GB2380134A - Therapeutic light source - Google Patents

Therapeutic light source Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2380134A
GB2380134A GB0123167A GB0123167A GB2380134A GB 2380134 A GB2380134 A GB 2380134A GB 0123167 A GB0123167 A GB 0123167A GB 0123167 A GB0123167 A GB 0123167A GB 2380134 A GB2380134 A GB 2380134A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
light
user
therapeutic
light device
treatment
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB0123167A
Other versions
GB0123167D0 (en
Inventor
Colin Whitehurst
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Photo Therapeutics Ltd
Original Assignee
Photo Therapeutics Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Photo Therapeutics Ltd filed Critical Photo Therapeutics Ltd
Priority to GB0123167A priority Critical patent/GB2380134A/en
Publication of GB0123167D0 publication Critical patent/GB0123167D0/en
Publication of GB2380134A publication Critical patent/GB2380134A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N5/00Radiation therapy
    • A61N5/06Radiation therapy using light
    • A61N5/0613Apparatus adapted for a specific treatment
    • A61N5/0616Skin treatment other than tanning
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N5/00Radiation therapy
    • A61N5/06Radiation therapy using light
    • A61N2005/0635Radiation therapy using light characterised by the body area to be irradiated
    • A61N2005/0643Applicators, probes irradiating specific body areas in close proximity
    • A61N2005/0645Applicators worn by the patient
    • A61N2005/0647Applicators worn by the patient the applicator adapted to be worn on the head
    • A61N2005/0648Applicators worn by the patient the applicator adapted to be worn on the head the light being directed to the eyes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N5/00Radiation therapy
    • A61N5/06Radiation therapy using light
    • A61N2005/065Light sources therefor
    • A61N2005/0651Diodes
    • A61N2005/0652Arrays of diodes

Abstract

A therapeutic light device configured to form a visor (10) further comprising a plurality of light-emitting diodes (18) arranged and configured to direct light onto one or more periocular regions of a user. The device may include an eyeshield disposed to protect one or both the user's eye from the light produced by said light-emitting diodes.

Description

<Desc/Clms Page number 1>

THERAPEUTIC LIGHT SOURCE The present invention relates to a non-coherent light source for use in therapy, particularly using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The present invention also has particular, although not exclusive advantage in treatment of periocular wrinkles.

The document US 5913883 discloses a face mask upon which is disposed a plurality of discrete light emitting diodes for flooding the facial area with therapeutic light. However, this document does not disclose a device capable of covering the eyes and hence focusing therapeutic light on the areas immediately adjacent to the eyes, nor is any manner of protection for the eyes provided.

Many other documents have been published, including US 5358503, WO 99/10046 and WO 93/21843, that disclose use of therapeutic light for healing or therapy. However, in these cases no use of therapeutic light in relation to use around the eyes is disclosed.

According to one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a therapeutic light device, comprising a plurality of light-emitting diodes arranged and configured to direct light onto one or more periocular regions of a user, the device including, or used in conjunction with, an eyeshield disposed to protect one or both the user's eyes from the light produced by said light-emitting diodes.

According to a second aspect of the present invention, there is provided a therapeutic light device comprising a visor wearable by a user and a plurality of light-emitting diodes mounted within the visor and arranged to direct light onto one or more periocular regions of the user.

<Desc/Clms Page number 2>

Preferably, the LEDs are arranged to illuminate discrete areas at a user's temples, above their nose and beneath each eye. Preferably the illuminated area is about 3 or 4 cm2. However, areas greater or smaller may be used if desired.

Ideally the visor comprises front and back mouldings. It is preferred that the LED arrays are disposed between said front and back mouldings.

In a preferred embodiment either or both the front and back mouldings comprises a plastics material or similar. Ideally the mouldings are configured to aid easy cleaning with sterilising solutions. In another preferred embodiment the moulding may be configured to accept closed cell, adhesive, foam pads. These may be used and changed in-between different users of the visor. In a particular desired embodiment the pads may be provided in a number of thicknesses allowing for an element of customisation of the visor.

This is of particular use when the visor is to be adapted for different users, each with differing sized heads.

Preferably the visor further comprises an eyeshield, the eyeshield being configured to protect the eyelids of the user. It is also preferred that the eyeshield is adapted to attenuate light produced by the LED array by, ideally, at least 90%.

In a further embodiment the eyeshield comprises one or more eye cups.

In a preferred embodiment the visor is powered by a battery pack. This gives advantages that include being able to easily transport the device, and use the visor at locations remote from a hospital, clinic or the like. Ideally the battery pack is rechargeable. In a most preferred embodiment the visor is connectable to the battery pack, desirably through a cable. Preferably the

<Desc/Clms Page number 3>

battery pack may be charged from the mains supply. An adaptor is preferably employed to connect the mains to the battery pack. In a preferred embodiment the cable may connect either the treatment device to the battery pack or the battery pack to the adaptor. Ideally it is not possible to connect the visor to the adaptor (and hence to the mains). This helps to ensure safety, by preventing a user from subjecting themselves to an excess of light.

Preferably the emission spectrum of the LED array is limited to the range 400nm to 900nm. More preferably the spectrum is limited to the range 600nm to 700nm.

According to a third aspect of the present invention there is provided an LED array coupled with a heatsink and cooling means, wherein the cooling means draws air across the heatsink away from the LEDs.

Preferably the cooling means comprises at least one and ideally a plurality of fan cooled heatsinks. Preferably the fans are attached to the heatsinks which are themselves attached to the LEDs. Cooling is achieved by forced convection across the heatsinks. Preferably the fans are arranged so that the air flow is directed away from a user. Thus in a particular embodiment the fans may draw through and air away from the heat sink and hence the user.

Preferably the therapeutic light device is associated with a base unit.

The base unit preferably is capable of communication with the photo therapeutic device. Ideally the photo therapeutic device will not execute a treatment program until signals or instructions have been sent between the therapeutic light device and the base unit. It is further preferred that communication between the base unit and the treatment device is via infra red signals. When interrogated by the base unit the treatment device exchanges information to establish that it can legitimately be operated by the base unit.

<Desc/Clms Page number 4>

Once this is established the base unit may load the treatment device with the data relevant to the treatment regime required.

Ideally the photo therapeutic device comprises a visor to cover or substantially cover the area of a user's face around their eyes.

It is preferred that the light source disposed in the visor may be controlled to allow the user to activate or pause the treatment. A particular control that is preferred is as follows. At the start of a treatment the first actuation on the control turns the LEDs on at a low level. This allows comfortable positioning of the device. The second actuation upon the controls activates the LEDs at full brightness. A third actuation will turn the LEDs off and pause the treatment timing. Re-activation after the pause will follow the initial sequence, i. e. two actuations to full brightness. It is preferred that if the device is paused for more than twenty four hours the treatment should be terminated. Once the treatment has been administered the light source may automatically turn off. Preferably the light source cannot be reactivated until a prescribed period has elapsed.

Ideally the LED arrays should be positioned less than 2.5 cm away from the surface of the user's skin. The visor is also ideally configured to allow use by persons as small as the 2. 5th percentile to as large as the 97. 5th percentile. Preferably the visor has an internal width of 157 mm, being the distance that satisfies the above criterion for women.

Preferably the visor incorporates appropriate circuitry to either or both communicate with the base unit and control the timing of the treatment.

In a preferred procedure, communication between base unit and visor will establish that both are appropriate for the necessary task. This is to say that both base unit and visor are of recognised type and configuration. The

<Desc/Clms Page number 5>

base unit will then load the control interface of the visor with the relevant treatment program. The circuitry in the visor will then control the duration, sequence and number of treatments over which it will operate. For example, the prescribed treatment may be ten treatments, each of twenty minutes administered every other day. Thus, in this preferred embodiment the treatment device automatically turns off after twenty minutes and cannot be re-activated until two days time. It is preferred that appropriate software is installed in the device to prevent overriding of the treatment regime.

However, it is desirable to allow the installed programs to be reprogrammed, if required. However, if this is to occur it is preferred that an element of security control is included.

It is preferred that the visor is programmed with data regarding the type, market, territory and serial number of the device.

Specific embodiments of the present invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which : Figure I shows an exploded view of an embodiment of the present invention; Figure 2 shows an embodiment of a carrier for a plurality of LED arrays for use with the embodiment of figure 1; Figure 3 shows an example of an LED array for use with embodiments of the present invention; Figure 4 shows an exploded view of the array of figure 2; Figure 5 shows a block diagram of the electronics in a preferred treatment device; and Figure 6 shows a block diagram of the electronics present in a preferred base unit.

<Desc/Clms Page number 6>

With reference to figure 1, a photo therapeutic device of the present invention comprises a visor 10 to be worn over the eyes. The visor comprises front 12 and back 14 mouldings. The front moulding 12 may be made from nylon, whilst the back moulding 14 may be manufactured from polycarbonate. A carrier 16 for LED arrays 18 is disposed between front and back mouldings 12,14. The carrier 16 comprises a plurality of ports 20 adapted to each receive an individual array 18. These ports 20 are disposed so that they are positioned, in use, one over the bridge of the nose. one over each temple and one under each eye.

The visor 10 is dimensioned so as to cover the area around the eyes.

Figure 2 shows an embodiment of a suitable carrier 16 for the arrays 18. The carrier 16 disposes the LED arrays 18 at each temple so as to illuminate an <img class="EMIRef" id="024171337-00060001" />

2 area of approximately 3 to 4 cm2, the inner edge being aligned with the orbital bone. Other arrays are disposed covering a similar area beneath each eye. A further array is positioned to illuminate a similar area centred above the nose.

The visor 10 is further dimensioned so that the LEDs are positioned so as to be less than 2.5cm from the surface of the skin of the user.

The LED array 18 comprises a plurality of light-emitting diodes. Each array is thermally coupled to a heatsink 22. A close-coupled fan 24 is attached to the other side of the heatsink 22 from the light-emitting diodes.

The arrays 18 are disposed in the ports 20 in the array carrier 16. The LEDs face the back moulding 14, whilst the fans 24 are disposed towards the front moulding 12. Vents 26 are disposed on the front moulding 12 opposite the fans 24. The back moulding 14 has a series of vents 28. Air is drawn through these vents 28 by the cooling fans 24 and passes over the LEDs and heatsinks then expelled from the vents 26 on the front moulding 12. This

<Desc/Clms Page number 7>

embodiment allows the LED arrays 18 to be cooled, whilst preventing warm air from being blown onto the face of a user or into the visor.

The arrays comprise a plurality of discrete, encapsulated LEDs. The encapsulated LEDs allow greater light intensities to be achieved than single LEDs.

In a particular embodiment the intensity of the light emitted from the <img class="EMIRef" id="024171337-00070001" />

2 arrays is at least 75mW/cm2.

In a particular embodiment the visor 10 is powered from a battery pack 30. In this embodiment the photo therapeutic device comprises a visor 10, battery pack 30, battery charger (not shown) and an adaptor (not shown).

The adaptor allows connection of the battery charger to the mains. In use the visor 10 is operated by connecting to a battery pack 30. In a preferred embodiment, for safety reasons, a power cable 32 may be used to connect the treatment device to the battery pack 30, or the battery pack 30 to the adaptor.

It should not be possible to connect the visor 10 directly to the adaptor. It is desirable to prevent a user from giving themselves, whether inadvertently or not, more than a prescribed light dose from the light source.

A suitable battery pack 30 uses nickel cadmium design, although other batteries are viable. The battery pack 30 is assembled into a moulded case having a connector which allows connection to the visor 10 and terminals which enable contact with the base unit charging terminals.

Typically, the adaptor will be an AC adaptor of standard type.

However the adaptor should be able to detect and adjust to ranges of input voltages from 100V to 260V whilst continuing to provide its rated output with the required tolerances.

<Desc/Clms Page number 8>

Suitable circuitry is also provided within the visor 10. The circuitry 34 is adapted for communication with a base unit and also to receive and respond to data from the base unit. A block diagram of the electronics present in the visor 10 is shown in Figure 6. The processor 58 controls or interacts with a program memory 60, an infra red communication means 62, a non-volitle memory 64 and a clock 66. A power control 68 is associated with the processor 58 and controls the LED arrays. A connector 70 is associated with the clock 66 and the power control 68. A battery 72 powers the clock 66. One or more switches 74 cooperates with the processor to activate the visor.

In order that the required treatment program is adhered to, it is important that the on-board battery has sufficient power to run the clock for a suitable length of time. In a particular embodiment this may be five days.

However, those skilled in the art will appreciate that batteries of differing capacity may be substituted depending upon the application required. In a preferred embodiment the on-board battery is automatically charged during operation of the treatment device.

The base unit associated with the visor 10 is used, primarily, to ensure that the correct treatment program is loaded onto the visor 10. A schematic of the circuitry in the base unit is shown in Figure 5. The circuitry of the base station comprises a processor 40 which controls and or interacts with an LCD display 42, a non-volitile memory 44, a program memory 46, and the infra red communication means 48 for communication with the visor and a power control 50. Switches 52 to control the operation of the base station are associated with the processor. A PSU 54 is associated with the power control and the power control is associated with battery charge sockets 56.

It is important that treatment other than the specified regime cannot be administered. Over-exposure to radiation is dangerous and should be avoided at all costs.

<Desc/Clms Page number 9>

The base unit also allows the visor to be validated prior to loading the treatment program.

In order to safeguard against unprescribed use the visor 10 will not operate, even if power is correctly applied, unless a correct exchange of signals is made with the base unit. The signals will enable the base unit to determine the necessary treatment area, size and type of treatment to be administered by the visor 10. The signals will also allow the visor to determine that it is attached to the correct base unit, i. e. that the market and territory data match.

Once the data has been exchanged the base unit loads credit for the correct treatment program into the visor 10. The visor electronics will then control the duration, sequence and number of treatments over which the visor will operate. For example, if the treatment program is 10 treatments of 20 minutes duration every other day the device is adapted to automatically turn off after twenty minutes and will not function again until the appropriate time until the next treatment has lapsed.

Prior to use the visor 10 is cleaned/sterilised by a suitable solution.

The mouldings 12,14 are constructed from suitable materials for easy sterilisation. Closed cell, stick-on, foam pads will be used to ensure cleanliness between different users. Also, by providing pads of differing thicknesses it is possible to customise the devices in the clinic, salon etc. for users with differing size heads. The pads are located on the back moulding 14.

The precise location may be adapted to fit the particular user of the visor.

In use the visor 10 is placed across the eye region of the user. Suitable strapping or similar (not shown) may be provided to ensure that the visor 10 stays in place. It is envisaged that typical treatment times will be of the order

<Desc/Clms Page number 10>

of 20 minutes, however, the visor 10 can be used for times considerably greater or lesser.

When the light source is activated the areas of the face under the lightemitting diodes are subjected to therapeutic light. The eyeshield attenuates the light directed at the user's eyes.

The present invention has particular application and advantage in treatment for periocular wrinkles, however, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that many further uses are possible.

It is to be understood that the above described specific embodiment is described by way of example only and that many modifications and variations are possible within the scope of the invention.

A particular modification is to the battery pack 30 which may be adapted to provide power to other appliances other than the visor 10. For example photo therapeutic devices configured for use on other areas of the body may be powered from the battery pack 30.

The base unit may also be compatible with other treatment devices and load the necessary treatment program into the said devices.

Claims (21)

1. A therapeutic light device, comprising a plurality of light-emitting diodes arranged and configured to direct light onto one or more periocular regions of a user, the device including an eyeshield disposed to protect one or both the user's eye from the light produced by said light-emitting diodes.
2. A therapeutic light device comprising a visor wearable by a user and a plurality of light-emitting diodes mounted within the visor and arranged to direct light onto one or more periocular regions of the user.
3. A therapeutic light device comprising one or more discrete and encapsulated arrays of LEDs each arranged to direct light at a periocular region of the user.
4. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claim wherein the light-emitting diodes are powered by a battery pack.
5. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claim wherein the diodes are thermally coupled to one or more heatsinks.
6. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claim wherein the diodes are thermally coupled to thermoelectric cooling means.
7. A therapeutic light device comprising at least one array of LEDs coupled with a heatsink and air cooling means, wherein the cooling means is arranged to draw air from the heatsink away from the LEDs.
8. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claim, wherein the light device includes a control interface associated with a base unit, said base unit being capable of relaying data to said control interface.
<Desc/Clms Page number 12>
9. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claim wherein the cosmetic treatment administered by the light device is controlled by the control interface.
10. A therapeutic light device as claimed in claim 9 wherein the control interface is operable to pause the treatment during a treatment session.
11. A therapeutic light device as claimed in claims 9 or 10 wherein the light-emitting diodes are positioned less than 2.5cm away from the user.
12. A therapeutic light device as claimed in any preceding claims wherein the array of light emitting diodes have emission wavelengths substantially within the range 400nm to 900nm.
13. A therapeutic light device as claimed in claim 12, wherein the emission wavelengths are substantially within the range 600nm to 700nm.
14. A method of cosmetic treatment using one or more LEDs to direct light upon on area surrounding the eyes of a user including providing means to attenuate light directed at the user's eye.
15. A method of medical treatment using one or more LEDs to direct light upon on area surrounding the eyes of a user including providing means to attenuate light directed at the user's eye.
16. A method of cosmetic treatment as claimed in claim 14 for the treatment of periocular wrinkles.
17. A method of cosmetic treatment using the apparatus as claimed in any of claims 1 to 13.
<Desc/Clms Page number 13>
18. Use of apparatus in accordance with any preceding claim for the treatment of periocular wrinkles.
19. A method of medical treatment using the apparatus as claimed in any of claims 1 to 13.
20. A therapeutic light device substantially as herein described with reference to and/or shown in the accompanying drawings.
21. A method of administering therapeutic substantially as herein described with reference to and/or shown in the accompanying drawings.
GB0123167A 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 Therapeutic light source Withdrawn GB2380134A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0123167A GB2380134A (en) 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 Therapeutic light source

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0123167A GB2380134A (en) 2001-09-26 2001-09-26 Therapeutic light source

Publications (2)

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GB0123167D0 GB0123167D0 (en) 2001-11-21
GB2380134A true GB2380134A (en) 2003-04-02

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Cited By (11)

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JP2015501159A (en) * 2011-09-08 2015-01-15 ラ リュミエール エルエルシーLa Lumiere Llc Phototherapy platform system
USD745694S1 (en) 2014-06-06 2015-12-15 La Lumiere Llc Light therapy mask
USD745695S1 (en) 2014-06-06 2015-12-15 La Lumiere Llc Light therapy mask
US9789333B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2017-10-17 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9999783B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-06-19 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy spot applicator
US10022555B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-07-17 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy bandage system
US10090694B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-10-02 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform mobile phone charger
US10195458B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-02-05 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform enhanced controller
US10213618B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-02-26 Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. Light therapy platform combination mask
US10272257B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-04-30 Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. Light therapy platform inductive mask and charger
US10434325B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-10-08 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform mobile device applications

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US5358503A (en) * 1994-01-25 1994-10-25 Bertwell Dale E Photo-thermal therapeutic device and method
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US5913883A (en) * 1996-08-06 1999-06-22 Alexander; Dane Therapeutic facial mask
US6129748A (en) * 1996-03-22 2000-10-10 Kamei; Tsutomu Apparatus for applying pulsed light to the forehead of a user
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US6350275B1 (en) * 1997-06-09 2002-02-26 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Devices for treating circadian rhythm disorders using LED's
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Cited By (26)

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JP2015501159A (en) * 2011-09-08 2015-01-15 ラ リュミエール エルエルシーLa Lumiere Llc Phototherapy platform system
EP2753400A4 (en) * 2011-09-08 2015-06-17 Lumiere Llc Light therapy platform system
US10300298B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-05-28 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US10293176B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-05-21 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9440092B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2016-09-13 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9561385B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2017-02-07 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
AU2012304689B2 (en) * 2011-09-08 2017-02-23 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9731143B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2017-08-15 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
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US9789333B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2017-10-17 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9814905B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2017-11-14 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
EP3260168A1 (en) * 2011-09-08 2017-12-27 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
JP2018086289A (en) * 2011-09-08 2018-06-07 ジョンソン・アンド・ジョンソン・コンシューマー・インコーポレイテッドJohnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US9999783B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-06-19 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy spot applicator
US10022555B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-07-17 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy bandage system
US10090694B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-10-02 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform mobile phone charger
US10092770B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2018-10-09 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy spot applicator
US10195458B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-02-05 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform enhanced controller
US10213618B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-02-26 Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. Light therapy platform combination mask
US10272257B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-04-30 Johnson & Johnson Consumer, Inc. Light therapy platform inductive mask and charger
US10286224B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-05-14 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform system
US10434325B2 (en) 2011-09-08 2019-10-08 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Light therapy platform mobile device applications
USD745695S1 (en) 2014-06-06 2015-12-15 La Lumiere Llc Light therapy mask
USD745694S1 (en) 2014-06-06 2015-12-15 La Lumiere Llc Light therapy mask

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