KR20140044394A - Allocating backhaul resources - Google Patents

Allocating backhaul resources Download PDF

Info

Publication number
KR20140044394A
KR20140044394A KR1020147004800A KR20147004800A KR20140044394A KR 20140044394 A KR20140044394 A KR 20140044394A KR 1020147004800 A KR1020147004800 A KR 1020147004800A KR 20147004800 A KR20147004800 A KR 20147004800A KR 20140044394 A KR20140044394 A KR 20140044394A
Authority
KR
South Korea
Prior art keywords
backhaul
link
method
rn
access link
Prior art date
Application number
KR1020147004800A
Other languages
Korean (ko)
Inventor
찬드라 세크하 본투
지준 카이
로즈 후
이 송
이 유
Original Assignee
블랙베리 리미티드
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201161514721P priority Critical
Priority to US61/514,721 priority
Priority to US13/486,541 priority
Priority to US13/486,541 priority patent/US8755324B2/en
Application filed by 블랙베리 리미티드 filed Critical 블랙베리 리미티드
Priority to PCT/US2012/049609 priority patent/WO2013020093A1/en
Publication of KR20140044394A publication Critical patent/KR20140044394A/en

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/08Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria
    • H04W72/085Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria using measured or perceived quality

Abstract

The system, apparatus, and method may relate to operating a wireless communication resource for a wireless communication system including a relay node and a base station. The backhaul link data rate for the first wireless link between the relay node and the base station can be identified. The access link data rate for the second wireless link between the relay node and the user equipment (UE) can be identified. The allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link may be adjusted or changed to optimize the allocation of resources.

Description

Allocating backhaul resources {ALLOCATING BACKHAUL RESOURCES}

Priority claim

This application is incorporated by reference in U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61 / 514,721, filed August 3, 2011, and U.S. Patent Application No. 13 / 486,541, filed June 1, 2012, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. Included-Claims priority based on

TECHNICAL FIELD The present disclosure relates to wireless communication systems, and more particularly, to allocation of backhaul resources.

As communications technology evolved, more advanced network access equipment was introduced that could provide services that were not previously possible. The network access equipment may include systems and devices that are improvements in corresponding equipment within conventional wireless communication systems. These advanced or next-generation equipment can be included in evolving wireless communications standards such as Long-Term Evolution (LTE) and LTE-Advanced (LTE-A). For example, an LTE or LTE-A system may be an Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (E-UTRAN) and may include an evolved Node B (eNB), a radio access point, or similar components rather than a conventional base station. . As used herein, the term "access node" refers to a conventional base station that creates a geographic area of receive and transmit coverage that allows a UE or relay node to access other components in a communication system, A wireless access point, or any component of a wireless network, such as LTE or LTE-A Node B or eNB. In this document, the terms "access node" and "access device" may be used interchangeably, but it will be appreciated that an access node may include a plurality of hardware and software. A relay node (RN) is a device that facilitates communication with an eNB. The RN can generally be divided into three groups-a layer 1 RN, a layer 2 RN, and a layer 3 RN. Relay technology may improve user throughput and network coverage.

The system, apparatus, and method may relate to operating a wireless communication resource for a wireless communication system including a relay node and a base station. The backhaul link data rate for the first wireless link between the relay node and the base station can be identified. The access link data rate for the second wireless link between the relay node and the user equipment (UE) can be identified. The allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link may be adjusted or changed to optimize the allocation of resources.

1 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary wireless communication system including a donor eNB and a relay node.
FIG. 2 shows a subframe for half-duplex communication over a backhaul link. FIG.
3 illustrates an example of backhaul subframe allocation.
4A is a process flow diagram for static allocation of backhaul resources.
4B is a swim-lane diagram for static allocation of backhaul resources.
5 is a schematic block diagram of example resource allocation for an access link and a backhaul link.
6A is a process flow diagram for dynamic allocation of backhaul resources.
6B is a swim lane diagram for dynamic resource allocation for a backhaul link.
7 is a block diagram of an exemplary asynchronous multicast broadcast single frequency network (MBSFN) resource allocation for multiple relay nodes.
8 is a block diagram of an exemplary asynchronous multicast broadcast single frequency network resource allocation for multiple relay nodes sharing the same subframe.
9A is a process flow diagram for quasi-static backhaul resource allocation.
9B illustrates a swim lane diagram 950 for quasi-static backhaul resource allocation.

Aspects of the present disclosure relate to backhaul resource allocation for communication between an eNB and a relay node (RN). For static subframe allocation, the RN may signal the number of connected users in the RN cell to the donor eNB (DeNB). The E-UTRAN supports relaying by relaying a relay node (RN) wirelessly to an eNB (called a DoNB) serving an RN to communicate with an evolved packet core (EPC) network. All RNs in the same donor cell may have the same backhaul subframe configuration.

In the case of dynamic resource allocation, the RN may signal the transmission data rate on each of its access links to the DeNB for optimal resource allocation. The transmission data rate may be an average data rate over a short time window.

For quasi-static assignment, the RN may signal / update the DeNB with an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) of each UE (or RN cell UE) connected to the RN. The geometry or average SINR of each RN cell UE may be reported to the DeNB at call setup and will be updated quasi-statically in accordance with UE mobility and radio link changes. Multiple RNs may form the RN group sharing the same subframe resource and identified by the RN group ID. Different RN groups may use different subframe resources to avoid interference.

First, although an exemplary implementation of one or more embodiments of the present disclosure is provided below, it is contemplated that the disclosed system and / or method may be implemented using any number of techniques, whether presently known or existing You will know that you can. The present disclosure should not be construed as limited to the exemplary implementations, drawings, and techniques described below, including the exemplary designs and implementations illustrated and described herein, and the full scope of equivalents thereof, And can be modified within a range of ranges.

As used herein, the terms "device", "user equipment" and "UE" refer, in some cases, to mobile phones, personal digital assistants, handheld or laptop computers, BLACKBERRY® devices, and communication functions. A mobile device such as a similar device having Such a UE may include a UE and its associated removable memory module (Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) application, Universal Subscriber Identity Module (USIM) application, or Removable User Identity Module (R-UlM) application). It is not limited to these). As another alternative, such a UE may consist of the device itself without such a module. In other cases, the term "UE " may refer to a device that has a similar function but is not mobile (such as a desktop computer, set-top box, or network device). The term "UE " may also refer to any hardware or software component that can terminate a communication session for a user. Also, the terms "user agent", "UA", "user equipment", "UE", "user device" and "user node" may be used synonymously herein. Other abbreviations and terms are provided below:

CQI Channel Quality Indicator

DL Down Link

E-UTRAN Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network

eNB E-UTRAN Node B

DeNB Donor Enb

HARQ Hybrid ARQ (Automatic Repeat Request)

LTE Long Term Evolution

LTE-A LTE-Advanced

MBSFN Multicast Broadcast Single Frequency Network

MCS Modulation and Coding Scheme

MME Mobility Management Entity

PRB Physical Resource Block

QoS Quality of Service

RN Relay Node

RRC Radio Resource Control

SGW Serving Gateway

TTI Transmission Time Interval

UE User Equipment

UL Uplink

A type I relay node (RN) is an in-band / out-band relay node that can have the following characteristics:

Figure pct00001
This controls the cells, each of which appears to the UE as a separate cell that is different from the donor cell.

Figure pct00002
These cells will have their own physical cell ID, synchronization channel, reference symbol, and so forth.

Figure pct00003
In connection with single cell operation, the UE will receive scheduling information and HARQ feedback directly from the relay node and transmit its control channel (SR / CQI / ACK) to the relay node.

Type I relays feature wireless in-band backhaul. The layer 1 RN may be a repeater that merely retransmits the received signal without any modification other than amplification and possibly some delay. The layer 2 RN may demodulate / decode the transmission it receives, re-encode / modulate the result of the decoding, and then transmit the modulated data. The layer 3 RN may have full radio resource control functionality and thus function similar to an access node. The radio resource control protocol used by the RN may be the same as that used by the access node, and the RN may typically have a unique cell identity used by the access node. The "layer x" RN is distinguished from the "type x" RN. For example, the layer 1 RN is not a type 1 RN; In fact, Type 1 RNs are similar in functionality to Layer 3 RNs. Type 1 RNs are described in more detail below.

For purposes of this disclosure, an RN is distinguished from an eNB or other access node because the term RN is used to access at least one eNB or other access node (eg, to access other components within a communication system such as MME / SGW). And the cell associated with the access node) and possibly other RNs. In addition, for the purposes of this disclosure, the term "eNB" is not limited to "evolved node-B", but communicates with components of an MME / SGW or enhanced packet core (EPC). May refer to any type of access node suitable for use.

Certain aspects of the present disclosure relate to a method of operating a wireless communication system comprising a relay node and a base station. The method may include, at the base station, identifying a backhaul link data rate for the first wireless link between the relay node and the base station. An access link data rate can be identified for the second wireless link between the relay node and the user equipment (UE). The allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link can be adjusted and optimized.

Certain aspects of the present disclosure relate to network elements operating in a wireless communication network. The network element may include a hardware processor and a transceiver. The hardware processor and the transceiver are configured to identify the backhaul link data rate for the first wireless link between the relay node and the base station. The access link data rate for the second wireless link between the relay node and the user equipment (UE) can be identified. The allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link can be adjusted and optimized.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the backhaul data rate between the base station and the particular relay node can be identified based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) measured over a particular link.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the access link data rate may be identified based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the average SINR observed over the access link can be scaled by the power control parameter.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the access link data rate may be identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link between the relay node and the associated user equipment.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the average SINR observed over the access link between the relay node and the UE may be scaled by the power control parameter.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is based on the total data transmitted in n subframes over the backhaul link and over N independent access links (T bh −n It is optimized by allocating n subframes every T bh subframes so that the total data transmitted in) subframes is equal.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is such that the expected future transport block for UE-j can be transmitted using n ij resource blocks. Can be optimized by allocating n ij resource blocks to convey data for UE-j over the backhaul link between -i.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the expected future transport block size may be the minimum of the transport block size expected to be transmitted by RN-i and the size of the data buffer for UE-j, where UE-j Is connected to RN-i.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is performed via an access link associated with RN-i and total data transmitted in n i subframes over the backhaul link ( T bh -n i ) may be optimized by allocating n i subframes in the backhaul link between the base station and RN-i so that the total data transmitted in the T bh subframes is the same.

In certain implementations of embodiments, optimizing the data rate over the backhaul link and the access link data rate associated with the relay node is based at least in part on the number of UEs connected to the relay node. And balancing the access link data rate.

Certain implementations may include receiving an average SINR of a UE access link from a relay node.

Certain implementations may include predicting a need for resources at the UE.

Certain implementations may include identifying signal to interference plus noise ratio between the relay node and the base station, and identifying the backhaul data rate to signal to interference and noise ratio. Is based at least in part on.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the access link data rate may be identified based at least in part on the average SINR of all UEs connected to the relay node.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the backhaul data rate between the base station and the particular relay node is identified based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) measured over the particular link.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the average SINR observed over the access link is scaled by the power control parameter.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link between the relay node and the associated user equipment.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the average SINR observed over the access link between the relay node and the UE is scaled by the power control parameter.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is based on the total data transmitted in n subframes over the backhaul link and over N independent access links (T bh −n It is optimized by allocating n subframes every T bh subframes so that the total data transmitted in) subframes is equal.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is such that the expected future transport block for UE-j can be transmitted using n ij resource blocks. Optimized by allocating n ij resource blocks to convey data for UE-j over the backhaul link between -i.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the expected future transport block size may be the minimum of the transport block size expected to be transmitted by RN-i and the size of the data buffer for UE-j, where UE-j Is connected to RN-i.

In certain implementations of embodiments, the allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is performed via an access link associated with RN-i and total data transmitted in n i subframes over the backhaul link ( T bh - the total data to be sent in the n i) of sub-frames are to be equal, it is optimized by assigning every T bh of n i sub-frames for each sub-frame to the backhaul link between the base station and the RN-i.

In certain implementations of embodiments, optimizing the backhaul data rate and the access link data rate maintains a balance between the backhaul data rate and the access link data rate based at least in part on the number of UEs connected to the relay node. It includes.

Certain implementations of the embodiments can include receiving information about the UE from the relay node.

Certain implementations of the embodiments may include predicting a need for resources at the UE.

Certain implementations of the embodiments may include identifying signal-to-interference and noise ratio between the relay node and the base station, and identifying the backhaul data rate is based at least in part on the signal-to-interference and noise ratio.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the backhaul data rate is identified based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) of all UEs connected to the relay node.

In certain implementations of the embodiments, the backhaul data rate is identified based at least in part on the total access link data rate of the relay node.

2 illustrates an example of a supported feature management object according to one embodiment of the disclosure. The wireless communication system 100 may represent the architecture of an LTE or LTE-A system, such as a UE in communication with an EUTRAN. In an example of the operation of an RN, the UE 102 communicates with the MME / SGW 112 via the RN 104 and a Donor eNB (DeNB) 106. The UE 102 can also communicate with the RN 104, the RN 104 can communicate with the eNB 108, and the eNB 108 in turn is represented by an phantom line. It communicates with the MME / SGW 110 via an interface such as.

The E-UTRAN is an eNB (Denor eNB) which serves the RN 104 to the RN 104 via a modified version of the E-UTRAN air interface, the modified version being referred to as the "Un" interface 118. 106) to support relaying by wireless connection. The RN 104 supports the DeNB function, which means that the RN 104 receives the E-UTRA air interface and the radio protocol of the S1 interface 114 and the X2 interface 116. The functions defined for the eNB also apply to the RN, unless explicitly stated. In addition to the eNB functionality, the RN 104 may also support some of the UE functionality (eg, physical layer, layer-2, RRC, and NAS functionality) for wirelessly connecting to the DeNB 106. In general, an eNB can host the following functions:

Figure pct00004
Functions for radio resource management: dynamic allocation of resources to the UE in both radio bearer control, radio admission control, connection mobility control, uplink and downlink (scheduling);

Figure pct00005
IP header compression and encryption of user data streams;

Figure pct00006
Selection of the MME upon UE connection when no routing from the information provided by the UE to the MME can be determined;

Figure pct00007
Routing of user plane data towards the serving gateway;

Figure pct00008
Scheduling and sending of paging messages (from MME);

Figure pct00009
Scheduling and transmission of broadcast information (from MME or O &M);

Figure pct00010
Configuring measurement and measurement reporting for mobility and scheduling;

Figure pct00011
Scheduling and transmission of PWS (including ETWS and CMAS) messages (from MME);

Figure pct00012
CSG handling;

Figure pct00013
Transport level packet marking on uplink.

The DeNB can host the following functions in addition to the eNB functions:

Figure pct00014
S1 / X2 proxy function to support RN;

Figure pct00015
S11 Incoming and S-GW / P-GW features to support RN.

An architecture for supporting the RN is shown in FIG. 1. The RN calls the S1 interface 114, the X2 interface 116, and the Un interface 118. DeNB 106 provides S1 and X2 proxy functionality between RN 104 and other network nodes (other eNBs, MMEs, and S-GWs). The S1 and X2 proxy functions include passing UE-only S1 and X2 signaling messages as well as GTP data packets between the S1 and X2 interfaces associated with the RN and the S1 and X2 interfaces associated with other network nodes. Due to the proxy function, DeNB 106 looks to the RN as MME (for S1-MME), eNB (for X2) and S-GW (for S1-U).

The above examples describe an eNB serving one RN, but each eNB can communicate with more RNs. Other configurations of the indicated components are possible, and there may be more, fewer, different, or additional components.

Relay techniques are used to improve average cell throughput and improve cell coverage. In addition, including the RN in the LTE-A system is also to effectively extend the UE's battery life, increase the UE throughput, and expand cell coverage. One of the problems posed by including the RN is that calculating the overall signal quality between the UE and the MME / SGW is complicated by the presence of two or more communication links. For example, although the connection between the MME and the eNB is often a good quality wired link, the link between the UE and the RN and the RN when determining which access node or RN the UE should connect to or try to camp on during the mobility procedure. Signal quality of both links between eNBs may be considered. Mobility procedures include cell selection cell reselection, handover, or, more generally, any mobility procedure that the UE may perform. In the embodiments described herein, the link between the UE and the RN may be referred to as an access link, and the link between the RN and eNB may be referred to as a backhaul link. However, other names can be used. In addition, for more complex communication systems, there may be multiple backhaul links if there is an additional RN between the eNB and the RN accessed by the UE. In addition, multiple access links may also exist. Other configurations are also possible, all of which are within the spirit and scope of the present disclosure.

The RN can operate in half-duplex mode to avoid in-band interference and reduce the RN cost. In conventional cellular networks, the backhaul link from eNB to MME / SGW is typically a wired or fiber optic connection. Wireless in-band backhaul for Type I relays enables fast roll-out of RNs in the network at lower cost. On the other hand, available radio resources must be distributed between the backhaul link and the access link (ie, the radio link between the UE and the RN). Part of the radio resource must be taken from the access link for backhaul link transmission.

FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating DL subframe partitioning for an access link and a backhaul link. FIG. 2 illustrates a typical half-duplex communication between a DoNB and a RN. As a result, system capacity for Type I relay networks may depend on backhaul link quality as well as resource partitioning between the backhaul link and the access link. In a Type I relay network with in-band backhaul, the RN operates in half-duplex mode, meaning that the RN stops transmitting to the UE when receiving the DL transmission from the donor eNB. The total available radio resources are divided into two parts: backhaul link radio resources and access link radio resources.

DL resource partitioning is typically done in the time domain to minimize self-interference from both of these links in the RN. For example, some subframes are dedicated to backhaul transmission and the remaining subframes are used to service the RN cell UE. One example is shown in FIG. 3.

In addition, in donor cells with multiple RNs, the donor eNB needs to coordinate the backhaul resource allocation between the RNs as well as serving the donor cell UE. In the special case where all UEs in the donor cell are associated with the RN, the donor eNB may be able to allocate all subframes that can be used for the MBSFN for backhaul communication to the RNs. Effective backhaul resource allocation must be able to balance the transmission over the backhaul link, the access link in the donor cell, and the access link in the RN cells so that higher spectral efficiency and user throughput can be achieved for the network.

When the donor eNB determines backhaul radio resource allocation, some information about the RN cell (e.g., the number of RNs in the donor cell, the number of UEs in the RN cell, etc.) is required for the donor eNB to effectively allocate resources for the RN. Must be available at the eNB. Depending on how quickly the RN cell sends updated information to the donor eNB, the backhaul resource allocation may be static, quasi-static or dynamic. However, it is important to reduce the feedback from the RN to the donor eNB and thus reduce the signaling overhead via backhaul. In the next section, several solutions are proposed in terms of trade-offs between performance and feedback overhead.

 For uplink transmission, the RN cell UE initiates transmission to the RN over the access link. The RN may report the total uplink traffic buffer size from all RN cell UEs to the donor eNB using the buffer status report message (which is implemented in the LTE Rel-8 system). Note that the actual amount of resources allocated for uplink backhaul also depends on the spectral efficiency at that link as well as the QoS of the corresponding traffic. The DeNB will treat the RN as a UE and allocate an uplink backhaul resource according to the buffer status report message, uplink backhaul spectral efficiency and QoS requirements from the RN accordingly. As such, no special processing will be required for DeNB to allocate uplink resources between RNs in this case, and of course it is an on-demand procedure. In addition, in LTE Rel-10, the uplink backhaul resource is automatically allocated according to the downlink backhaul resource. For example, in the FDD system, for every configured downlink backhaul subframe, a corresponding uplink backhaul subframe is configured after 4 milliseconds. Therefore, this document concentrates mainly on downlink backhaul resource allocation for type I relay networks due to the more complex nature of the problem.

The MBSFN subframe may be adopted at the RN to receive downlink backhaul transmission from the DeNB. During these MBSFN subframes, the RN does not transmit to the RN cell UE. MBSFN subframe configuration is determined by the DeNB. Proper MBSFN configuration facilitates balancing traffic flow on both links (access link and backhaul link). Otherwise, a traffic buffer overflow or empty buffer may occur at the RN (eg, if there is not enough resources left for access link transmission, a buffer overflow may occur at the RN, or there may not be enough traffic to be sent to the UE). If not in RN, the buffer is empty). This will result in an inefficient use of radio resources and thus compromise system capacity.

The present disclosure relates, for example, to a downlink backhaul resource allocation scheme for a Type I relay network taking into account both performance and feasibility. The quasi-static allocation solution can achieve a system throughput gain compared to the static resource allocation scheme, even if the feedback from the RN is limited. The present disclosure also contemplates in-band backhaul resource allocation over the backhaul link. In the present disclosure, a relay node can act like a small base station that will make its independent scheduling decision, and no feedback is required for relay cell scheduling. Possible feedback can be used to achieve traffic load balancing between the relay link and the access link. In some implementations, such as LTE-A, over the backhaul link, new channels, such as R-PDCCH and R-PDSCH, are designed to carry backhaul traffic more efficiently.

As mentioned above, the present disclosure relates to backhaul resource allocation. In certain implementations, a static backhaul subframe allocation scheme with minimal feedback from RN to DeNB can be used. In other implementations, a dynamic backhaul resource allocation scheme can be used when the RN reports the data rate transmitted over the RN cell access link. Quasi-static resource allocation schemes based on UE geometry are also discussed, which achieve similar performance with dynamic allocation schemes with significantly reduced overhead.

In static backhaul subframe allocation, in order to allocate different amounts of resources to different RNs, it may be assumed that the DeNB knows the number of users associated with each RN. One of the advantages of static subframe allocation is that the DeNB can operate without knowing the bandwidth requirements of the RN cell user. Subframes allocated for backhaul communication may be synchronous between multiple RNs in the donor cell, meaning that each RN in the donor cell is composed of the same backhaul subframes. In LTE Rel-10, synchronous subframe allocation will mean the same MBSFN configuration for RNs, and all RNs listen for DeNB for DL transmission in the same subframes.

4A is a process flow diagram 400 for static allocation of backhaul resources. The capacity required at the backhaul link may be estimated at the DeNB (402). In certain implementations, the capacity at the backhaul link can be estimated based at least in part on the average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) between the donor eNB and the RN. The average SINR between DeNB and RN i may be represented by S i . Applying the Shannon theorem, the estimated capacity in the backhaul link in terms of bits per second (bits per second / Hz) per Hz can be derived as follows:

Figure pct00016

Where N is the number of RNs in the donor cell. For certain cellular systems,

Figure pct00017
Can also be obtained empirically based on the available MCS options. In Equation 1, the logarithm function is base 2. Generally,
Figure pct00018
The
Figure pct00019
Can be expressed as a function of S i , which is SINR, where f (...) represents any function determined by the receiver implementation. In the above formula, f (x) is expressed as log 2 (1 + x).

The required capacity of the RN access link can be identified (404). Since the DeNB may not know the access link quality in the RN cell, the median SINR of the access link geometry distribution in the RN cell i

Figure pct00020
Can be used to determine the estimated capacity on the access link per second per Hz:

Figure pct00021

here

Figure pct00022
Considers possible different power adjustments applied in the RN cell due to possible power offsets of the data compared to the reference signal (
Figure pct00023
Is usually obtained from the reference signal). For example, a cell boundary user may benefit from higher transmit power from an RN in its assigned frequency band, while a cell central user may be transmitting at a relatively lower power in its assigned frequency band. Can still have good signal reception. value
Figure pct00024
May be selected as the mean SINR across UEs, instead of the median SINR.

M i is represented by the number of UEs in RN i. As an example,

Figure pct00025
Can be set to 15dB according to the previous simulation result. In each backhaul subframe, the backhaul bandwidth may be allocated such that the bandwidth allocated to each RN is proportional to the number of UEs (or other functions thereof) in that RN cell:

Figure pct00026

Where B is the bandwidth allocated for backhaul in the DeNB,

Figure pct00027
Is a weighting factor that reflects different backhaul link quality between RNs. E.g,
Figure pct00028
Is inversely proportional to the backhaul link transmission rate (i.e.,
Figure pct00029
Can be set). If the backhaul link transmission rate is higher, then a smaller backhaul bandwidth needs to be allocated. If the backhaul link quality is nearly the same between the RNs communicating with the DeNB,
Figure pct00030
May be set to one.

The number of backhaul subframes may be identified (406). If no UE exists in the RN cell, no backhaul resource will be allocated to that RN. The reason for allocating more resources to RN cells with more users is to facilitate fairness among users and to improve cell boundary performance. The total amount of data in the backhaul per subframe is as follows (in bits per subframe):

Figure pct00031

here

Figure pct00032
Denotes a time duration per subframe (eg 1 ms in LTE). The number of subframes allocated to the backhaul (n of the total available subframes T bh ) is derived such that the total data rate at the backhaul link is equal to the total data rate at the access link across all RNs:

Figure pct00033

here

Figure pct00034
Denotes the available access bandwidth in the i th RN cell, and T bh is the periodicity (in units of subframes) of the backhaul subframe allocation. As such, the number of backhaul subframes may be derived as follows:

Figure pct00035

Figure pct00036

Figure pct00037
Is equal to the bandwidth at DeNB (complete frequency reuse for RN) (i.e.
Figure pct00038
Is assumed to be In addition, if information regarding access link quality in the RNs is not available in the DeNB,
Figure pct00039
And
Figure pct00040
Is the same for all RNs, and for all i
Figure pct00041
ego
Figure pct00042
It is assumed to be. In these assumptions, the equation can be simplified as follows:

Figure pct00043

here

Figure pct00044
Denotes the smallest integer greater than or equal to x.

After the number of backhaul subframes is determined, a backhaul resource for each RN may be allocated 408 according to equation (3).

In the above derivation, UEs directly associated with the donor eNB are not considered. This may not be a problem if the backhaul link quality is better than the access link and does not take all the donor cell resources for backhaul transmission. In some cases, the donor eNB may reserve a certain amount of resources to ensure that UEs connected to the LTE network via the donor eNB have sufficient resources. The maximum number of available backhaul subframes is denoted by n max . If the number n of backhaul subframes calculated from Equation 7 is smaller than n max , no additional processing is required. Otherwise, if the number n of backhaul subframes is greater than n max , n is changed to n max instead. To determine the value of n max , a simple solution is to make it proportional to the number of UEs in each RN cell:

Figure pct00045

Where M 0 represents the number of UEs associated with the donor eNB,

Figure pct00046
Is a weighting factor applied to account for different user priorities.

In summary, static sync subframe allocation uses information about the number of RN cells and the number of UEs connected to each RN cell. In some relay architectures, the DeNB may already know this information. In another relay architecture where the number of RN cell users is not available at the DeNB, the RN may report this information to the DeNB by higher layer signaling. In a static subframe allocation scheme, statistics of large user SINR distributions of donor cells and RN cells may be used as a priori knowledge. If this prior knowledge is not available, the RN may signal the average or median SINR of the RN cell user to the donor eNB.

As another alternative, in the static subframe allocation scheme, without knowing the number of UEs in the RN, the donor eNB determines the backhaul resource for the RN based on the average SINR of the UEs in the RN cell and the average SINR between DeNB and RN. You can decide. For example, the number of backhaul subframes for RN i may be determined as follows:

Figure pct00047

In this case, the average SINR of the UEs in the RN

Figure pct00048
Is a priori knowledge, the RN may not need to transmit any information to the DeNB. Otherwise, the RN may signal the average or median SINR of the UEs in the RN cell to the DeNB. The maximum number of subframes that can be used for backhaul transmission is n max
Figure pct00049
If, no additional processing is necessary. other,
Figure pct00050
Figure pct00051
If, the number of allocated backhaul subframes for RN i may be calculated as follows:

Figure pct00052

4B is a swim lane diagram 450 for static allocation of backhaul resources. Relay node RN i (which represents one of i relay nodes) may obtain an SINR report from one or more UEs,

Figure pct00053
And / or
Figure pct00054
May be calculated (452). The measurement report may be sent to the DeNB (454). Measurement report
Figure pct00055
or
Figure pct00056
And / or M i . The DeNB may calculate the number of required subframes for the backhaul and configure the MBSFN subframe (456). SIB-2 may be sent to RN i (458). The SIB-2 message may include the configured MBSFN pattern.

The DeNB can dynamically allocate backhaul resources. In order for the DeNB to allocate backhaul resources dynamically, the donor eNB will need to track the data rate transmitted instantaneously over each access link and predict the data rate over the access link at a future time instance. . The DeNB may then dynamically change the resource allocation for the backhaul according to the requirements for the access link data rate. In the dynamic resource allocation scheme, as shown in FIG. 5, resources between the access link and the backhaul link may be separated in the frequency domain. FIG. 5 is a schematic block diagram 500 of an example resource allocation for an access link and a backhaul link. In FIG. 5, the dashed box represents a null resource block without transmission. The RN may operate in a full duplex mode in which the backhaul link and the access link are separated in the frequency domain.

6A is a process flow diagram 600 for dynamic allocation of backhaul resources. The expected access link data rate for each RN cell user may be identified 602. The RN may feed back the expected access link data rate for the next subframe transmission for each user (or UE) in the cell. To reduce the amount of RN feedback, if the access link radio quality is slowly changing, the RN can instead report the expected access link data rate for multiple subframes.

The amount of backhaul resources needed for each RN cell user may be identified by the DeNB (604). In some cases, for all RNs the amount of traffic over the backhaul may be equal to the amount of traffic over the access link if the traffic buffer at the DeNB is not empty. In each subframe, the amount of backhaul resources (in units of PRBs) required for the user in RN cell i with user index j is as follows:

Figure pct00057

Figure pct00058

here

Figure pct00059
Denotes the estimated transport block size on the access link in the next subframe before backhaul transmission, Q ij denotes the current traffic buffer size at DeNB for user-j in RN cell i, and B prb is the PRB Bandwidth per second (eg, 180 kHz in LTE / LTE-A). The total amount of available backhaul resources may be identified (606). The amount of available backhaul resource may be limited to a value that may be predetermined or based on other factors. For example, the total amount of available backhaul resources can be defined in the RN cell and based on the number of users in the donor eNB cell.
Figure pct00060
It can be limited to PRBs:

Figure pct00061

Where M 0 represents the number of UEs associated with the donor eNB, N 0 represents the total number of PRBs available at the donor eNB,

Figure pct00062
Is a weighting factor applied to account for different user priorities. For users with higher QoS requirements,
Figure pct00063
Higher values of may be assigned. In the special case where all users have the same priority,
Figure pct00064
May be set to one.

Allocation may be based on available backhaul resources (607). If the backhaul link quality is low, the total amount of resources needed for all RN cell users from equation (9).

Figure pct00065
There may not be enough resources to be allocated because the amount of available resources exceeds. If the amount of backhaul resources is insufficient, the number of PRBs allocated to each RN cell user will be scaled, for example, as follows (610):

Figure pct00066

If there are enough backhaul link resources, a backhaul resource for each RN may be allocated (608). The backhaul resources allocated to the RN cells (in units of PRBs) are for the case where the amount of backhaul resources is sufficient and for the case where the amount of backhaul resources is insufficient, respectively.

Figure pct00067
And
Figure pct00068
Can be derived as

The information that needs to be fed back from the RN to the DeNB is the estimated transport block size in the access link for all RN cell UEs in each subframe.

Figure pct00069
to be. Dynamic backhaul resource allocation utilizes information of the access link data rate and allocates resources such that the same amount of data is transmitted from DeNB to RN over the backhaul link.

6B is a swim lane diagram 650 for dynamic resource allocation for a backhaul link. The relay node RN i estimates Q ij

Figure pct00070
And / or
Figure pct00071
It can be calculated (652). The measurement report may be sent to the DeNB (654). The measurement report can be sent from RNi and for all values of j (value j is the UE index).
Figure pct00072
And
Figure pct00073
It may include a measure of. The DeNB may calculate 656 the number of resource blocks (RBs) required for the backhaul for each UEj. The DeNB may allocate downlink (DL) resources for the backhaul (PDCCH) (658).

In the static backhaul resource allocation scheme, the signaling overhead is negligible, but the performance gain obtained by the RN may not be satisfactory in certain cases. In dynamic backhaul resource allocation, performance can be greatly improved, but signaling overhead can be increased. Quasi-static backhaul resource allocation may be considered. In semi-static resource allocation, the RN may operate in half-duplex mode. When multiple RNs are present in a donor cell, each RN may have a different backhaul subframe allocation and may not share a backhaul subframe with other RNs (shown in FIG. 7).

7 is a block diagram of an exemplary asynchronous multicast broadcast single frequency network (MBSFN) resource allocation 700 for multiple relay nodes. The eNB may allocate one full subframe to one RN and another full subframe to another RN. The advantage of this asynchronous RN operation is that the RN can limit the number of subframes on which it listens to DeNB and more subframes can be used for access link transmission.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, it is also possible to multiplex one set of RNs in one subframe and multiplex another set of RNs in another subframe. 8 is a block diagram of an exemplary asynchronous multicast broadcast single frequency network (MBSFN) resource allocation 800 for multiple relay nodes sharing the same subframe. For example, in subframe 2 802, RN1 and RN2 shares the same subframe. If the RNs are located close to each other, the asynchronous RN operation in FIG. 7 may cause relay-to-relay interference. For example, in FIG. 7, during subframe two 702, RN1 may be listening to the DeNB at the DL frequency, while RN2 may be transmitting to its UE at the same frequency. As a result, when RN1 and RN2 are close to each other, RN1 can see the interference from RN2. In this case, the RN operation in FIG. 8 may be used such that nearby RNs are multiplexed into the same backhaul subframe and distant RNs are assigned different backhaul subframes. In some cases, RNs may be grouped together and then share a common resource to avoid interference. This concept of "relay group" could be widely used. For example, when multiple repeaters are placed in the same building to improve throughput, these repeaters may form a "repeater group" and may have a group ID. These relays can share common downlink backhaul resources or even perform DL / UL multi-point cooperative transmission.

9A is a process flow diagram 900 for quasi-static backhaul resource allocation. Quasi-static subframe allocation can be based, for example, on the average SINR for the access link, which can facilitate the tradeoff between signaling overhead and performance gain. The geometry or average SINR of each RN cell UE may initially be reported to the DeNB, and may be updated quasi-statically, for example, in accordance with UE mobility and radio link change (902). The SINR distribution can be estimated by CQI feedback from the UE at the RN or can be derived from the UE measurement report. The average SINR for a user in RN cell i with user index j is

Figure pct00074
Lt; / RTI > The average capacity for the access link of each RN cell UE may be identified 904. Applying the Shannon theorem, the average capacity (in bits per second per second) for the access link between RN cell i and user j is:

Figure pct00075

here

Figure pct00076
Considers possible different power adjustments applied in the RN cell due to the power offset of the possible data for user j compared to the reference signal. The average capacity (in units of bits per Hz per second) for the backhaul link may be calculated, for example, by Equation 1 (906). The number of backhaul subframes for RN cell i may be identified (908). For example, the number of backhaul subframes can be determined based on the total access link data rate so that approximately the same amount of traffic as on the access link is carried over the backhaul link, which is given by:

Figure pct00077

Where Q ij is the average buffer size for user j that can be reported by RN cell i, or can be derived from the user traffic profile, and T bh is the periodicity (in units of subframes) of the backhaul subframe allocation. . For example, in LTE-A Rel-10, T bh may be set as 10 or 40 subframes. N i in the above formula can be obtained as follows:

Figure pct00078

In the case of a full buffer traffic model for the UE and if the RN has the same bandwidth as the donor eNB (full frequency reuse), equation (14) can be simplified to equation (15):

Figure pct00079

The backhaul resource allocated to the RN cell UE in the backhaul subframe is proportional to the UE access link rate, which is given by:

Figure pct00080

Figure pct00081

In other cases, the UE does not need to be allocated backhaul bandwidth within each backhaul subframe. The overall n i backhaul subframe bandwidth is distributed to the UEs based on the access rate of the UEs. As such, the backhaul resource allocated to the RN cell UE in the n i backhaul subframe is proportional to the UE access link rate, which is given by:

Figure pct00082

Figure pct00083

Similar to that described above for dynamic allocation, any number of subframes may be reserved for a UE that is directly associated with the donor cell, or may be constrained from not making backhaul transmissions (eg, subframe 0). , 4, 5, 9 cannot be used for backhaul subframe in Rel 10). Nmax represents the maximum number of subframes that can be used for backhaul transmission.

Figure pct00084
If, no additional processing is necessary. other
Figure pct00085
If, the number of allocated backhaul subframes can be calculated as follows:

Figure pct00086

Figure pct00087

The backhaul resource allocated to each RN cell UE is the number of modified backhaul subframes.

Figure pct00088
It can be determined using Equation 16 or Eq. In Equation 18, the number of allocated backhaul subframes
Figure pct00089
7 may be dedicated for backhaul transmission to a particular RN i, as illustrated in FIG. 7.

Thus, the number of backhaul subframes and the resources for each RN cell UEN in the backhaul subframe are determined. In quasi-static backhaul subframe allocation, the geometry or average SINR of each RN cell UE is fed back from the RN to the DeNB. No additional complexity will be added to the UE because the RN may be able to estimate the UE geometry or average SINR from the CQI or measurement report. Unlike the static allocation described above, the DeNB can allocate resources according to the data rate in the access link of each RN cell UE, so more efficient resource utilization can be achieved. On the other hand, user geometry or average SINR will change to a slow scale, so only a limited amount of feedback overhead will be needed. As another alternative, instead of the RN signaling the average SINR of each RN cell UE to the DeNB, in order to further reduce the feedback, the RN is calculated using the total access link data rate (e.g.,

Figure pct00090
Or in equation (15)
Figure pct00091
) May be signaled to DeNB.

9B is a swim lane diagram 950 for quasi-static backhaul resource allocation. UE (or multiple UEs, denoted by index j: UE j ) is SINR

Figure pct00092
Can be calculated
Figure pct00093
Can be calculated (952). The measurement report may be sent to the relay node RN i (954). Measurement report
Figure pct00094
or
Figure pct00095
It may include a measure of. The relay node RN i may transmit a measurement report to the DeNB (956). Measurement reports sent to the DeNB for all values of j
Figure pct00096
or
Figure pct00097
And / or
Figure pct00098
It may include a measure of. The DeNB may calculate the number of required subframes for the backhaul and configure the MBSFN subframe (958). A group RNTI-based RRC message indicating the MBSFN subframe configuration may be sent to the DeNB (960). In some cases, this message may also be multicast.

This disclosure describes backhaul resource allocation in a type I relay network, and describes static, dynamic, and quasi-static resource allocation schemes. Depending on the overhead constraints, any scheme may be chosen to accommodate Type I relay network design requirements. However, quasi-static resource allocation solutions can provide the desired tradeoff between performance and signaling overhead. In summary, when RN is added to the macro network, the user throughput can be significantly increased by the high backhaul resource allocation scheme.

Although this specification contains many details, these details should be construed as a description of features that may relate to particular implementations, rather than a limitation to the claims. Certain features that are described in this specification in the context of separate implementations can also be implemented in combination in a single implementation. Alternatively, the various features described in connection with a single implementation can also be implemented individually or in any suitable subcombination in multiple implementations. Moreover, although the features have been described above as operating in a particular combination and may even be initially claimed as such, one or more features from the claimed combination may, in some cases, be excluded from the combination and claimed The combination may relate to subcombinations or variations of subcombinations.

Similarly, although the actions are shown in the drawings in a particular order, this is because these actions must be performed in the particular order shown, or in the sequential order, or all illustrated actions must be performed to achieve desirable results. It should not be construed as requiring something to do. In certain situations, multitasking and parallel processing may be advantageous. Moreover, the separation of various system components in the implementations described above should not be construed as requiring such separation in all implementations.

Other implementations are within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (27)

  1. A method of operating a wireless communication system including a relay node (RN) and a base station,
    At the base station, identifying a backhaul link data rate for a first wireless link between the relay node and the base station;
    Identifying an access link data rate for a second wireless link between the relay node and user equipment (UE); And
    Adjusting the allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link
    / RTI >
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  2. The method of claim 1,
    Wherein a backhaul data rate between the base station and a particular relay node is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) measured over a particular link,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  3. The method of claim 1,
    Wherein the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link.
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  4. The method of claim 3,
    The average SINR observed over the access link is scaled by power control parameter,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  5. The method of claim 1,
    Wherein the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over an access link between the relay node and associated user equipment;
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5,
    The average SINR observed over the access link between the relay node and the UE is scaled by a power control parameter,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  7. The method of claim 1,
    The allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link comprises (T bh -n) over N independent access links and aggregate data transmitted in n subframes over the backhaul link. Is optimized by allocating n subframes every T bh subframes such that the total data transmitted in the subframes is the same,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  8. The method of claim 1,
    The allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is such that the expected future transport block for UE-j can be transmitted using n ij resource blocks, so that the backhaul link between the base station and RN-i Is optimized by allocating n ij resource blocks to convey data for UE-j through
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  9. 9. The method of claim 8,
    The expected future transport block size is one of the transport block size expected to be transmitted by RN-i and the size of the data buffer for UE-j (UE-j is attached to RN-i). Is the minimum value,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  10. The method of claim 1,
    Allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is performed via an access link associated with RN-i and total data transmitted in n i subframes over the backhaul link (T bh -n i ). Optimized by assigning n i subframes to the backhaul link between the base station and RN-i so that the total data transmitted in the subframes is the same, every T bh subframes
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  11. The method of claim 1,
    Optimizing the data rate over the backhaul link and the access link data rate associated with the relay node is based on at least in part on the number of UEs connected to the relay node, between the backhaul data rate and the access link data rate. That includes maintaining balance,
    Method of operation of a wireless communication system.
  12. A network element operating in a wireless communication network,
    Hardware processor; And
    Transceiver
    Lt; / RTI >
    The hardware processor and the transceiver,
    Identify a backhaul link data rate for the first wireless link between the relay node and the base station;
    Identify an access link data rate for a second wireless link between the relay node and a user equipment (UE);
    Is configured to regulate the allocation of available resources between the backhaul link and the access link,
    Network element.
  13. The method of claim 12,
    Wherein a backhaul data rate between the base station and a particular relay node is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) measured over a particular link,
    Network element.
  14. The method of claim 12,
    Wherein the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over the access link.
    Network element.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14,
    The average SINR observed over the access link is scaled by power control parameter,
    Network element.
  16. The method of claim 12,
    Wherein the access link data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) observed over an access link between the relay node and associated user equipment;
    Network element.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16,
    The average SINR observed over the access link between the relay node and the UE is scaled by a power control parameter,
    Network element.
  18. The method of claim 12,
    Allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is performed in (T bh -n) subframes over N independent access links and total data transmitted in n subframes over the backhaul link. Is optimized by allocating n subframes every T bh subframes such that the total data transmitted is equal,
    Network element.
  19. The method of claim 12,
    The allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is such that the expected future transport block for UE-j can be transmitted using n ij resource blocks, so that the backhaul link between the base station and RN-i Is optimized by allocating n ij resource blocks to convey data for UE-j through
    Network element.
  20. 20. The method of claim 19, wherein the expected size of the future transport block is determined by the transport block size and UE-j (UE-j attached to RN-i) expected to be transmitted by RN-i. Is the minimum of the size of the data buffer for
    Network element.
  21. The method of claim 12,
    Allocation of resources between the backhaul link and the access link is performed via an access link associated with RN-i and total data transmitted in n i subframes over the backhaul link (T bh -n i ). Optimized by assigning n i subframes to the backhaul link between the base station and RN-i so that the total data transmitted in the subframes is the same, every T bh subframes
    Network element.
  22. The method of claim 12,
    Optimizing the backhaul data rate and the access link data rate comprises maintaining a balance between the backhaul data rate and the access link data rate based at least in part on the number of UEs connected to the relay node sign,
    Network element.
  23. The method of claim 12,
    Further comprising receiving information about the UE from the relay node,
    Network element.
  24. The method of claim 12,
    Further comprising predicting a request for resources for the UE,
    Network element.
  25. The method of claim 12,
    Further comprising identifying a signal to interference and noise ratio between the relay node and the base station, wherein identifying the backhaul data rate is based at least in part on the signal to interference and noise ratio;
    Network element.
  26. The method of claim 12,
    Wherein the backhaul data rate is identified based at least in part on an average signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) of all UEs connected to the relay node,
    Network element.
  27. The method of claim 12,
    The backhaul data rate is identified based at least in part on a total access link data rate of the relay node;
    Network element.
KR1020147004800A 2011-08-03 2012-08-03 Allocating backhaul resources KR20140044394A (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161514721P true 2011-08-03 2011-08-03
US61/514,721 2011-08-03
US13/486,541 2012-06-01
US13/486,541 US8755324B2 (en) 2011-08-03 2012-06-01 Allocating backhaul resources
PCT/US2012/049609 WO2013020093A1 (en) 2011-08-03 2012-08-03 Allocating backhaul resources

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
KR20140044394A true KR20140044394A (en) 2014-04-14

Family

ID=47626900

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
KR1020147004800A KR20140044394A (en) 2011-08-03 2012-08-03 Allocating backhaul resources

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (1) US8755324B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2740309A1 (en)
KR (1) KR20140044394A (en)
CN (1) CN103875297A (en)
CA (1) CA2843444A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2013020093A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR20190087743A (en) * 2018-01-17 2019-07-25 국방과학연구소 Method and apparatus for frequency allocation

Families Citing this family (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2583388A4 (en) * 2010-06-21 2017-04-19 Nokia Solutions and Networks Oy Method and apparatus for reducing interference
WO2012079629A1 (en) * 2010-12-15 2012-06-21 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Configuring relay nodes
IL218046A (en) * 2012-02-12 2018-11-29 Elta Systems Ltd Multi-directional relay architecture and apparatus and methods of operation useful in conjunction therewith
WO2014000128A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-03 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Method and relay node for implementing multiple wireless backhauls
US9432175B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-08-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Control channel management for relay backhaul
US9420605B2 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-08-16 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for cell coordination in heterogeneous cellular networks
WO2014205772A1 (en) * 2013-06-28 2014-12-31 华为技术有限公司 Method, device, and system for establishing wireless network
EP3038410B1 (en) * 2013-09-13 2019-04-24 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Backhaul link establishment method and base station
US20150117206A1 (en) 2013-10-29 2015-04-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Backhaul management of a small cell using passive estimation mechanism
KR20150055399A (en) * 2013-11-13 2015-05-21 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for allocating resource in wireless communication system
WO2015094256A1 (en) * 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 Intel IP Corporation Apparatus, system and method of dynamic allocation of radio resources to wireless communication links of a plurality of types
US9232516B1 (en) 2014-01-03 2016-01-05 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Managing allocation of frequency bandwidth between donor access link and relay backhaul link
KR101926001B1 (en) * 2014-02-26 2019-02-26 후아웨이 테크놀러지 컴퍼니 리미티드 Network device and data backhaul implementation system and method
CN103888981B (en) * 2014-03-25 2017-12-29 电信科学技术研究院 A kind of determination method and apparatus of communication path
US9813341B1 (en) * 2014-06-12 2017-11-07 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Systems and methods for routing data traffic based on network conditions
CN106664711A (en) * 2014-08-14 2017-05-10 华为技术有限公司 Apparatus and method for distributing return resource
WO2016032573A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Intel IP Corporation Systems and methods for a wireless network bridge
US20180159584A1 (en) * 2015-05-05 2018-06-07 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Base station, small cell, and control channel configuration method
CN106304373A (en) * 2015-05-15 2017-01-04 电信科学技术研究院 A kind of method and apparatus of resource coordination
WO2016187756A1 (en) * 2015-05-23 2016-12-01 华为技术有限公司 Resource allocation method, apparatus and system, and base station
US9807624B2 (en) * 2015-06-01 2017-10-31 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. Self-adjusting wireless in-band backhaul
CN106452703B (en) * 2015-08-10 2019-04-26 普天信息技术有限公司 Relay the resource allocation methods and relay node of return link and access link
US9866310B1 (en) 2015-11-17 2018-01-09 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Dynamic selection of a donor base station to serve a relay node
KR101815967B1 (en) * 2016-02-04 2018-01-08 주식회사 큐셀네트웍스 Method and Apparatus for Measuring a Throughput of a Backhaul Network
US20170257881A1 (en) * 2016-03-01 2017-09-07 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for distributed uplink data processing in a communication network with limited backhaul
EP3445130A4 (en) * 2016-05-31 2019-03-13 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Resource allocation method and device
US10375707B2 (en) * 2016-08-04 2019-08-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Dynamic resource allocation in wireless network
CN106507430B (en) * 2016-11-03 2019-12-27 Oppo广东移动通信有限公司 Data forwarding method and device, router and electronic equipment
CN110351836A (en) * 2018-04-03 2019-10-18 维沃移动通信有限公司 The configuration method and equipment of relay resource
WO2019191936A1 (en) * 2018-04-04 2019-10-10 Oppo广东移动通信有限公司 Resource allocation method and device, and computer storage medium

Family Cites Families (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8032146B2 (en) 2006-08-18 2011-10-04 Fujitsu Limited Radio resource management in multihop relay networks
US8503374B2 (en) * 2007-08-02 2013-08-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Method for scheduling orthogonally over multiple hops
US8428608B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2013-04-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and system for resource allocation in relay enhanced cellular systems
US9801188B2 (en) * 2008-02-01 2017-10-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Backhaul signaling for interference avoidance
US8982765B2 (en) * 2009-03-17 2015-03-17 Lg Electronics Inc. Method and apparatus for transmitting data on relay communication system
US8553711B2 (en) * 2009-03-19 2013-10-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Association and resource partitioning in a wireless network with relays
US8588178B2 (en) * 2009-03-19 2013-11-19 Qualcomm Incorporated Adaptive association and joint association and resource partitioning in a wireless communication network
JPWO2010131488A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2012-11-01 パナソニック株式会社 Wireless communication terminal and wireless communication method
US9565011B2 (en) * 2009-06-04 2017-02-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Data transmission with cross-subframe control in a wireless network
CN101938775B (en) * 2009-06-29 2017-07-18 宏达国际电子股份有限公司 Handle mobile device mobility method and its related communication device
CN102006601B (en) * 2009-09-02 2014-03-19 电信科学技术研究院 Method, system and device for sending collaboration data
WO2011052022A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 株式会社日立製作所 Wireless communication system having relay device, and method for selecting relay terminal
CN101742601B (en) * 2009-12-24 2012-03-14 中国科学技术大学 Switch method for guaranteeing business service quality in relay system
US8634842B2 (en) 2010-01-15 2014-01-21 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Radio resource allocation in systems comprising relays
US8724472B2 (en) * 2010-03-25 2014-05-13 Qualcomm Incorporated Data radio bearer mapping in a telecommunication network with relays
US20110235569A1 (en) * 2010-03-26 2011-09-29 Qualcomm Incorporated Radio bearer management at a donor base station in a wireless network with relays
WO2011129016A1 (en) * 2010-04-16 2011-10-20 富士通株式会社 Mobile wireless communication system including radio relay transmission function
US9276722B2 (en) * 2010-05-05 2016-03-01 Qualcomm Incorporated Expanded search space for R-PDCCH in LTE-A
WO2012015411A1 (en) * 2010-07-29 2012-02-02 Research In Motion Limited System and method for mobile access control and load balancing in a relay network
WO2012028199A1 (en) * 2010-09-03 2012-03-08 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Cooperative relay system
EP2645605A4 (en) * 2010-11-22 2017-06-21 LG Electronics Inc. Method and device for measuring a downlink in a wireless communication system
KR101425762B1 (en) * 2010-12-02 2014-08-01 엘지전자 주식회사 Method for avoiding inter-cell interference in wireless access system
US9635666B2 (en) * 2010-12-22 2017-04-25 Lg Electronics Inc. Method for reporting channel state information requiring sequential transmission in wireless communication system and apparatus for same

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR20190087743A (en) * 2018-01-17 2019-07-25 국방과학연구소 Method and apparatus for frequency allocation

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20130034043A1 (en) 2013-02-07
EP2740309A1 (en) 2014-06-11
CN103875297A (en) 2014-06-18
US8755324B2 (en) 2014-06-17
WO2013020093A1 (en) 2013-02-07
CA2843444A1 (en) 2013-02-07

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP2347526B1 (en) Resource sharing in relay operations within wireless communication systems
CN102870356B (en) The method for mapping resource of ofdm system and device
JP6104966B2 (en) Method and apparatus for subframe interlacing in heterogeneous networks
EP2351401B1 (en) Relaying in a communication system
US9491766B2 (en) Device-to-device communication scenario
US8942758B2 (en) Method and device for link-characteristic based selection of supporting access nodes
KR20110086758A (en) Peer-to-peer communication using a wide area network air interface
JP2012525068A (en) Enabling support for transparent repeaters in wireless communications
EP3457751A1 (en) Enhanced local access in mobile communications
US20120093098A1 (en) Apparatus and method for dynamic communication resource allocation for device-to-device communications in a wireless communication system
US9445380B2 (en) Method and apparatus for power control and interference coordination
JPWO2010001928A1 (en) Wireless communication system, method, program, base station apparatus, and multi-cell / multistrack
US20080285499A1 (en) System and Method for Unbalanced Relay-Based Wireless Communications
EP2471326B1 (en) Wireless communication device and method
KR101317598B1 (en) Relay operation in a wireless communication system
US9936484B2 (en) Control signaling for wireless communication
US20140023008A1 (en) Method for establishing a device-to-device link connection and scheduling for device-to-device communication and terminal relaying
US9014636B2 (en) Cognitive interference management in wireless networks with relays, macro cells, micro cells, pico cells and femto cells
KR101596543B1 (en) FRAME STRUCTURE AND CONTROL SIGNALING FOR DOWNLINK COORDINATED MULTI-POINT (CoMP) TRANSMISSION
RU2433545C2 (en) Data transmission and power control in multihop relay communication system
EP2448351B1 (en) Type II Relay Node Initializataion Procedures.
US8761074B2 (en) Relay backhaul in wireless communication
US9001717B2 (en) Method and apparatus of transmitting and receiving signal in a distributed antenna system
US20120231797A1 (en) Method and Apparatus
US9265053B2 (en) System and method for assigning backhaul resources

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
A201 Request for examination
E902 Notification of reason for refusal
E601 Decision to refuse application