GB2414574A - Managing shared data - Google Patents

Managing shared data Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2414574A
GB2414574A GB0411938A GB0411938A GB2414574A GB 2414574 A GB2414574 A GB 2414574A GB 0411938 A GB0411938 A GB 0411938A GB 0411938 A GB0411938 A GB 0411938A GB 2414574 A GB2414574 A GB 2414574A
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Prior art keywords
data
system according
project
user
suite
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GB0411938A
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GB2414574A8 (en )
GB0411938D0 (en )
Inventor
David Edward Richardson
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* DAVID SETCHELL AND PATRICK BROOKE ACTING AS NOMINATED TRUSTEES OF UNIVERSITY OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE TRUST INCORPORATING CHURCH OF ENGLAND FOUNDATION OF ST PAUL AND ST MARY
DAVID SETCHELL AND PATRICK BRO
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David Setchell And Patrick Bro
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F17/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific functions
    • G06F17/30Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor
    • G06F17/30286Information retrieval; Database structures therefor ; File system structures therefor in structured data stores
    • G06F17/30557Details of integrating or interfacing systems involving at least one database management system
    • G06F17/3056Details of integrating or interfacing systems involving at least one database management system between a Database Management System and a front-end application
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/0482Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction with lists of selectable items, e.g. menus

Abstract

A data management system comprises: a user interface system enabling a user to create at least one project suite and subsequently select one of said at least one project suites to permit working in said selected project suite, each project suite including at least one container for storing data; means for extracting core data from a data source; and means for tagging the data source, such that the core data extracted from the tagged data source is automatically placed into a container located within the selected project suite. The user interface used may be formed as a represention of a segmented sphere.

Description

Data Management Svstem This invention concerns a data management system

for implementation on a computer or network of computers.

Typically, within desktop file systems, stored data is represented graphically (the so called "presentation layer") using two (x, y) or three (x, y, z) dependent spatial dimensions. 'This data is typically stored as miniature icons or lists of files within a structure of folders and sub folders. Many documents may be opened on screen (presentation layer) together, which could relate to one state in time of a particular project. However, unless the user of the computer knows how the documents have been organised then it is impossible to know that these are related documents. One presently used solution is to create duplicates of these documents and to place all these into a single folder. This would be highly organised, but depends on the el'ficiency of the user. Generally, a mixed set of documents are saved in one folder and then others are opened up in new folders when required. Difficulties may occur if the user changes occupation or if multiple copies are made at dil'ferent times, as differing versions in different places. A new person taking over a previous user occupation will need to spend time working out the previous user's filing system and replacing it with their own system. Even then they may Lot be able to find all the required stored documents related to one single project. It may be possible through understanding the folder name, file name, extension, internal document data or randomly previewing the file required, but it is likely that some knowledge about how the original user undertook that project and the thought processes involved would now be lost.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a data management system which overcomes the problems outlined above. This is achieved by providing a new user interface whereby users can navigate through, interact with and organise data through a cognitive project based fi optend which integrates directly with a back-end data mining and searching / categorizing system.

In accordance with a first aspect of the present invention there is provided a data management system comprising: a user interface enabling a user to create at least one project suite and subsequently select one of said at least one project suites to permit working in said selected project suite, each project suite including at least one container for storing data; means for extracting core data from a data source; and means for tagging the data source, such that the core data extracted from the tagged data source is automatically placed into a container located within the selected project suite.

The at least one project suite preferably includes at least one workspace which may be selected by the user, each said workspace including at least one container. The at least one JO workspace may include at least one segment whicl1 may be selected by the user, each said segment including at least one container.

Each said project suite is advantageously represented visually by a layer of a sphere. Each workspace may be represented visually by a circumferential section of said sphere layer, each segment may represented visually by a segment radially within said circumferential section and each container may be represented visually by a slice of said at least one segment.

Preferably, the data source may be tagged upon selection by the user.

The extracted data may advantageously be additionally stored within a core area, which may be represented vi sually by an inner sphere at the centre of the spherical shell. The extracted data may be viewed or analysed within the core area.

Means may be provided for searching through the data by entering search request information via the user interface system. The search request information may be automatically stored within a search data container within the selected project suite and the search data container may be represented visually by circumferential section, radially inwardly of the workspace circumferential section. Data found as a result of the search may be automatically stored within a container within the selected project suite.

Preferably, a plurality of user interfaces are provided to permit a plurality of users to access data. The plurality of user interfaces may be personalized to allow access to different data depending on the authority of each of the plurality of users.

The data source may be automatically tagged when the data source is accessed. Core data extracted from the automatically tagged data source may only he accessible to a user with a predetermined level of authority.

Advantageously, the data source is a web document, text document, spreadsheet or other computer-based application.

Means may be provided for viewing or performing statistical analysis of the stored data.

According to a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of organising data, comprising the steps of: a) creating a virtual project suite; b) creating a virtual task space within said project suite, said task space including a container for storing data; c) entering said virtual task space; d) accessing a data source from within said task space; e) extracting core data from said data source; and f) providing means for tagging said data source, such that extracted data from a tagged data source is automatically placed into the container.

There may be a further step of creating a virtual workspace within the project suite, and creating the task space within said workspace.

According to a third aspect ofthe present invention there is provided a computer program for implementing the data management system on a computer.

According to a fourth aspect ofthe present invention there is provided a computer when programmed with the program.

The invention wild now be described by way of example with reference to the following figures, in which: Figure 1 shows a visual representation of the data management system according to an embodiment of the invention; Figure 2 shows the geometrical transformations used to construct the data structure used in the inventive data management system; Figure 3 shows various representations of the data structure used within the inventive data management system; Figure 4 shows an example of an authority level structure; Figure 5 shows the effect of hyperpath linkage between data within the data structure; Figure 6 shows the user interface for navigating between projects and workspaces according to an embodiment of the invention; and Figure 7 shows the user interface for navigating within workspaces and segments.

A visual representation of the data management system is shown in Fig. 1, with its construction described with reference to Figs. 2 to 5. I'ig. 1 shows a three-dimensional representation ofthc hierarchical data levels within the system. The outermost sphere 1 is termed the "user sphere". Each user of the system will be able to access their own user sphere, so that the sphere defines the identity ofthe user. The sphere contains a number of project suites, which in the figure shown are arranged as vertically arranged layers of the sphere. For simplicity, only one such project suite is shown in its expanded form. Circumferentially arranged around the outside of each proj ect suite is at least one workspace, three such workspaces being shown in the figure, with tile frontmost workspace shown as being selected. Within the selected workspace are a number of segments, with five of these being shown in the figure. Each such segment includes at least one slice, each slice being a container Nor data. Also shown in the figure are a number of search slots, which are used for holding information relating to data searches, as will be explained in detail later. At the centre of the user sphere is the core, in which all of the data within the system is stored.

This structural geometry is a three-dimcosional ghost pro jection ofthc underlying hidden four-dimensional mathematical structure of a "hyperspUcre'', although it is considered synonymous (topologically equivalent in mathematical terms) to that of a "hypercube". The geometric structural visualization provides a means by which interaction can take place within a three-dimensional e-space environment, the statistical results of which can be viewed from within the central core hypersp]lere. Consider three cubes, each centrally placed inside each other. The outer and middle ones are joined at their vertices to produce a tesseract or hypercube, as shown in Fig. 2. The top and bottom faces of the middle cube are then cut and removed, leaving a cubic torus around the inner cube. The tesseract is then topologically transfonned into a smooth torus while the inner cube is similarly transformed into a sphere. The radius of the sphere is slightly less than that of the inner diameter of the torus so that it fits into the central space but is distinct from the torus itself. The cubic torus is homeomorphically transformed into a smooth torus whicl1 is represented topologically by S' x S7, which, through the induced topology of S in R2, can be considered as a subset of R4. Here S r epresents the circle in (real) Euclidean 2-space, R2, while R4 represents (real) Euclidean 4-space. The innermost cube is topologically equivalent to a sphere S2, and so can be topologically represented in this way. This structural geometry greatly assists the interaction with the complex multidimensional data and / or levels.

Everything that a user undertakes within the system is based upon the premise that data is being stored within the single central hyperspherc core that denotes their user identity. This sphere is then split into multiple layers, i.e. project suites which have an infinite number of multiple cells of multi-dimensional information stored within them. The limit to the volume of information stored is determined by the constraints of the external physical storage media used.

Figure 3 shows various representations ofthe data structure. The middle row ofthe figure shows the mathematically derived structure, and its limitations as the detail of the structure Camelot be easily viewed. -I he bottom row of the figure shows representations of the structure in a form more accessible to a user of the system, which form the basis for the user interface.

The upper row shows f urther detail of the structure in plan view and perspective view for clarity.

3 0 The layers when viewed as a three-dimensional structure can only be seen as flat layers appearing within 3-space, as shown in the "User Sphere - Project Suites" image in the middle row of the figure. The complexity of the structure is therefore hidden from someone viewing it in three dimensions as the rest of the structure exists in a fourth spatial dimension. The design then reflects a number of mathematical transformations based on the topology of the hypersphere / hypercube, in order to provide a means of interaction with this hidden geometric structure. In the example shown, there are thirty-five separate project suites or layers (not all shown in the middle row images). If a single one of these layers or project suites is expanded, it can be seen that a number of workspaces, in this case three workspaces, exist within the layer. These are shown as concentric circles in the middle row and as circumferential sections in the bottom row.

Again, each workspace is a hypershere which includes data hidden in segments as described with lO reference to lain. 1. As shown in the bottom row for example, "workspace]" includes five segments.

The segments and workspace layers which make up a single project are connected by four-dimensional joins. This means that any workspace hypertorus can touch others at any point, and also that the segment hypercubes can also touch each other at any point. This provides the flexibility to infer distant relationships or patterns between or within datasets. If the system used relational database architectures within the visualization then disparate data could not physically be joined within a three-dimensional environment. The analogy is that a three-dimensional environment will allow data to be bent in order to touch each other, but if that data is from a distant dataset then this would not be possible. Hence it is necessary to use four dimensions, where the analogy is that disparate datasets can be ripped within 4-space and then a relationship can be derived from joining these new datasets for the purpose of complex analysis or data mining. It also provides the gateway to hyperbolically connected paths which can be searched for or manually connected according to user storage patterns or requirements.

As stated earlier, each segment contains a number of slices, which essentially act as containers for data. Since the hypercubic structure is hidden (in Euclidean three-dimensional space), what an end-user visualises via the interlace is a single slice, with the most recent slices being closer to the centre of the structure. In reality, behind the visualization are many multi dimensional cells of stored information which are linked through the geometric structural relationships provided by the hypercube and multi-dimensional database architectures. This is illustrated in Fig. 5, which shows two related report documents which are stored in separately named workspaces, i.e. "]998 Report" and "1999 Report" within one project suite. The segments are named according to sections of the report, for example "statement", "forecast" in the first workspace and "profit / loss" and "balance sheets" in the second workspace. Each segment therefore contains slices of data which are relevant to the segment, such as tables or pages. In the figure, dotted lines show that there is a hyperpath link between these documents, and thus that a new relationship exists. For example, 1998 Report forecast is linked to] 999 Report profit / loss. Incidentally, hyperpath relational links also exist within a report, such as profit / loss being linked to the balance sheet.

It is an important aspect of the invention that many users can access the same data, to allow joined-up working on a project for example, or to avoid duplication of effort. Generally, data will either be linked to by another user, or, if it is altered in some way then it is automatically copied into the new user's environment. Alternatively, a user may designate that some information is private, in which case it will not be available to other users. If for example a workspace is made private by a user, then even though a slice or segment within that workspace remains public, then due to the hierarchical structure of the data the slice or segment still cannot be accessed by other users. In addition, users may be assigned different access rights to the data depending on the authority ofthc user. For example, an administrator may have authority over a group of proj cot managers, who in turn have authority over groups of team members. Such an arrangement is shown in Fig. 4. In this case, although a user of a certain authority may mark information as private, it may still be viewed by users of a higher authority level.

The operation of the data management system in a preferred embodiment will now be described with reference to Figs. 6 and 7. When entering the data management system, the user must be determined. If the user has a computer terminal of their own then it may he configured so that only the user's sphere is available for selection. Alternatively' if several users have access to a terminal then they may select their own user sphere by selecting, e.g. by clicking, the correct sphere of a "user map" similar to the authority diagram of Fig. 4, or by entering log-in details into the interface, in which case the correct user sphere is automatically selected. Once the correct user sphere has been selected, a representation ofthe sphere showing the available project suites is shown on screen. The project suites may be shown as individual layers of the sphere, which may he vertically arranged as shown on the left hand side of Fig. 6, or alternatively as concentric layers of the sphere in an 'onion-skin" arrangement. The user may add new project suites or rename or otherwise edit individual suites at this stage. In the example shown, there are 35 pro ject suites available, with total space for l 00 suites, although this is determined by the limits of the external storage medium.

A parti cular proj ect suite is then selected and entered, for example by clicking on a layer.

The visual representation then changes to that shown at the top of Fig. 6. In the example shown, there are three workspaces available. The user may add new workspaces, or rename, edit or delete existing workspaces as required. The workspace at the front of the sphere is the one currently selected, the others may be selected by clicking on them for example. An animation may be triggered so that the selected workspace spins round to the front, as shown by the arrows.

A workspace may be entered by further clicking.

Once a workspace has been entered, the visua] representation changes to that shown directly underneath the previous image. In the example shown, the workspace selected has five segments available. The images to the right indicate that the other two workspaces have eight and seven segments available respectively. Tile amount of data held within the segments is indicated by the shading applied thereto, so that each full slice is shaded.

Fig. 7 shows some of the options available to a user through the interface. If a segment is selected, for example by clicking, then a slice history area, for example a window, appears on screen. The slice history area enables the individual slice containers, holding various multivariate released document data, to be previewed. The window would include a visual representation of the segment with individual stacked slices, and the content of a slice viewed by moving the mouse pointer over a slice. The slices may also be flicked through in a "pack of' cards" manner. Slice histories may be displayed with the oldest task documents being at the front of the "pack" and the newest being towards the centre of the segmented structure (i'ollowing the inverse ghost projection out from the central core). The window also contains means, for example icons, to allow the user to access a variety of applications. These may include internet browsers, word processors, or spreadsheet applications for example. This means that the application is only accessible from within a segment of a workspace. rl herefore any data taken from the application, as will be described later, is automatically associated with a particular task of a particular project, leading to an efficiently organised data structure.

If the core is selected, for example by clicking, then a "statistical workbench" is entered.

The central hypersphere core is the place where all the "hidden" fourdimensional data can be analyzed. Note that the core may be selected from inside or outside a workspace. The statistical workbench allows the user to carry out and display various multidimensional level specific statistics, for example the time spent on a various task or project. Single user or multiple user statistics may also be provided.

Selecting a search slot, for example by clicking, will pull up a search screen or window.

This search visualization interface front-end provides a means for previewing basic or advanced filtered queries placed upon the multidimensional database Essentially, key content which is stored in the database is then made available through On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) queries. This allows the user to search, for example by keyword, for data contained in slices.

The search may be limited to, for example, the active segment, current workspace or entire project as appropriate. These queries can be used multiple times and are stored alongside the workspaces as temporary search blocks for the lifetime that the user is logged into the current project or session. Tllis means that when a user does another search, the previous search data is also included, increasing performance or refining search results to the key content required.

Should the user wish to keep the created search block workspace, then it can be upgraded or promoted to the outer ring, i.e. becoming a single project workspace which can be entered and viewed as any other workspace. This frees the search block which may then be deleted or overwritten.

As mentioned above, applications such as internet browsers and word processors are accessed from within a segment. These task applications are data sources, providing the data whicl1 is stored in the individual slice containers. The data management system includes an embedded, expandable set of tools or agents with hooks and / or links directly into task applications which compress, reformat, dissect or extract all related document content, whether hidden or visible. In addition, control is provided over data categorization by facilities to customise or to view certain meta-content fields. For example, suppose the task application entered is an internet browser, and the user visits a web- page. The data management system will automatically extract all the data about that page, which may be previewed in a separate "workbench" window. The data may include aspects such as the number of page links, the luternet protocol address of the server it came from and vital meta-data information. As well as this visible extracted data, the system will also collect in-session statistics, with regard to areas such as origin, content, time-frames or whether the data is sensitive or protected. Also, a unique ] O hasl1 identity is given to the page container upon loading which helps prevent duplication of content. The user may edit the extracted data from within the workbench as needed, for example the user may add a custom comment about the web-page.

In addition, a "hidden" log is made of every document that is vat sited alongside spatial and selected information about it. 1 his goes towards prohibited content analysis This log is created as an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file and is synchronized with the database using a Web Service through a "Search and Scan" module, so that the user knows that this document is being recorded. Tllese statistics go beyond simply watching for prohibited content, but enable the system to predict options or locations that a user might like to take. If a user wants to bookmark a document page for off-line inclusion inside the system, they can manually tag the page, for example by clicking a taskbar button. At this point two things happen: firstly, all vital information is collected from the workbench and is recorded to a local XML index file using a Schema, and secondly text content is processed into keywords, body text and a description regarding the content. If a user had provided custom comments about the page then this would additionally be saved. Lastly, a sereenshot of the document page at the time of saving is made, as wel 1 as a copy of the document as a compound MHT file or in its original format, should those options be selected by the user. These files are retained on the hard disk until the user closes the application and returns to the slice history interface. When this happens, the data is synehronised with the database using the Search and Scan Web Service as used previously for the "hidden" log file. Depending on file size, MH T files or backup documents are synchronized with a content management server, and index / content XMI, files have their data extracted into the separate server database fields. When this data is needed again, the XML is generated and the content files are pulled back as packets off the content server.

When the slice container is viewed within the slice history window, an image of the document page will be shown, and the workbench data will be available for viewing if desired.

The web document page may then be returned to by selecting that slice.

The hidden log of every page visited allows the user's actions to be tracked. This information can be used for example to determine the user's activity and efficiency, and whether they have been viewing prohibited content. Such hidden information about the user's activities may be inaccessible to the user, but may be accessed by a user of greater authority. This promotes greater accountability and reduces unprofessional practice.

Although the invention has been described with reference to the embodiments above, ] 5 there are many other modifications and alternatives possible within the scope ofthe claims. The visual interface is exemplary only as a method for interacting with the four-dimensional data structure used by the system.

Claims (28)

  1. Claims 1. A data management system comprising: a user interface enabling a
    user to create at least one project suite and subsequently select one of said at least one project suites to permit working in said selected project suite, each project suite including at least one container for storing data; means for extracting core data from a data source; and means for tagging the data source, such that the core data extracted from the tagged data source is automatically placed into a container located within the selected project suite.
  2. 2. A system according to claim I, wherein the at least one project suite includes at least one workspace which may be selected by the user, each said workspace including at least one container.
  3. 3. A system according to claim 2, wherein the at least one workspace includes at least one segment which may be selected by the user, each said segment including at least one container.
  4. 4. A system according to any preceding claim, wherein each said project space is represented visually by a layer of a sphere.
  5. 5. A system according to claim 4, wherein each said workspace is represented visually by a circumferential section of said sphere layer.
  6. 6. A system according to claim S. wherein each said segment is represented visually by a segment radially within said circumferential section.
  7. 7. A system according to claim 6, wherein each said container is represented visually by a slice of said at least one segment.
  8. 8. A system according to any preceding claim, wherein the data source is tagged upon selection by the user.
  9. 9. A system according to any preceding claim, in which the extracted data is additionally stored within a eve area.
  10. 10. A system according to claim 9, wherein said eve area is represented visually by an inner sphere at the eentre of said spherical shell.
  11. 11. A system according to either of Claims 9 and 10, wherein the extracted data may be viewed or analysed within the core area.
  12. 12. A system according to any preceding claim, comprising means for searching through the data by entering search request information via the user interface system.
  13. 13. A system according to claim 12, wherein the search request information is automatically stored within a search data container within the selected project suite.
  14. 14. A system according to claim 13, wherein the search date containeris represented visually by circumferential section, radially inwardly of the workspace circumferential section
  15. 15. A system according to any ofclaims 12 to 14,wherein data found as a result ofthe search is automatically stored within a container within the selected project suite.
  16. 16. A system according to any preceding claim, wherein a plurality of user interfaces are provided to permit a plurality of users to access data.
  17. 17. A system according to claim 16, wherein the plurality of user interfaces are personalised to allow access to different data depending on the authority of each of the plurality of users.
  18. 18. A system according to any preceding Elaine, wherein the data source is automatically tagged when the data source is accessed.
  19. 19. A system according to claim 18, wherein core data extracted from the automatically tagged data source Is only accessible to a user with a predetermined level of authority.
  20. 20. A system according to any preceding claim, wherein the data source is a web document, text document, spreadsheet or other computer-based application.
  21. 21. A system according to any preceding claim, comprising means tor viewing or performing statistical analysis of the stored data.
  22. 22. A method of organising data, comprising the steps of: a) creating a virtual project suite; b) creating a virtual task space within said pro ject suite, said task space including a container for storing data; c) entering said virtual task space; d) accessing a data source from within said task space, ] 5 e) extracting core data from said data source; and f) providing means for tagging said data source, such that extracted data fiom a tagged data source is automatically placed into the container.
  23. 23. A method according to claim 22 further comprising the step of creating a virtual workspace within the project suite, and creating the task space within said workspace.
  24. 24. A computer program for implementing the data management system of any preceding claim on a computer.
  25. 25. computer when programmed with the program of claim 24.
  26. 26. A data management system as herein described with reference to the accompanying figures.
  27. 27. A method of organizing data as herein descril:'ed with reference to the accompanying figures.
  28. 28. A computer program as herein described with reference to the accompanying figures.
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0339220A2 (en) * 1988-04-25 1989-11-02 Hewlett-Packard Company File management system for a computer
US5982374A (en) * 1997-04-30 1999-11-09 Wahl; Larry E. Vallian/geometric hexagon opting symbolic Tesseract V/GHOST
WO2001037120A2 (en) * 1999-11-15 2001-05-25 Mohammed Shahbaz Anwar Programs and methods for the display, analysis and manipulation of multi-dimensional data
US20020174105A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 2002-11-21 Carlos De La Huerga Method for storing records at easily accessible addresses
US20030135512A1 (en) * 1997-07-29 2003-07-17 Morgan Charles D. Data linking system and method using encoded links
US6636246B1 (en) * 2000-03-17 2003-10-21 Vizible.Com Inc. Three dimensional spatial user interface

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0339220A2 (en) * 1988-04-25 1989-11-02 Hewlett-Packard Company File management system for a computer
US20020174105A1 (en) * 1996-07-30 2002-11-21 Carlos De La Huerga Method for storing records at easily accessible addresses
US5982374A (en) * 1997-04-30 1999-11-09 Wahl; Larry E. Vallian/geometric hexagon opting symbolic Tesseract V/GHOST
US20030135512A1 (en) * 1997-07-29 2003-07-17 Morgan Charles D. Data linking system and method using encoded links
WO2001037120A2 (en) * 1999-11-15 2001-05-25 Mohammed Shahbaz Anwar Programs and methods for the display, analysis and manipulation of multi-dimensional data
US6636246B1 (en) * 2000-03-17 2003-10-21 Vizible.Com Inc. Three dimensional spatial user interface

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