illustrated as a protrusion. Contact portion 310 can, but need not, protrude radially. In FIG. 3B , the contact portion 310 has begun to advance into the coupler 200 , and the contact portion 310 is beginning to be formed as the contour of the coupler 200 . As illustrated in FIG. 3B , the contact portion 310 is being formed into an arcuate shape, or an at least partially arcuate shape. As the post 300 proceeds further into the coupler 200 (as shown in FIG . 3C ), the contact portion 310 continues to form the contour of the coupler 200 . When assembled as shown in FIG . 3D , the contact portion 310 is formed as a profile of the coupler 200 and contacts the hole 230 to accommodate tolerance variations with the bore 230 . In the FIG. 3D, the coupling portion 200 has a surface 202, the tapered surface portion 202. During assembly, the surface portion 202 so as not to compromise the structural integrity of the contact portion 310 of the elastic portion 310, and thereby info / plastic properties without compromise contact with the guide portion 310 is formed to the contact portion 310 of the contact state. Surface portion 202 can be or can have other structural features (as a non-limiting example, curved edges) to guide contact portion 310 . As described above, the flexible or resilient nature of the contact portion 310 in the formed state allows the coupler 200 to be easily rotated and still maintains a reliable conductive path. It will be appreciated that the contact portion 310 is formable, and such elastic/plastic properties of the contact portion 310 based on the material of the contact portion 310 may exist in an unformed and formed state. When the coaxial cable connector 100 is assembled, the contact portion 310 transitions from the unformed state to the formed state.

Referring to Figure 4A, Figure 4B, FIG. 4C and FIG. 4D first, the column is shown at 300 in different states of the forming tool 900 is inserted into. In FIG. 4A , the post 300 is illustrated as being partially inserted into the forming tool 900 , and the contact portion 310 of the post 300 is illustrated as a protrusion. The protrusions may, but need not, protrude radially. In FIG. 4B , the contact portion 310 has begun to advance into the forming tool 900 . As the contact portion 310 advances into the forming tool 900 , the contact portion 310 begins to flexibly form the contour of the interior of the forming tool 900 . As illustrated in FIG. 4B , the contact portion 310 is being formed into an arcuate shape, or an at least partially arcuate shape. As the post 300 is advanced further into the forming tool 900 (as shown in FIG . 4C ), the contact portion 310 continues to form the contour of the interior of the forming tool 900 . As shown in FIG. 4C , at the final stage of insertion, the contact portion 310 is completely formed as a profile of the forming tool 900 , and the contact portion 310 has undergone deformation during the forming process but maintains the elasticity/plastic properties of the material based on the contact portion 310 . Spring or elastic features. After the formation of the contact portion 310 is completed or partially completed, the post 300 is removed from the forming tool 900 and the post 300 can be subsequently mounted in the connector 100 or other type of coaxial cable connector. This manner of forming or shaping the contact portion 310 into the contour of the forming tool 900 can aid in assisting in processing (such as, for example, electroplating) the post 300 in a subsequent manufacturing process. Moreover, the use of this method enables various configurations in which the contact portion 310 is formed, as illustrated in Figures 5A through 5H . FIG 5A is a schematic side view of a first exemplary embodiment of the column 300, wherein the contact portion 310 is completely circumscribed radially projecting posts 300 of the projection. In this view, the contact portion 310 is formable but not formed to reflect the contour of the coaxial cable connector or forming tool. FIG. 5B is a front view of the column 300. 5 FIG. FIG. 5C is a schematic side view of an exemplary embodiment of the column 300, wherein the contact portion 310 has a polygonal configuration. The contact portion 310 can be a protrusion and can, but need not, protrude radially. Although the contact portion 310 is illustrated as three corners in Figure 5C , the contact portion 310 can have any number of angular configurations, as non-limiting examples, two, three, four or more. In Figure 5C , the contact portion 310 can be formable but not formed to reflect the contour of the coaxial cable connector or forming tool. FIG. 5D of FIG. 5C is a front column 300 of FIG. FIG. 5E is a schematic side view of the column 300, the contact portion 310 having a configuration wherein three corners. In this view, the contact portion 310 is illustrated as being shaped such that the contact portion 310 slopes or tends toward the front end 305 of the post 300 . FIG. 5E 5F is a section of a front pillar 300 of FIG. FIG. FIG 5G is a schematic side view of a first exemplary embodiment of the column 300, the contact portion 310 having a configuration wherein three corners. In this view, the contact portion 310 is formed in a different manner than in FIG. 5E , in which the indentation 311 in the contact portion 310 results in a segmented or reduced arcuate shape 313 . FIG 5H is a section of a front pillar of FIG. 5G 300 of FIG.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the contact portion 310 and the post 300 as illustrated in Figures 2 through 5H can be unitary and can be monolithic with the post 300 . Moreover, contact portion 310 can have or can be any shape, including a shape that can be flush or aligned with other portions of post 300 , or contact portion 310 can have any number of configurations (as a non-limiting example, from all The configuration of the circular geometry to the geometric range of the polygonal angle), and the contact portion 310 can still perform the function of providing electrical continuity of the contact portion 310 . Further, the contact portion 310 can be formable and formed into any shape or in any orientation.

FIG 6 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 110, the coaxial cable connector 110 comprises a pin 805 integrally, wherein the coupler body 200 about the post 500 rather than 300 rotates, and the contact portion 510 to customize protrusion 500 instead of column 300, instead of the projection body 500 and column 300 integral with the body 500 instead of the column 300 as a single piece. In this regard, the contact portion 510 can be an integral part of the body 500 . As such, the contact portion 510 can be constructed from a single piece of material with the body 500 or a portion of the body 500 . Coaxial cable connector 110 is configured to accept a coaxial cable. As shown in FIG . 6A , when the coupler 200 is assembled with the body 500 , the contact portion 510 can be formed as a profile of the coupler 200 . Figure 6A is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector in a partially assembled state 110. The contact portion 510 is not formed as the outline of the coupler 200 . The assembly coupler 200 forms a contact portion 510 with the body 500 in a rearward manner, which is in a reverse orientation to the illustrated contact portion 310 . However, like the contact portion 310 , the material of the contact portion 510 has a certain elastic/plastic property. When the contact portion 510 is formed, the elastic/plastic property provides that the contact portion 510 will be pressed against the contour of the coupler 200 and maintained. Mechanical and electrical contact of the coupler 200 . In the same manner as previously described with respect to contact portion 310 , contact portion 510 provides electrical continuity from the wires to the terminals beyond the coaxial cable, regardless of the tightness or fit of the coaxial cable connector 100 to the terminals, and regardless of The tightness of the coaxial cable connector 100 on the terminal. Additionally or alternatively, the contact portion 310 can be supported or attached to the cantilever only at one end of the segment.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of an exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 111, the coaxial cable connector 111 comprises a pin 805 and a conductive element integrally 400. The coupler 200 rotates about the body 500 rather than around the post, which is not present in the coaxial cable connector 111 . The contact portion 410 is illustrated as a protrusion, and the contact portion 410 and the conductive element 400 may be integral, may be monolithic with the conductive element 400 , and protrude radially from the conductive assembly 400 ; the conductive assembly 400 is press fit to the body 500 in. Contact portion 410 can be an integral part of conductive element 400 . As such, the contact portion 410 can be constructed from a monolithic material with the conductive element 400 or a portion of the conductive element 400 . As with the contact portion 310 , the material of the contact portion 410 has a certain elastic/plastic property, and when the contact portion 410 is formed, the elastic/plastic property provides: as previously described, the conductive member 400 is at the assembly body 500 and the coupler 200. When inserted into the coupler 200 , the contact portion 410 will be pressed against the contour of the coupler 200 and the contact portion 410 will maintain mechanical and electrical contact with the coupler 200 .

Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view of another exemplary embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 111, the coaxial cable connector 111 comprises a pin 805 and collar 402 integrally. The coupler 200 rotates about the body 500 instead of the post. The contact portion 410 may be integral with the retaining ring 402 and project radially from the retaining ring 402 , and the retaining ring 402 is mounted into a recess formed in the body 500 . Contact portion 410 can be an integral part of retaining ring 402 . As such, the contact portion 410 can be constructed from a single piece of material with the retaining ring 402 or a portion of the retaining ring 402 . In this regard, Figure 8A illustrates a front and side view of the retaining ring 402 . In FIG. 8A , the contact portion 410 is illustrated as three protrusions that are integral with the retaining ring 402 and that protrude radially from the retaining ring 402 . As described above, the material of the contact portion 410 has a certain elastic/plastic property. When the contact portion 410 is formed, the elastic/plastic property provides: when the retaining ring 402 is inserted in the assembly body 500 and the coupler 200 as previously described. In coupler 200 , contact portion 410 will be pressed against the contour of coupler 200 and maintain mechanical and electrical contact with coupler 200 .

Will be apparent to those skilled in the art, such as exposure to FIGS. 6 to 8A illustrated in FIG portion 410 and the body 500 may be integral or may be attached to the other components 400, 402, 400, or may be another element , part of 402 . Moreover, contact portion 410 can have or be any shape, including a shape that can be flush or aligned with other portions of body 500 and/or another element 400 , 402 , or contact portion 410 can have any number of configurations (as non- A finite example, from the configuration of the geometric shape of the entire circular geometry to the range of polygonal angles).

Figure 9 is a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 112, the coaxial cable connector 112 does not have the column compression type connector. In other words, it has a columnless configuration. The coupler 200 rotates about the body 500 instead of the post. The body 500 includes a contact portion 510 . The contact portion 510 is integral with the body 500 . As such, the contact portion 510 can be constructed from a single piece of material with the body 500 or a portion of the body 500 . When the coupler 200 is assembled with the body 500 , the contact portion 510 is formed as a profile of the coupler 200 .

Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 113, the coaxial cable connector 113 is a hexagonal crimp-type connectors. The coaxial cable connector 113 comprises a coupler 200, a body 500 and a column 300, the column 300 having a contact portion 310. Contact portion 310 integral with the column 300 and the column 300 as a single piece. The contact portion 310 can be integral with the post 300 . As such, the contact portion 310 can be constructed from a single piece of material with the post 300 or a portion of the post 300 . When the coupler 200 is assembled with the body 500 and the post 300 , the contact portion 310 can be formed as a profile of the coupler 200 . Coaxial cable connector 113 is attached to the coaxial cable by radially compressing body 500 with one or more tools well known in the industry.

Figure 11 is a schematic isometric view of the second column 300 in FIG coaxial cable connector 100, the column 300 having a contact portion 310, the contact portion 310 is formed to a position of the contour of the coupling (not shown) of.

12 an isometric view of a cross-sectional view of a second connector post 100 of FIG. 300 and coupler 200, the coupler 200 is shown with the post 300 assembly. The contact portion 310 is formed as a profile of the coupler 200 .

FIG 13 is a cross sectional view of an embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 114, the coaxial cable connector 114 comprises a post 300 and a coupler 200, coupler 200 has a contact portion 210. Contact portion 210 is illustrated as an inwardly directed protrusion. Contact portion 210 with coupling 200 and is integral with the coupling 200 is a single piece, and when assembled with a coupler post 300 200, the contact portion 210 is formed to the contour of the column 300. The contact portion 210 can be integral with the coupler 200 . As such, the contact portion 210 can be constructed from a single piece of material with the coupler 200 or a portion of the coupler 200 . The contact portion 210 provides electrical continuity from the wires to the terminals outside of the coaxial cable, regardless of the tightness or fit of the coupling of the coaxial cable connector 114 to the terminals, and regardless of the tightness of the coaxial cable connector 114 on the terminals. The contact portion 210 can have or can be any shape, including a shape that can be flush or aligned with other portions of the coupler 200 , or the contact portion 210 can have and/or can be formed in any number of configurations (as non-limiting) Example, configuration from a full circular geometry to a multi-angle geometry range).

Figure 14, Figure 15 and Figure 16 is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 115, the coaxial cable connector 115 has a post similar to that described above to include a contact portion 310 of post 300 so as to contact Portion 310 is illustrated as protruding radially outwardly, and contact portion 310 is formed as a contour of coupler 200 at different locations of coupler 200 . Further, as in the first example, FIG. 15 and FIG. 16, the contact portion 310 may contact the coupling 200, after the lip 215, for example, as shown in FIG. 15, the contact surface 217 to be at 215 after the lip.

FIG 17 is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a coaxial cable connector 500 having a body 116, the body 500 comprises a contact portion 310, wherein the contact portion 310 is illustrated as directed outwardly from the body 500 of a protrusion is formed Coupler 200 .

Figure 18 is a coaxial cable connector 117 of the cross-sectional view of the embodiment, the coaxial cable connector 117 having a post 300 and a coupler 200, a column 300 having integral contact portions 310, the coupling 200 has an undercut 231. The contact portion 310 is illustrated as a protrusion that is formed as the contour of the coupler 200 at the location of the undercut 231 . FIG 18A is a section as shown in FIG. 18 of the cross-sectional view of a coaxial cable connector 117, the coaxial cable connector of the coaxial cable 117 is inserted into the prepared coaxial cable connector 117. The main body 500 and the post 300 receive a coaxial cable ( Fig . 18A ). The post 300 at the rear end 395 is inserted between the wire and the dielectric layer outside the coaxial cable.

Figure 19 is a partial cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a coaxial cable having a connector post 301 of 118, the column 301 comprises a contact portion 310 integrally. The movable post 301 is illustrated in a forward position in which the contact portion 310 is not formed by the contour of the coupler 200 . Figure 20 is a cross-sectional view 118 of the portion of the coaxial cable connector shown in FIG. 19, where column 301 is in the rearward position and the contact portion 310 is formed as a profile 200 of the coupler.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the inventions set forth herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited by the scope of the invention, and the scope of the appended claims. It is intended that the present invention cover the modifications and variations of the embodiments, which are within the scope of the appended claims and the scope of the claims. Although specific terms are used herein, they are used only for general purpose and description. In the sense and not for limiting purposes.

100‧‧‧ coaxial cable connector

105‧‧‧ front end

195‧‧‧ Backend

200‧‧‧coupler

205‧‧‧ front end

210‧‧‧Central passage

215‧‧‧Lip

216‧‧‧ forward surface

217‧‧‧Back surface

220‧‧‧through hole

230‧‧‧ hole

295‧‧‧ Backend

300‧‧ ‧ column

305‧‧‧ front end

310‧‧‧Contact section

320‧‧‧ collar part

325‧‧‧through hole

330‧‧‧Backward annular surface

335‧‧‧With barbed parts

340‧‧‧Magnified shoulder

395‧‧‧ Backend

500‧‧‧ subject

505‧‧‧ front end

525‧‧‧Central passage

595‧‧‧ Backend

600‧‧‧shell

605‧‧‧ front end

625‧‧‧Central passage

695‧‧‧ backend

700‧‧‧Clamping elements

705‧‧‧ front end

725‧‧‧ center passage

795‧‧‧ backend

800‧‧‧Seal ring

Claims (10)

  1. A coaxial cable connector for coupling one end of a coaxial cable to a terminal, the coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor; a dielectric surrounding the inner conductor; an outer conductor, the outer conductor Surrounding the dielectric; and a sheath surrounding the outer lead; the connector includes: a coupler, the coupler adapted to couple the connector to a terminal, the coupler including a a lip extending into a central passage defined by the coupler; a body assembled with the coupler; and a post assembled with the coupler and the body, the post Included in a flange at a front end of the post, wherein the post is adapted to receive one end of a coaxial cable, and wherein at least one of the coupler and the post includes the flange and the coupling at the post An integral contact portion between the lips of the connector, the contact portion extending between the coupler and the post, and wherein the contact portion and at least one of the coupler and the post are at least One portion is monolithic, and wherein when the connector is coupled to the terminal When receiving the body of a coaxial cable, which provides the contact portion from the outer conductor of the coaxial cable passes through one of the connector to the electrical continuity of the terminal, regardless of whether the connector is coupled to the terminal of the contact tightness.
  2. A connector as claimed in claim 1 wherein electrical continuity is provided from an outer conductor of the coaxial cable through the connector to the terminal, rather than by a separate coherent assembly.
  3. The connector of claim 1, wherein the contact portion is constructed of a material having an elastic/plastic property that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact, regardless of when the connector is assembled There are any gaps between the components.
  4. The connector of claim 1 wherein the contact portion is formable.
  5. The connector of claim 4, wherein the contact portion is formed as a profile of the coupler and at least one of the posts when the post is at least partially assembled with the coupler.
  6. The connector of claim 4, wherein the contact portion is formed as a contour of at least one of the body and the post when the post is at least partially assembled with the body.
  7. The connector of claim 4, wherein the contact portion is formed in an at least partially arcuate shape.
  8. The connector of claim 1 wherein the electrical continuity means that a DC contact resistance of the outer conductor of the coaxial cable passing through the connector to the device is less than about 3000 milliohms.
  9. The connector of claim 1, wherein the contact portion is constructed of a material having an elastic/plastic property that allows the contact portion to maintain electrical and mechanical contact, regardless of when the connector is assembled There are any gaps between the components.
  10. The connector of claim 1 wherein the contact portion is formed in response to a forming tool.
TW102105865A 2012-02-22 2013-02-20 Coaxial cable connector with integral continuity contacting portion TWI593198B (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201261601821P true 2012-02-22 2012-02-22
US13/652,969 US9407016B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2012-10-16 Coaxial cable connector with integral continuity contacting portion

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Publication Number Publication Date
TW201340502A TW201340502A (en) 2013-10-01
TWI593198B true TWI593198B (en) 2017-07-21

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EP (1) EP2817852B1 (en)
CN (1) CN105027359B (en)
AU (1) AU2013222365B2 (en)
BR (1) BR112014020690A2 (en)
CA (1) CA2877008A1 (en)
DK (1) DK2817852T3 (en)
ES (1) ES2688326T3 (en)
TW (1) TWI593198B (en)
WO (1) WO2013126629A2 (en)

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ES2688326T3 (en) 2018-10-31
EP2817852A2 (en) 2014-12-31
BR112014020690A2 (en) 2017-07-04
CA2877008A1 (en) 2013-08-29
WO2013126629A3 (en) 2015-11-19
WO2013126629A2 (en) 2013-08-29
CN105027359A (en) 2015-11-04
AU2013222365B2 (en) 2017-07-20
DK2817852T3 (en) 2018-11-26
EP2817852B1 (en) 2018-08-01
CN105027359B (en) 2017-05-31
EP2817852A4 (en) 2017-04-19
TW201340502A (en) 2013-10-01
AU2013222365A1 (en) 2014-09-18

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