JP5074841B2 - Wood type golf club head - Google Patents

Wood type golf club head Download PDF

Info

Publication number
JP5074841B2
JP5074841B2 JP2007183446A JP2007183446A JP5074841B2 JP 5074841 B2 JP5074841 B2 JP 5074841B2 JP 2007183446 A JP2007183446 A JP 2007183446A JP 2007183446 A JP2007183446 A JP 2007183446A JP 5074841 B2 JP5074841 B2 JP 5074841B2
Authority
JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
face
club head
moment
inertia
cm
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
JP2007183446A
Other languages
Japanese (ja)
Other versions
JP2009018049A (en
Inventor
政利 横田
Original Assignee
ダンロップスポーツ株式会社
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by ダンロップスポーツ株式会社 filed Critical ダンロップスポーツ株式会社
Priority to JP2007183446A priority Critical patent/JP5074841B2/en
Publication of JP2009018049A publication Critical patent/JP2009018049A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of JP5074841B2 publication Critical patent/JP5074841B2/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0466Heads wood-type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0408Heads with defined dimensions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0458Heads with non-uniform thickness of the impact face plate
    • A63B2053/0462Heads with non-uniform thickness of the impact face plate characterised by tapering thickness of the impact face plate

Description

  The present invention relates to a wood type golf club head capable of increasing the flight distance of a hit ball by defining the curvature radius of a face roll in association with the moment of inertia.

  In order to improve the flight distance of the hit ball, various studies have been made on wood-type golf club heads. As one of them, it is considered effective to increase the flight distance to reduce the backspin amount of the hit ball and prevent the so-called blow-up of the ball that rises too high. For this reason, conventionally, various attempts have been proposed to suppress the change in the backspin amount of the hit ball as much as possible and to stabilize the flight distance even when the ball hitting position varies up and down the face.

  For example, the face of a wood type golf club head is often provided with a face roll (sometimes referred to as “vertical face roll” or simply “roll”). As shown in FIG. 7A, the face roll is a round or curved surface that is smoothly convex forward over almost the entire area of the face f in the longitudinal section of the head. Such a face roll is useful for weakening the longitudinal gear effect of the club head and thus suppressing the change in the backspin amount of the hit ball.

  Here, the vertical gear effect will be briefly described. When the ball is hit on the crown portion c side of the sweet spot SS of the face f (hereinafter, such hitting may be simply referred to as “upper hit”) or when the ball is hit on the sole portion s side (hereinafter referred to as “hitting hit”). Such a hit may be simply referred to as “lower hit”.) The head a is a moment that is the product of the force F received from the golf ball b and the orthogonal distance L1 or L2 from the hit position to the head center of gravity G. Thus, the head rotates around the horizontal axis passing through the center of gravity G and extending in the toe-heel direction by a small angle. At this time, since the golf ball b and the face f are in contact with each other, the golf ball b receives a force in the direction opposite to the rotation of the head a like a gear meshing with the face f by the frictional force between them. . In the case of an upper hit, the back spin amount of the ball b decreases. On the other hand, in the case of a lower hit, the back spin amount of the golf ball b increases. These actions are called vertical gear effects.

  On the other hand, as shown in FIG. 7A, a face f provided with a face roll having a curvature radius Y is a face fn not provided with a face roll as shown in FIG. Even when the golf ball b is hit at a position shifted from the sweet spot SS by the same distance from the sweet spot SS to the crown side or the sole portion side, the orthogonal distance L1 or L2 between the head gravity center G and the impact force F Becomes smaller. Therefore, the head provided with the face roll can reduce the rotational moment, thereby suppressing the vertical gear effect and reducing the change in the backspin amount. Further, the face roll increases the launch angle of the ball at the time of top hit. This suppresses a decrease in hitting ball height accompanying a decrease in the backspin amount. On the other hand, the face roll reduces the launch angle of the ball at the time of lower hit, and suppresses an increase in hit height due to an increase in the backspin amount. Related prior art includes the following.

JP 2000-61012 A

  By the way, in recent wood type golf club heads, the moment of inertia Ma about the horizontal axis passing through the head center of gravity and extending in the toe-heel direction is increased due to the increase in the head volume and the optimization technique of the center of gravity of the head. . In such a club head, even if the ball hitting position varies above or below the face, the amount of rotation of the head itself becomes small, and the vertical gear effect is further weakened.

  However, if such a club head is provided with a face roll having a small radius of curvature as before, for example, in the case of a top hit, the backspin amount is not sufficiently reduced. The ball is launched at a high launch angle. This becomes a trajectory that blows up and tends to cause a decrease in flight distance. Further, in the case of a bottom hit, the ball is hit with a low launch angle even though the backspin amount has not increased sufficiently. This results in a low trajectory and a reduction in flight distance.

  The present invention has been devised in view of the above problems. The radius of curvature of the face corresponding to the face roll is related to the moment of inertia around the horizontal axis passing through the center of gravity of the head and extending in the toe-heel direction. The main object is to provide a wood-type golf club head that can suppress a decrease in flight distance even when the ball hitting position is shifted above or below the face, based on making it larger than before.

The invention according to claim 1 of the present invention is a wood type golf club head having a face as a surface for hitting a ball, which passes through the center of gravity of the head in a reference state with a specified lie angle and loft angle, and The inertia moment Ma about the horizontal axis extending in the heel direction is 3000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and the curvature radius Y (inch) of the face in a vertical section including the head center of gravity and the sweet spot in the reference state is 20 The radius of curvature Y (inches) and the moment of inertia Ma (g · cm 2 ) satisfy the following expression (1).
Ma / Y ≦ 250 (1)

The invention according to claim 2 is the wood according to claim 1, wherein the moment of inertia Mb about the vertical axis passing through the center of gravity of the head in the reference state is 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and the face progression is 20 mm or more. Type golf club head.

According to a third aspect of the present invention, the moment of inertia Mb about the vertical axis passing through the center of gravity of the head in the reference state is 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and the face is located in front of a horizontal section passing through the sweet spot. Or a curvature bulge X (inches) of the face bulge and the moment of inertia Mb (g · cm 2 ) satisfy the following expression (2): 2. A wood type golf club head according to 2.
Mb / X ≦ 350 (2)
The invention according to claim 4 is the wood type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 3 , wherein the moment of inertia Ma is 3200 to 4500 (g · cm 2 ). The present invention is the wood type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 3 , wherein the moment of inertia Ma is 3900 to 4500 (g · cm 2 ).
The invention according to claim 6 is the wood type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the curvature radius Y is 40 inches or less, and the invention according to claim 7 is the curvature according to the invention. The wood type golf head according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein a radius Y is 30 inches or less.

In a wood-type golf club head, when the moment of inertia Ma about the horizontal axis passing through the center of gravity of the head and extending in the toe-heel direction increases to 3000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, the ball hitting position is shifted above or below the face. Even in this case, the amount of rotation of the head around the horizontal axis is relatively small. That is, the vertical gear effect described above is weakened, and the backspin amount of the hit ball is not greatly reduced even when hitting. Since the golf club head of the present invention has a face (face roll) having a large curvature radius Y defined in relation to the moment of inertia Ma, an increase in launch angle at the time of top hit can be suppressed, and a backspin amount is large. A significant decrease in flight distance is suppressed. Similarly, in the club head having a large moment of inertia Ma, the backspin amount does not increase greatly even when hitting downward, but by increasing the radius of curvature Y of the face, a decrease in launch angle can be suppressed and, consequently, a flight distance is remarkable. Reduction is suppressed.

Hereinafter, an embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings.
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wood-type golf club head (hereinafter, simply referred to as “head” or “club head”) 1 according to the present embodiment in a reference state, FIG. 2 is a plan view thereof, and FIG. FIG. 4 and FIG. 4 show AA sectional views of FIG.

  Here, the reference state means that the shaft axis center line CL is arranged in an arbitrary vertical plane VP as shown in FIG. 2, and a specified lie angle α with respect to the horizontal plane HP as shown in FIG. As shown in FIG. 4, the sweet spot SS of the face 2 is held at the loft angle (real loft angle) β (the face angle is set to zero). In the present specification, the club head 1 will be described as being in such a reference state unless otherwise specified. The loft angle is given as an angle larger than 0 degrees.

  The wood type golf club head does not mean that the head material is made of a wood material, but refers to a head having a head shape that has conventionally been mainly formed of a wood material. Specifically, it includes at least the driver (# 1), the plush (# 2), the spoon (# 3), the buffy (# 4), and the creek (# 5). This concept includes a head having a similar shape.

  In the figure, a club head 1 includes a face portion 3 having a face 2 as a surface for hitting a ball on the front side, a crown portion 4 connected to an upper edge 2a of the face 2 and forming an upper surface of the head, and the face 2 A sole portion 5 that is connected to the lower edge 2b and forms the bottom of the head, and a side portion 6 that extends between the crown portion 4 and the sole portion 5 from the toe side edge 2c of the face 2 through the back face BF to the heel side edge 2d. And a hosel part 7 having a shaft insertion hole 7a to which a shaft (not shown) is mounted, and a hollow part i is provided inside. When the golf club head 1 is not mounted with a shaft, the center line of the shaft insertion hole 7a is used as the shaft axis center line CL.

  The face 2 is provided with a plurality of score lines 9 extending linearly in the toe / heel direction and arranged in parallel to each other. The score line 9 is a concave groove having a small width and depth, and provides moderate friction between the face and the ball even in a wet state, and effectively prevents so-called hit ball dropping.

  The club head 1 of this embodiment is formed from a metal material. Although it does not specifically limit as said metal material, For example, a stainless alloy, maraging steel, titanium, a titanium alloy, a magnesium alloy, or an aluminum alloy with a large specific strength is desirable. Moreover, as a titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn, Ti-15Mo-5Zr-3Al, Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al, etc. are suitable, for example. In order to reduce the weight and adjust the position of the center of gravity G of the head, a fiber reinforced resin may be used for a part of the club head 1.

  The club head 1 can be manufactured by joining a plurality of members (for example, about 2 to 5). The number of members is not particularly limited. Each member (each piece) is formed by various forming methods such as casting, forging, or pressing.

Further, the volume of the club head 1 is preferably 400 cm 3 or more, more preferably 420 cm 3 or more, and further preferably 440 cm 3 or more. Here, the said volume is taken as the whole volume enclosed by the head outer surface obtained by filling the shaft insertion hole 7a of the hosel part 7. FIG. Such a large volume provides a sense of security at the time of addressing, and is useful for increasing the moment of inertia and the center of gravity depth of the club head 1 and improving the directionality of the hit ball. On the other hand, even if the volume of the club head 1 is too large, there are problems such as an increase in head weight, a deterioration in swing balance and a decrease in durability, and therefore it is preferably 600 cm 3 or less, more preferably 500 cm 3 or less. , when adapting the rules of Golf, 470 cm 3 or less, more preferably 460 cm 3 or less.

The club head 1 of the present invention has an inertia moment Ma of about 3000 (g · cm 2 ) around the horizontal axis passing through the center of gravity G of the head in the reference state and extending in the toe-heel direction. Here, the “toe-heel direction” is a direction parallel to both the vertical plane VP and the horizontal plane HP, as represented by a symbol TH in FIG. Thus, by setting the moment of inertia Ma to 3000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, even when the ball hitting position is shifted above or below the face 2, the amount of rotation (blur) around the horizontal axis of the club head 1 is increased. Can be reduced. As a result, the vertical gear effect is weakened, and as a result, the change in the backspin amount of the hit ball is suppressed regardless of the hit point position.

On the other hand, if the moment of inertia Ma around the horizontal axis is less than 3000 (g · cm 2 ), the above-described effects cannot be obtained, and the backspin amount of the hit ball is not preferable. In particular, the moment of inertia Ma is preferably 3200 (g · cm 2 ) or more, more preferably 3500 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and further preferably 3900 (g · cm 2 ) or more. On the other hand, if the moment of inertia Ma is too large, the weight of the head may increase or the shape of the head may become specific. Therefore, it is preferably 4500 (g · cm 2 ) or less, more preferably 4000 (g・ Cm 2 ) or less is desirable.

  The cross-sectional view shown in FIG. 4 is a vertical plane including the head gravity center G and the sweet spot SS in the reference state. FIG. 5 is a partially enlarged view of the face portion 3 of FIG. As apparent from the figure, the face 2 of the club head 1 according to this embodiment has a face roll FR with a radius of curvature Y that smoothly protrudes forward on a vertical plane including the center of gravity G of the head and the sweet spot SS. Provided. In the present embodiment, the face roll FR is provided over substantially the entire face 2. The face roll FR smoothly extends not only to the cross-sectional position shown in FIG. 4 but also to the toe side and the heel side of the face 2.

In the club head 1, the radius of curvature Y (inch) of the face 2 and the moment of inertia Ma (g · cm 2 ) about the horizontal axis satisfy the following expression (1).
Ma / Y ≦ 250 (1)

In a club head having a large moment of inertia Ma around the horizontal axis of 3000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, even when the ball hitting position is shifted above or below the face 2, the amount of rotation of the head around the horizontal axis is small, As a result, the change in the backspin amount of the hit ball is small. That is, as described above, the backspin amount of the hit ball is not greatly reduced even when hitting the upper ball, and the back spin amount of the hit ball is not greatly increased even when hitting the lower ball as described above.

  On the other hand, the launch angle of the ball is substantially equal to the angle formed by the normal line set at the ball hitting position of the face 2 and the horizontal axis. Therefore, in the head having a large moment of inertia Ma as described above, when the curvature radius Y of the face 2 is small, the ball is hit with the sweet spot SS even though the backspin amount is not sufficiently reduced at the time of top hit. The launch angle is larger than the case. Further, at the time of the lower impact, the launch angle is smaller than that in the case of the impact at the sweet spot although the backspin amount has not increased sufficiently. These all reduce the flight distance.

  Therefore, in the present invention, for the golf club head having a large inertia moment Ma, the curvature radius Y of the face 2 is increased in association with the inertia moment Ma. Specifically, the value of the ratio (Ma / Y) is suppressed to 250 or less. Thereby, at the time of the top hit, it is possible to prevent the hitting angle of the hit ball from becoming large, and consequently to prevent the hit of the hit ball. Similarly, it is possible to prevent the launch angle from becoming smaller at the time of lower impact, and thus to prevent a decrease in flight distance due to insufficient height. If the ratio (Ma / Y) exceeds 250, the launch angle at the time of lower impact is large and the launch angle at the time of lower impact is large even though the vertical gear effect is weakened as in the conventional case. Both of these are likely to cause a significant decrease in flight distance.

  Here, as shown in FIG. 5, the radius of curvature Y of the face 2 is a face upper point Pu which is a point on the face that is 10 mm downward from the upper edge 2a of the face 2, and a lower edge 2b of the face 2 For convenience, it is defined as the radius of a single circular arc passing through three points: a face lower point Pd, which is a point on the face that is 10 mm upward from the point, and a sweet spot SS. The radius of curvature Y is specified with the score line 9 filled.

In particular, the ratio (Ma / Y) between the radius of curvature Y (inches) of the face 2 and the moment of inertia Ma (g · cm 2 ) around the horizontal axis is more preferably 245 or less, more preferably 200 or less. More preferably, 195 or less is desirable. On the other hand, if the ratio (Ma / Y) is too small, the trajectory of the hit ball tends to be low at the time of the upper hit, or the trajectory of the hit ball tends to be higher at the time of the lower hit, and is preferably 90 or higher, more preferably 110 or higher. More preferably, 130 or more is desirable.

Further, the curvature radius Y (inch) of the face 2 is 20 inches or more . On the other hand, the upper limit of the curvature radius Y is not particularly limited. Therefore, the curvature radius Y may be infinite (the face 2 of such a club head 1 is substantially flat and has no face roll). However, even if the head has a large moment of inertia Ma, a vertical gear effect is produced. Therefore, the curvature radius Y of the face is preferably 100 inches or less, more preferably 50 inches or less, and even more preferably 40 inches or less. More preferably , the launch angle is set to 30 inches or less , and the launch angle is slightly adjusted at the time of upper impact and lower impact. In the present embodiment, the center of gravity G of the head does not coincide with the center of the radius of curvature Y.

  In addition, if the height h in the vertical direction of the face 2 measured in the cross section shown in FIG. 5 is too small, it may be difficult to hold or the resilience may be lowered to impair the flight distance. Desirably, more preferably 35 mm or more, and still more preferably 40 mm or more. On the other hand, if the height h of the face 2 becomes excessively large, the position of the sweet spot SS may be increased, and the flight distance is likely to be similarly lost. From such a viewpoint, the height h of the face is preferably 70 mm or less, more preferably 65 mm or less, and still more preferably 60 mm or less.

  The upper edge 2a and the lower edge 2b of the face 2 are determined as the positions of the edges when they can be clearly identified by edges or the like, but when they cannot be clearly identified, the actual curvature radius of the face 2 is It is determined as the position that becomes 20 mm for the first time from the sweet spot SS side.

In the club head 1 of the present embodiment, the inertia moment Mb around the vertical axis passing through the head center of gravity G in the reference state is 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, more preferably 4500 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and It is preferably made of 5000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, particularly preferably 5200 (g · cm 2 ) or more. For this reason, even when the ball striking position is shifted to the toe or heel side of the face 2, the amount of rotation (blur) of the head around the vertical axis can be kept small. For this reason, if the face 2 can be returned correctly at the moment of impact of the ball, the directionality of the hit ball can be stabilized with respect to the variation in the hit position of the face 2 in the toe-heel direction. If the moment of inertia Mb is too large, the head weight may increase or the shape of the head may become unique. Therefore, it is preferably 8000 (g · cm 2 ) or less, more preferably 6000 ( g · cm 2 ) or less is desirable.

  Further, a club head having a large moment of inertia Mb around the vertical axis is preferable from the viewpoint of suppressing head blurring with respect to variations in the hitting position in the toe-heel direction, but the center-of-gravity distance GL1 (shown in FIG. 3) increases. For these reasons, the return of the head during the swing tends to be poor. In order to prevent such deterioration of the head return, the face progression of the club head 1 is preferably set to 20 mm or more.

  Here, as shown in FIG. 4, the face progression is a head sectional view including the center of gravity G of the head and the sweet spot SS, and the vertical plane VP including the shaft axis center line CL and the leading edge of the club head 1. The distance FP in the horizontal direction from Le is assumed to be FP.

  As shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, by increasing the face progression FP to 20 mm or more, more preferably 21 mm or more, the shaft axis center line CL is moved toward the rear of the head. Thereby, the shaft axis center line CL can be brought close to the head gravity center G without reducing the moment of inertia Mb, the gravity center depth GL2 (shown in FIG. 4), and the like. This reduces the moment of inertia Mc of the club head around the shaft axis center line CL, making it easier for the golfer to control the head 1 during the swing. Therefore, even if the player is an intermediate player, the return of the head is improved, and excellent directionality of the hit ball is secured by the synergistic action with the large moment of inertia Mb.

  If the face progression FP is excessively increased, a sense of incongruity is likely to occur when it is held, and the inertia moment Mc is decreased, so that the head is likely to return excessively, and in turn, hooks are likely to occur. From this point of view, the face progression FP is preferably 25 mm or less, more preferably 24 mm or less, and even more preferably 23 mm or less.

  The same effect as the vertical gear effect also occurs in the toe-heel direction of the face. That is, as shown in FIG. 8A, when the ball b is hit on the toe side of the sweet spot SS of the face 2, the club head 1 rotates clockwise around the head center of gravity G, while the ball b In the plan view, a side spin in a counterclockwise direction (hook rotation in the case of right-handed) occurs, and it tends to shift to the left from the target flying line direction j. On the contrary, when the ball b is hit on the heel side from the sweet spot SS, the club head 1 rotates counterclockwise around the head center of gravity G, while the ball b rotates clockwise (slice in the case of the right strike). Rotation) side spin occurs, and it tends to shift to the right from the target flying line direction j. Such a phenomenon is known as a lateral gear effect.

  In order to prevent the directionality of the hit ball from deteriorating due to the lateral gear effect, the face 2 usually has a face bulge with a radius of curvature X (“ Also called “Horizontal Face Bulge”). In such a face bulge, as shown in FIG. 8 (b), when the ball is hit on the toe side of the sweet spot SS, the ball has a rightward swing angle θt with respect to the target flying line direction j. After launching in the right direction, the effect of returning to the target flying ball direction j is obtained by the side spin of the hook rotation. On the other hand, when the ball b is hit on the heel side from the sweet spot SS, the ball b is hit with a swing angle θh in the left direction with respect to the target flying line direction j and then the target by the side spin of the slice rotation An effect of returning to the flying ball direction j is obtained. That is, the bending of the ball due to the side spin and the lateral deflection angle θt or θh at the time of launching the ball cancel each other, thereby stabilizing the directionality.

However, as described above, when the moment of inertia Mb around the vertical axis of the club head 1 is increased to 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, the lateral gear effect is also reduced, and the side spin amount is reduced. The face bulge may cause the ball to be launched with an excessive lateral deflection angle.

Therefore, for such a club head 1 having a large moment of inertia Mb, the radius of curvature X (inches) of the face bulge and the moment of inertia Mb (g · cm 2 ) around the vertical axis are expressed by the following equation (2). It is desirable to be configured to satisfy.
Mb / X ≦ 350 (2)

  As in the above equation (2), for a golf club head having a large moment of inertia Mb, by increasing the radius of curvature X of the face bulge in relation to the moment of inertia Mb, It is possible to prevent the deflection angle in the lateral direction of the hit ball from being increased, and thus to prevent the directionality of the hit ball from deteriorating.

  Here, as shown in FIG. 6, the radius of curvature X of the face bulge FB is a point on the face that is separated from the toe side edge 2c of the face 2 by 20 mm toward the sweet spot SS in the toe-heel direction. A single point that passes through the three points of the side point Pt, the face heel side point Ph that is a point on the face that separates 20 mm from the heel side edge 2d of the face 2 in the toe-heel direction and the sweet spot SS side, and the sweet spot SS. It is defined for convenience as the radius of one arc. The curvature radius X is specified with the score line 9 filled. In addition, the toe side edge 2c and the heel side edge 2d of the face 2 are determined as the positions of the edges when they can be clearly identified by edges, but when they cannot be clearly identified, in the cross section of FIG. The actual curvature radius of the face 2 is determined as a position where it becomes 20 mm for the first time from the sweet spot SS side.

In particular, the ratio (Mb / X) between the radius of curvature X (inches) of the face bulge and the moment of inertia Mb (g · cm 2 ) around the vertical axis is more preferably 325 or less, more preferably 260 or less. Is desirable. On the other hand, if the ratio (Mb / X) is too small, the ballistic trajectory may be excessively hooked when the toe side is hit, or may be excessively sliced when hitting the heel side. Is preferably 100 or more, more preferably 130 or more.

  Further, the curvature radius X (inch) of the face bulge is not particularly limited as long as it satisfies the above formula (2). However, when the radius is reduced, the above-mentioned action tends to be relatively lowered. Preferably, it is 15 inches or more, more preferably 16 inches or more, and further preferably 20 inches or more. On the other hand, the upper limit of the curvature radius X is not particularly limited. Therefore, the radius of curvature X may be infinite (the face 2 of such a club head 1 is substantially flat and does not have a face bulge FB). However, even with a club head having a large moment of inertia Mb, the lateral gear effect is slightly generated, so the radius of curvature X is preferably 100 inches or less, more preferably 50 inches or less, and even more preferably 40 inches or less. It is desirable to give a slight lateral deflection angle when hitting the toe or heel side. Note that the center of gravity G of the head does not coincide with the center of the radius of curvature X.

  Further, in the wood type golf club head, the inertia moment Ma around the horizontal axis is usually smaller than the inertia moment Mb around the vertical axis. For this reason, the vertical gear effect tends to appear stronger than the horizontal gear effect. Therefore, it is desirable to make the curvature radius Y of the face roll FR smaller than the curvature radius X of the face bulge FB and weaken the vertical gear effect more strongly than the horizontal gear effect. In particular, the ratio of the radii of curvature (X / Y) is preferably greater than 1.0, more preferably 1.2 or more, and even more preferably 1.5 or more. On the other hand, if the ratio (X / Y) becomes excessively large, the radius of curvature Y of the face roll becomes excessively small. As a result, the launch angle at the time of upper impact becomes large, or the launch angle at the time of lower impact becomes small and the flying is reduced. There is a risk of losing distance. From such a viewpoint, the ratio (X / Y) is preferably 3.5 or less, more preferably 3.0 or less.

  As shown in FIG. 3, the width FW in the toe-heel direction of the face 2 at the sweet spot SS position in the front view in the reference state is suitable for the sense of security and weight distribution of the head. Therefore, the thickness is preferably 90 mm or more, more preferably 95 mm or more, and further preferably 100 mm or more, and the upper limit is preferably 130 mm or less, more preferably 127 mm or less, and further preferably 125 mm or less.

  Although the embodiment of the present invention has been described above, it is needless to say that the present invention is not limited to the specific embodiment described above, and can be implemented in various forms.

Based on the specifications in Tables 1 to 3, hollow wood-type golf club heads were manufactured, and the flight distance and directionality of the hit ball were tested. Each head has a head body made of a cast product of Ti-6Al-4V having an opening in the crown portion, and a crown member made of a forged product of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn fixed to the opening by laser welding. And a weight member fixed to the inside of the head with an epoxy adhesive. The common specifications of each part are as follows.
Head volume: 460cm 3
Head mass: 198g
Lie angle: 58 ° Real loft angle: 10.5 ° Thickness of the central part including the sweet spot of the face part: 3.8mm
The thickness of the peripheral part of the face part: 2.5mm
Face height h: 52 mm
Face width FW: 105mm
Crown member thickness: 0.4mm
Weight member: Tungsten alloy Then, the moments of inertia Ma and Mb were adjusted by changing the thickness of the sole portion, the side portion and / or the crown portion, the number of weight members, the position of the hosel portion, and the like. The test procedure is as follows.

<Hit distance of hit ball>
A wood type golf club having a 48 g FRP golf club shaft (MP400, Flex R, manufactured by SRI Sports Co., Ltd.) mounted on each test head is manufactured, and these are mounted on a swing robot, and 3 at a head speed of 45 m / s. A piece golf ball (“SRIXON” (registered trademark of the company) Z-UR manufactured by SRI Sports Co., Ltd.) was hit in six balls, and the average value of the flight distance was measured for each club. Further, the following five hitting positions were used.
SS hit: sweet spot position on the face Upper hit: 10mm above the sweet spot Lower hit: 10mm below the sweet spot Toe hit: 10mm below the sweet spot on the toe side Heel hit: sweet spot 10mm from heel to heel side

<Direction of hit ball>
The golf club was used and evaluated by an actual hit test in which 10 golf balls of 10 to 20 handicap hit the 3 piece golf balls 10 balls at a time. The amount of deviation between the stop position of the ball after the fall and the target flying line is measured with the slice side deviation as a positive value and the hook side deviation as a negative value. Summarized.
B) Average deviation (average of 50 balls)
B) Maximum deviation (average value of deviations of the most sliced hitting ball)
C) Minimum deviation (average value of deviations of the most hooked ball)
D) Difference in deviation (maximum deviation-minimum deviation)
In addition, about the directionality of a hit ball, it measured only about the Example described in Table 2 and Table 3.
Test results and the like are shown in Tables 1 to 3.

As apparent from Table 1, it can be confirmed that the club head of the example significantly suppresses the decrease in the flight distance at the time of the upper hit and the lower hit by increasing the curvature radius Y of the face roll. Further, as shown in Table 2, it was confirmed that when face progression was limited, the flight distance and directionality were improved in a well-balanced manner. Further, as shown in Table 3 , it was confirmed that when the face bulge was defined, the flight distance and the directionality were improved with good balance.

It is a perspective view of the club head which shows embodiment of this invention. FIG. It is a front view of FIG. It is AA sectional drawing of FIG. It is the elements on larger scale of FIG. It is a BB end view of FIG. (A) And (b) is sectional drawing of the club head explaining the vertical gear effect. (A) And (b) is sectional drawing of the club head explaining the side gear effect.

Explanation of symbols

1 golf club head 2 face 3 face portion 4 crown portion 5 sole portion 6 side portion 7a shaft insertion hole 7 hosel portion i hollow portion CL shaft axis center line FP face progression FR face roll FB face bulge Y radius of curvature X of face roll Face bulge radius of curvature SS Sweet spot G Head center of gravity Ma Moment of inertia about horizontal axis Mb Moment of inertia about vertical axis

Claims (7)

  1. A wood type golf club head having a face which is a surface for hitting a ball,
    The inertia moment Ma about the horizontal axis that passes through the center of gravity of the head in the reference state with the specified lie angle and loft angle and extends in the toe-heel direction is 3000 (g · cm 2 ) or more,
    And the curvature radius Y (inch) of the face in a vertical section including the center of gravity of the head and the sweet spot in the reference state is 20 inches or more,
    Moreover , the wood type golf club head characterized in that the radius of curvature Y (inch) and the moment of inertia Ma (g · cm 2 ) satisfy the following formula (1).
    Ma / Y ≦ 250 (1)
  2. 2. The wood type golf club head according to claim 1, wherein the moment of inertia Mb about the vertical axis passing through the center of gravity of the head in the reference state is 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more and the face progression is 20 mm or more.
  3. A moment of inertia Mb about a vertical axis passing through the center of gravity of the head in the reference state is 4000 (g · cm 2 ) or more, and the face is a convex surface smoothly projecting forward in a horizontal section passing through the sweet spot. Have a bulge,
    The wood type golf club head according to claim 1 or 2, wherein a curvature radius X (inch) of the face bulge and the moment of inertia Mb (g · cm 2 ) satisfy the following expression (2).
    Mb / X ≦ 350 (2)
  4. The moment of inertia Ma is 3200-4500 (g · cm 2 The wood type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 3.
  5. The inertia moment Ma is 3900-4500 (g · cm 2 The wood type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 3.
  6. The wood-type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the curvature radius Y is 40 inches or less.
  7. The wood-type golf club head according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the curvature radius Y is 30 inches or less.
JP2007183446A 2007-07-12 2007-07-12 Wood type golf club head Active JP5074841B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2007183446A JP5074841B2 (en) 2007-07-12 2007-07-12 Wood type golf club head

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2007183446A JP5074841B2 (en) 2007-07-12 2007-07-12 Wood type golf club head
US12/216,455 US20090017938A1 (en) 2007-07-12 2008-07-03 Wood-type golf club head

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
JP2009018049A JP2009018049A (en) 2009-01-29
JP5074841B2 true JP5074841B2 (en) 2012-11-14

Family

ID=40253621

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
JP2007183446A Active JP5074841B2 (en) 2007-07-12 2007-07-12 Wood type golf club head

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20090017938A1 (en)
JP (1) JP5074841B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090156329A1 (en) * 2006-10-25 2009-06-18 Noah De La Cruz Golf club with optimum moments of inertia in the vertical and hosel axes
US7731603B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2010-06-08 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Golf club head
US8801541B2 (en) 2007-09-27 2014-08-12 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Golf club
US8715107B2 (en) * 2009-11-04 2014-05-06 Sri Sports Limited Golf club head
JP2011212102A (en) * 2010-03-31 2011-10-27 Mrc Composite Products Co Ltd Golf club head
JP5890995B2 (en) * 2011-10-12 2016-03-22 ダンロップスポーツ株式会社 Golf club
JP2016221099A (en) * 2015-06-02 2016-12-28 ブリヂストンスポーツ株式会社 Manufacturing method, golf club head, and design method
JP6240293B2 (en) * 2016-10-31 2017-11-29 ダンロップスポーツ株式会社 Golf club head

Family Cites Families (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4471961A (en) * 1982-09-15 1984-09-18 Pepsico, Inc. Golf club with bulge radius and increased moment of inertia about an inclined axis
JP2856325B2 (en) * 1989-08-10 1999-02-10 ブリヂストンスポーツ株式会社 Wood club head
US6425832B2 (en) * 1997-10-23 2002-07-30 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head that optimizes products of inertia
US6669580B1 (en) * 1997-10-23 2003-12-30 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head that optimizes products of inertia
JP2000061012A (en) * 1998-08-18 2000-02-29 Daiwa Seiko Inc Wood golf club head
JP2000084124A (en) * 1998-09-16 2000-03-28 Bridgestone Sports Co Ltd Wood club head
US7115047B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2006-10-03 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with customizable center of gravity
US6582323B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2003-06-24 Callaway Golf Company Multiple material golf club head
US7491134B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2009-02-17 Callaway Golf Company Multiple material golf club head
US6491592B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2002-12-10 Callaway Golf Company Multiple material golf club head
TW577761B (en) * 1999-11-01 2004-03-01 Callaway Golf Co Multiple material golf club head
US7121955B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2006-10-17 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with customizable center of gravity
US6739983B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2004-05-25 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with customizable center of gravity
US7128661B2 (en) * 1999-11-01 2006-10-31 Callaway Golf Company Multiple material golf club head
JP2001161866A (en) * 1999-12-06 2001-06-19 Sumitomo Rubber Ind Ltd Golf club head
US6508722B1 (en) * 2000-01-31 2003-01-21 Acushnet Company Golf club head and improved casting method therefor
JP3992918B2 (en) * 2000-10-26 2007-10-17 美津濃株式会社 Golf club
US6454664B1 (en) * 2000-11-27 2002-09-24 Acushnet Company Golf club head with multi-radius face
US6524194B2 (en) * 2001-01-18 2003-02-25 Acushnet Company Golf club head construction
US6458043B1 (en) * 2001-04-18 2002-10-01 Acushnet Company Golf club head with multi-radius face
JP4274712B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2009-06-10 ダイワ精工株式会社 Wood type golf club
US6506124B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2003-01-14 Callaway Golf Company Method for predicting a golfer's ball striking performance
JP2003210625A (en) * 2002-01-28 2003-07-29 Sumitomo Rubber Ind Ltd Golf club head
US6602149B1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2003-08-05 Callaway Golf Company Bonded joint design for a golf club head
US6623374B1 (en) * 2002-04-15 2003-09-23 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head and set of golf clubs
JP4044363B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2008-02-06 Sriスポーツ株式会社 Wood type golf club head
US7147572B2 (en) * 2002-11-28 2006-12-12 Sri Sports Limited Wood type golf club head
JP2004261451A (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-09-24 Sumitomo Rubber Ind Ltd Golf club head
US7066835B2 (en) * 2004-09-10 2006-06-27 Callaway Golf Company Multiple material golf club head
US7591737B2 (en) * 2005-01-03 2009-09-22 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head
US7163468B2 (en) * 2005-01-03 2007-01-16 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head
US7166038B2 (en) * 2005-01-03 2007-01-23 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head
JP5314319B2 (en) * 2008-04-15 2013-10-16 ダンロップスポーツ株式会社 Wood type golf club head

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP2009018049A (en) 2009-01-29
US20090017938A1 (en) 2009-01-15

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6530847B1 (en) Metalwood type golf club head having expanded additions to the ball striking club face
US7662050B2 (en) Iron-type golf clubs
US7507167B2 (en) Golf club head with multiple undercuts
JP4451797B2 (en) Golf club head
US7186188B2 (en) Iron-type golf clubs
US8647216B2 (en) Golf club head
US9999812B2 (en) Golf club head or other ball striking device having impact-influencing body features
JP3145480U (en) Changing hollow type golf club
US9199138B2 (en) Golf clubs and club-heads comprising a face plate having a central recess and flanking recesses
US4420156A (en) Iron-type golf clubs
US5544885A (en) Iron with improved mass distribution
JP5467717B2 (en) Metal wood club with improved moment of inertia
US7572193B2 (en) Golf club head
EP2646123B1 (en) Golf club heads or other ball striking devices having distributed impact response
US7524249B2 (en) Golf club head with concave insert
JP4128970B2 (en) Golf club
CA2432479C (en) Metal wood golf club with progressive weighting
US7192361B2 (en) Iron-type golf clubs
JP4632342B2 (en) Golf club head
US6048278A (en) Metal wood golf clubhead
US8485920B2 (en) Metal wood golf club head
US9737770B2 (en) Metal wood club
EP2470273B1 (en) Golf clubs and golf club heads having a configured shape to adjust the center of gravity
US7232377B2 (en) Iron-type golf clubs
JP4423435B2 (en) Golf club head

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
A621 Written request for application examination

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A621

Effective date: 20100222

A131 Notification of reasons for refusal

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A131

Effective date: 20111101

A977 Report on retrieval

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A971007

Effective date: 20111104

A521 Written amendment

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A523

Effective date: 20111219

TRDD Decision of grant or rejection written
A01 Written decision to grant a patent or to grant a registration (utility model)

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A01

Effective date: 20120817

A01 Written decision to grant a patent or to grant a registration (utility model)

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A01

A61 First payment of annual fees (during grant procedure)

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: A61

Effective date: 20120824

R150 Certificate of patent or registration of utility model

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R150

FPAY Renewal fee payment (event date is renewal date of database)

Free format text: PAYMENT UNTIL: 20150831

Year of fee payment: 3

R250 Receipt of annual fees

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R250

R250 Receipt of annual fees

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R250

R250 Receipt of annual fees

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R250

R250 Receipt of annual fees

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R250

R250 Receipt of annual fees

Free format text: JAPANESE INTERMEDIATE CODE: R250