SE543863C2 - Wearable therapeutic device - Google Patents

Wearable therapeutic device

Info

Publication number
SE543863C2
SE543863C2 SE1930135A SE1930135A SE543863C2 SE 543863 C2 SE543863 C2 SE 543863C2 SE 1930135 A SE1930135 A SE 1930135A SE 1930135 A SE1930135 A SE 1930135A SE 543863 C2 SE543863 C2 SE 543863C2
Authority
SE
Sweden
Prior art keywords
sensor
user
music
shoulders
therapeutic device
Prior art date
Application number
SE1930135A
Other languages
Swedish (sv)
Other versions
SE1930135A1 (en
Inventor
Philip Wilkens
Thomas Unfors
Original Assignee
Joyvest Ab C/O Tomas Unfors
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Joyvest Ab C/O Tomas Unfors filed Critical Joyvest Ab C/O Tomas Unfors
Priority to SE1930135A priority Critical patent/SE543863C2/en
Publication of SE1930135A1 publication Critical patent/SE1930135A1/en
Publication of SE543863C2 publication Critical patent/SE543863C2/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M21/00Other devices or methods to cause a change in the state of consciousness; Devices for producing or ending sleep by mechanical, optical, or acoustical means, e.g. for hypnosis
    • A61M21/02Other devices or methods to cause a change in the state of consciousness; Devices for producing or ending sleep by mechanical, optical, or acoustical means, e.g. for hypnosis for inducing sleep or relaxation, e.g. by direct nerve stimulation, hypnosis, analgesia
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H2201/00Characteristics of apparatus not provided for in the preceding codes
    • A61H2201/16Physical interface with patient
    • A61H2201/1602Physical interface with patient kind of interface, e.g. head rest, knee support or lumbar support
    • A61H2201/165Wearable interfaces
    • A61H2201/1652Harness
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H2201/00Characteristics of apparatus not provided for in the preceding codes
    • A61H2201/50Control means thereof
    • A61H2201/5023Interfaces to the user
    • A61H2201/5025Activation means
    • A61H2201/503Inertia activation, i.e. activated by movement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H2201/00Characteristics of apparatus not provided for in the preceding codes
    • A61H2201/50Control means thereof
    • A61H2201/5058Sensors or detectors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H2201/00Characteristics of apparatus not provided for in the preceding codes
    • A61H2201/50Control means thereof
    • A61H2201/5097Control means thereof wireless
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M21/00Other devices or methods to cause a change in the state of consciousness; Devices for producing or ending sleep by mechanical, optical, or acoustical means, e.g. for hypnosis
    • A61M2021/0005Other devices or methods to cause a change in the state of consciousness; Devices for producing or ending sleep by mechanical, optical, or acoustical means, e.g. for hypnosis by the use of a particular sense, or stimulus
    • A61M2021/0027Other devices or methods to cause a change in the state of consciousness; Devices for producing or ending sleep by mechanical, optical, or acoustical means, e.g. for hypnosis by the use of a particular sense, or stimulus by the hearing sense
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/33Controlling, regulating or measuring
    • A61M2205/332Force measuring means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2209/00Ancillary equipment
    • A61M2209/08Supports for equipment
    • A61M2209/088Supports for equipment on the body
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2210/00Anatomical parts of the body
    • A61M2210/08Limbs
    • A61M2210/083Arms
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2210/00Anatomical parts of the body
    • A61M2210/08Limbs
    • A61M2210/086Legs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2230/00Measuring parameters of the user
    • A61M2230/63Motion, e.g. physical activity

Abstract

A wearable therapeutic device (100) comprising at least: a harness (101) configured to be worn around a user's shoulders (S1, S2); a music player (102) (101); a first sensor (103, 104) configured to be worn on a user's body part (W, A) other than the shoulders and/or a second sensor (105) attached to the harness (101); and a control unit (106) configured to communicate with the sensor(s) (103, 104; 105) and control the music player (102) based on signals from the sensor(s) (103, 104; 105), wherein the harness (101) has a weight applying a reassuring pressure on the shoulders (S1, S2); wherein the control unit (106), when receiving a signal indicating user movement, causes the music player (102) to start playing music within 3 seconds; and, when receiving a signal indicating a static position, causes the music player (102) to stop playing music within 3 seconds.

Description

The median age of the world's population is increasing because of a decline in fertilityand a 20-year increase in the average life span during the second half of the 20thcentury and the beginning of the 2lst century. These factors, combined with elevatedfertility in many countries during the two decades after World War II, will result inincreased numbers of persons older than 65 years during the decades to come.Worldwide, the average life span is expected to extend another l0 years by 2050. Thegrowing number of older adults increases demands on the public health system and onmedical and social services. Aging often contributes to disability, dirninishes quality of life and increases health- and long-term-care costs.
For example, the United States is facing a major challenge as an aging populationthreatens to strain the nation's healthcare system to the breaking point. The U.S.Alzheimer's Association has reported that more than 4 million Americans haveAlzheimer's - a number that is projected to more than triple to l4 million by 2050 as theelderly population continues to increase. The worldwide cost of caring for older adultswith Alzheimer's or other dementia is expected to escalate sharply in the coming decades.
Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) are routine activities that people do every daywithout assistance. There are six basic ADLs: eating, bathing, dressing, toileting,transferring (walking) and continence. Nearly half of all Americans who tum 65 duringany given year will eventually enter a nursing home as a result of being unable toperform some ADLs. While the majority of those nursing-home admissions will be for less than a year, about a quarter will stay longer than a year.
It has been found, however, that the cost of caring for older adults escalates and theirquality of life frequently declines as they move from home to a nursing home or otherassisted living facility. ln other Words, the longer an individual can live at home, thebetter the mental health and Well-being of the individual. lf someone can't care forhimself or herself, then others should help. This may include spouses, children,relatives, and/or hired caregivers. lf this is not effective, then the person must be moved into a long-term care facility.
Under-stimulation is a problem for many older adults living in nursing homes or otherlong-term care facilities. lt becomes increasingly difficult for these older adults to enjoythe activities that they once enjoyed. Cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer's or otherdementia leads to Weakened abilities to process sensory stimuli. Because the individualcannot process the stimuli or is not provided sufficient stimuli, he/she becomes bored,or under-stimulated. lt has been found that lack of movement and activity can cause depressions and other disorders.
A person's mood or state of mind can be affected by a variety of daily experiences, fromminor experiences, such as receiving an unexpected compliment or having a good meal,to more significant experiences, such as an enlightening conversation With a dear friendor a visit of a loved one. Often, one can trace an unexpectedly good mood back to a seemingly minor experience.
Regardless of short-term memory loss, an older adult's state-of-rr1ind improves afterpositive experiences. The emotional boost persists after the event that caused it isforgotten. The emotional boost may result in a variety of effects, from eating on aregular basis to reduced agitation to better communication. The inability to recall thepositive experience (e. g. a visit from a loved one) does not diminish the positive impactof the experience itself. Familiar voices create emotional responses every day, Whetherover the phone, on the radio or television, or in person. For seniors experiencing adecline in cognitive functioning due to aging, trusted voices have the power to calm, to re-orient, and to reassure. 3 However, problems may arise When periods of time, sometimes significant, elapsebetween a loved one's visits and/or phone calls. Even though the resident mayexperience an emotional boost during the loved one's visit or phone call, the frequencyof receiving this emotional boost is dependent on the loved one. Moreover, if a residentis feeling agitated or confused and thus has an immediate need for an emotional boostbut the loved one is unable to visit or call, the resident must handle his/her agitation or confusion without the emotional boost.
Music is a proven method of providing a positive emotional boost to seniors sufferingfrom dementia or other cognitive impairment that alters one's cognitive state. Musicalmemories often last well into advanced age, so familiar songs elicit particular emotions.Background music and singing have been shown to be useful interventions for dementiapatients. Studies have confirmed that, following music therapy, individuals sufferingmental or emotional impairment due to aging display an increase in quality-of-life scores, reduced agitated behaviours, and a decrease in disturbances.
One problem with many of the existing music therapy devices, however, is that theyhave an unwieldy and complicated design. This means that the therapy devices require alot of storage space and that nursing staff may have difficulties in understanding andcorrectly setting up the music therapy system. Furthermore, older adults suffering fromdementia may be functionally unable to independently use the music therapy devicesdue to their complicated design. In addition, most of the existing music therapy devices do not enable individualized music therapy that can be intuitively controlled by the user.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A first object of the present invention is therefore to provide a simple and easilyunderstandable wearable therapeutic device adapted for individualized music therapy,which is small in size and relatively light in weight and easy to set up for nursing staff and easy to use for older adults.
This first object is achieved by means of a wearable therapeutic device according toclaim l, which comprises: an upper-body harness configured to be wom around a user's shoulders; at least one music player connected to the upper-body hamess; at least one 4 first sensor configured to be Wom on a user's body part other than the shoulders todetect movement of the user's body part and/or at least one second sensor attached to theupper-body harness and configured to detect movement of the user's body part otherthan the shoulders relative to the second sensor; and at least one control unit connectedto the upper-body hamess and configured to Wirelessly communicate With the at leastone first sensor and/or to communicate With the at least one second sensor, Wherein theat least one control unit is configured to control the at least one music player based onone or several signals received from the at least one first sensor and/or the at least onesecond sensor, and Wherein the harness has a Weight sufficient to apply a reassuringpressure on the shoulders of the user Wearing the harness; Wherein the at least onecontrol unit is configured to, When receiving a signal or signals indicating movement ofthe user's shoulders and/or the body part or body parts other than the shoulders, causethe at least one music player to start playing a user's personal favourite piece of musicintuitively Within 3 seconds; and Wherein the at least one control unit is configured to,When receiving a signal or signals indicating the user being in a static position, cause the at least one music player to stop playing the music intuitively Within 3 seconds.
The reassuring pressure applied on the shoulders of the user by the hamess isadvantageous since it gives the user of the therapeutic device a feeling of security, Which Will promote confidence and relaXation during the music therapy.
Since the at least one control unit is configured to, When receiving a signal or signalsindicating movement of the user's shoulders and/or the body part or body parts otherthan the shoulders, cause the at least one music player to start playing a user's personalfavourite piece of music intuitively Within 3 seconds, the user of the Wearabletherapeutic device according to the invention Will be stimulated to keep moving by the music.
Since, on the other hand, the at least one control unit is configured to, When receiving asignal or signals indicating the user being in a static position, cause the at least onemusic player to stop playing the music intuitively Within 3 seconds, the user of theWearable therapeutic device according to the invention Will be stimulated to start moving again by the interruption of the music.
Accordingly, thanks to the reassuring pressure applied by the upper-body harness, auser wearing the wearable therapeutic device according to the invention will feel bothsecure and relaXed while receiving music therapy. Furthermore, movements performedby the user will cause the music player to play personal favourite music of the user, sothat the user gets a reward and will associate movement with favourite music and bestimulated to start or continue moving to be rewarded again. If, on the other hand, theuser stops moving, this will cause the music player to stop playing favourite music sothat the user will associate being in a static position with the interruption of music andbe stimulated to start moving again in order to start the music again. In this way, thewearable therapeutic device according to the invention can substantially increase the activity level of older adults suffering from Alzheimer's or other dementia.
Further objects and advantages of the invention, and the features enabling these objects and advantages to be achieved, will become evident from the following description.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGSIn the following, the present invention will be described by means of a number of different embodiments, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure l is a schematic view of a wearable therapeutic device according to a preferredembodiment of the invention being worn around a user's shoulders while the user wearing the wearable therapeutic device receives music therapy; and Figure 2 shows a more detailed schematic view of the wearable therapeutic device of Figure l.
DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTIONIn the following, a number of embodiments of a wearable therapeutic device accordingto the invention will be described in greater detail with reference to the accompanying Figures l and 2. 6 As can be seen in Figure 1, the wearable therapeutic device 100 according to theinvention comprises an upper-body harness 101 configured to be worn around a user'sshoulders S1, S2. The upper-body harness can be a Vest harness or a collar harness, or acombination thereof. The upper-body harness in the embodiment illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 is a collar harness.
The wearable therapeutic device 100 according to the invention further comprises atleast one music player 102 connected to the upper-body harness 101. The at least onemusic player preferably comprises, or is connected or connectable to, at least oneportable loudspeaker. The at least one music player, including the portable loudspeaker,is preferably attached to, or integrated into the upper-body harness, as in the preferredembodiment illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. However, embodiments of the wearabletherapeutic device where music players and/or loudspeakers are integrated intoheadphones are also conceivable (not shown in the figures). It is preferred that the atleast one music player including the at least one portable loudspeaker are worn by theuser during music therapy as shown in Figure 1. However, embodiments with wireless external loudspeakers (not shown in the figures) are also conceivable.
The wearable therapeutic device 100 according to the invention further comprises atleast one first sensor 103, 104 configured to be worn on a user's body part W, A otherthan the shoulders to detect movement of the user's body part W, A and/or at least onesecond sensor 105 attached to the upper-body harness 101 and configured to detectmovement of the user's body part W, A other than the shoulders relative to the second sensor 105.
In one advantageous embodiment, the at least one first sensor is a movement sensor103, 104, preferably an accelerometer, which is adapted to be attached to a user's wristW and/or a user's ankle A. The movement sensor 103, 104 is preferably adapted for wireless communication via IR or radio.
In another advantageous embodiment, the at least one second sensor is a positionsensor, preferably an IR sensor, most preferably an IR sensor comprising an IR unit 105 attached to the upper-body harness 101 and configured to detect movement of an IR 7 reflector or en1itter (not shown in the figures) attached to the user's body part W, A other than the shoulders relative to the IR unit 105.
The wearable therapeutic device 100 according to the invention further comprises atleast one control unit 106 connected to the upper-body harness 101 and configured towirelessly communicate with the at least one first sensor 103, 104 and/or tocommunicate with the at least one second sensor 105, wherein the at least one controlunit 106 is configured to control the at least one music player 102 based on one orseveral signals received from the at least one first sensor 103, 104 and/or the at least onesecond sensor 105. The at least one control unit 106 is preferably attached to, orintegrated into the upper-body harness 101, as in the preferred embodiment illustrated inFigures 1 and 2. However, embodiments with external control units (not shown in the figures) are also conceivable.
The upper-body harness 101 of the wearable therapeutic device 100 according to theinvention has a weight sufficient to apply a reassuring pressure on the shoulders S1, S2of the user wearing the harness 101. In a preferred embodiment, the harness 101 has aweight between 150 - 2000 g, which depends on the physical strength and body size ofthe user. The reassuring pressure applied on the shoulders by the harness isadvantageous since it gives the user of the wearable therapeutic device 100 a feeling ofsecurity, which will promote confidence and relaXation during the music therapy. Theupper-body harness 101 is advantageously provided with size adjustment means,preferably magnetic means or velcro means, to allow adjustment to fit different body sizes.
The at least one control unit 106 of the wearable therapeutic device 100 according to theinvention is configured to, when receiving a signal or signals indicating movement ofthe user's shoulders S1, S2 and/or the body part or body parts W, A other than theshoulders, cause the at least one music player 102 to start playing a user's personalfavourite piece of music intuitively within 3 seconds. This feature is advantageous sincethe user of the wearable therapeutic device will be stimulated to start or keep moving in order to be rewarded by personal favourite music. 8 A short time span between movement performed by the user of the wearable therapeuticdevice and music starting playing is important since many persons suffering fromdementia have a short memory span. As short a time span as possible betweenmovement and music starting playing will help users suffering from dementia toassociate movement with favourite music. However, if the time span is too short, thereis a risk that tremor or other unintentional movements causes the music to start playing,which is not desirable. Therefore, it can be particularly advantageous that the at leastone control unit 106 of the wearable therapeutic device 100 according to the inventionis configured to, when receiving a signal or signals indicating movement of the user'sshoulders S1, S2 and/or the body part or body parts W, A other than the shoulders,cause the at least one music player 102 to start playing a user's personal favourite piece of music intuitively within 1.5 seconds, preferably within 0.4 to 1.5 seconds.
The at least one control unit 106 of the wearable therapeutic device 100 according to theinvention is further configured to, when receiving a signal or signals indicating the userbeing in a static position, cause the at least one music player 102 to stop playing themusic intuitively within 3 seconds. This feature is advantageous since the user of thewearable therapeutic device will be stimulated to start moving again by the interruption of the music.
A short time span between assuming a static position and the interruption of music isimportant since many persons suffering from dementia have a short memory span. Asshort a time span as possible between assun1ing a static position and the interruption ofmusic will help users suffering from dementia to associate being in static position withthe interruption of music. However, if the time span is too short, there is a risk that justa brief stop in the movement causes the music to stop playing, which is not desirable.Therefore, it can be particularly advantageous that the at least one control unit 106 ofthe wearable therapeutic device 100 according to the invention is further configured to,when receiving a signal or signals indicating the user being in a static position, causethe at least one music player 102 to stop playing the music intuitively within 1.5 seconds, preferably within 0.4 to 1.5 seconds. 9 In a particularly preferred embodiment, the wearable therapeutic device 100 has a firstmanual control button 107 configured to allow the user to change volume level of the atleast one music player 102; and a second manual control button 108 configured to allowthe user to select pieces of music played by the at least one music player 102. Thesefeatures are advantageous since they allow the user to independently control the volume and selection of music during music therapy.
In another advantageous embodiment of the wearable therapeutic device 100 accordingto the invention, the music player 102 or music players, the sensor or sensors 103, 104,105 and the control unit 106 or control units all are battery-operated. This feature is advantageous since it elin1inates the need for cumbersome power cords.
In a particularly advantageous embodiment of the wearable therapeutic device 10according to the invention, the body part or body parts other than the shoulders S1, S2is/are a user's wrist W or wrists and/or a user's ankle A or ankles to which the firstsensor or sensors 103, 104 is/are attached and/or the movement of which the secondsensor 105 or sensors detects/detect while the user receives music therapy. This featureis advantageous since it allows detection of either arm movements or leg movements, or both, depending on the mobility of the user.
In the foregoing, the present invention has been described with the aid of a number ofdifferent embodiments and with reference to the accompanying drawings. lt should beunderstood, however, that the invention is not limited to the described embodiments andto what is shown in the drawings, but that also other embodiments are conceivable within the scope of the invention as it is defined by the following claims.

Claims (6)

1. A wearable therapeutic device (100), which comprises: an upper-body hamess (101) configured to be wom around a user's shoulders(Sl, S2); at least one music player (102) connected to said upper-body harness (101); at least one first sensor (103, 104) configured to be worn on a user's body part(W, A) other than said shoulders (S1, S2) to detect movement of said user'sbody part (W, A) and/or at least one second sensor (105) attached to said upper-body harness (101) and configured to detect movement of said user's body part(W, A) other than said shoulders (S1, S2) relative to said second sensor (105);and at least one control unit (106) connected to said upper-body hamess (101) andconfigured to wirelessly communicate with said at least one first sensor (103,104) and/or to communicate with said at least one second sensor (105),wherein said at least one control unit (106) is configured to control said at leastone music player (102) based on one or several signals received from said at least one first sensor (103, 104) and/or said at least one second sensor (105), characterized in that said hamess (101) has a weight between 150-2000 g so as to apply areassuring pressure on said shoulders (S1, S2) of said user wearing said hamess(101); that said at least one control unit (106) is configured to, when receiving a signal or signals indicating movement of said user's shoulders (S1, S2) and/or said (body part (W, A) or body parts (W, A) other than said shoulders (S 1 , S2), cause said at least one music player (102) to start playing a user's personal favouritepiece of music within 3 seconds; and that said at least one control unit (106) is configured to, when receiving a signalor signals indicating the user being in a static position, cause said at least onemusic player (102) to stop playing said music within 3 seconds; and that said wearable therapeutic device ( 100) has: a first manual control button (107) configured to allow the user to change volume level of said at least one music player ( 102); and 2 - a second manual control button (108) configured to allow the user to select pieces of music played by said at least one music player ( 102).
2. The wearable therapeutic device (100) according to claim 1, characterized in that said at least one first sensor (103, 104) is a movement sensor, preferably an accelerometer.
3. The wearable therapeutic device (100) according to claim 1 or 2, characterized in thatsaid at least one second sensor (105) is a position sensor, preferably an IR sensor, mostpreferably an IR sensor comprising an IR unit attached to said upper-body hamess (101)and configured to detect movement of an IR reflector or emitter attached to said user's body part (W, A) other than said shoulders (S1, S2) relative to said IR unit.
4. The wearable therapeutic device (100) according to any one of the preceding claims,characterized in that said harness (101) is provided with size adjustment means,preferably magnetic means or velcro means, to allow adjustment to fit different body sizes. 5_ 6. The wearable therapeutic device (100) according to any one of the preceding claims, characterized in that said music player (102) or music players (102), said first sensor(103, 104) or first sensors (103, 104), said second sensor (105) or second sensors (105)and said control unit (106) or control units (106) all are battery-operated. §_ 1. The wearable therapeutic device (100) according to any one of the preceding claims,characterized in that said body part (W, A) or body parts (W, A) other than said shoulders (S1, S2) is/are a user's wrist (W) or wrists and/or a user's ankle (A) or ankles 3 (A) to which said first sensor or sensors (103, 104) is/are attached and/or the movement of Which said second sensor (105) or second sensors (105) detects/detect.
SE1930135A 2019-04-24 2019-04-24 Wearable therapeutic device SE543863C2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
SE1930135A SE543863C2 (en) 2019-04-24 2019-04-24 Wearable therapeutic device

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
SE1930135A SE543863C2 (en) 2019-04-24 2019-04-24 Wearable therapeutic device
PCT/SE2020/050400 WO2020218961A1 (en) 2019-04-24 2020-04-20 Wearable therapeutic device
EP20796296.0A EP3958943A1 (en) 2019-04-24 2020-04-20 Wearable therapeutic device

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
SE1930135A1 SE1930135A1 (en) 2020-10-25
SE543863C2 true SE543863C2 (en) 2021-08-17

Family

ID=72941121

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
SE1930135A SE543863C2 (en) 2019-04-24 2019-04-24 Wearable therapeutic device

Country Status (3)

Country Link
EP (1) EP3958943A1 (en)
SE (1) SE543863C2 (en)
WO (1) WO2020218961A1 (en)

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2963689A1 (en) * 2010-08-04 2012-02-10 Michael Stephen Herve Digital music listening device for use at time of sporting practice i.e. race, has audio headset/ear-phones reproducing selected bit of music from music file database, and accelerometer capturing movement signal of runner
US20120253236A1 (en) * 2011-04-04 2012-10-04 Snow Buddy L Methods and apparatuses for delivering external therapeutic stimulation to animals and humans
US10182964B2 (en) * 2012-02-13 2019-01-22 Copa Animal Health, Llc Delivery of audio and tactile stimulation therapy for animals and humans
US10231664B2 (en) * 2016-05-26 2019-03-19 Raghav Ganesh Method and apparatus to predict, report, and prevent episodes of emotional and physical responses to physiological and environmental conditions
US20190126002A1 (en) * 2017-10-31 2019-05-02 Tim Brimmer Method for using targeted playlists to treat dementia patients

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2020218961A1 (en) 2020-10-29
EP3958943A1 (en) 2022-03-02
SE1930135A1 (en) 2020-10-25

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Foner Nursing home aides: Saints or monsters?
US8409116B2 (en) Method and device to manage freezing of gait in patients suffering from a movement disorder
US20160121074A1 (en) System with a Heart Rate Adjusting Mechanism
JP2022123075A (en) Physical condition estimation device control method and physical condition estimation device control device
US20090005834A1 (en) Deep vein thrombosis prevention
US20190231256A1 (en) Apparatus and associated methods for adjusting a user's sleep
KR101975384B1 (en) Robot caring solitaries, system and method for caring solitaries using the same
Łuc et al. SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the population with dementia. Recommendations under the auspices of the Polish Psychiatric Association
US11141556B2 (en) Apparatus and associated methods for adjusting a group of users' sleep
US5823932A (en) Apparatus and method for modifying human behavior by triggering positive and aversive post-hypnotic suggestions
SE543863C2 (en) Wearable therapeutic device
Campbell et al. After the Fall: Confusion
Rosenblum Telephone therapy.
CN204910441U (en) Be applied to meeting private parts safety cover device that boy can prevent catheter slippage
KR20190038960A (en) Sports equipment
Brugge Symptomatology in Practice in the Case of Dementia
Webb Nursing care across the lifespan: older adult
DiMauro 4 Client Centeredness: A Survivor’s Perspective
WU Alzheimer daily care center bathroom design
Vitale et al. Background Sounds and Noises in Hospital: A Proactive Analysis of Psychological Repercussions on Patients in the “Santissima Annunziata” Hospital, Taranto, Italy
Hills Working with children: a medical practice staff training tool
Martin et al. Breathing in interpersonal encounter
CN107713195A (en) A kind of bracelet device for first aid
JP2005081109A (en) Bath round straw mat: "paradise"
Rodríguez Birth as Battle Cry: A Doula's Journey from Home to Hospital