JP4495055B2 - SPECT camera and PET camera radioactivity resolution resolution phantom, radioactivity density resolution evaluation image creation method, and radioactivity density resolution evaluation method - Google Patents

SPECT camera and PET camera radioactivity resolution resolution phantom, radioactivity density resolution evaluation image creation method, and radioactivity density resolution evaluation method Download PDF

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JP4495055B2
JP4495055B2 JP2005261056A JP2005261056A JP4495055B2 JP 4495055 B2 JP4495055 B2 JP 4495055B2 JP 2005261056 A JP2005261056 A JP 2005261056A JP 2005261056 A JP2005261056 A JP 2005261056A JP 4495055 B2 JP4495055 B2 JP 4495055B2
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radioactive solution
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JP2007071778A (en
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幹 久保村
和徳 小林
彰宏 村田
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日本メジフィジックス株式会社
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Description

  The present invention provides the radioactivity density resolution of cameras for single photon emission computed tomography (hereinafter referred to as SPECT) and positron emission tomography (hereinafter referred to as PET). It relates to phantoms for evaluation. The present invention also relates to a method of creating an image for evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of the SPECT camera and the PET camera using the phantom, and an radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation method.

  In nuclear medicine diagnosis, a radiopharmaceutical (medicine labeled with a radioisotope that emits radiation such as gamma rays) is administered into the body using the property of being distributed to specific organs or tissues depending on the nature of the radiopharmaceutical. Diagnostic method for diagnosing organ shape and function, presence / absence of lesion, metabolic function, etc. by detecting radiation emitted from radiopharmaceuticals from outside the body and imaging the distribution of radioisotopes in the body as a tomographic image Has been done.

  Generally, SPECT and PET are mainly used as image diagnostic methods in nuclear medicine diagnosis. These are useful methods for examining biological functions such as local blood flow distribution in the brain and myocardial blood flow distribution, and are released directly or indirectly from radiopharmaceuticals using SPECT cameras or PET cameras. In this method, a substantial distribution of radioisotopes is imaged by detecting gamma rays. The SPECT camera is generally called a gamma camera. In this specification, the SPECT camera and the PET camera are sometimes collectively referred to as “gamma camera etc.” in the following description.

  As radioisotopes used for radiopharmaceuticals, technetium-99m, thallium-201, iodo-123, gallium-67, etc. are used as diagnostic agents for SPECT diagnosis, and fluorine-18 as diagnostic agents for PET diagnosis. Nitrogen-13 and the like are used, and these drugs are used as various functional diagnostic agents including cerebral blood flow diagnostic agents and myocardial blood flow diagnostic agents.

  When developing the above-mentioned radiopharmaceuticals, in the process, clinical trials to confirm efficacy (effects, etc.) and safety (side effects, etc.) and obtain permission for manufacturing or importing radiopharmaceuticals, It is necessary to conduct a so-called “clinical trial”. In clinical trials, it is common to verify the efficacy and safety of a radiopharmaceutical in a multicenter study.

  When clinical trials are conducted at multiple facilities as described above, different gamma cameras are used at each facility, but there is no guarantee that the performance of all gamma cameras will be uniform, so there are multiple different gamma cameras. When confirming the effectiveness of a radiopharmaceutical using a gamma camera or the like, it is necessary to evaluate in advance the performance differences among the multiple gamma cameras used.

Since nuclear medicine diagnosis is based on observation and determination of local differences in the accumulation state of radioisotopes, the resolution of the radioactivity concentration in gamma cameras is important when conducting clinical trials. It is necessary to evaluate the difference in radioactivity concentration resolution among a plurality of gamma cameras used. In the present specification, the radioactivity concentration resolution (hereinafter referred to as radioactivity concentration resolution) indicates an index indicating how small the change in local radioactivity concentration can be captured. The radioactivity concentration resolution can be expressed by, for example, creating a graph plotting signal intensity against local radioactivity concentration (MBq / m L ) in an arbitrary region of interest and using the slope of the graph.

  As a method for evaluating the difference in the radioactivity concentration resolution in a plurality of gamma cameras or the like, there is a method in which cross-sectional images of phantoms filled with a radioactive solution are taken using a plurality of gamma cameras and the results are compared. Phantoms that can be used for such purposes include the following (A) and (B). In addition, in this specification, a radioactive solution shows the solution containing a radioisotope.

(A) A phantom whose interior is divided into a plurality of rooms In this phantom, each room is filled with a radioactive solution having a different radioactive concentration, and the radioactive solution is photographed with a gamma camera or the like. The concentration ratio between the true radioactivity concentration and the measurement radioactivity concentration is measured, the linear relationship between them is examined, and the radioactivity concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like is evaluated.

(B) 3D brain phantom using the brain as a model (three-dimensional brain model, see Non-Patent Document 1)
In this 3D brain phantom, a large number of fine spaces are created reflecting the human cerebral blood flow distribution, and the actual cerebral blood flow distribution can be simulated by filling the space with a radioactive solution. In other words, this phantom changes the local porosity in order to reproduce the actual cerebral blood flow distribution in the human head. By filling the entire phantom with one concentration of radioactive solution, the radiation in gray matter and white matter The active density is 5: 1.

IEEE TRANSACTIONSON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL.37, NO.2, APRIL 1990, 616-620 "3-D PHANTOM TOSIMULATE CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLIC IMAGES FOR PET"

  However, the phantom in which the interior of (A) is divided into a plurality of rooms has the following problems (a) to (c).

(A) Multiple types of concentration adjustment and dilution are required for the radioactive solution Since each room of the phantom must be filled with radioactive solutions having different concentrations, it is necessary to prepare radioactive solutions having a plurality of concentrations. The concentration of radioactive solution is generally adjusted by first preparing a radioactive solution with high concentration and then diluting it sequentially to the desired concentration. Since the number of times of density adjustment increases, the possibility of an error with respect to a desired density increases.

(B) Concentration error is likely to occur in the radioactive solution whose concentration has been adjusted. Since the actual volume of each room of the phantom often has an error for each room with respect to the display volume, it is usually in each room of the phantom. In this case, the radioactive solution is not directly diluted, but it is necessary to separately dilute the radioactive solution in another container and adjust the concentration, and then transfer it to each room of the phantom. For this reason, when preparing radioactive solutions of multiple concentrations, there is a need to transfer the radioactive solution to each room of the phantom many times, and each time there is a high possibility that the radioactive solution will be scattered or mixed with different components. Thus, an error is likely to occur in the concentration of the radioactive solution. If an error occurs in the concentration of the radioactive solution in this way, it becomes difficult to evaluate the resolution by setting the radioactive solution having the same radioactive concentration for a plurality of gamma cameras and the like. It was difficult to accurately assess the differences.

(C) Difficult to check for human error When transferring radioactive solution to each phantom room, there is a risk of transfer to the wrong room. Check for such human error. It was difficult.

On the other hand, when the 3D brain phantom modeled on the brain of (B) is filled with a radioactive solution, the radioactivity concentration per unit area of the portion corresponding to “grey matter” and “white matter” of the brain Since the space is made so that the ratio of gray matter: white matter = 5: 1, the concentration adjustment of the radioactive solution is not required multiple times, and only one type of radioactive solution is used, and gamma is used. It is possible to evaluate the radioactivity concentration resolution of a camera or the like. However, the 3D brain phantom of (B) has the following problems (d) to ( e ).

(D) The structure is complicated and difficult to handle. ・ It is difficult to fill the radioactive solution. Fill the space in the 3D brain phantom with the radioactive solution and remove all the air present in the space without leaking the radioactive solution to the outside. Work to spread the radioactive solution in the space (for example, work to shake or rotate the phantom) is necessary, but it is not easy to remove air from the space with a fine and complicated shape, and the work is very complicated. It becomes difficult. Further, since the inside of the phantom has a fine and complicated shape, cleaning after discarding the radioactive solution is difficult.

(E) Since the concentration ratio is fixed, another concentration cannot be evaluated. Since the local radioactive concentration ratio in the phantom is 5: 1 as described above, other concentrations are used. The ratio cannot be evaluated. For example, when comparing the local blood flow distributions of the left and right brains to confirm a decrease in blood flow, the ratio of the radioactivity concentration between the “normal part” and the “blood flow reduction part” is normal part: blood flow reduction part = 10 : 9 to 10: 7 in some cases, but with this phantom, the density resolution in this range cannot be evaluated.

  The present invention has been made in view of the above-described circumstances, and is a radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom of a gamma camera or the like (a SPECT camera and a PET camera), and a plurality of concentration adjustments of a radioactive solution filled in the phantom are performed. Multiple radioactivity concentrations can be set with only one concentration adjustment, and multiple radioactive solutions with the same radioactivity concentration ratio must be set repeatedly when evaluating multiple gamma cameras, etc. It is an object of the present invention to provide a method for evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of a phantom that can be used and a gamma camera using the same.

In order to achieve the above object, the present invention is a phantom in which a cross-sectional image is taken by a SPECT camera or a PET camera, wherein a plurality of radioactive solution filling units filled with a radioactive solution are arranged, and the plurality of radioactive rays are arranged. at least one of the solution filling unit, Ri radioactive solution volume adjustable der per unit area in a cross section the cross-sectional image is captured, and the radioactive solution filling unit includes a tube radioactive solution is filled, A SPECT camera and a PET camera , comprising: a wound body around which the tube is wound, wherein the amount of the radioactive solution per unit area can be adjusted by adjusting a winding density of the tube around the wound body. A phantom for evaluation of radioactivity concentration resolution is provided.

  In the present invention, by adjusting the radioactive solution filling density of the radioactive solution filling unit, the radioactivity concentration per unit area in a cross-sectional image photographed by a gamma camera or the like can be partially set arbitrarily. Therefore, according to the present invention, it is possible to set a desired concentration ratio as a radioactivity concentration ratio between portions in the cross-sectional image in one phantom using one type of radioactive solution, thereby It is possible to easily evaluate the radioactivity concentration resolution in a desired concentration range of a camera or the like.

  In the present invention, it is preferable that each of the plurality of radioactive solution filling units described above can adjust the amount of the radioactive solution per unit area. If it does in this way, the radioactivity concentration ratio of the parts in one phantom mentioned above can be set up more freely. The number of radioactive solution filling units arranged in the phantom can be appropriately set according to the purpose and the like.

  The phantom of the present invention can include an outer container, and a plurality of radioactive solution filling units can be arranged inside the outer container. More preferably, a plurality of storage sections partitioned by a partition plate are formed inside the outer container, and one radioactive solution filling unit is arranged in one storage section.

  Although the shape of the outer container described above is not limited, the outer shape is usually cylindrical or prismatic. The material of the outer container is not particularly limited as long as it is a material that transmits radiation such as gamma rays, but an acrylic resin having an absorption coefficient for gamma rays equal to that of water and “1” is preferable.

  The outer container can be of a size approximating that of a living organ to be examined. For example, in the case of a phantom simulating a human head, it is placed in a gamma camera for the head. Any size can be used as long as it can be captured.

  However, the outer container may not be necessary for the phantom of the present invention as long as the radioactive solution filling unit can be disposed at a predetermined location. When the outer container is used, it is possible to reproduce a state closer to a living body by selecting a desired material for the container or filling a liquid according to the purpose around the radioactive solution filling unit. In addition, if the outer container is used, the possibility of contamination of the camera can be reduced when the radioactive solution is scattered from the radioactive solution filling unit, so use the outer container from the viewpoint of safety. Is preferred. Further, in the outer container, as long as the radioactive solution filling unit can be disposed at a predetermined place, the storage portion may not be formed by the partition plate.

In the present invention, the radioactive solution filling unit includes a tube filled with the radioactive solution and a wound body around which the tube is wound. By adjusting the winding density of the tube around the wound body, a cross-sectional image can be obtained with a gamma camera or the like. A radiological solution having an adjustable amount of radioactive solution per unit area in a photographed cross section is used. This radioactive solution filling unit adjusts the winding density of the tube with respect to the winding body, for example, by changing the number of windings when the tube is wound around the winding body (changing the interval between the tubes), the radioactive in the phantom The density of the radioactive solution per unit area can be changed by adjusting the amount of the radioactive solution per unit area in a cross section where a cross-sectional image is taken with a gamma camera or the like.

  Examples of the radioactive solution used in the present invention include technetium-99m, thallium-201, iodo-123, gallium-67, etc. used in the diagnostic agent for SPECT diagnosis, and fluorine- used in the diagnostic agent for PET diagnosis. 18. Liquid containing a radioactive isotope such as nitrogen-13. The radioisotope used for the radioactive solution is appropriately selected depending on the type of apparatus to be evaluated and the drug being studied. For example, when the device to be evaluated is a SPECT camera, it is necessary to use the nuclide used in the diagnostic agent for SPECT diagnosis. In particular, the radionuclide contained in the drug that is the subject of the trial It is necessary to select the same nuclide.

Incidentally, the previously radioactive solution colored by ink or the like, whether the extent to fill radioactive solution tube of a radioactive solution filling unit described above can be easily confirmed, also, by any chance the radioactive solution radioactive solution filling unit It is possible to immediately confirm that it has leaked outside.

  When evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like using the phantom of the present invention, a plurality of radioactive solution filling units are filled with radioactive solutions having the same radioactivity concentration, and the plurality of radioactive solution filling units are The phantoms of the present invention are used in which the amount of radioactive solution per unit area in the cross section where the cross-sectional image is taken with a gamma camera or the like is different. Then, an image for evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like can be created by photographing the phantom with a gamma camera or the like and obtaining a cross-sectional image thereof. In this case, a plurality of radioactive solution filling units having different radioactive solution amounts per unit area may be captured in a series of images.

  Take a cross-sectional image of the phantom with the radioactive solution filling unit filled with the radioactive solution as described above using a gamma camera etc., and be interested in a certain part of the cross-sectional image (the part where the radioactive solution filling unit is placed) Set an area and measure the average radioactivity concentration in that area. Since the average radioactivity concentration in the region of interest varies from site to site where the radioactive solution filling unit is arranged, the concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like can be evaluated by obtaining the ratio of the average radioactivity concentrations.

The radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom such as a gamma camera according to the present invention has the following effects.
(B) Since one type of radioactive solution is used, it is not necessary to adjust the concentration of the radioactive solution a plurality of times, and a plurality of radioactivity concentrations can be set by only one concentration adjustment. It is possible to easily evaluate the radioactivity concentration resolution in a desired concentration range such as the above.
(B) Since the radioactivity concentration per unit area is changed for each radioactive solution filling unit, it is possible to set a plurality of desired radioactivity concentration ratios as radioactivity concentration ratios between portions in the cross-sectional image in one phantom. .
(C) By prescribing the concentration of the radioactive solution and the conditions of the radioactive solution filling unit in advance, it is possible to always set the same radioactive concentration ratio as the radioactive concentration ratio between the portions in the cross-sectional image. Concentration resolution can be evaluated using the same radioactive concentration ratio for a gamma camera or the like.

  Hereinafter, embodiments of the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings. However, the present invention is not limited to the following examples. FIG. 1 shows components of an embodiment of a radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom such as a gamma camera according to the present invention. The phantom of this example includes an outer container 10 and a radioactive solution filling unit 40. To do. 1A is a top view of the outer container 10, FIG. 1B is a side sectional view of the outer container 10 taken along line BB in FIG. 1, and FIG. It is a front view of the radioactive solution filling unit 40 formed by winding 20.

  The outer container 10 in FIGS. 1 (a) and 1 (b) imitates the human cerebrum, and is a cylindrical container made of a transparent acrylic resin with a bottom diameter of 180 mm and a height of 150 mm. is there. The outer container 10 has five storage portions 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 that are partitioned by a partition plate 11 inside. That is, in the present embodiment, in order to make the phantom close to the human brain, the outer container 10 is divided into five storage parts of left 5, right 6, front 7, rear 8, and center 9. The five storage units assume a left temporal lobe (left), a right temporal lobe (right), a frontal lobe (front), a cerebellum (rear), and a ventricle (center). The outer container 10 has a bottom plate 12 and a lid plate 13.

  The tube 20 in FIG. 1C is made of a silicone resin, has an inner diameter of 2 mm, and an outer diameter of 4 mm. The tube 20 can be filled with a radioactive solution after being wound around the wound body 30.

  The wound body 30 is made of a transparent acrylic resin, and includes a plate-like portion 31 around which the tube is wound, and extending portions 32, 33, 34, and 35 formed vertically from both ends of the plate-like portion 31. The width (w) of the plate-like portion 31 is 80 mm, the height (h) is 60 mm, the length (m) of the extending portions 32 and 34 is 30 mm, and the length (n) of the extending portions 33 and 35 is 50 mm. is there.

  FIG. 2 is a diagram illustrating a state in which the radioactive solution filling unit 40 is disposed in each of the two storage portions 5 and 6 of the outer container 10. 2A is a top view of the phantom 50 in which the radioactive solution filling unit 40 is disposed in the outer container 10, and FIG. 2B is a side cross-sectional view of the phantom 50 taken along line BB in FIG. FIG.

  In the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 in the phantom 50 of FIGS. 2A and 2B, the radioactive solution filling unit 40 is in a state in which the tube 20 filled with the radioactive solution is wound around the wound body 30. Three each are stored. In the present invention, a combination of a plurality of radioactive solution filling units is also referred to as one radioactive solution filling unit. The concentration of the radioactive solution is in a concentration range that can be detected by the gamma camera used.

  In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 5, the tube 20 is wound around each wound body 30 14 times. In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 6, the tube 20 is wound around each winding body 30 20 times. In addition, a three-way cock is attached to both ends of the tube 20, and the radioactive solution inside is sealed. Further, the tube 20 is fastened to the wound body 30 with an adhesive tape so as not to be detached from the wound body 30.

  In this case, when the tube is wound around the wound body and filled with the radioactive solution, it is appropriate to use a tube having such a thickness that the tube is not crushed at the corners of the wound body. If the tube is crushed at the corner of the wound body, the radioactive solution is clogged in the middle when the tube is filled with the radioactive solution, and the whole tube cannot be filled with the radioactive solution. Further, when the tube is wound around the wound body, the interval between the radioactive solutions (interval between the tubes) is preferably smaller than the spatial resolution of the gamma camera used. If the distance between the radioactive solutions is larger than the spatial resolution of a gamma camera or the like, the cross-sectional image in the region of interest is not uniform, which causes data variations and is not preferable. Note that the spatial resolution of a gamma camera, etc., is the collimator that the gamma camera has originally, the type of filter (used for processing to remove noise) used in the gamma camera, the nuclear energy used, etc. It depends on.

  In the phantom 50 of this example, after the radioactive solution filling unit is accommodated in the accommodating portion, the void in the accommodating portion can be filled with a liquid or solid having a low radiation absorption coefficient, for example, water, acrylic resin or the like.

A method for evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like using the phantom 50 of this example is as follows (1) to (4), for example.
(1) For the storage section 5 and storage section 6 of the phantom 50 shown in FIGS. 2 (a) and 2 (b), a horizontal cross-sectional image cut along the line XX in FIG. 2 (b) is a gamma camera or the like. The region of interest 60 is set at a location where the radioactive solution of the cross-sectional image exists, for example, as shown in FIG.
(2) The average radioactivity concentration (count / pixel) in the region of interest 60 set in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 is measured, respectively, and the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest 60 in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 is measured. Ask for.
(3) The average number of radioactivity concentration ratios in the region of interest 60 in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 is obtained in the same manner as above by changing the number of turns of the tube stored in the storage unit 5.
(4) In each radioactivity concentration ratio, the actually set radioactivity concentration ratio per unit area of the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6, and the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest 60 determined as described above Are compared to evaluate the density resolution of a gamma camera or the like.

The phantom of this embodiment has the following effects.
(B) Since one type of radioactive solution is used, it is not necessary to adjust the concentration of the radioactive solution a plurality of times, and a plurality of radioactivity concentrations can be set by only one concentration adjustment. It is possible to easily evaluate the radioactivity concentration resolution in a desired concentration range such as the above.
(B) Since the radioactivity concentration per unit area is changed for each radioactive solution filling unit, it is possible to set a plurality of desired radioactivity concentration ratios as radioactivity concentration ratios between portions in the cross-sectional image in one phantom. .
(C) By prescribing the concentration of the radioactive solution and the conditions of the radioactive solution filling unit (the number of turns of the tube) in advance, it is possible to always set the same radioactivity concentration ratio as the radioactivity concentration ratio between the portions in the cross-sectional image. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate the concentration resolution using the same radioactive concentration ratio for a plurality of gamma cameras and the like.
(D) Since the radioactive solution filling unit does not have a complicated structure, filling work is easy, and handling is easy without requiring complicated and difficult work.
(E) Since the radioactive solution filled in each radioactive solution filling unit is easy to judge the difference in appearance, confusion such as wrong insertion into the storage unit is unlikely to occur.
(F) Since the outer container of the phantom and the radioactive solution filling unit filled with the radioactive solution can be separated, the outer container is not contaminated by the radioactive solution. It can be used for evaluation of cameras and the like.
(G) After the evaluation, it is only necessary to discard the radioactive solution in the radioactive solution filling unit and wash only the inside of the radioactive solution filling unit, so that the washing is easy and maintenance is easy.

[Example 1]
Experiments were performed using the radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom 50 such as a gamma camera shown in FIGS. 2 (a) and 2 (b). The storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 each store three radioactive solution filling units 40 in a state where the tube 20 filled with the radioactive solution is wound around the wound body 30. In this case, as the radioactive solution, hydrochloric N- isopropyl-4-iodo-amphetamine (123 I) [Japan Medi-Physics Co., Ltd. Pahyuzamin (registered trademark) Note, radioactive concentration 111 MBq] a 0.1M citric acid - hydrochloric acid buffer A solution diluted to a radioactivity concentration of 111 kBq / mL was used.

  In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 5, the tube 20 is wound around each wound body 30 14 times. In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 6, the tube 20 is wound around each winding body 30 20 times. The radioactivity concentration ratio of the storage unit 5: storage unit 6 is 7:10.

  In this example, the measurement was performed by filling the central storage unit 9 corresponding to the ventricle with water (corresponding to cerebrospinal fluid). Although measurement is possible without putting water in the storage section corresponding to the ventricle, it is preferable to put water in order to make it closer to the human brain. Further, in this example, in order to make the state closer to the human brain, the width of the central storage portion 9 (brain chamber) of the outer container was set to 30 mm (40 mm including the partition thickness).

  About the cross section of the storage part 5 and the storage part 6 of the phantom 50, the cross-sectional image of the cross section cut | disconnected along XX line was image | photographed using the gamma camera (Hitachi company_made: SPECT2000H), and the radioactive solution of this cross-sectional image A rectangular region of interest was set where there is. From this, the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 was determined.

[Example 2]
In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 5, a cross-sectional image was taken with a gamma camera in the same manner as in Example 1 except that the tube 20 was wound around each winding body 30 16 times. Then, a rectangular region of interest was set at a location where the radioactive solution in the cross-sectional image was present (the storage unit 5: the concentration ratio of the storage unit 6 was 8:10). From this, the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 was obtained.

[Example 3]
In the three radioactive solution filling units 40 stored in the storage unit 5, a cross-sectional image was taken with a gamma camera in the same manner as in Example 1 except that the tube 20 was wound around each winding body 30 18 times. Then, a rectangular region of interest was set at the location where the radioactive solution in the cross-sectional image was present (accommodation ratio of the storage unit 5: storage unit 6 was 9:10). From this, the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest in the storage unit 5 and the storage unit 6 was obtained.

The measurement results of the average activity concentration ratio of the storage section 5 and the region of interest of the housing part 6 in the embodiment 1-3 shown in FIG. From the results of FIG. 4 , it is confirmed that there is a correlation between the set radioactivity concentration ratio and the measured radioactivity concentration ratio, and that the radioactivity concentration resolution of a gamma camera or the like can be evaluated by using the phantom of the present invention. It was done.

1A and 1B are diagrams showing components of an embodiment of a radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom such as a gamma camera according to the present invention, wherein FIG. 1A is a top view of an outer container, and FIG. 1B is a line BB in FIG. (C) is a front view of a radioactive solution filling unit. It is a figure which shows the state which has arrange | positioned the radioactive solution filling unit in the accommodating part of the outer container of the phantom of FIG. 1, (a) is a top view of a phantom, FIG.2 (b) follows FIG.2 (a) BB line. FIG. It is a figure which shows the state which set the region of interest in the place where the radioactive solution of a cross-sectional image exists. It is a graph which shows the result of the average radioactivity concentration ratio in the region of interest in Examples 1-3.

Explanation of symbols

5, 6, 7, 8, 9 Storage unit 10 Outer container 20 Tube 30 Wrapped body 40 Radioactive solution filling unit 50 Phantom 60 Area of interest

Claims (4)

  1. A phantom in which a cross-sectional image is taken by a SPECT camera or a PET camera, wherein a plurality of radioactive solution filling units filled with a radioactive solution are arranged, and at least one of the plurality of radioactive solution filling units is the cross section Ri adjustable der radioactive solution per unit area in a cross section image is photographed, and the radioactive solution filling unit, comprising a tube radioactive solution is filled, the winding body and winding the tube, A radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation phantom for a SPECT camera and a PET camera , wherein the amount of radioactive solution per unit area can be adjusted by adjusting the winding density of the tube around the wound body .
  2. The radioactive solution of the respective same radioactive concentration in a plurality of radioactive solution filling unit is filled, the more radioactive solution filling unit according to claim 1, characterized in that different radioactive solution per each unit area A phantom for evaluating the radioactivity concentration resolution of the SPECT camera and PET camera described in 1.
  3. 3. Creation of a SPECT camera and an image for evaluation of radioactivity concentration resolution of the PET camera, wherein the phantom according to claim 1 is photographed by a SPECT camera or a PET camera to obtain a cross-sectional image of the phantom. Method.
  4. A cross-sectional image of the phantom according to claim 1 or 2 is taken by a SPECT camera or a PET camera, and an average radioactivity concentration in a certain region in the cross-sectional image is measured to evaluate the radioactivity concentration resolution of the camera. SPECT CAMERA and PET CAMERA radioactivity concentration resolution evaluation method
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