GB2376801A - Antenna device having suppressed far field radiation - Google Patents

Antenna device having suppressed far field radiation Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2376801A
GB2376801A GB0115398A GB0115398A GB2376801A GB 2376801 A GB2376801 A GB 2376801A GB 0115398 A GB0115398 A GB 0115398A GB 0115398 A GB0115398 A GB 0115398A GB 2376801 A GB2376801 A GB 2376801A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
portions
radiative
radiator according
loops
arranged
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB0115398A
Other versions
GB0115398D0 (en
GB2376801B (en
Inventor
Moshe Einat
Gadi Shirazi
Jon Dellon
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Motorola Solutions Israel Ltd
Original Assignee
Motorola Solutions Israel Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Motorola Solutions Israel Ltd filed Critical Motorola Solutions Israel Ltd
Priority to GB0115398A priority Critical patent/GB2376801B/en
Publication of GB0115398D0 publication Critical patent/GB0115398D0/en
Publication of GB2376801A publication Critical patent/GB2376801A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2376801B publication Critical patent/GB2376801B/en
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q7/00Loop antennas with a substantially uniform current distribution around the loop and having a directional radiation pattern in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the loop
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q1/00Details of, or arrangements associated with, antennas
    • H01Q1/36Structural form of radiating elements, e.g. cone, spiral, umbrella; Particular materials used therewith
    • H01Q1/38Structural form of radiating elements, e.g. cone, spiral, umbrella; Particular materials used therewith formed by a conductive layer on an insulating support
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q21/00Antenna arrays or systems
    • H01Q21/29Combinations of different interacting antenna units for giving a desired directional characteristic

Abstract

A RF antenna 100 has a first radiative portion 104 and a second radiative portion 106. The portions each generate an electromagnetic field, the fields having magnetic vector directions 112 and 110 which are substantially opposing, so as to suppress far field radiation. The two radiative regions, which each define a plane, may be superimposed, or may be displaced from one another. Preferably the radiating portions comprise one or more loops, which may have a rectangular shape. The antenna may be in the form of microstrip lines on a printed circuit board (PCB). The antenna may be connected to a transmitter 102. Applications include near field probes for identification detectors/electronic readers.

Description

<Desc/Clms Page number 1>

Title of the Invention R. F. RADIATORS AND TRANSMITTERS Field of the Invention This invention relates to r. f. radiators and transmitters. In particular, the invention relates to, but not limited to, r. f. radiators and transmitters including them for use as near-field probes.

Background of the Invention R. f. radiators radiate electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency part of the spectrum. As such, they are the basic components of any electronic system that uses free space as an r. f. propagation medium. An antenna is a device that conventionally provides a means for radiating or receiving radio waves in many r. f. systems.

Ir is a transducer converting between an electrical signal generated in a r. f. transmitter and/or received in an r. f. receiver and an electromagnetic wave which propagates in free space.

The physical form and dimensions of a radiator such as an antenna dictate the radiation pattern of the transmitted electromagnetic energy. There are certain basic properties that define the function and operation of an antenna. The properties most often of interest in the design of an antenna are: radiation pattern, antenna gain, polarisation and impedance. For a linear, passive antenna, these properties are identical for the

<Desc/Clms Page number 2>

transmitting operation and the receiving operation of the antenna, by virtue of the reciprocity theorem as known to those skilled in the art.

The form of an r. f. radiator determines the spatial distribution of the radiated energy. For example, a vertical wire antenna gives uniform coverage in the horizontal (azimuth) plane, with some vertical directionality. As such, a vertical wire antenna is often used for broadcasting purposes.

As an alternative to a radiation pattern providing a uniform coverage, the radiation pattern can be made directional. The directional properties of antennas are frequently expressed in terms of a gain function. The gain of an antenna is defined as the ratio of the maximum radiation intensity from the antenna to the maximum from a reference antenna having the same input power. The reference antenna for this purpose is usually a hypothetical loss-less isotropic radiator and the gain is subsequently expressed in dBi (dB level with reference to an isotropic radiator).

Conventional antennas employed in telecommunications applications are designed to radiate energy to the farfield. The far-field is generally understood, by those skilled in the art, to be indicative of a region which is at a distance from the antenna of the transmitting device which is equal to or greater than a distance which defines the boundary of the so called near-field. The near-field is generally understood, by those skilled in the art, to be a region which is at a small distance from the transmitting device antenna or radiator. Such a

<Desc/Clms Page number 3>

distance may be defined as any distance within one wavelength of the antenna (at its radiative centre).

Conventional antennas that radiate energy to the farfield, inherently emit some radiated energy in the nearfield. For telecommunications applications radiation patterns produced in the near-field are deemed undesirable.

In some applications, such as where a radiator is to be used as an r. f. probe, e. g. for use in an electronic reader or interrogation device, it may be necessary to provide a radiation pattern only in the near-field. The inventors of the present invention have recognised that conventional antennas do not provide acceptable performance in some such applications since they radiate also to the far-field. Furthermore, the inventors of the present invention have recognised that there is a significant disadvantage in emitting both near-field and far-field radiation patterns in such applications since far field transmissions may have to meet specifications laid down by regulatory authorities. Every device that radiates to the far-field at a power level above a specified minimum must be approved. The specified minimum power level is-ISdBmw. Ensuring that devices and transmissions from them comply with such specifications adds to the cost of antenna design and manufacture.

The purpose of the present invention is to provide an r. f. radiator that may be used to produce a near-field radiation pattern without having the disadvantages described earlier associated with conventional antennas.

<Desc/Clms Page number 4>

Summary of the present invention According to the present invention in a first aspect there is provided an r. f. radiator which includes a first radiative portion and a second radiative portion, wherein the portions are arranged such that in operation the first radiative portion generates a first electromagnetic field having a first magnetic vector in a first direction and the second radiating portion generates a second electromagnetic field having a second magnetic vector in a second direction substantially opposite to the first direction, such that the first and second magnetic vectors substantially cancel each other.

The first and second portions may each comprise a radiative track or region substantially defining a plane and each of the magnetic field vectors may be substantially perpendicular to the plane defined by the radiative track or region which has produced it. The first and second portions may be arranged such that the planes which are defined by their radiative track or region in this way co-incide, i. e. the first and second portions are superimposed one on the other.

Alternatively, the radiative portions may arranged such that the said defined planes are displaced from one another. Even where displaced, the said planes are preferably parallel or in the same overall plane.

In any event, the radiating portions of the r. f. radiator according to the invention may beneficially be arranged such that in operation substantial radiation transmission to the far-field is eliminated.

<Desc/Clms Page number 5>

In the r. f. radiator according to the invention each of the radiative portions may comprise one or more loops which in operation are current-carrying loops. Each loop may be formed in a region which approximates to an associated defined plane. The loops may be or may approximate to rectangular-shaped current-carrying loops, e. g. wire loops. Each of the current-carrying loops may conveniently be of shape and dimensions substantially the same as for the other loops. The radiative portions may comprise wire loops although they may alternatively be printed on a printed circuit board and/or are microstrip or stripline portions.

The r. f. radiator according to the invention may be such that the portions are arranged so that in operation they form a single electric current path. In operation, where the portions comprise one or more loops, the instantaneous sense (i. e. clockwise or anticlockwise) of current flow in the loop (s) of the first portion may be opposite to that of current flow in the second portion.

According to the present invention in a second aspect there is provided an r. f. transmitter or transceiver including an r. f. radiator according to first aspect described earlier. The transmitter or transceiver may be a probe for near field r. f. irradiation, e. g. near-field excitation, of a target, e. g. an article or sample to be inspected or interrogated for identity or authentication. The target or sample may be located so as to be strongly irradiated by r. f. radiation from the radiator in its near-field. A detector device to hold the sample or target and irradiate the same with r. f.

<Desc/Clms Page number 6>

radiation may be constructed so that a sample when held by the device is positioned to be suitably irradiated by the r. f. probe.

As noted earlier, if a device radiates in the far-field at a power level below that which requires compliance with regulatory specifications, namely-13dBmw, it can be designed and produced more cheaply than conventional antennas and r. f. probes. The present invention which can be operated at an output power level substantially less than lOOmw giving below the specified far-field radiation level of-13dBmw beneficially provides such a device.

In summary, the inventive concepts described herein provide an arrangement and method for producing a r. f. electromagnetic pattern in the near-field of a radiating device and at the same time suitably minimising or eliminating the radiation delivered to the far-field.

Embodiments of the present invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Brief description of the accompanying drawings Figure 1 is a front view of an r. f. transmitter and radiator arrangement in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention; Description of embodiments of the Invention As shown in Figure 1, a current-carrying wire radiator 100 is coupled 108 to a r. f. transceiver device 102. The transceiver device 102 generates r. f. signals for

<Desc/Clms Page number 7>

transmission via the radiator 100. The device 102 also processes returned signals received via the radiator 100 (acting as a receiving transducer). The radiator 100 is formed from a plurality of rectangular conducting wire loops 104. Notably, the rectangular conducting wire loops 104 (two loops in the FIG. 1 example) are formed and arranged so that when the loops 104 are energised with suitable electric signals from the transceiver 102, the resultant r. f. electromagnetic field has a magnetic vector in a direction 112 which is'out from the page'as indicated, i. e. perpendicular to the plane of the loops 104. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the rectangles are narrow and long, to ease the manufacturing process. However, it is within the contemplation of the invention that alternative configurations can be used.

The wire employed to form the loops 104 forms a second set of rectangular conducting loops 106 (two shown in Figure 1), i. e. all of the loops being in one overall current path. The loops 106 are laterally displaced from the loops 104 by a distance (between nearest sides) approximately equal to the loop width of the loops. The instantaneous current flow in the loops 106 is as shown in Figure 1 in a clockwise sense when that in the loops 106 is in an anticlockwise sense. The rectangular loops 106 have been formed in such a manner as to generate a radiation pattern having a magnetic vector in a direction 110 which is'into the page'as shown in Figure 1, i. e. in a direction opposite to that of the magnetic vector of the field produced by the loops 104.

A strong near-field radiation pattern is achieved by ensuring the parallel wires in each side of each

<Desc/Clms Page number 8>

rectangular loop are formed very close together. Since the instantaneous currents are directed in an opposite sense in the two sets of loops 104,106 and the wires of each set of loops are close together, so the overall sense of the current flow is substantially summed to zero. A minimal electromagnetic far-field radiation pattern is thereby achieved by mutual cancellation of the magnetic vectors of the fields produced by the loops 104 on the one hand and the loops 106 on the other hand. achieved.

In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, the radiator arrangement shown in Figure 1 can be formed in microstrip or stripline form, rather than in wire form, on a suitable insulating substrate in a well known manner. For example, the radiator can be easily printed on a printed circuit board (PCB) in this form, with minimal cost.

In a further embodiment of the invention, the loops 104 and 106 may be substantially superimposed one on top of the other.

It will be understood that the radiator arrangement described above, provides the following advantages: (i) it enhances the near-field radiation pattern by arranging and operating the two radiating portions such that the radiation emitted to the far-field is minimised or eliminated; (ii) it avoids the need for users or manufacturers to apply for and receive regulatory approvals or licences, thereby saving time and money ; and (iii) it permits designers and manufacturers to develop a class of r. f. probe for use in authentication

<Desc/Clms Page number 9>

or identification detectors, e. g. to be used to detect forgery/counterfeiting of inspected samples, that benefit from such an improved radiation pattern that the radiator according to the invention can provide.

Claims (14)

  1. Claims 1. An r. f. radiator which includes a first radiative portion and a second radiative portion, wherein the portions are arranged such that in operation the first radiative portion generates a first electromagnetic field having a first magnetic vector in a first direction and the second radiating portion generates a second electromagnetic field having a second magnetic vector in a second direction substantially opposite to the first direction, such that the first and second magnetic vectors substantially cancel each other.
  2. 2. An r. f. radiator according to claim 1, wherein each of the radiative portions comprises a radiative track or region substantially defining a plane and wherein in operation each of the said magnetic field vectors is substantially perpendicular to the plane defined by the radiative track or region which has produced it.
  3. 3. An r. f. radiator according to claim 2 and wherein the first and second portions are arranged such that the planes which are defined by their respective tracks or regions coincide, whereby the first and second portions are superimposed one on the other.
  4. 4. An r. f. radiator according to claim 2 and wherein the radiative portions are arranged such that the planes which are defined by their respective tracks or regions are displaced from one another.
  5. 5. An r. f. radiator according to claim 4 and wherein the radiative portions are arranged such that the said planes are parallel or in the same overall plane.
    <Desc/Clms Page number 11>
  6. 6. An r. f. radiator according to any one of the preceding claims and wherein the radiative portions are arranged such that in operation substantial radiation transmission to the far-field is eliminated.
  7. 7. An r. f. radiator according to any one of the preceding claims, and wherein each of the radiating portions comprises one or more loops which in operation are current-carrying loops.
  8. 8. An r. f. radiator according to claim 7, wherein the loops are or approximate to rectangular-shaped loops.
  9. 9. An r. f. radiator according to claim 7 or claim 8, and wherein the loops are of substantially the same shape and dimensions.
  10. 10. An r. f. radiator according to any one of the preceding claims and wherein the portions are arranged so that they form a single electric current path.
  11. 11. An r. f. radiator according to any one of claims 7 to 10 and wherein the first and second portions are arranged so that in operation the instantaneous sense of current flow in the loop or loops comprising the first portion is opposite to that of the current flow in the loop or loop comprising the second portion.
  12. 12. An r. f. radiator according to any one of the preceding claims, and wherein the radiative portions are printed on a printed circuit board and/or are microstrip or stripline portions.
  13. 13. An r. f. radiator according to claim 1 and substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawing.
  14. 14. An r. f. transmitter or transceiver including a r. f. radiator according to any one of the preceding claims.
GB0115398A 2001-06-22 2001-06-22 R F Radiators and Transmitters Expired - Fee Related GB2376801B (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0115398A GB2376801B (en) 2001-06-22 2001-06-22 R F Radiators and Transmitters

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0115398A GB2376801B (en) 2001-06-22 2001-06-22 R F Radiators and Transmitters

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB0115398D0 GB0115398D0 (en) 2001-08-15
GB2376801A true GB2376801A (en) 2002-12-24
GB2376801B GB2376801B (en) 2005-10-19

Family

ID=9917229

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB0115398A Expired - Fee Related GB2376801B (en) 2001-06-22 2001-06-22 R F Radiators and Transmitters

Country Status (1)

Country Link
GB (1) GB2376801B (en)

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012126555A1 (en) * 2011-03-23 2012-09-27 Sew-Eurodrive Gmbh & Co. Kg System having a stationary part and a mobile part arranged such that it can be moved relative thereto
US9112379B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2015-08-18 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Pairing of components in a direct current distributed power generation system
US9130401B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2015-09-08 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9235228B2 (en) 2012-03-05 2016-01-12 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current link circuit
US9291696B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2016-03-22 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Photovoltaic system power tracking method
US9318974B2 (en) 2014-03-26 2016-04-19 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Multi-level inverter with flying capacitor topology
US9362743B2 (en) 2008-05-05 2016-06-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current power combiner
US9368964B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2016-06-14 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power system using direct current power sources
US9401599B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2016-07-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Disconnection of a string carrying direct current power
US9407161B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2016-08-02 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Parallel connected inverters
US9537445B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2017-01-03 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Testing of a photovoltaic panel
US9543889B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-01-10 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9548619B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-01-17 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Method and apparatus for storing and depleting energy
US9590526B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-03-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Safety mechanisms, wake up and shutdown methods in distributed power installations
US9644993B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-05-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Monitoring of distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9647442B2 (en) 2010-11-09 2017-05-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Arc detection and prevention in a power generation system
US9673711B2 (en) 2007-08-06 2017-06-06 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Digital average input current control in power converter
US9680304B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-06-13 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Method for distributed power harvesting using DC power sources
US9812984B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2017-11-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Maximizing power in a photovoltaic distributed power system
US9819178B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-11-14 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Bypass mechanism
US9831824B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2017-11-28 SolareEdge Technologies Ltd. Current sensing on a MOSFET
US9853565B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2017-12-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Maximized power in a photovoltaic distributed power system
US9853538B2 (en) 2007-12-04 2017-12-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9866098B2 (en) 2011-01-12 2018-01-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Serially connected inverters
US9869701B2 (en) 2009-05-26 2018-01-16 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Theft detection and prevention in a power generation system
US9876430B2 (en) 2008-03-24 2018-01-23 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Zero voltage switching
US9923516B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2018-03-20 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Photovoltaic panel circuitry
US9941813B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-04-10 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. High frequency multi-level inverter
US9960667B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-05-01 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. System and method for protection during inverter shutdown in distributed power installations
US9966766B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-05-08 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Battery power delivery module
US10115841B2 (en) 2012-06-04 2018-10-30 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Integrated photovoltaic panel circuitry
US10230310B2 (en) 2016-04-05 2019-03-12 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Safety switch for photovoltaic systems
US10396662B2 (en) 2011-09-12 2019-08-27 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Direct current link circuit

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2014796A (en) * 1978-02-17 1979-08-30 Lichtblau G J Antenna system for electronic security installation
US4633250A (en) * 1985-01-07 1986-12-30 Allied Corporation Coplanar antenna for proximate surveillance systems
US5218371A (en) * 1990-08-14 1993-06-08 Sensormatic Electronics Corporation Antenna array for enhanced field falloff
US5602556A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-02-11 Check Point Systems, Inc. Transmit and receive loop antenna
EP0766200A2 (en) * 1995-09-30 1997-04-02 Sony Chemicals Corp. Antenna for reader/writer
WO1998005088A1 (en) * 1996-07-29 1998-02-05 Motorola Inc. Magnetic field antenna and method for field cancellation
JPH11272827A (en) * 1998-03-24 1999-10-08 Nippon Steel Corp Antenna system for reader writer
JPH11313017A (en) * 1998-04-24 1999-11-09 Nippon Steel Corp Antenna device for reader-writer

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2014796A (en) * 1978-02-17 1979-08-30 Lichtblau G J Antenna system for electronic security installation
US4633250A (en) * 1985-01-07 1986-12-30 Allied Corporation Coplanar antenna for proximate surveillance systems
US5218371A (en) * 1990-08-14 1993-06-08 Sensormatic Electronics Corporation Antenna array for enhanced field falloff
US5602556A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-02-11 Check Point Systems, Inc. Transmit and receive loop antenna
EP0766200A2 (en) * 1995-09-30 1997-04-02 Sony Chemicals Corp. Antenna for reader/writer
WO1998005088A1 (en) * 1996-07-29 1998-02-05 Motorola Inc. Magnetic field antenna and method for field cancellation
JPH11272827A (en) * 1998-03-24 1999-10-08 Nippon Steel Corp Antenna system for reader writer
JPH11313017A (en) * 1998-04-24 1999-11-09 Nippon Steel Corp Antenna device for reader-writer

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9644993B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-05-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Monitoring of distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9112379B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2015-08-18 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Pairing of components in a direct current distributed power generation system
US9130401B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2015-09-08 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US10447150B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2019-10-15 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9948233B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-04-17 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US10230245B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2019-03-12 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Battery power delivery module
US9960667B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-05-01 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. System and method for protection during inverter shutdown in distributed power installations
US9368964B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2016-06-14 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power system using direct current power sources
US9960731B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-05-01 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Pairing of components in a direct current distributed power generation system
US9680304B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-06-13 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Method for distributed power harvesting using DC power sources
US10097007B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-10-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Method for distributed power harvesting using DC power sources
US9543889B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-01-10 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9853490B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-12-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power system using direct current power sources
US9590526B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2017-03-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Safety mechanisms, wake up and shutdown methods in distributed power installations
US9966766B2 (en) 2006-12-06 2018-05-08 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Battery power delivery module
US10116217B2 (en) 2007-08-06 2018-10-30 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Digital average input current control in power converter
US9673711B2 (en) 2007-08-06 2017-06-06 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Digital average input current control in power converter
US9853538B2 (en) 2007-12-04 2017-12-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Distributed power harvesting systems using DC power sources
US9407161B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2016-08-02 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Parallel connected inverters
US9291696B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2016-03-22 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Photovoltaic system power tracking method
US9831824B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2017-11-28 SolareEdge Technologies Ltd. Current sensing on a MOSFET
US9979280B2 (en) 2007-12-05 2018-05-22 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Parallel connected inverters
US9876430B2 (en) 2008-03-24 2018-01-23 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Zero voltage switching
US9362743B2 (en) 2008-05-05 2016-06-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current power combiner
US10468878B2 (en) 2008-05-05 2019-11-05 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current power combiner
US10461687B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2019-10-29 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Testing of a photovoltaic panel
US9537445B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2017-01-03 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Testing of a photovoltaic panel
US9869701B2 (en) 2009-05-26 2018-01-16 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Theft detection and prevention in a power generation system
US9647442B2 (en) 2010-11-09 2017-05-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Arc detection and prevention in a power generation system
US9935458B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2018-04-03 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Disconnection of a string carrying direct current power
US9401599B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2016-07-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Disconnection of a string carrying direct current power
US9866098B2 (en) 2011-01-12 2018-01-09 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Serially connected inverters
WO2012126555A1 (en) * 2011-03-23 2012-09-27 Sew-Eurodrive Gmbh & Co. Kg System having a stationary part and a mobile part arranged such that it can be moved relative thereto
US10396662B2 (en) 2011-09-12 2019-08-27 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Direct current link circuit
US9812984B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2017-11-07 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Maximizing power in a photovoltaic distributed power system
US9853565B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2017-12-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Maximized power in a photovoltaic distributed power system
US10381977B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2019-08-13 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Photovoltaic panel circuitry
US9923516B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2018-03-20 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Photovoltaic panel circuitry
US9639106B2 (en) 2012-03-05 2017-05-02 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current link circuit
US9235228B2 (en) 2012-03-05 2016-01-12 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current link circuit
US10007288B2 (en) 2012-03-05 2018-06-26 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Direct current link circuit
US10115841B2 (en) 2012-06-04 2018-10-30 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Integrated photovoltaic panel circuitry
US9941813B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2018-04-10 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. High frequency multi-level inverter
US9548619B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-01-17 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Method and apparatus for storing and depleting energy
US9819178B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-11-14 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Bypass mechanism
US9318974B2 (en) 2014-03-26 2016-04-19 Solaredge Technologies Ltd. Multi-level inverter with flying capacitor topology
US10230310B2 (en) 2016-04-05 2019-03-12 Solaredge Technologies Ltd Safety switch for photovoltaic systems

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB0115398D0 (en) 2001-08-15
GB2376801B (en) 2005-10-19

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Behdad et al. A compact antenna for ultrawide-band applications
Cheng et al. Substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) Rotman lens and its Ka-band multibeam array antenna applications
Mak et al. Isolation enhancement between two closely packed antennas
Jensen et al. Performance analysis of antennas for hand-held transceivers using FDTD
Yang et al. Design of a uniform amplitude time modulated linear array with optimized time sequences
JP3734975B2 (en) Dual beam antenna device and mounting structure thereof
CN1921225B (en) Composite antenna
KR100699472B1 (en) Plate board type MIMO array antenna comprising isolation element
US20050237258A1 (en) Switched multi-beam antenna
Haga et al. Characteristics of cavity slot antenna for body-area networks
Wang et al. Single-fed broadband circularly polarized stacked patch antenna with horizontally meandered strip for universal UHF RFID applications
JP2006203899A (en) Small ultra wideband antenna having unidirectional radiation pattern
Li et al. Reducing mutual coupling of MIMO antennas with parasitic elements for mobile terminals
US5945938A (en) RF identification transponder
Adamiuk et al. Compact, dual-polarized UWB-antenna, embedded in a dielectric
Nikolic et al. Microstrip antennas with suppressed radiation in horizontal directions and reduced coupling
Ranga et al. An ultra-wideband quasi-planar antenna with enhanced gain
Bhobe et al. Wide-band slot antennas with CPW feed lines: Hybrid and log-periodic designs
US4724443A (en) Patch antenna with a strip line feed element
US6844854B2 (en) Interferometric antenna array for wireless devices
US7427955B2 (en) Dual polarization antenna and RFID reader employing the same
Weller et al. Single and double folded-slot antennas on semi-infinite substrates
Yu et al. RFID tag antenna using two‐shorted microstrip patches mountable on metallic objects
Stutzman Estimating directivity and gain of antennas
Tennant Experimental two-element time-modulated direction finding array

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
PCNP Patent ceased through non-payment of renewal fee

Effective date: 20060622