TWI507068B - Providing and utilizing maps in location determination based on rssi and rtt data - Google Patents

Providing and utilizing maps in location determination based on rssi and rtt data Download PDF

Info

Publication number
TWI507068B
TWI507068B TW102144603A TW102144603A TWI507068B TW I507068 B TWI507068 B TW I507068B TW 102144603 A TW102144603 A TW 102144603A TW 102144603 A TW102144603 A TW 102144603A TW I507068 B TWI507068 B TW I507068B
Authority
TW
Taiwan
Prior art keywords
mobile device
information
data
rssi
based
Prior art date
Application number
TW102144603A
Other languages
Chinese (zh)
Other versions
TW201427461A (en
Inventor
Saumitra Das
Alok Aggarwal
Ayman Fawzy Naguib
Vinay Sridhara
Hardie Edward Thomas Lingham
Original Assignee
Qualcomm Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US13/707,484 priority Critical patent/US8938211B2/en
Application filed by Qualcomm Inc filed Critical Qualcomm Inc
Publication of TW201427461A publication Critical patent/TW201427461A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of TWI507068B publication Critical patent/TWI507068B/en

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/0205Details
    • G01S5/0215Details interference or multipath issues related to signal reception
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S13/00Systems using the reflection or reradiation of radio waves, e.g. radar systems; Analogous systems using reflection or reradiation of waves whose nature or wavelength is irrelevant or unspecified
    • G01S13/87Combinations of radar systems, e.g. primary radar and secondary radar
    • G01S13/878Combination of several spaced transmitters or receivers of known location for determining the position of a transponder or a reflector
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/0205Details
    • G01S5/0236Receiving assistance data, e.g. base station almanac
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/0252Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves by comparing measured values with pre-stored measured or simulated values
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/0257Hybrid positioning solutions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01SRADIO DIRECTION-FINDING; RADIO NAVIGATION; DETERMINING DISTANCE OR VELOCITY BY USE OF RADIO WAVES; LOCATING OR PRESENCE-DETECTING BY USE OF THE REFLECTION OR RERADIATION OF RADIO WAVES; ANALOGOUS ARRANGEMENTS USING OTHER WAVES
    • G01S5/00Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations
    • G01S5/02Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more direction or position line determinations; Position-fixing by co-ordinating two or more distance determinations using radio waves
    • G01S5/14Determining absolute distances from a plurality of spaced points of known location

Description

Used to provide and utilize maps in location decisions based on RSSI and RTT data

The subject matter disclosed herein relates to location determination using local maps and annotations.

Different techniques can be used to estimate the location of mobile devices such as cellular phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or any other mobile device. For example, some mobile devices can process signals received from a satellite positioning system (SPS) to estimate their position. However, there are sometimes certain areas in which navigation signals from the SPS may not be available, such as in certain indoor locations.

The mobile device can estimate the mobile device location in an area in which the navigation signal transmitted from the SPS is not available. For example, the mobile device can transmit a signal to the access point and measure the length of time until the response signal from the access point is received. The distance from the mobile device to the access point can be determined based on the measured length of time between the transmission of the signal from the mobile device and the receipt of the response signal at the mobile device. Alternatively, the signal strength of the signal received from the access point can be measured and the distance from the mobile device to the access point can be estimated based on the measured signal strength. Access points may include A device in which a wireless communication device communicates with a network.

However, the access point may experience a processing delay between when the signal is received from the mobile device and when the response signal is transmitted to the mobile device. Such processing delays may vary depending on the particular access point and may need to be accounted for when the mobile device estimates the distance to the access point based on the measured time interval. Furthermore, the signal strength of the received signal may vary depending on the physical structure within the area, such as the presence of ceilings and walls, ie, resulting in a change in received signal strength, which does not account for, for example, the presence of a physical structure. Such variations can result in inaccurate estimates of the distance to the access point.

In one particular implementation, a system and method for obtaining a partial map for a given area is provided. One or more signals wirelessly transmitted from one or more wireless network elements may be received by the mobile device. The mobile device can identify the associated local map based at least in part on the received one or more signals. Such signals may be received from wireless network elements, such as indicating the presence of such wireless network elements along with the unique identifier of such wireless network elements, such as a Media Access Control (MAC) address. The associated partial map and annotations associated with the associated partial map may then be obtained, for example, by associating the partial map with the wireless network element identifier indicated on the particular partial map. The associated local map can utilize a predefined coordinate system. In one implementation, features of the map - such as, for example, walls, doors, and room numbers - are using local coordinate systems with their own reference points (eg, x, y coordinates in units such as feet, etc.) Expressed. However, it should be understood that this is merely an example implementation and that the claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.

According to the present disclosure, an example method for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include determining an area in which the mobile device is located, and based on The location information associated with the area determines the conditions of the environment of the mobile device. The method can also include weighting the RSSI and RTT data by the processing unit based on conditions of the environment; and calculating the location of the mobile device based on the RSSI and RTT data with the determined weighting.

An example non-transitory computer readable storage medium according to the present disclosure may have instructions embedded thereon for causing a processing unit to perform functions including determining an area in which the mobile device is located, and based on the area The location information of the joint determines the conditions of the environment of the mobile device. The instructions may also cause the processing unit to perform functions comprising: weighting received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data based on conditions of the environment; and based on the determined weighting based on the RSSI and The RTT data is used to calculate the location of the mobile device.

In accordance with the present disclosure, an example system for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include means for determining an area in which the mobile device is located Means for determining conditions of the environment of the mobile device based on location data associated with the region for weighting received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data based on conditions of the environment Means, and means for calculating the location of the mobile device based on the RSSI and RTT data with the determined weighting.

According to the present case, a configuration is based on the weighted received signal strength Example mobile devices that indicate (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data to determine location may include a transmitter, a receiver, a memory, and a processing unit coupled to the transmitter, the receiver, and the memory. The processing unit may be configured to: determine an area in which the mobile device is located, determine a condition of an environment of the mobile device based on location information associated with the area, and receive a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) based on the condition of the environment Round trip time (RTT) data is weighted and the location of the mobile device is calculated based on the RSSI and RTT data with the determined weighting.

In accordance with the present disclosure, an example method for facilitating determining a position of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include obtaining a plurality of regions corresponding to a structure Location data, and for each of the plurality of regions, the processing unit determines a condition of the environment associated with the region based on the location data and conditions based on the environment associated with the region and the RSSI Weighted information related to weighting of RTT data. The method can also include transmitting weighting information for each of the plurality of regions to the mobile device.

In accordance with the present disclosure, an exemplary non-transitory computer readable storage medium can have instructions embedded thereon for causing a processing unit to perform functions including obtaining a location corresponding to a plurality of regions associated with a structure Data, and for each of the plurality of regions, determining conditions of the environment associated with the region based on the location data and based on conditions of the environment associated with the region and weighting the RSSI and RTT data Relevant weighted information. The instructions also enable the program to each of the plurality of regions The weighted information of the areas is sent to the mobile device.

In accordance with the present disclosure, an example system for facilitating determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include: obtaining a complex number corresponding to a structure Means of the location data of the regions, and for each of the plurality of regions, determining conditions of the environment associated with the region based on the location data and based on conditions of the environment associated with the region Means of weighting information related to weighting RSSI and RTT data. The system can also include means for transmitting weighted information for each of the plurality of regions to the mobile device.

In accordance with the present specification, an example server for facilitating determination of a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data may include a transmitter, a receiver, a memory, and The transmitter, the receiver, and a processing unit communicatively coupled to the memory. The processing unit may be configured to: obtain location data corresponding to a plurality of regions associated with the structure, and for each of the plurality of regions, determine conditions of an environment associated with the region based on the location data and Weighted information related to the conditions of the environment associated with the region and weighting the RSSI and RTT data. The processing unit can also be configured to transmit weighting information for each of the plurality of regions to the mobile device via the transmitter.

According to the present disclosure, an example method for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include receiving, by the mobile device, each of the plurality of regions The weighted information of an area stores weighted information of each of the plurality of areas in the memory of the mobile device, and obtains RSSI measurement and RTT measurement related to the area in which the mobile device is located. The method can also include determining weighted information for the region in which the mobile device is located to determine a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement. The method can also include calculating a location of the mobile device using the first weight and the second weight.

In accordance with the present disclosure, yet another example non-transitory computer readable storage medium can have instructions embedded thereon for causing a processing unit to perform functions including receiving weighted information for each of a plurality of regions The weighted information of each of the plurality of regions is stored in the memory, and the RSSI measurement and the RTT measurement related to the region in which the mobile device is located are obtained. The instructions may also cause the processor to use the weighted information of the region in which the mobile device is located to determine a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement. The instructions may further cause the processor to calculate the location of the mobile device using the first weight and the second weight.

In accordance with the present disclosure, an example system for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data can include: for receiving each of a plurality of regions Means for weighting information, means for storing weighted information for each of the plurality of regions in the memory, and means for obtaining RSSI measurements and RTT measurements related to the region in which the mobile device is located . The system can also include means for determining a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement using weighting information for the region in which the mobile device is located. The system can further include for using the first weight and the second weight A means of calculating the location of the mobile device.

In accordance with the present specification, an example mobile device configured to determine a location based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data may include a transmitter, a receiver, a memory, and a transmitter, A processing unit coupled to the memory and the memory. The processor is configurable to: receive weighting information for each of the plurality of regions, store weighting information for each of the plurality of regions in the memory, and obtain information related to the region in which the mobile device is located RSSI measurement and RTT measurement. The processing unit may be further configured to use the weighting information of the region in which the mobile device is located to determine a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement. The processing unit can be further configured to calculate the location of the mobile device using the first weight and the second weight.

100‧‧‧ floors

105‧‧‧First wireless network component

110‧‧‧Second wireless network component

115‧‧‧ Third wireless network component

120‧‧‧fourth wireless network component

125‧‧‧Fifth wireless network component

130‧‧‧Users

135‧‧‧Mobile equipment

145‧‧‧Local Map Database

150‧‧‧ annotated database

155‧‧‧Server

160‧‧‧Broadcast message transmitter

200‧‧‧Wireless network components

205‧‧‧First wall

210‧‧‧ second wall

215‧‧‧Mobile equipment

220‧‧‧ obstacles

225‧‧‧ first position

230‧‧‧second position

235‧‧‧ third position

300‧‧‧ display screen

302‧‧‧Partial map

305‧‧‧ first store

310‧‧‧Second store

315‧‧‧ third store

320‧‧‧fourth store

325‧‧‧Restaurant

330‧‧‧Washroom

340‧‧‧ fifth store

345‧‧‧ Sixth Store

350‧‧Food Court

355‧‧‧First wireless network component

360‧‧‧Second wireless network component

365‧‧‧ Third wireless network component

370‧‧‧fourth wireless network component

375‧‧‧Fifth wireless network component

380‧‧‧User/Mobile Equipment

385‧‧‧Annotation window

400‧‧‧ system

405‧‧‧Mobile equipment

410‧‧‧Local Map Server

415‧‧‧First Annotated Database

420‧‧‧ Second Annotation Database

500‧‧‧ procedures

505‧‧‧ operation

510‧‧‧ operation

515‧‧‧ operation

600‧‧‧Wireless network components

605‧‧‧Processing unit

610‧‧‧ memory

615‧‧‧ Receiver

620‧‧‧transmitter

700‧‧‧Mobile equipment

705‧‧‧Processing unit

710‧‧‧User interface

715‧‧‧transmitter

720‧‧‧ Receiver

725‧‧‧ memory

800-1‧‧‧ first map

800-2‧‧‧Second map

810‧‧‧ access point

820‧‧‧Area

830‧‧‧Area

840‧‧‧Area

900‧‧‧Building layout

910‧‧‧ access point

910-1‧‧‧First access point

920-1‧‧‧ first position

920-2‧‧‧second position

920-3‧‧‧ third position

920-4‧‧‧ fourth position

1000‧‧‧Program

1010‧‧‧ square

1020‧‧‧ square

1030‧‧‧ square

1040‧‧‧ square

1100‧‧‧Program

1110‧‧‧

1120‧‧‧ square

1130‧‧‧

1200‧‧‧Program

1210‧‧‧Steps

1220‧‧‧Steps

1230‧‧‧Steps

1240‧‧‧Steps

1250‧‧ steps

The non-limiting and non-exhaustive features are described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which like reference

1 is a plan view of a floor of an office building having various wireless network components in accordance with one particular implementation.

2 is an illustration of an area surrounding a wireless network element in accordance with one implementation.

3 is an illustration of a display screen of a mobile device in accordance with one implementation.

4 is a schematic block diagram of a system for providing local maps and annotations to a mobile device, in accordance with one implementation.

Figure 5 is a flow diagram illustrating a procedure for obtaining a partial map of a given area, in accordance with one implementation.

6 is a schematic block diagram of a wireless network element in accordance with one implementation.

7 is a schematic block diagram of a particular implementation of a mobile device in accordance with one implementation.

FIG. 8A illustrates a first map providing a layout of a building, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 8B illustrates a second map including a heat map based on the first map of FIG. 8A, according to one embodiment.

9 is a diagram illustrating a building layout that may use heat maps and/or other location data when weighting received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data.

10 is a flow diagram of a procedure for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data, in accordance with one embodiment.

11 is a flow diagram of a procedure for facilitating determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data, in accordance with one embodiment.

12 is a flow diagram of a procedure for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data, in accordance with one embodiment.

The use of "a" or "an" or "an" or "an" or "an" In the example. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in an embodiment", "an" In addition, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in one or more examples and/or features.

The mobile device determines the location or location of the mobile device. In one implementation, the mobile device can estimate the mobile device location based on signals wirelessly received from wireless network elements of other devices capable of wirelessly transmitting signals. For example, it is possible to use mobile devices in areas where navigation signals from satellite positioning systems (SPS) are not available, such as in certain buildings. The wireless network element can be located at a known location in such an area, and the mobile device can estimate the distance from the mobile device to a particular wireless network element. Known techniques can be used to estimate such distances and triangulate the location of such mobile devices.

In one implementation, the mobile device can estimate the location of the mobile device itself by communicating with one or more nearby femtocell service areas. A "nanocytic service area" as used herein may refer to a smaller honeycomb base station. Such a femtocell service area can be connected to the service provider's network via a broadband such as, for example, via a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) or cable. The femtocell service area may, for example, utilize, for example, Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UTMS), Long Term Evolution (LTE), Evolution Data Optimized or Evolutionary Information (EV-DO), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), Global Interoperability Microwave Storage Technologies such as WiMAX, Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)-2000, or Time Division Synchronous Code Division Multiple Access (TD-SCDMA), which are only compatible with the femtocell service area. Several of the many possible technologies. The femtocell service area can also have integrated Wi-Fi. Round trip time ranging can be performed by utilizing a femtocell service area.

The mobile device can utilize any of several techniques to estimate the distance from the mobile device to the wireless network element. One way to estimate such distances is by wirelessly transmitting probe request signals to specific wireless network elements. Once received To such a probe request, the wireless network component can wirelessly transmit a response signal. The mobile device can measure the time interval (referred to herein as "round trip time") between when the mobile device transmits the probe request and when the response signal is received. Wirelessly transmitted signals can propagate at known speeds such as the speed of light. Accordingly, the distance can be estimated based on the round trip time between when the probe request is transmitted and when the response is received. However, the wireless network element typically experiences a processing delay between the time the probe request is received and the time the response signal is transmitted. To ensure an accurate estimate of the distance based on the measured time interval, the mobile device can subtract an estimate of the processing delay from the measured round trip time interval. However, different wireless network elements can experience different processing delays. In order to accurately account for such different processing delays, an estimate of the processing delay that is specific to a particular wireless network element can be provided to the mobile device as an annotated map for a given area. Once the measurement of the round trip time between the transmit probe request and the receive response signal has been obtained and the processing delays due to the wireless network component have been subtracted, the time from the mobile device can be estimated based on such time measurements. Measurement of the distance of wireless network components.

As used herein, "wireless network element" may refer to a device that allows a wireless communication device to communicate with a network. For example, wireless network elements can include, for example, access points (eg, Wi-Fi access points), femtocell service areas, etc., and can allow wireless communication devices to use Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, such as code division multiplexing Take (CDMA), Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA), Single Carrier Frequency Division Multiple Access (SC-FDMA) Connect to the wireless network with cellular communication technology or any other suitable wireless technology and/or standard.

Another technique for estimating the distance from a mobile device to a wireless network element includes measuring the signal strength of a signal received from a wireless network element. The response signal may be transmitted from the wireless network element to the mobile device in response to the probe request, as discussed above, and the strength of such a response signal may be measured. Based on such measured signal strength, the distance from the mobile device to the wireless network component can be estimated. Alternatively, the wireless network element can periodically broadcast signals without first receiving a probe request, and the strength of such received broadcast signals can be measured. In one implementation, the wireless network element can transmit a signal at a known signal strength. For example, at locations where there are no obstacles, the intensity of the signal transmitted from the wireless network element will decrease at a known rate over a given distance. For example, in one example implementation, if the signal strength of the received signal is 80.23% of the strength of the wireless network component transmitting the signal, the mobile device can estimate the distance to the wireless network component to be 100.45 meters. In another example implementation, if the signal strength of the received signal is measured as 82.57% of the strength of the wireless network component transmitting the signal, the mobile device can estimate the distance to the wireless network component as 91.35 meters. The signal strength is reduced in distance over a known rate, and based on the measurement of the signal strength of the signal received from the wireless network element, the distance from the mobile device to the wireless network element can be estimated. In one example, a comment on a map of the corresponding area can be provided, the annotation specifying a mapping of signal strength to distance for a particular wireless network element.

However, the presence of an obstacle between the wireless network component and the mobile device reduces the strength of the signal transmitted from the wireless network component to the mobile device. For example, at an indoor location, the presence of a wall between the wireless network component and the mobile device dissipates the strength of the transmitted signal. In addition, the amount of such signal strength that is dissipated is desirable. Depends on the materials used to make such walls. For example, walls made of drywall can dissipate a smaller amount of signal strength than signals that are dissipated by walls made of concrete. Accordingly, to ensure an accurate estimate of the distance from the mobile device to the wireless network component based on the measured signal strength, such obstacles or other factors that may reduce the signal strength may be accounted for. For example, a scaling formula that indicates the distance relative to the measured signal strength can be determined for the wireless network component. Such a formula may depend on the location of the mobile device receiving the signal from the wireless network element. For example, such a formula applies a weight that is 50 meters away from the wireless network component and has no obstacles. The mobile device is located 50 meters away from the wireless network component but the signal must pass through. The weights applied in the case of several obstacles such as walls may be different. Such formulas or mathematical relationships can be provided to the mobile device for use in estimating the distance. In one implementation, such formulas or mathematical relationships may be provided via annotations to the map.

The mobile device can identify the distance to several wireless network elements. As discussed above, if the corresponding location of such a wireless network element is known, the mobile device can triangulate the location of the mobile device.

According to one implementation, the mobile device can access the local map if the mobile device is in a particular area where the navigation signal from the SPS may not be available within the mobile device. Such local maps can be stored at locations on the network and can be accessed via, for example, the Internet. Such partial maps can be retrieved and subsequently displayed on the user's mobile device. Such a map may indicate, for example, the location of a particular store within a shopping mall. The mobile device can also obtain annotations associated with such partial maps. In some implementations, such annotations can be stored at the same location as the local map. However, in other implementations, such annotations can be stored At one or more different locations. Such annotations may indicate the wireless network elements in which the area memory covered by the local map is located. In one implementation, such annotations may indicate an estimated processing delay, and a formula for estimating a distance to the one or more wireless network elements based on signal strength of signals received from one or more wireless network elements. . Unlike global coordinate systems, such partial maps may include local coordinate systems. By utilizing a local coordinate system, local maps can be provided without reference to earth-centered coordinates - such as the Global Geodetic System (WGS) 84 style global coordinates. The partial map may include structural information relating to the indoor location specified in the local coordinate system where the origin is within the local map itself. The annotations on the partial map may include information about the entities illustrated on the partial map.

The use of such local coordinate systems provides certain advantages. For example, it may be easier to locate a device for which ranging can occur in a local coordinate system than in a global coordinate system. Given a map with a known x,y coordinate grid, the access point location can be assigned, for example, by an information technology engineer, factory, or by simply marking the location of the access point on the map. In order to perform a similar arrangement in the global coordinate system, for example, the position is first determined in the global coordinate system. If each point is locally performed within the global coordinate system, location locking may be required based on navigation signals, such as via GPS signals. However, performing positional locking based on navigation signals within a building or other structure can be difficult and is likely to be inaccurate and slow.

Alternatively, multiple position fixes can be moved from the azimuth point on the local coordinate reference system to the global coordinate reference frame. Such multiple position fixes can be used to convert local coordinates into global coordinates. In order to perform such a conversion from local to global coordinates, it may first be generated or obtained by accurately arranging network entities within it. Local coordinate system. This additional conversion from local to global coordinateization introduces a potential source of error plus additional computation/work.

Upon entering the area, the mobile device may first identify a particular local map associated with the area and may subsequently retrieve the map. In one implementation, the mobile device can broadcast a probe request and can receive a response signal from a wireless network element within the area. Some or all of such response signals may include information describing a Media Access Control Identifier (MAC ID) that may indicate the identity of the wireless network element from which such response signals are transmitted. Upon receipt of such a MAC ID, the mobile device can consult, for example, a database or look up a data sheet to determine the identity of the map associated with such wireless network element. In one implementation, the mobile device can access a database accessible via a mobile device wireless internet service provider. Alternatively, the mobile device can access a known network address that stores such a MAC ID to identify a partial map associated with such a MAC ID.

In one implementation, the mobile device can receive signals from wireless network elements associated with a particular local map and additional signals from other wireless network elements associated with different local maps. In such a scenario, the mobile device can determine the MAC ID associated with the received signal having at least the minimum threshold signal strength. The mobile device can then access the database to identify local maps associated with such MAC IDs. If some of the MAC IDs are associated with the first partial map and some of the MAC IDs of the received signals are associated with the second partial map, the mobile device can, for example, identify which local map is associated with the strongest received signal. A selection can then be presented to the user for selecting a partial map from which the user is located from among the most likely partial maps.

Other implementations for identifying local maps may be used in other implementations. the way. In some implementations, a unified reference identifier ("URI") can be wirelessly transmitted to the mobile device as it enters the area. A "URI" as used herein may refer to a location in which information is stored. For example, the URI may indicate where the network address of the partial map is stored according to any of several protocols, such as Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Such network addresses may include Internet addresses or regional network addresses, to name just two of many possible examples. After the mobile device has received the URI, the mobile device can access the referenced address or location and retrieve the associated local map.

In one implementation, the partial map can be presented to the user and displayed on a display screen such as the user's mobile device. In some implementations, comments about wireless network elements can be hidden from the user. For example, such annotations about wireless network elements can be hidden because annotations can confuse displayed maps, and users may not desire to view information about such wireless network elements. However, other types of annotations may alternatively be displayed to the user. A wide range of annotations can be provided to the user's mobile device for display. For example, if the user is in a shopping mall, the annotation may indicate whether a particular restaurant in the shopping mall has a vacancy, the location of the checkout counter with the shortest waiting time in the store, or whether the public restroom is closed for cleaning, here Only a few of the many examples are exemplified.

As discussed above, the annotations may be taken from one or more locations and may be taken from different locations from which the partial map was taken. In one implementation within the shopping mall, for example, annotations associated with the wireless network element can be retrieved from the first location, annotations associated with the department store can be retrieved from the second location, and can be retrieved from, for example, the third location Public office Area - such as the restroom - associated notes. In one implementation, the mobile device can retrieve various annotations of the partial map from different sources and can selectively display one or more of such annotations to the user via display means.

If the user moves to the area associated with the local map and the user's mobile device identifies and retrieves the associated local and related annotations, the mobile device can then use the annotations associated with the wireless network element to determine to the wireless network The distance of the road component. For example, as discussed above, the mobile device can transmit a probe request to one or more wireless network elements and measure a round trip time interval until a probe response signal is received from each wireless network element. Such a mobile device may subtract the associated processing delay associated with the associated wireless network element - as indicated by the annotation on the local map, and may subsequently estimate the distance to the wireless network element. Such mobile devices may also measure the signal strength of signals received from various wireless network elements and estimate the distance to such wireless network elements based at least in part on the measured signal strength. As discussed above, the predefined relationship between received signal strength and distance can be indicated on a partial map as a comment about a particular wireless network element. Moreover, such predefined relationships between received signal strength and distance may also depend on the particular type of obstacle between a particular wireless network element and the mobile device. Accordingly, based on such predefined relationships, the distance can be estimated based on the signal strength of the received signal. In one implementation, the corresponding weights may be determined for the combination of the processing delay estimate from the probe request round trip time interval and the distance result estimated from the received signal strength. For example, if one of the methods is determined to produce a more accurate result, then more weight is applied to such methods. For example, if the distance estimate determined based on the received signal is estimated to be inferior to the round trip time interval according to the probe request Subtracting the estimated distance of the processing delay is so accurate, a weight of 0.60 can be applied to the distance determined by subtracting the processing delay from the probe request round trip time interval, and a weight of 0.40 can be applied to the distance determined according to the received signal strength.

If the distance from the mobile device to the at least three wireless network elements has been estimated, the mobile device can then triangulate the location of the mobile device. After such locations have been estimated, such users may be presented with annotations related to the area in which the user is located. For example, the user may be provided with directions to a particular store in the shopping mall based on the estimated location of the user.

1 is a plan view of a floor 100 of an office building having various wireless network components installed at known locations in accordance with one particular implementation. As shown, the first wireless network element 105, the second wireless network element 110, the third wireless network element 115, the fourth wireless network element 120, and the fifth wireless network element 125 are disposed in the floor 100. . User 130 can carry mobile device 135 and move in floor 100. The office building can include floor 100 and many other floors that are potentially possible. In one implementation, the mobile device 135 can estimate the location of the mobile device 135 by communicating with wireless network elements located at the same floor 100 as the floor on which the mobile device 135 is located. Different floors may have different floor plans and may have different arrangements of: wireless network elements, offices, restrooms, libraries, cafeterias, to which only a few variations are exemplified.

Mobile device 135 can include a display screen, such as a liquid crystal display (LCD), a touch capable screen, or any other type of display capable of presenting a graphical user interface. The display of the mobile device 135 can present a partial map to the user 130. Such a partial map can present that the user 130 is carrying the line A 2-dimensional floor plan of the floor 100 on which the moving device 135 moves, or a portion of the floor plan. Upon moving to floor 100, mobile device 135 may initially be unaware of floor 100 at which mobile device 135 is currently located, and may not have a partial map for floor 100 presented to user 130. Once moved to floor 100, mobile device 135 may determine the identity of the local map corresponding to the location at which mobile device 135 is currently being migrated, in this case floor 100. There are different ways in which the mobile device can determine the identity of the local map to be presented to the user 130. After deciding the identity of the appropriate local map to present, the mobile device 135 can retrieve such local maps and then display such local maps, for example, on the display of the mobile device 135.

In a particular implementation, the mobile device can identify a suitable local map of the location that the corresponding mobile device 135 is currently holding by listening to broadcasts from various wireless network elements, such as access points, femtocell service areas, and the like. For example, the first wireless network element 105 can periodically broadcast beacon messages. Such beacon messages may indicate the MAC ID of the first wireless network element 105. Such a MAC ID may indicate an identifier of the first wireless network element. Once such a MAC ID is extracted from the beacon message, the mobile device can access the database or consult the data table to determine the identity of the local map corresponding to the first wireless network element 105. For example, the location and method of accessing such a database or consulting a data sheet may be known before the user 130 carries the mobile device 135 into the floor 100. In one implementation, the lookup profile corresponding to the MAC ID can be stored in one or more predefined repository locations. Alternatively, the MAC ID associated with the wireless network element may indicate the location of such a database or lookup data sheet. In other implementations, the MAC ID may directly indicate a partial map corresponding to the first wireless network element 105.

In one implementation, the mobile device 135 can transmit a probe request following the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 to one or more wireless network elements located on the floor 100. Upon receipt of such an 802.11 compliant probe request, one or more wireless network elements can transmit a response to the mobile device 135. One or more of such responses may include information indicating a URI at which a local area map corresponding to floor 100 may be accessed.

If the mobile device 135 receives a response to the probe request from the wireless network element, the mobile device 135 can then communicate with such wireless network element. For example, if the mobile device 135 is permitted to associate with a particular network element and an Internet Protocol (IP) address is desired, the mobile device 135 can transmit a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) "discovery" request to request such an IP bit. site. Upon receiving such a DHCP discovery request, the wireless network element can respond with a DHCP "Supply" response, which can include an IP address assigned to the mobile device 135. A URI indicating where the local map associated with the wireless network element is located may also be included in the DHCP provisioning response. Upon receiving such a DHCP provisioning response, the mobile device 135 can access the URI and obtain an associated local map. For example, the URI can be stored in a local map repository 145 that is accessible via the Internet or some other network.

In some implementations, the URI indicating where the local map corresponding to the region in which the mobile device 135 is currently located can be transmitted to the mobile device 135 via the network layer broadcast packet. A host attached to a local subnet can listen to broadcast messages on that subnet. One or more of such broadcast messages may contain related URIs. One form of broadcast that differs depending on the Internet Protocol (IP) subnet is a message that is delivered to an IP address such as 255.255.255.255 on a dedicated port. Should understand There may be versions of this type of broadcast that vary by factor network of different addresses.

In one implementation, the URI may be transmitted to the mobile device 135 via a link layer broadcast frame. For example, there may be such an entity on floor 100 that the entity periodically broadcasts a frame containing the identity of the URI in which the local map may be obtained. Such broadcast frames may be broadcast by wireless network elements, such as first wireless network element 105, or by some other element within floor 100 that includes a transmitter such as broadcast message transmitter 160. The broadcast message transmitter 160 may, for example, periodically and locally transmit frames containing such URIs in a compressed format. Upon receiving such a broadcast frame, the mobile device 135 can extract the URIs within such broadcast frames and subsequently retrieve the corresponding local area maps stored at the address indicated by such URIs.

In one implementation, the URI may be transmitted to the mobile device 135 via a beacon information element such as a wireless network element or transmitter. For example, multiple elements that are too small to individually transmit such URIs to mobile device 135 can be "stitched" together or combined to deliver the URI.

In some implementations, the URI can be encoded into a Service Set Identifier (SSID) of the wireless network element. For example, devices on a wireless network may utilize a particular SSID to communicate with each other. If the local area network component, such as, for example, the first wireless network element 105, can communicate with another element on the local area network, such as the second wireless network element 110 or the mobile device 135, the SSID can It is included in the transmitted message. If the mobile device 135 receives such a message from the first wireless network element 105, the URI can be extracted from such an SSID, and then the mobile device 135 can obtain a local area map corresponding to the floor 100 from the location indicated by the URI.

In one implementation, the URI can be encoded into a Basic Service Set Identifier (BSSID) of the wireless network element. In one implementation, a basic service set may refer to a basic building block of an IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN. In infrastructure mode, a wireless network element along with all associated wireless devices or stations may be referred to as a basic set of services. A particular wireless network element, such as first wireless network element 105, can transmit both the SSID and the BSSID to mobile device 135. The URI may be encoded in either the SSID or may be encoded within the BSSID as discussed above. For example, both the SSID and the BSSID can be transmitted in the message from the first wireless network element 105 to the mobile device 135. Once such a message is received, the URI can be extracted from the BSSID and/or SSID. In one implementation, the mobile device 135 can be programmed to search for a URI in the received SSID or BSSID.

As discussed above, the use of local maps provides several advantages over global maps. The global map can be stored, for example, in a central location. Such global maps can be accessed from such central locations and the way in which such global maps are obtained can be predefined. However, since such global maps are stored in a central location, updating such global maps with information can be difficult or cumbersome. For example, if the floor plan of a store in a shopping mall changes during the re-creation process, the change to the floor plan may not be reflected in the global map in a timely manner.

In addition, the global map may be associated with a global coordinate system, such as a coordinate system associated with the Global Positioning System (GPS) or a coordinate system defined by some other satellite positioning system (SPS).

On the other hand, the partial map may be easier to update to reflect the changes in the elements shown on the partial map. Partial maps may be easier to maintain because Local maps only have a relatively small coverage area. Such local maps may be stored in one or more network accessible locations, such as in a server accessible through the Internet.

Moreover, as noted above, the local map need not be associated with a global coordinate system; alternatively, the local map may be associated with a local coordinate system that may be independent of the GPS coordinate system or some other SPS defined coordinate system. . The map in the local coordinate system may be easier to maintain than the map in the global coordinate system because there is no need to use navigation signals such as GPS or to perform a transformation between coordinates to determine the changed items in the map in the local coordinate system. position.

The annotation corresponding to the partial map may be obtained before, at the same time as, or after the partial map has been acquired. Such annotations may be stored in the repository 145 shown in FIG. 1 or in some other repository or server, such as, for example, the annotation repository 150 or the server 155. In one implementation, the mobile device 135 can retrieve such annotations from a predefined annotation repository 150 located at a predefined location. Alternatively, the URI of the annotation repository 150 can be sent to the mobile device 135 in a similar manner as the URI of the local map repository 145 is provided to the mobile device 135. In other implementations, the annotations may be communicated to the mobile device 135 after the partial map corresponding to the floor 100 has been retrieved from the local map repository 145. For example, after the mobile device 135 has retrieved the partial map from the local map repository 145, the message can be sent from the local map repository 145 to the server 155. The server 155 can then retrieve annotations of the partial map corresponding to the floor 100 from the annotation repository 150 and communicate such annotations to the mobile device 135.

As discussed above, such annotations may include information about wireless network elements Piece of information. For example, the annotation may indicate a mathematical model of the estimated processing delay and/or the estimated received signal strength of the signal transmitted by the particular wireless network element. Such annotations can be used by mobile devices to accurately estimate the distance between the mobile device and the wireless network component, as discussed below.

2 is an illustration of an area surrounding wireless network element 200 in accordance with one implementation. FIG. 2 also illustrates the first wall 205, the second wall 210, and the obstacle 220. The mobile device 215 can receive signals transmitted by the wireless network component 200 and can be based, at least in part, on the measured time interval - during which the signal is transmitted from the wireless network component 200 to the mobile device 215 - estimating the mobile device 215 to wireless The distance of the network element 200.

One way in which mobile device 215 can estimate the distance to wireless network component 200 is by transmitting a probe request to wireless network component 200 and measuring the response received from wireless network component 200 when such probe request is transmitted. The time interval between the times of the signal. If the mobile device 215 desires to measure the distance to the wireless network element 200, the mobile device 215 can transmit such a probe request to one or more nearby wireless network elements. Such a probe request may indicate that a response signal will be passed back to the mobile device 215.

The wirelessly transmitted signal can propagate at a constant speed such as the speed of light. How long it takes to propagate from the wireless network component 200 to the mobile device 215 by measuring the signal, such as the "time of flight" of such a signal, can estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200. In this example, a probe request is first transmitted from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200, and then a second signal, such as a response signal, is transmitted from the wireless network component 200 to the mobile device 215. Accordingly, between the detection request and the reception of the response signal from the mobile device 215 The flight time interval can be divided by a factor of two to estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network element 200. In addition, an estimate of the processing delay incurred by the wireless network component 200 can also be accounted for to ensure accurate measurement of the actual time of the signal transmitted between the mobile device 215 and the wireless network component 200. In particular, there is a period of time from receipt of a probe request from mobile device 215 at wireless network element 200 to transmission of a response signal from wireless network element 200 to mobile device 215. This section is referred to herein as "processing delay." Such processing delays may be incurred, for example, because the wireless network element processes the received probe request and decides how to respond to such probe request. The processing delay for a particular wireless network element can be estimated based on previous measurements of such processing delays. Such processing delay estimates can be stored in the annotation database and can be retrieved and utilized by the mobile device 215 - if the distance to the wireless network component 200 is to be estimated. The estimate of the processing delay for wireless network element 200 may be updated in the annotation database based on measurements made on the actual processing delay over a period of time.

Another technique for estimating the distance from mobile device 215 to wireless network element 200 is based on received signal strength. For example, wireless network elements within a given area can transmit signals at known signal strengths. Alternatively, a code can be transmitted in the signal transmitted by the wireless network element indicating the strength at which such a signal is transmitted. The farther the signal transmitted by the wireless network component travels, the more it will degrade or lose its strength. The farther away the wirelessly transmitted signal is from the wireless network component from which the signal is transmitted, the signal strength is degraded at a known rate. Accordingly, by measuring the signal strength of the received signal and comparing the signal strength against the strength of the wireless network element transmitting such signals, the distance from the mobile device receiving the signal to the wireless network element can be estimated.

However, as noted above, there may be obstacles between the mobile device and the wireless network element that may dissipate signal strength. For example, if the signal has to pass through a wall, such as the first wall 205 or the second wall 210 shown in Figure 2, such signals will lose strength when the signal propagates away from the wireless network element 200 than at the signal. In the case of passing through such a wall, the strength will be lost more. In order to accurately estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network element 200, when estimating the distance, it may be considered that there are such obstacles or any other factors that degrade the signal strength in addition to the distance. Other factors that degrade the signal strength include, for example, interference from other sources - if the other sources do not perform carrier sensing operations and do not avoid transmissions in the presence of existing signals.

2 illustrates three different locations that mobile device 215 may be in upon receiving a signal from wireless network element 200 and estimating the distance to wireless network element 200 based on the measured signal strength of the received signal. The signal may be transmitted by the wireless network component 200 in response to receiving a probe request from the mobile device 215. Alternatively, wireless network element 200 can broadcast a beacon or some other message or signal received by mobile device 215. As illustrated, if the mobile device 215 is located at the first location 225, such signals can be received directly without going through any walls or obstacles. On the other hand, if the mobile device 215 is located at the second location 230, the signal transmitted from the wireless network component 200 will thus pass through the first wall 205 before reaching the second location 230. Finally, if the mobile device 215 is located at the third location 235, the signal transmitted from the wireless network component 200 may need to pass through the obstacle 220 to reach the mobile device 215 at the third location 235.

Signal strength drops when passing through objects such as walls or other obstacles The amount of grade may depend on the thickness or density of such walls/obstacles and the materials used to make such walls/obstacles. For example, walls made of steel can degrade signal strength by a greater amount than walls made of drywall materials.

In one implementation, the distance to the wireless network element can be estimated based on both time of flight and received signal strength. For example, if the approximate position of the mobile device is triangulated based on the estimated distance based on the time of flight measurement, a mathematical model for estimating the distance based on the received signal strength can be used to further estimate the mobile device 215 to the wireless network. The distance of the component 200. As discussed above, the amount of signal transmitted by wireless network component 200 that is degraded in distance depends, at least in part, on whether any walls and/or other obstacles are disposed between wireless network component 200 and mobile device 215. If the approximate location of the mobile device 215 is known via other methods, such as time of flight, a suitable mathematical relationship between received signal strength and distance can be used to estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200. For example, if it can be determined that the mobile device 215 is located somewhere near the second location 230, then the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200 can be estimated based on the strength of the signal received by the mobile device 215. The presence of a wall 205. On the other hand, if it can be determined that the mobile device 215 is located somewhere near the first location 225, the different relationship between signal strength and distance can be used to estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200. Moreover, if it can be determined that the mobile device 215 is located somewhere near the third location 235, the different relationship between signal strength and distance can be used to estimate the distance from the mobile device 215 to the wireless network component 200, which distance is taken into account. The presence of obstacles 220. The annotation may include one or more parameters indicating at least one associated signal strength measurement and distance of the same or multiple wireless network elements Relationship between. The annotation can include one or more parameters indicative of a relationship between the associated round trip time measurement and the distance of at least one of the one or more wireless network elements.

After the distance to at least three wireless network elements has been determined, the location of such mobile devices can be triangulated.

FIG. 3 is an illustration of a display screen 300 of a mobile device in accordance with one implementation. Such display screen 300 can include a graphical user interface for presenting a partial map to a user. The partial map can present a point of interest (POI) to the user. These POIs can be predefined. The annotations can include symbols corresponding to at least one predefined POI. In this example, a partial map 302 of the shopping mall is presented to the user. As shown, the partial map 302 includes an illustration of a POI such as a first store 305, a second store 310, a third store 315, a fourth store 320, a restaurant 325, a restroom 330, a fifth store 340, Six stores 345 and food court 350. For ease of illustration, several wireless network elements are also shown to indicate where wireless network elements are deployed within the shopping mall illustrated by the partial map 302. However, it should be appreciated that in some implementations, such wireless network elements may not be displayed to the user.

In this example, the shopping mall includes a first wireless network element 355, a second wireless network element 360, a third wireless network element 365, a fourth wireless network element 370, and a fifth wireless network element 375. As discussed above with respect to Figures 1 and 2, signals transmitted by such wireless network elements can be used to determine the identity of a local map corresponding to such a shopping mall and the location from which such local maps can be obtained. Such signals can also be used to determine the location of the mobile device within the local map 302 itself. For example, if the user position of the mobile device 380 is carried In the aisle between the third store 315 and the fifth store 340, the user and/or mobile device 380 can be illustrated as being positioned at such a location on the partial map 302. In some implementations, only portions of the local map 302 that illustrate locations near the user and/or mobile device 380 can be displayed to the user. It is executable to present only a partial map at a time such that it is easier for a user to view and parse the partial map 302 in the case of, for example, a large shopping mall with numerous stores illustrated within such a partial map 302.

As discussed above, annotations for wireless network elements can be retrieved from, for example, an annotation database. Such annotations about wireless network elements can be used to determine the distance from mobile device 380 to one or more wireless network elements. In some implementations, such annotations about wireless network elements may not be presented to the user on the partial map 302. However, other annotations can be presented to the user. For example, if the restroom 330 is confusing or is being cleaned, a note may be displayed on the partial map 302 to inform the user of such conditions regarding the restroom 330. The user can thus avoid going to the restroom 330 to use the restroom and can instead use different washrooms for use. In some implementations, such annotations can be displayed directly on top of the restroom 330 shown in the partial map. Such annotations may be reflected, for example, as text or large "X", and may be shown as above the restroom 330 on the partial map 302 to indicate that such restroom 330 is not available. Alternatively, the annotation window 385 can be used to display annotations to the user. For example, a note to this article can be displayed stating that "the restroom opposite the restaurant is currently unavailable."

An additional type of comment can also be displayed to the user. For example, if there is a vacancy in the restaurant 325, a message can be displayed to let the user know that there is such a vacancy. In addition, if the second store 310 has a sale sale on the shoes, the user can be A comment is presented to indicate that such a reduced sale is being made. Additional types of annotations may include business hours and snoring times for particular stores or other venues illustrated on the partial map 302, whether the escalator is confusing, or whether a particular area of the shopping mall is crowded. In some implementations, a user may select a particular area of the partial map 302, such as a first store, such as via a stylus, mouse, trackball, touch screen, button/key, touch pad, control stick, or other selection tool. 305. Once the first store 305 is selected, the comments associated with the first store 305 are presented to the user.

4 is a schematic block diagram of a system 400 for providing local maps and annotations to a mobile device 405, in accordance with one implementation. If the user carries the mobile device 405 into an area corresponding to the local map, such as an area in which a navigation signal from the SPS may not be available, such a mobile device 405 may determine the identity of such a corresponding partial map and may be from it The location of such a partial map is obtained, as discussed above with respect to Figures 1 and 2. The mobile device 405 can then retrieve the partial map from the local map server 410. For example, the mobile device 405 can receive a URI indicating the network location of such a local map server 410 upon entering an area corresponding to the local map. As discussed above, such partial maps may utilize a local coordinate system. For example, such a local coordinate system can indicate a 2-dimensional coordinate relative to the origin.

After the partial map has been obtained, annotations for such partial maps may be obtained from one or more sources, such as the first annotation repository 415 and the second annotation repository 420. For example, annotations associated with respective wireless network elements can be stored in the first annotation repository 415, and annotations for providing other information to the user of the partial map can be stored in the second annotation repository 420. First commentary The network address or location of library 415 and second annotation database 420 may be known to mobile device 405 before mobile device 405 enters an area corresponding to the local map. Alternatively, such first annotations may be broadcast or otherwise transmitted to the mobile device 405 by one or more wireless network elements or transmitters deployed within an area corresponding to the local map, such as a shopping mall, for example. The location of the database 415 and/or the second annotation database 420. In another implementation, the network address or location of such first annotation database 415 and second annotation database 420 can be stored in local map server 410 and retrieved from local map server 410. The network address or location may be provided to the mobile device 405 when the local map is available.

FIG. 5 is a flow chart illustrating a procedure 500 for obtaining a partial map of a given area, in accordance with one implementation. First, at operation 505, the mobile device can receive one or more signals wirelessly transmitted from one or more wireless network elements. Next, at operation 510, such a mobile device can determine the identity of the local map associated with the wireless network element based at least in part on the received one or more signals. The mobile device can also receive a URI indicating the location in which such a partial map can be obtained, such as a network address. Finally, at operation 515, an associated partial map and annotations associated with the associated partial map can be retrieved. For example, such annotations may be received concurrently with obtaining a partial map or after a partial map has been taken. In some implementations, local maps and annotations can be stored in the same location. In other implementations, such local maps and annotations can be stored separately.

FIG. 6 is a schematic block diagram of a wireless network element 600 in accordance with one implementation. As shown, wireless network element 600 can include various components such as processing unit 605, memory 610, receiver 615, and transmitter 620. Processing unit 605 Both receiver 615 and transmitter 620 can be controlled. Processing unit 605 can execute the code or instructions stored in memory 610. Receiver 615 can receive communications from a mobile station (e.g., mobile device 135 in FIG. 1), such as a probe request. Transmitter 620 can transmit a response to the probe request to the mobile station. Receiver 615 and/or transmitter 620 can also communicate with other wireless network elements and/or access points. In some implementations, wireless network element 600 may not include receiver 615. Wireless network component 600 can provide access to the network to one or more mobile communication devices. Wireless network component 600 can communicate with such mobile communication devices via one or more wireless protocols and/or standards, such as IEEE 802.11, 802.15 or 802.16 Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) or Bluetooth, here are just a few of the many different types of wireless protocols and/or standards.

Circuitry such as transmitters and/or receivers may provide a feature set, for example, by using various wireless communication networks such as a wireless wide area network (WWAN), a wireless local area network (WLAN), a wireless personal area network (WPAN), and the like. The terms "network" and "system" are often used interchangeably. WWAN can be a code division multiplex access (CDMA) network, a time division multiplex access (TDMA) network, a frequency division multiplex access (FDMA) network, and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access (OFDMA). Network, single carrier frequency division multiplexing access (SC-FDMA) network, and more. A CDMA network may implement one or more radio access technologies (RATs) such as CDMA2000, Wideband CDMA (W-CDMA). CDMA2000 covers the IS-95, IS-2000, and IS-856 standards. The TDMA network can implement the Global System for Communications (GSM), Digital Advanced Telephone System (D-AMPS) or some other RAT. GSM and W-CDMA are described in documents from a consortium named "3rd Generation Partnership Project" (3GPP). CDMA2000 comes from a third-generation partner The case of Case 2" (3GPP2) is described in the document of the Alliance. 3GPP and 3GPP2 documents are publicly available. The WLAN may be an IEEE 802.11x network, and the WPAN may be a Bluetooth network, IEEE 802.15x, or some other type of network. These techniques can also be used for any combination of WWAN, WLAN, and/or WPAN. These techniques can be implemented in conjunction with Ultra Mobile Broadband (UMB) networks, High Rate Packet Data (HRPD) networks, CDMA2000 1X networks, GSM, Long Term Evolution (LTE), and the like.

FIG. 7 is a schematic block diagram of a particular implementation of a mobile device 700 in accordance with one implementation. The mobile device 700 can include a mobile station (MS), wherein the radio transceiver can be adapted to modulate an RF carrier signal with baseband information, such as voice or data, onto an RF carrier, and demodulate the modulated RF carrier to obtain Such fundamental frequency information.

Mobile device 700 can include several components, such as processing unit 705, user interface 710, transmitter 715, receiver 720, and memory 725. User interface 710 can include a plurality of devices for inputting or outputting user information, such as voice or material. Such devices may include, for example, a keyboard/key pad, a display screen (eg, a touch screen), a microphone, a speaker, buttons, and knobs, just to name a few examples.

Memory 725 can be adapted to store machine readable instructions executable to perform one or more of the programs, examples, implementations, or examples thereof that have been described or suggested. Processing unit 705 can be adapted to access and execute such machine readable instructions. By executing the machine readable instructions, processing unit 705 can direct various elements of mobile device 700 to perform one or more functions.

The transmitter 715 can utilize an antenna to transmit communications, such as to other wireless Packet-based communication of the device. Receiver 720 can also utilize such antennas to receive communications, such as packet-based communications from other wireless devices.

Some portions of the detailed description are presented in the form of an algorithmic or symbolic representation of the operation of a binary bit signal stored in the memory of a particular device or dedicated computing device or platform. In the context of this detailed description, the term specific device or the like includes a general purpose computer - as long as the device is programmed to perform a particular function in accordance with instructions from the programming software. Algorithmic descriptions or symbolic representations are examples of techniques used by those skilled in the signal processing or related arts to convey the substance of their work to those skilled in the art. The algorithm is here generally considered to be a self-consistent sequence of operations or similar signal processing that yields the desired result. In this context, operations or processing involve entity manipulation of the amount of entities. Usually, though not necessarily, the equivalents may employ electrical or magnetic signals that can be stored, transferred, combined, compared, or otherwise manipulated.

It has proven convenient at times, principally for reasons of common usage, to refer to such signals as bits, data, values, elements, symbols, characters, terms, numbers, numbers, and so forth. It should be understood, however, that all such or similar terms are to be associated with a suitable quantity of quantities and are merely convenience labels. Unless otherwise expressly stated, it should be appreciated that the use of terms such as "processing," "calculation," "calculus," "decision," or the like throughout this specification refers to a computer, such as a dedicated computer or similar specialized computing device. The action or program of a particular device. Thus, in the context of the present specification, a dedicated computer or similar dedicated electronic computing device is capable of manipulating or translating signals, which are typically represented as memory, scratchpad or other information storage device of the special purpose computer or similar special electronic computing device. , physical or magnetic quantities within the transmission device or display device. For example, special meter The computing device can include one or more processing units programmed with instructions for executing one or more dedicated functions.

A satellite positioning system (SPS) typically includes a transmitter system positioned to enable an entity to determine the position of an entity on or above the earth based, at least in part, on signals received from the transmitter. Such transmitters typically transmit signals that are marked with repeated pseudo-random noise (PN) codes of a set number of wafers and may be located on ground-based control stations, user equipment, and/or space vehicles. In a specific example, such a transmitter may be located on an earth orbiting satellite vehicle (SV). For example, SVs in a cluster of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) such as Global Positioning System (GPS), Galileo, Glonass, or Compass may transmit PN codes that are distinguishable from PN codes transmitted by other SVs in the cluster. (eg, using different PN codes for each satellite in GPS or signals that make the same code on different frequencies in Glonass). For SPS, there are global systems (for example, GNSS) and various regional systems, such as the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) over Japan, the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) over India, and the Beidou over China. / or various amplification systems (eg, satellite-based amplification systems (SBAS)) that may be associated with or otherwise implemented in conjunction with one or more global and/or regional navigation satellite systems. By way of example and not limitation, SBAS may include amplification systems that provide integrity information, differential correction, etc., such as Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), European Geostationary Satellite Navigation Enhanced Service System (EGNOS), multi-function satellite amplification. System (MSAS), GPS-assisted Geo (Earth Synchronous Orbit) augmentation navigation or GPS and Geo Augmentation Navigation System (GAGAN) and/or the like. Thus, as used herein, an SPS may include one or more global and/or Any combination of regional navigation satellite systems and/or amplification systems, and the SPS signals may include SPS signals, SPS-like signals, and/or other signals associated with such one or more SPSs.

A mobile station (MS) refers to a device such as a cellular or other wireless communication device, a personal communication system (PCS) device, a personal navigation device (PND), a personal information administrator (PIM), a personal digital assistant (PDA), a laptop, or A device such as other suitable mobile devices that receive wireless communications and/or navigation signals. The term "mobile station" also includes devices that communicate with personal navigation devices (PNDs), such as via short-range wireless, infrared, wired connections, or other connections, regardless of satellite signal reception, auxiliary data reception, and/or location-related processing that occurs on the device. It is also on the PND. In addition, the "Mobile Station" includes all devices that can communicate with the server, such as via the Internet, Wi-Fi or other networks, including wireless communication devices, computers, laptops, etc., regardless of satellite signal reception, auxiliary data. The receiving and/or locating related processing occurs on the device, on the server, or on another device associated with the network. Any of the above operational combinations is also considered to be a "action station".

The methods described herein can be implemented by various means depending on the application according to particular features and/or examples. For example, such methods can be implemented in hardware, firmware, software, and/or combinations of the foregoing. In hardware-implemented implementations, for example, the processing unit may be in one or more special application integrated circuits (ASICs), digital signal processors (DSPs), digital signal processing devices (DSPDs), programmable logic devices (PLDs). Field programmable gate array (FPGA), processor, controller, microcontroller, microprocessor, electronics, other device or other device combination designed to perform the functions described herein achieve.

For implementations involving firmware and/or software, certain methods may be implemented with modules (eg, programs, functions, etc.) that perform the functions described herein. Any machine readable medium tangibly embodying instructions can be used to implement the methods described herein. For example, the software code can be stored in the memory of the mobile station and/or wireless network component and executed by the processing unit of the device. The memory can be implemented inside the processing unit and/or outside the processing unit. As used herein, the term "memory" means any type of long-term, short-term, volatile, non-volatile or other memory, and is not limited to any particular type of memory or memory number or memory stored thereon. Type of media.

If implemented in firmware and/or software, each function can be stored as one or more instructions or codes on a computer readable medium. Examples include computer readable media encoded with a data structure and computer readable media encoded with a computer program. Computer readable media can take the form of an article. Computer readable media includes physical computer storage media. The storage medium can be any available media that can be accessed by a computer. By way of example and not limitation, such computer-readable media may include RAM, ROM, EEPROM, CD-ROM or other optical disk storage, disk storage, semiconductor storage or other storage device or may be used to store instructions or data structures. Any other media that is compatible with the code and accessible by the computer; as described herein, a disk or CD includes a compact disk (CD), a laser disc, a compact disc, a digital versatile disc (DVD), a floppy disk, and a Blu-ray. disc where disks (Disk) usually reproduce data magnetically, while discs (disc) reproducing information using laser optically. The above combinations should be included in the scope of computer readable media.

In addition to being stored on computer readable media, instructions and / or information may be Provided as a signal on a transmission medium included in the communication device. For example, the communication device can include a transceiver having signals indicative of instructions and data. The instructions and materials are configured to cause one or more processing units to perform the functions outlined in the claims. That is, the communication device includes a transmission medium having signals indicative of information used to perform the disclosed functions. In a first time, the transmission medium included in the communication device can include a first portion of information to perform the disclosed function, and at a second time, the transmission medium included in the communication device can include a function to perform the disclosed function. The second part of the news.

An "instruction" as referred to herein is meant to mean an expression of one or more logical operations. For example, the instructions may be "machine readable" by machine interpreting for performing one or more operations on one or more of the data objects. However, this is merely an example of an instruction, and the claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect. In another example, the instructions recited herein may be related to encoded commands that may be executed by a processing unit having a set of commands that include the encoded commands. Such instructions may be encoded in the form of a machine language that the processing unit can understand. Again, these are merely examples of instructions, and the claimed subject matter is not limited in this respect.

As previously described, environmental conditions, such as the presence of an obstacle between a wireless network element (eg, an access point) and a mobile device, may affect the signal strength of RF communication between the wireless network element and the mobile device. Includes received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) measurements. The existence and type of environmental conditions may also affect the relative reliability of these RSSI and RTT measurements. For example, in a clustered environment with more obstacles and obstacles between mobile devices and access points, RSSI performance tends to exceed RTT performance. another On the other hand, RTT performance may be more reliable in an open and free environment with no obstacles between mobile devices and access points. Thus, as indicated previously, environmental conditions may affect the weighting of the RSSI and RTT measurements when calculating the location of the mobile device. Additionally, location information (eg, a map) may include weighted information indicative of environmental conditions at a particular location.

8A and 8B illustrate how location information (including weighted information) can be provided in the form of a map 800. In Figure 8A , a first map 800-1 provides a layout of the building. An access point 810 is provided at a location on the map. The map may be stored on a map server (such as the local map server 410 of FIG. 4), access points, and/or other wireless network elements, and may be wirelessly communicated to the mobile device. The mobile device may receive the map (or other location material) with a receiver, such as receiver 615 of FIG.

Depending on the desired functionality, a first map 800-1 may be processed to establish a second map comprises a weighted information 800-2, as shown in Figure 8B. In particular, map processing techniques can be used to process the location of the building layout and access points 810, the RSSI and/or RTT models to be determined based on obstacles and/or other environmental conditions of the plurality of regions indicated on the map 800. Initial weighting information.

For example, the first map 800-1 can be processed to determine that the environmental conditions of the three different regions 820, 830, 840 relative to the access point 810 result in different weighted information about each of the three regions 820, 830, 840 . Thus, the second map 800-2 can act as a heat map that defines the boundaries of each of the three regions 820, 830, 840 and provides a different for each of the three regions 820, 830, 840. Weighted information. For example, the mobile device in the first region 820 is within the line of sight (LOS) of the access point 810. Second map 800-2 thus The RTT measurement made in the first region 820 can be indicated to be more emphasized than the RSSI measurement.

As the number of obstacles between the mobile device and the access point 810 increases, the emphasis on the RSSI data can also increase relative to the RTT measurement. For example, in Figure 8B, the second map 800-2 defines a second region 830 in which the mobile device will no longer be located within the LOS of the access point 810, but will likely have the mobile device and access point A single wall separated by 810. Thus, for mobile devices in the second region 830, the RTT and RSSI data can be emphasized relatively equally, such that the data is similarly weighted when computing the location of the mobile device. However, in the third region 840, where two or more blocked walls may be located between the mobile device in the third region 840 and the access point 810, the RSSI data may be emphasized.

A second map 800-2 showing a weighted information based heat map for a plurality of regions can be generated in any of a variety of ways. For example, the regions 820, 830, 840 defined by the second map 800-2 may be predefined by the map server using map processing techniques and associated with location material (eg, first map 800-1). Additionally or alternatively, the second map 800-2 may be generated by the mobile device upon receiving location data (eg, the first map 800-1) from the map server (or other device). In fact, depending on the capabilities of the mobile device, a second map 800-2 can be generated from the location data on the fly. Determining which device(s) (eg, mobile device, access point, map server, etc.) processes the first map 800-1 to generate the second map 800-2 may be based not only on the processing capabilities of the mobile device, but also on the bandwidth Limitations, power considerations, wireless capabilities and/or other factors. Depending on the desired format, the weighting information can be provided as a metadata tag associated with the region of the second map 800-2.

Embodiments may include more or less information than those shown in the examples of Figures 8A and 8B. For example, in addition to or as a wall replacement, location (map) material may include information about windows, doorways, building materials (eg, steel doors, firewalls, etc.), furniture, shelves, and the like. In addition, the mobile device and/or access point may use RTT and/or RSSI data, data from other sensors (eg, proximity sensors, Bluetooth, camera(s), etc.) and/or Location information (eg, historical location data from one or more mobile devices) to make decisions regarding environmental conditions and/or update location information. For example, indicating location information that a mobile device often bypasses a particular area may imply the presence of walls or other obstacles in the area. The location data can be updated to include walls or other obstacles.

As with the other figures provided herein, Figures 8A and 8B are provided as examples. Other embodiments may be implemented differently. In fact, weighted information, such as heat maps, can vary from device to device depending on the sensitivity and accuracy of the wireless hardware available on each device. Customized heat maps based on processing power, bandwidth limitations, wireless capabilities, and/or other considerations may be necessary for different types of devices.

In some embodiments, instead of including three regions 820, 830, 840 that define a similarly located region of the map, some embodiments may provide an application in which each map is divided into grids and defined by the grid. A heat map of the weighted information in the area. The size or subtleness of the grid may vary depending on device capabilities, desired accuracy, and/or other factors. Some embodiments may include a grid in which each area is a 2 foot by 2 foot square. Other embodiments may include grid areas as small as 6" x 6" squares, up to 10 feet x 10 feet square A grid area of the shape and/or any size grid area between them. Other embodiments may have mesh regions outside of this range depending on the desired functionality. Further, in some embodiments, the size of the mesh area and/or other areas may depend on the respective mobile device and/or access point.

Because the mobile device can communicate with multiple access points at a given area, and because the calculation of the location of the mobile device can depend on RSSI and/or RTT information from multiple access points, Take the weighted information of the point. The method of providing this information can vary depending on the application. In some embodiments, different heat maps can be provided for different access points. In other embodiments, such as where location material (eg, a map) is divided into similar regions with respect to multiple access points, each region may have weighted information about multiple access points. Further, although mobile devices in a particular area may be able to communicate with a large number of access points, the number of access points for which weighted information is provided may be limited to a subset of their access points, depending on bandwidth and/or other considerations. . For example, weighted information for a given region may be limited to the closest access point, the access point with the strongest signal strength, the most accurate and/or reliable access point, and the like.

The weighting information for each region of the heat map (or other form of location data) may vary depending on the desired functionality. For example, in some embodiments, the weighted information associated with the region may include any of a variety of metrics that may affect the confidence level of the RSSI and/or RTT data obtained in the region. The confidence metrics may include whether there is an LOS to the access point, the number of walls between the area and the access point, the type of wall component, the distance from the access point, hardware information of the access point (eg, RTT) The measured processing delay time, which may include an average value and/or a standard deviation). Confidence metrics may also include RTT and/or RSSI The expected mean and/or standard deviation of the data, the expected mean and/or standard deviation can be based on model and/or crowdsourced information for the area. In addition, the confidence metric can also include the source of the information, and the source of the information can also affect the confidence level. For example, the confidence metric may indicate whether the hardware information is provided by the skilled person, approximated, measured, determined by crowdsourcing information, or provided by other technologies. The weighting decision may be more biased towards the confidence metric provided by the skilled person than the approximate confidence measure of the approximation.

In some embodiments, the weighting information can include a confidence level based on one or more of the confidence metrics. The confidence level may indicate the reliability of the RSSI and/or RTT data for a given area based on a predetermined scale. For example, in some embodiments, the map server may use the number and composition of walls, the predicted average, and the expected standard deviation to determine the confidence level for both RSSI and RTT data based on a scale from 0.0 to 1.0. RSSI and RTT data with higher confidence levels can be given greater weight in position calculations. Other embodiments may use other dimensions. Additionally or alternatively, some embodiments may provide a heat map with weighting information including actual weights for providing RSSI and/or RTT data for use in location calculations. In other words, although the confidence level may affect the final weighting of RSSI and/or RTT data in calculations that may also account for other factors used for weighting (eg, device-specific hardware considerations), actual weights may be provided. Where additional factors are not taken into account in the location calculation or additional factors are taken in a manner independent of RSSI and/or RTT weights.

9 is a building layout 900 that helps illustrate how heat maps and/or other location data can be used to weight RSSI and/or RTT data. The building can include a number of access points 910. Depending on the location of the mobile device, the mobile device may be able to communicate with some or all of the access points. However, the following examples will focus on how RSSI and/or RTT data regarding the first access point 910-1 can be weighted when the mobile device is in various locations within the building.

When the mobile device is in the first location 920-1, the mobile device is in close proximity to the first access point 910 and is in the direct LOS at the first access point 910. Therefore, the RSSI and RTT measurements between the mobile device and the first access point will likely be reliable. Therefore, the RSSI and RTT data weighting used in the location calculation of the mobile device can emphasize both RSSI and RTT data. The location information provided to the mobile device may include a grid or other area designation, wherein the weighted information of the area including the first location 920-1 indicates that both RSSI and RTT data may be given a relatively large amount in the calculation of the location of the mobile device. Weight.

When the mobile device is in the second location 920-2, the mobile device is no longer in the LOS of the first access point 910. Further, because there are several walls between the first access point 910 and the second location 920-2, the RTT data may not be reliable. However, the received signal strength may still be at an acceptable level for reliable RSSI measurements because RSSI measurements often reliably model wall-induced losses. Also, information including the wall can be included in the map and/or other location information to calculate the location of the mobile device. For example, in some embodiments, the acceptable level is between -70 and -75 dBm. In other embodiments, the acceptable level can be any value above -90 or -95 dBm. Still other embodiments may include acceptable levels outside of the ranges. Because the RSSI data may be reliable at the second location 920-2 and the RTT data may be unreliable, the RSSI and RTT data weighting used in the location calculation of the mobile device may emphasize the RSSI data more than the RTT data. Again, location information can include The weighting information for the area of the second location 920-2 and indicates that the RSSI data can be given a relatively greater weight relative to the RTT data in the calculation of the location of the mobile device.

When the mobile device is in the third position 920-3, the mobile device is again in the LOS of the first access point 910, but relatively far from the first access point 910-1, which causes more signal loss. Further, the third location 920-3 is down from the first access point 910 along the aisle, which can cause a "wayway effect" that is difficult to model in the RSSI data. These factors may reduce the reliability of the RSSI data, but may not adversely affect the RTT measurement to any significant extent. Since the location information may indicate the distance of the third location 920-3 and environmental factors that may cause a "walkway effect", the weighting of the location calculation for the mobile device at the third location 920-3 may be more biased than the RSSI data. In the RTT data.

When the mobile device is in the fourth location 920-4, the mobile device is not in the LOS of the first access point 910-1 and may not receive sufficient signal strength for reliable RSSI data. (For example, the signal strength may be below -90 or -95 dBm.) In such cases, the location information may include an indication that the RSSI data and the RTT data should not be given too much weight in the location of the computing mobile device. Weighted information for access point 910-1. Therefore, RSSI and/or RTT data from other access points 910 that may have more reliable RSSI and/or RTT data may be more emphasized.

Embodiments herein may also provide an algorithm for updating weighting information and/or for calculating weighted information based on information about the effectiveness of the weighting. This information can come from current and/or historical data originating from one device or multiple devices (ie, crowdsourcing) and can be maintained at a central location (eg, network component) And/or shared between mobile devices. For example, a map server (or other network device) can maintain and update a map with corresponding weighting information (eg, a heat map) based on input from a plurality of mobile devices. Additionally or alternatively, each mobile device may maintain and update weighted information and/or share updated weighted information with the server and/or other mobile device(s). Where the location data set is associated with a particular structure (eg, a building), the mobile device can store and maintain a plurality of location data sets (eg, maps) for the plurality of structures. Location information and/or corresponding weighted information may also be time and/or date sensitive. For example, a heat map in and/or around a crowded cafeteria during a lunchtime on weekdays may be different from a heat map at a midnight of the weekend when the heat map is almost empty.

10 is a flow diagram of a routine 1000 for determining the location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data. Program 1000 may be by a wireless network element (e.g., an access point) (such as wireless network element 600 of Figure 6), a mobile device (such as mobile device 700 of Figure 7), a server (such as a partial map of Figure 4) Server 410) and/or other elements of the wireless network described herein are implemented. Means for performing some or all of the elements shown in FIG. 10 may include, for example, dedicated and/or general purpose hardware that is programmed and/or otherwise configured to perform the illustrated elements. Such means are described in further detail above with respect to Figures 4, 6 and 7.

As illustrated in block 1010, the process 1000 can begin by determining the area in which the mobile device is located. This initial decision can be based on any of a wide variety of materials, such as previously known locations, deadweight speculation data, sensor data, GNSS and other signal sources, and the like. Some embodiments may provide for determining a coarse location via a location associated with a particular MAC ID, the coarse location It is then used to determine a more accurate location. As discussed herein above, the area in which the mobile device is determined to be located may affect the weighting of the RSST and RTT measurements used to calculate the more precise location of the mobile device.

At block 1020, the program also includes criteria for determining an environment of the mobile device based on location data associated with the region. As indicated elsewhere, the location data may include information indicative of environmental conditions of one or more regions. The location material may, for example, include a map, such as a layout of a building, which may indicate the location of walls, windows, doors, and/or other structures that may affect the environmental conditions of the area. The location data may further include weighting information that may be generated by using a map processing algorithm and may also indicate conditions of the environment of the area (eg, the number of walls between the area and the access point, wall component type) , distance, hardware information of the access point and/or confidence level of the RSSI and/or RTT data (eg, distance measurement between the mobile device and the access point), etc.). Weighted information may relate to a single access point or a plurality of access points for which RSSI and/or RTT data may be obtained.

At block 1030, the RSSI and RTT data are then weighted based on environmental conditions. This can be done in a variety of ways depending on the conditions of the environment provided in the location data. For example, the weighting may be calculated using one or more confidence metrics provided in the weighting information of the location data, which may include weights for the RSSI data and the RTT data. Specific information that may not be included in the weighting information may also be taken into account, such as device-specific information about a given mobile device and/or access point. For example, the mobile device may have an antenna and/or other signal receiving hardware that will make the RSSI data more accurate than other mobile devices, in which case the RSSI data may be given a greater weight. In another instance The access point may have some hardware that causes the access point to have a processing delay that is more unstable than many other access points, in which case the RTT data measured using the access point may be given a smaller weight. . Where the weighting is determined, the location of the mobile device is then calculated based at least in part on the RSSI and RTT data with the determined weighting, as illustrated by block 1040.

As indicated above, the device(s) that perform the various functions of the routine 1000 of FIG. 10 may vary depending on the implementation. For example, some embodiments may implement network-based positioning (NBP) in which one or more network devices (eg, access points and/or servers) obtain information from a mobile device (eg, hardware type, characteristics, Etc.) and calculate the location of the mobile device based on the information obtained. In some embodiments, the information may be obtained from the mobile device by observing and/or using a database or a look-up data table (eg, a mobile device based MAC address). In other embodiments, the information can be communicated directly from the mobile device (such as via an agreement). The network device(s) may also maintain a heat map that may be used for location calculations and/or updated based on input from a plurality of mobile devices (i.e., crowdsourcing). Some embodiments may implement mobile station based positioning (MBP), where the mobile device obtains information from a network device, such as a server or access point, such as location material, weighting information, and the like. The mobile device can then calculate the location of the mobile device by weighting the RSSI and RTT data for at least one access point based on the obtained information.

It will be appreciated that the specific steps illustrated in FIG. 10 provide an example procedure 1000 for determining the location of a mobile device based on the weighted RSSI and RTT data. Alternative embodiments may include changes to the illustrated embodiment. Further, additional features may be added or removed depending on the particular application. For example, an embodiment may include All of the available sampling strategies are reduced to a different order of the subset of sampling strategies that can ultimately be executed. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize many variations, modifications, and alternatives.

11 is a flow diagram of a routine 1100 for facilitating determination of the location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data. More specifically, the process 1100 illustrates how weighted information (such as a heat map) can be generated and sent to a mobile device for location determination using RSSI and RTT data. For example, program 1100 can be a wireless network element (eg, an access point) (such as wireless network element 600 of FIG. 6), a server (such as local map server 410 of FIG. 4), and/or Other components of the described wireless network are implemented. Means for performing some or all of the functions shown in FIG. 11 may include, for example, dedicated and/or general purpose hardware that is programmed and/or otherwise configured to perform the illustrated elements. Such means are described in further detail above with respect to Figures 4 and 6.

Program 1100 can begin at block 1110 by obtaining location data corresponding to a plurality of regions associated with the structure. For example, the location data may include a layout of buildings (or other structures) having several areas. The regions may include physically separated regions (such as rooms, yards, walkways, etc.), and/or regions separated by non-physical boundaries (such as regions of a grid applied to the map).

At block 1120, the program also includes determining, for each of the plurality of regions, a condition of the environment associated with the region based on the location data and weighting information based on conditions of the environment. As indicated previously, location information, such as a map, can be processed to determine environmental conditions for each of the plurality of regions. For example, as shown in Figures 8A and 8B, the determined environment The condition can be based on the number of walls between the area and the access point. Other environmental conditions can be determined based on location data. The weighted information based on the conditions of the environment may indicate environmental conditions, indicating the number of walls, the composition of the walls, the distance, the confidence level, the hardware information, and/or other factors that may affect the RSSI and RTT weighting of each region.

The program 1100 further includes, at block 1130, transmitting weighting information for each of the plurality of regions to the mobile device. Depending on the embodiment, the weighting information may be provided in the form of a heat map. Where the weighted information is sent by the access point, the weighting information may involve weighting the RSSI and RTT data from the access point, in which case the access point may also exchange RSSI and RTT communications with the mobile device. Of course, as explained above, the weighting information may also include information relating to the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data for each of the plurality of access points for each of the plurality of regions. In embodiments where the weighted information can be modified by crowdsourced information from a plurality of mobile devices, the data can also be received from one or more mobile devices, and the weighting information for at least one of the plurality of regions can be based on the received information The information obtained is updated.

It will be appreciated that the specific steps illustrated in Figure 11 provide an example program 1100 for facilitating the determination of the location of a mobile device based on the weighted RSSI and RTT data. Alternative embodiments may include changes to the illustrated embodiment. Further, additional features may be added or removed depending on the particular application. For example, an embodiment may include a different order in which all available sampling strategies are reduced to a subset of sampling strategies that may ultimately be executed. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize many variations, modifications, and alternatives.

12 is a flow diagram of a routine 1200 for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted RSSI and RTT data. The program 1200 can be executed by a mobile device, such as the mobile device 700 of FIG. Moreover, the mobile device executing the routine 1200 of FIG. 12 can be in communication with the network device executing the routine 1100 of FIG. Means for performing some or all of the elements shown in FIG. 12 may include, for example, dedicated and/or general purpose hardware that is programmed and/or otherwise configured to perform the illustrated elements. Such means are described in further detail above with respect to FIG.

The process 1200 can begin by receiving weighting information for each of the plurality of regions (1210). The weighting information is described in detail above and may include a heat map and/or other information indicating any of the various confidence metrics, the confidence metric may be notified based on RSSI and RTT measurements for one or more access points. position.

The program also includes weighting information (1220) for storing each of the plurality of regions in a memory (such as the mobile device memory 725 of FIG. 7). Storing weighted information in this manner may illustrate reducing subsequent communications with the mobile device and allowing the mobile device to update and/or based on historical information of the mobile device and/or subsequent information obtained from the network device and/or other mobile device. Or modify the weighting information in other ways.

RSSI measurements and RTT measurements related to the area in which the mobile device is located are then obtained (1230). Depending on the desired functionality of the network, such measurements may be taken periodically and/or on demand. In addition, such measurements can be obtained as part of a network agreement. The weighted information of the region in which the mobile device is located is then used to determine a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement (1240). In some embodiments, this may include calculating a confidence level of either or both RSSI and/or RTT measurements based on the weighted information, weighted The information may include one or more confidence metrics that may inform the confidence level.

The first weight and the second weight are then used to calculate the location of the mobile device (1250). In some embodiments, multiple RSSI and/or RTT measurements may be obtained, each of which may involve different access points, may include different weights, and may be used to calculate the location of the mobile device. As indicated above, embodiments may allow a mobile device to update and/or otherwise modify weighted information based on historical data and/or data received from another mobile device. Thus, for example, the mobile device can update the weighted information for at least one of the plurality of regions.

It will be appreciated that the specific steps illustrated in Figure 12 provide an example routine 1200 for determining the location of a mobile device based on the weighted RSSI and RTT data. Alternative embodiments may include changes to the illustrated embodiment. Further, additional features may be added or removed depending on the particular application. For example, an embodiment may include a different order in which all available sampling strategies are reduced to a subset of sampling strategies that may ultimately be executed. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize many variations, modifications, and alternatives.

As used herein, the term "based on" is also to be interpreted broadly as "partially based" and/or "based, at least in part," in describing embodiments of the invention. Therefore, if the result A is "based on" factor B, then A can be based on one or more other factors.

While the present invention has been shown and described, it will be understood by those skilled in the art In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation to the teachings of the claimed subject matter. Will not break away from the central idea described in this article. Therefore, the claimed subject matter is not intended to be limited to the specific examples disclosed, and the scope of the claimed subject matter may also include all aspects within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.

100‧‧‧ floors

105‧‧‧First wireless network component

110‧‧‧Second wireless network component

115‧‧‧ Third wireless network component

120‧‧‧fourth wireless network component

125‧‧‧Fifth wireless network component

130‧‧‧Users

135‧‧‧Mobile equipment

145‧‧‧Local Map Database

150‧‧‧ annotated database

155‧‧‧Server

160‧‧‧Broadcast message transmitter

Claims (76)

  1. A method for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the method comprising the steps of: determining an area in which the mobile device is located; Determining a condition of an environment of the mobile device based on the location data associated with the area, wherein the location profile includes obstruction information; and determining, in the region and a wireless access point based on the obstacle information a quantity of obstacles between the two; a processing unit weights the RSSI and RTT data based on the obstacle information, wherein an emphasis on the RTT data and the RSSI data is based on the number of obstacles; The determined weighting is based on the RSSI and RTT data to calculate the location of the mobile device.
  2. The method of claim 1, wherein the location data further comprises a map.
  3. The method of claim 2, wherein the map comprises a heat map having weighted information about each of the plurality of regions.
  4. The method of claim 2, wherein the map comprises a layout of a building.
  5. The method of claim 1, wherein the obstacle information includes information about a location of at least one of: a wall, a window, a doorway, a building material, furniture, or a shelf.
  6. The method of claim 1, wherein the location profile associated with the zone is received by a receiver of the mobile device.
  7. The method as recited in claim 1 also includes updating the location information associated with the area.
  8. The method of claim 7, wherein updating the location profile associated with the zone is based on at least one of: the RTT profile, the RSSI profile, data from a sensor of the mobile device, from the mobile device Historical data, or information from at least one other mobile device.
  9. The method of claim 1, wherein the location data depends on either or both of the following: a time, or a date.
  10. The method of claim 1, wherein adjusting the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data is further based on a device type of the mobile device.
  11. The method of claim 1, wherein the obstacle information includes a wall component type.
  12. The method of claim 1, wherein the RTT data is emphasized if the number of obstacles is zero, and if the number of obstacles is one, the RTT data has the same emphasis as the RSSI data, and if the obstacle is The RSSI data is emphasized if the number is two or more.
  13. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium having instructions embedded thereon, the instructions for causing a processing unit to perform functions including: determining an area in which a mobile device is located; based on a location associated with the area Data to determine a condition of an environment of the mobile device, wherein the location data includes obstruction information; and based on the obstacle information, determine an amount of obstacles between the region and a wireless access point ; Receiving a signal strength indication (RSSI) and a round trip time (RTT) data based on the obstacle information, wherein an emphasis on the RTT data and the RSSI data is based on the number of obstacles; The weighting of the decision is based on the RSSI and RTT data to calculate a location of the mobile device.
  14. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 13 wherein the instructions for determining the condition of the environment of the mobile device include: determining the environment based on a map and the obstacle information Conditional instructions.
  15. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 14, wherein the map includes a heat map having weighted information for each of the plurality of regions.
  16. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 14, wherein the map includes a layout of a building.
  17. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 13 also includes instructions for updating the location material associated with the area.
  18. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 13, wherein the instructions for determining the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data comprise: determining the RSSI and RTT data based on a device type of the mobile device The weighted instruction.
  19. A system for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the system comprising: determining an area in which the mobile device is located Means; means for determining a condition of an environment of the mobile device based on location data associated with the area, wherein the location information includes obstruction information; and based on the obstacle information, Means of an amount of an obstacle between the area and a wireless access point; means for weighting received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data based on the obstacle information, wherein An emphasis on the RTT data and the RSSI data is based on the number of obstacles; and means for calculating the location of the mobile device based on the RSSI and RTT data at the determined weight.
  20. The system of claim 19, wherein the means for determining the condition of the environment of the mobile device comprises means for determining the condition of the environment based on a map and the obstacle information.
  21. A system as recited in claim 20, wherein the map comprises a heat map having a plurality of location classifications.
  22. The system as recited in claim 20, which also includes updating the region The means of linking the location information.
  23. The system of claim 20, wherein the means for determining the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data comprises: means for determining the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data based on a device type of the mobile device .
  24. A mobile device configured to determine a location based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the mobile device comprising: a transmitter; a receiver; a memory; The transmitter, the receiver and a processing unit coupled to the memory, the processing unit configured to: determine an area in which the mobile device is located; determine an environment of the mobile device based on location information associated with the area a condition, wherein the location data includes obstruction information; based on the obstacle information, determining a quantity of an obstacle between the area and a wireless access point; receiving the information based on the obstacle information Signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data are weighted, wherein an emphasis on the RTT data and the RSSI data is based on the number of obstacles; and based on the determined weighting based on the RSSI and RTT Data to calculate the line The location of the device.
  25. The mobile device as recited in claim 24, wherein the processing unit is configured to determine the condition of the environment of the mobile device based on a map stored in the memory, wherein the map includes the obstacle information.
  26. The mobile device as recited in claim 25, wherein the processing unit is further configured to receive the map with the receiver.
  27. The mobile device as recited in claim 24, wherein the processing unit is further configured to update the location profile associated with the region.
  28. The mobile device as recited in claim 24, wherein the processing unit is further configured to determine the weighting of the RSSI and RTT data based on a device type of the mobile device.
  29. A method for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the method comprising the steps of: obtaining a complex number associated with a structure Location data for each region; for each of the plurality of regions, a processing unit determines: a condition of an environment associated with the region based on the location data; and Based on the condition of the environment associated with the region and weighted information related to weighting the RSSI and RTT data, wherein an emphasis of the weighted information set on the RTT data or RSSI data is based on the region and a a quantity of obstacles between the wireless access points; and transmitting the weighted information for each of the plurality of areas to the mobile device.
  30. The method of claim 29, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  31. The method as recited in claim 29, the method comprising the steps of: exchanging RSSI and RTT communications with the mobile device.
  32. The method of claim 29, wherein the weighting information comprises at least one of: a confidence level, a wall component type, a number of walls between a region and an access point, a distance, or an access Point hardware information.
  33. The method as recited in claim 29, the method comprising the steps of: receiving data from one or more mobile devices; and updating at least one of the plurality of regions based on the received data This weighted information for the area.
  34. The method of claim 29, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information relating to weighting RSSI and RTT data for each of the plurality of access points.
  35. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium having instructions embedded thereon, the instructions for causing a processing unit to perform a function of obtaining location data corresponding to a plurality of regions associated with a structure; Determining, in each of the plurality of regions, a condition of an environment associated with the region based on the location data; and weighting the RSSI and RTT data based on the condition of the environment associated with the region Relevant weighting information, wherein an emphasis of the weighted information set on the RTT data or RSSI data is based on a quantity of obstacles between the area and a wireless access point; and in the plurality of areas This weighted information for each zone is sent to the mobile device.
  36. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 35, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  37. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 35 also includes instructions for exchanging RSSI and RTT communications with the mobile device.
  38. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 35, wherein the weighting information comprises at least one of: a confidence level, a wall component type, a number of walls between an area and an access point, a distance , or hardware information for an access point.
  39. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 35, further comprising instructions for receiving data from one or more mobile devices; and updating at least one of the plurality of regions based on the received data This weighted information for a region.
  40. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 35, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises weighting RSSI and RTT data for each of the plurality of access points Relevant information.
  41. A system for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the system comprising: obtaining a complex number corresponding to a structure Means of location information for a region; Means for determining, for each of the plurality of regions, a condition of an environment associated with the region based on the location profile; and based on the condition of the environment associated with the region Weighting information relating weighting of RSSI and RTT data, wherein an emphasis of the weighting information set on the RTT data or RSSI data is based on a quantity of obstacles between the area and a wireless access point; Means for transmitting the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions to the mobile device.
  42. The system of claim 41, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  43. The system as recited in claim 41 also includes means for exchanging RSSI and RTT communications with the mobile device.
  44. The system as recited in claim 41, wherein the weighting information comprises at least one of: a confidence level, a wall component type, a number of walls between an area and an access point, a distance, or an access Point hardware information.
  45. The system as recited in claim 41, further comprising: means for receiving data from the one or more mobile devices; and means for updating the weighting of the at least one of the plurality of regions based on the received data The means of information.
  46. The system of claim 41, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information relating to weighting RSSI and RTT data for each of the plurality of access points.
  47. A server for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the server comprising: a transmitter; a receiver; a memory And a processing unit communicatively coupled to the transmitter, the receiver, and the memory, the processing unit configured to: obtain location data corresponding to a plurality of regions associated with a structure; for the plurality of regions Each of the regions determines a condition of an environment associated with the region based on the location data; and weighting based on the condition of the environment associated with the region and weighting the RSSI and RTT data Information, which is set in the RTT An emphasis of the weighted information on the material or RSSI data is based on a quantity of obstacles between the area and a wireless access point; and the weighting of each of the plurality of areas via the transmitter Information is sent to the mobile device.
  48. The server as recited in claim 47, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  49. The server as recited in claim 47, wherein the processing unit is further configured to exchange RSSI and RTT communications with the mobile device using either or both of the transmitter or the receiver.
  50. The server as recited in claim 47, wherein the weighting information comprises at least one of: a confidence level, a wall component type, a number of walls between a region and an access point, a distance, or a deposit Take some hardware information.
  51. The server as recited in claim 47, wherein the processing unit is further configured to: receive data from the one or more mobile devices; and update the weighting of the at least one of the plurality of regions based on the received data News.
  52. The server as recited in claim 47, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information relating to weighting RSSI and RTT data for each of the plurality of access points.
  53. A method for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the method comprising the steps of: receiving, by a mobile device, each of a plurality of regions Weighted information of an area; storing the weighted information of each of the plurality of areas in a memory of the mobile device; obtaining an RSSI measurement and an RTT related to an area in which the mobile device is located Measuring; using the weighted information of the area in which the mobile device is located to determine: a first weight for the RSSI measurement, and a second weight for the RTT measurement; and using the first weight and the The second weight is used to calculate the location of the mobile device.
  54. The method of claim 53, wherein the determining the first weight and the second weight by using the weighting information comprises: calculating one or both of the RSSI measurement and the RTT measurement based on the weighting information A level of confidence.
  55. The method of claim 53, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  56. The method of claim 53, further comprising updating the weighted information of at least one of the plurality of regions.
  57. The method of claim 56, wherein the updating the weighting information of the at least one of the plurality of regions is based on either or both of: historical data of the mobile device; or received from another mobile device data.
  58. The method of claim 56, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information about a plurality of access points.
  59. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium having instructions embedded thereon, the instructions for causing a processing unit to perform a function of receiving weighted information for each of a plurality of regions; the plurality of regions The weighted information for each of the regions is stored in a memory; obtaining an RSSI measurement and an RTT measurement associated with an area in which the mobile device is located; using the weighting of the region in which the mobile device is located Information to determine a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement; and The first weight and the second weight are used to calculate a location of the mobile device.
  60. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 59, wherein the instructions for using the weighting information to determine the first weight and the second weight comprise: calculating the RSSI measurement based on the weighted information And a confidence level command for either or both of the RTT measurements.
  61. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 59, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  62. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 59, further comprising instructions for updating the weighted information of at least one of the plurality of regions.
  63. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 62, wherein the instructions for updating the weighted information of the at least one of the plurality of regions are configured to cause the update to be based on either or both of: Historical data of the mobile device; or data received from another mobile device.
  64. The computer readable storage medium as recited in claim 62, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions includes information regarding a plurality of access points.
  65. A system for determining a location of a mobile device based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the system comprising: weighting for receiving each of a plurality of regions Means of information; means for storing the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions in a memory; for obtaining an RSSI measurement and an RTT amount related to an area in which the mobile device is located Means for determining, using the weighted information of the region in which the mobile device is located, a means for determining a first weight for the RSSI measurement and a second weight for the RTT measurement; Means for calculating the location of the mobile device using the first weight and the second weight.
  66. The system as recited in claim 65, wherein the means for determining the first weight and the second weight using the weighting information comprises: calculating the RSSI measurement based on the weighting information and the RTT measurement A means of confidence level for either or both.
  67. The system of claim 65, wherein the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  68. The system as recited in claim 65, further comprising means for updating the weighted information of at least one of the plurality of regions.
  69. The system of claim 68, wherein the means for updating the weighted information of the at least one of the plurality of regions is configured to cause the update to be based on either or both of: a historical profile of the mobile device; Or receive data from another mobile device.
  70. A system as recited in claim 68, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information regarding a plurality of access points.
  71. A mobile device configured to determine a location based on weighted received signal strength indication (RSSI) and round trip time (RTT) data, the mobile device comprising: a transmitter; a receiver; a memory; The transmitter, the receiver, and a processing unit coupled to the memory, the processing unit configured to: receive weighting information for each of the plurality of regions; the weighting information for each of the plurality of regions Stored in the memory; obtain an RSSI amount related to an area in which a mobile device is located Measuring an RTT measurement; determining, by the weighted information of the area in which the mobile device is located, a first weight for the RSSI measurement, and a second weight for the RTT measurement; and using the A weight and the second weight calculate a location of the mobile device.
  72. The mobile device as recited in claim 71, wherein the processing unit is configured to use the weighted information to determine a confidence level of the RSSI measurement and the RTT measurement based on the weighting information The first weight and the second weight.
  73. The mobile device as recited in claim 71, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions comprises a heat map.
  74. The mobile device as claimed in claim 71, wherein the processing unit is further configured to update the weighted information of at least one of the plurality of regions.
  75. The mobile device as claimed in claim 74, wherein the processing unit is configured to cause the weighting information of the at least one of the plurality of regions to be updated based on any one or both of the following: historical data of the mobile device; or receiving Information from another mobile device.
  76. The mobile device as recited in claim 74, wherein the weighted information for each of the plurality of regions comprises information regarding a plurality of access points.
TW102144603A 2008-12-22 2013-12-05 Providing and utilizing maps in location determination based on rssi and rtt data TWI507068B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/707,484 US8938211B2 (en) 2008-12-22 2012-12-06 Providing and utilizing maps in location determination based on RSSI and RTT data

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
TW201427461A TW201427461A (en) 2014-07-01
TWI507068B true TWI507068B (en) 2015-11-01

Family

ID=49887286

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
TW102144603A TWI507068B (en) 2008-12-22 2013-12-05 Providing and utilizing maps in location determination based on rssi and rtt data

Country Status (6)

Country Link
EP (1) EP2929363A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2016507724A (en)
KR (1) KR20150094665A (en)
CN (1) CN104838280B (en)
TW (1) TWI507068B (en)
WO (1) WO2014089531A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9253599B1 (en) * 2014-08-20 2016-02-02 Qualcomm Incorporated RTT processing based on a characteristic of access points
US9686649B2 (en) * 2015-03-13 2017-06-20 Intel IP Corporation Determination of device location in crowded indoor environments
US20170131402A1 (en) * 2015-11-06 2017-05-11 Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Inc. System and Method for Augmented Localization of WiFi Devices
TWI602166B (en) * 2016-03-03 2017-10-11 金寶電子工業股份有限公司 Beacon reception state of the computer-implemented method of displaying on an electronic map
CN105978726B (en) * 2016-05-18 2019-03-26 兰州理工大学 A kind of cellular base station fault locating analysis method
JP6346676B2 (en) * 2017-01-12 2018-06-20 株式会社小松製作所 Excavator
JP2019144046A (en) * 2018-02-19 2019-08-29 オムロン株式会社 Position determining device, position determining method, and program

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050192024A1 (en) * 2002-10-17 2005-09-01 Leonid Sheynblat Method and apparatus for improving radio location accuracy with measurements
US20070001904A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2007-01-04 Ehud Mendelson System and method navigating indoors and outdoors without GPS. utilizing a network of sensors
US20110081919A1 (en) * 2009-10-01 2011-04-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Mobile Device Locating In Conjunction With Localized Enviornments

Family Cites Families (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6282426B1 (en) * 1999-06-08 2001-08-28 Nokia Mobile Phones Limited Method, and associated apparatus, for determining geographic positioning of a wireless communication station operable in a non-ideal propagation environment
US6473038B2 (en) * 2001-01-05 2002-10-29 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for location estimation
US20100135178A1 (en) * 2008-11-21 2010-06-03 Qualcomm Incorporated Wireless position determination using adjusted round trip time measurements
US20100157848A1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for providing and utilizing local maps and annotations in location determination
US7986953B2 (en) * 2009-06-01 2011-07-26 Microsoft Corporation Location determination with geographic and bias tuning
US8406785B2 (en) * 2009-08-18 2013-03-26 Skyhook Wireless, Inc. Method and system for estimating range of mobile device to wireless installation
US8878725B2 (en) * 2011-05-19 2014-11-04 Exelis Inc. System and method for geolocation of multiple unknown radio frequency signal sources

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050192024A1 (en) * 2002-10-17 2005-09-01 Leonid Sheynblat Method and apparatus for improving radio location accuracy with measurements
US20070001904A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2007-01-04 Ehud Mendelson System and method navigating indoors and outdoors without GPS. utilizing a network of sensors
US20110081919A1 (en) * 2009-10-01 2011-04-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Mobile Device Locating In Conjunction With Localized Enviornments

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Zàruba et al, "Indoor location tracking using RSSI readings from a single Wi-Fi access point", Wireless Networks, 8 June 2006. *

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
TW201427461A (en) 2014-07-01
WO2014089531A1 (en) 2014-06-12
CN104838280B (en) 2017-09-15
CN104838280A (en) 2015-08-12
KR20150094665A (en) 2015-08-19
EP2929363A1 (en) 2015-10-14
JP2016507724A (en) 2016-03-10

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9313615B2 (en) Mobile device locating in conjunction with localized environments
US8700058B2 (en) Position estimation of a wireless terminal in a structure using base station signal information
ES2511190T3 (en) Wireless position determination using the adjusted round trip time measurements
JP5173035B2 (en) Wireless-based positioning adjustment using motion sensor
KR101409388B1 (en) Determination of positions of wireless transceivers to be added to a wireless communication network
US9500738B2 (en) Utilizing a reference signal for indoor positioning
US8831594B2 (en) Post-deployment calibration of wireless base stations for wireless position determination
TWI539854B (en) A method for transmitting information indoor situation, devices and non-transitory computer-readable medium
US8626198B2 (en) Characterizing an indoor structure based on detected movements and/or position locations of a mobile device
JP2015519592A (en) Map information and AP location mashup for WiFi based indoor positioning
US8698671B2 (en) Binning venues into categories based on propagation characteristics
CN104303071B (en) Adaptive update for indoor navigation assistance data used by mobile devices
EP3098620A1 (en) Locating electromagnetic signal sources
JP2014122921A (en) System and method for estimating positioning error within wireless lan-based positioning system
JP6162070B2 (en) Device for round trip time measurement
JP2014522188A (en) The likelihood of mobile device portal migration
JP5592030B2 (en) RSSI-based indoor positioning in the presence of dynamic transmit power control access points
US9432964B2 (en) Method and apparatus for determining locations of access points
CN102939784B (en) Radio model update
US9699618B2 (en) Determining location based on both a detected location and a predicted location
JP2013536631A (en) Method and apparatus for use in determining that a mobile station is in one or more specific indoor areas
CN104735782B (en) Method for determining location of mobile station, equipment and computer-readable medium
CN103843429B (en) For a bit position of the instruction control apparatus
US9606215B2 (en) Terrestrial positioning system calibration
CN103080765B (en) Methods and apparatus for use in estimating a location of a mobile device within a structure

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
MM4A Annulment or lapse of patent due to non-payment of fees