GB2358033A - A perforation apparatus - Google Patents

A perforation apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2358033A
GB2358033A GB0107221A GB0107221A GB2358033A GB 2358033 A GB2358033 A GB 2358033A GB 0107221 A GB0107221 A GB 0107221A GB 0107221 A GB0107221 A GB 0107221A GB 2358033 A GB2358033 A GB 2358033A
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GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
gun
tubular structure
apparatus according
workstring
nipple
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
GB0107221A
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GB2358033B (en
GB0107221D0 (en
Inventor
Ron Van Petegem
Perry C Shy
David L Reesing
Alan T Jackson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Original Assignee
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US08/792,743 priority Critical patent/US5865252A/en
Application filed by Halliburton Energy Services Inc filed Critical Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Priority to GB9802350A priority patent/GB2323397B/en
Publication of GB0107221D0 publication Critical patent/GB0107221D0/en
Publication of GB2358033A publication Critical patent/GB2358033A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of GB2358033B publication Critical patent/GB2358033B/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/11Perforators; Permeators
    • E21B43/119Details, e.g. for locating perforating place or direction
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B23/00Apparatus for displacing, setting, locking, releasing, or removing tools, packers or the like in the boreholes or wells
    • E21B23/02Apparatus for displacing, setting, locking, releasing, or removing tools, packers or the like in the boreholes or wells for locking the tools or the like in landing nipples or in recesses between adjacent sections of tubing
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B34/00Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells
    • E21B34/06Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells
    • E21B34/14Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells operated by movement of tools, e.g. sleeve valves operated by pistons or wire line tools
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/11Perforators; Permeators
    • E21B43/116Gun or shaped charge perforators
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/25Methods for stimulating production
    • E21B43/26Methods for stimulating production by forming crevices or fractures
    • E21B43/267Methods for stimulating production by forming crevices or fractures reinforcing fractures by propping

Abstract

A well production zone perforation apparatus includes a tubular structure (30) with a perforating gun (48) supported on the tubular structure (30). A check valve (56) is also located on the tubular structure (30) and allows fluid flow inward into the tubular structure (30) but prevents outward flow. The tool is positioned by use of a locator device (32) mounted on the exterior of the tubular structure (30) which engages with an interior profiled portion (20) on a perforable casing nipple (18) to permit travel of the locator device (32) in one axial direction and releasably preclude subsequent return in the opposite direction.

Description

2358033 METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR COMPLETING A WELL.

The present invention generally relates to tools used in subterranean wells and. more particularly relates to apparatus and methods for conducting perforation and related formation fracturing.

operations in subterranean wells.

A potentially productive geologi cal formation beneath the earth's surface often- contains a sufficient volume of valuable fluids, such as hydrocarbons, but also has a -Very low permeability. "Permeability,, is a term used to describe that quality of a geological formation which enables fluids to move about in the formation. All potentially productive subterrane. an formations have pores, a quality described using the term "porosit-,-,1', ids are within which the valuableflul contained. If, however, the pores are not interconnected, the fluids cannot move.

about and, thus, cannot be brought to the earth's surface without a structural modification of the production zone.

When such a formation having very low permeability, but a sufficient quantity of valuable fluids in its pores, is desired to be produced, it becomes necessary to artfficially increase the formation's permeability. This is t:,-picallv accomplishe d by "fracturing" the formation, a practice which is well known in. the art and for which purpose ma ny methods. have been conceived. Basically, fracrurin- is achieved bv a-D-olvin- suffie' ient pressure to the formation to cause it to crack or Lracture, hence the term "frac.Eulinz" Of simDlv "fracing". The desired result of this Drocess is what the cracks interconnect the ^ rmati ion's pores and aLlow the valuable fluidS zo be 'Oroughlr out of the formation and to the suriace.

Using previously proposed apparatus and methods, the general sequence of steus needed to stninulare a production zone through which a wellbore extends is as lollows. First-, a perforable nipple is made up in the well casing, and cemented in. at a predetermined depth in the well - i.e., within the subterranean production 2 zone requiring stimulation. Next a perforating trip is made by lowering a perforation assembly into the nipple on a lower end portion of a tubular work string. The gun assembly is then detonated to create a spaced series of perforations extending outwardly through the nipple, the casing, the cement and into the production zone. The discharged gun assembly is then pulled up with the workstring to complete the perforating trip.

Next, the spent gun assembly is replaced on the workstring with a tubular proppant discharge member having spaced series of sidewall proppant slurry discharge openings formed therein, the discharge openings being at least theoretically alignable with the gun-created perforations extending outwardly through the now perforated nipple in the well. With the proppant discharge member in place, the workstring is again lowered into the well (typically with one or more stimulation packers thereon) until the proppant discharge member is within the nipple. Proppant slurry is then pumped down the workstring so that proppant slurry is discharged through the discharge member side wall outlet openings and then flowed outwardly through the nipple and cement perforations into the corresponding perforations in the surrounding production zone. The workstring is then pulled out again to complete the stimulation trip and ready the casing for the installation therein of production tubing and its associated production packer structures.

This previously proposed perforation and proppant fracturing technique has several well known and heretofore unavoidable problems, limitations and disadvantages. For example, it requires two separate trips into the well to respectively carry out the necessary perforation and fracturing procedures.

Additionally, when the proppant slurry discharge member is lowered into the perforated nipple it is, as a practical matter, substantially impossible to obtain a precise alignment (in both axial and circumferential directions) between'the between the side wall discharge openings in the proppant slurry discharge member and the gun-created perforations in the nipple-.. The usual result of this discharge ope 11Migg/nipple perforation misalignment is that after it is discharged from the workstring, the proppant must -follow. a tortuous path on its way to entering the nipple perforations. Because of the highly abrasive character of proppant slurry, this tortuous flow path can easily cause severe abrasion wear problems in the casing.

Using this previously proposed perforation and proppant fracturing technique also limits the ability to-isolate multiple production zones from one another - a requirement that may easily arise due to the fact that different zones may re quire different fracturing pressures and total amounts of proppant. This problem can be partially alleviated by using straddle packers at each zone.

However,'each zone requires a separate trip with packers, and the retrieval of the packers can be quite difficult.

Moreover, there is a lack of immediate (i.e., right after proppant fracturing) proppant flow-back control. After the production zone is stimulated using this technique, proppant flow-back can easily occur when the proppant pumping pressure is relaxed, or later when the well is producing.. Such proppant flow-back creates a variety of problems, such. as abrasion of production equipment, or reduction in the production rate of the stimulated formation.

Finally, the previously proposed perforation and proppant fracturing technique described above lacks the ability to provide well pressure balance control during. pre-production trips, thereby tending to create undesirable unbalanced pressure situations during the completion of the well.

As can be readily. seen from the foregoing, it would'be highly desirable to provide improved perforation and proppant fracturing apparatus and methods which eliminate or at least substantially reduce the abovementioned problems, limitations and disadvantages commonly associated with the previously proposed perforation/stimulation technique generally described above. It is accordingly an -4object of the present invention to provide such improved- apparatus and methods.

In carrying out -principles of the present invention, in accordance with a preferred embodiment thereof, a one-trip method of perforating and stimulating a subterranean well production zone is provided which at least substantially reduces the above-mentioned problems, limitations and disadvantages commonly associated with conventional multi-trip perforation/stimulation techniques as previousl3Lutilized.

From a broad perspective, the one-trip perforation and stimulation method of the present invention is carried out by extending a wellbore through the production zone and positioning a perforable tu in the wellbore bular member within the production. Preferably the perforable tubular member is a dedicated perforable nipple cemented-in with the balance of a casing structure formed in the wellbore.

A tubular workstring is lowered into the wellbore in a manner positioning a predetermined longitudinal portion of the workstrin- within the tubular C member.

This longitudinal work-srring portion interiorly supports a drop-off type perforating gun which, when fired. is automatically released g 1. 1 from the workstring- and falls downwardly therethrough. -After positioning thereof in the 'perforable nipple, the paced series o'first perforations in the side wall of the gun 1 g s fired to create a s lowered Ion-altudinal work-string porrion. and a spaced senies of secon d perforations alie-ned with the first peri'Orations and ex-cending outwardly through the side wan Ofrhe nipple and into whe rroduction zone. Alternarively, the first perforations are -ore-formed in the longnudinal work-striliz -porrion before it is lowered into the well, -rd the -,- - r -- ounwardly through these pre-formed workstring, side wall DerforaTions. --)eal-:zrructures carried bv the workstring engage longitudinally 1D C spaced aparr seal surface areas on the interior of the nipple to isolate the perforable side wall portion thereof from the balance of the nipple.

Positioned below the supported gun within the workstring is a check valve structure operative to permit fluid flow upwardly therethrough but preclude fluid flow downwardly therethrough. Upwardly adjacent the check valve within the workstring is an inwardly projecting catch structure, representatively a no-go structure, which is spaced downwardly apart from the lower end of the gun a distance at le ast e qual to the axial le ngth of the gun.. After the gun Is fire d it drop s downwardly through the workstring to below the first perforations and is stopped by the' catch structure and retained within the workstring for subsequent retrieval therewith from the wellbore.

The workstring preferably has a locator key installed thereon above the gun-carrying longitudinal portion of the workstring, and the gun is operatively positioned within the perforable nipple by lowering the locator key through an internal profile within the nipple to a lociation below the nipple, with the workstring then being pulled upwardly to engage the key in the nipple profile. The engaged key releasably prevents its upward passage through the profile. Prior to the firing of the gun, and with the locator key engaged with the nipple profile, a substantial overpull tension force is exerted on the portion of the workstring above the locator key and maintained durin- the firing of the gun.

This overpull force on the workstring is also maintained after the firing of the gun while a suitable stimulating lluid, such as a proppant slurry, is forced downwardly through the workstning, outwardly through the first perforations and into the production zone through the second perforations which are aligned both axially and circumferentially with the first perforations. The overpull force being in in maintained on the workstrinautomatically maintains the orig. ally created alignment between the first and second perforations and compensates for. thermal and mechanical forces that are exerted on the workstring during the slurry pumping operation and might otherwise cause misalignment between the first and second perforations.

If desired, after the proppant slurry pumping. step is completed, th workstring may be lowered again and a cleanout fluid, such as a brine solution, pumped downwardly through the workstring, outwardly through the first perforations, and then upwardly through the annulus between the workstrm'g and the well casing, to clean out residual proppa nt slurry from within the casing.

Next, a sufficient upward force is exerted on the workstring, with the locator key operatively received in its associated nipple profile,to disable the key and p. ermit-its. upward movement through the nipple profile. In conjunction with this operation, at.least a portion of the. workstring, including the. longitudinal portion thereof in which the spent perforating gun is retained, is pulled out of the well. According to another feature of the present invention, in response to this workstring removal step, the second perforations are covered,' in a manner preventing appreciable fluid infl ow through the second perforations; with a fluid control member subsequently shiftable relative to the nipple to permit Euid inflow through the second perforations. This ste p serves to controllably isolate the stimul ated production zone from the casing until well fluid production from the zone is subsequ ently desired.

In one embodiment of the apparatus used to perform this one-trip method, a lower end section of the workstring extends downwardly beyond the check valve. Mounted on this lower end section, from top to bottom along its length, are a releasably connection structure, a locking key, and a tubular sliding side door structure. After the -locator key above the gun is disabled and passed upwardly through the nipple profile, the locking key is moved into and locked within the nipple profile. At this point the sliding side structure, in its closed onientati C1 ion, is sealingly moved into place inwardly over the second perforations. Next, a sufficient upward force is exerted on the workstring portion above the releasable connection therein to separate the workstring at such connection, leaving the sliding side door in place in its closed orientation within the nipple. The upward Y balance of the workstring, including the longitudinal portion thereof in which the spent perforating gun is retained, is then pulled out of the well. Using a suitable conventional shifting tool lowered into the -well, the closed sliding side door structure may later be opened to permit well fluid from the now stimulated production zone to flow through the second perforations into and upwardly through the easing to the earth's surface.

In a second embodiment of the. apparatus used to perform the olle-trip perforatior. and stimulation. meth6d, the releasable connection. structure, the locking type locator key and the sliding side door structure on the lower workstring end section beneath the check valve are eliminated and replaced with a tubular fluid flow control sleeve shifter member, and an wdally shiftable tubular fluid flow control sleeve is slidably and sealingly disposed in an open position thereof within the nipple beneath its perforable, side wall Portion. After the workstring loc ator key disposed above the perforating gun 1S' disabled and passed upwardly through the nipple profile, the entire workstring is.retrieved from the well. As the shifter member on the lower end of the workstring approaches the tubular sleeve it sequentially engages it, shifts it upwardly to its closed position in' which the closed sleeve inwardly and sealingly blocks the second perforations, and then disengage's from the upwardly shifted sleeve to be retrieved with the workstring.

The one-trip perforation and stimulation technique of the present invention provides a variety of advantages over conventional production zone perforation m YP"C and stimulation apparatus and methods. For example, i stead of the t 1 al multiple downhole trips needed, the present invention uniquely performs the perforation and stimulation operations in a single downhole trip. Additionally, due to the maintenance of alignment between the first and second perforations, abrasion damage during the proppant slurry pumping phase of the process is substantially reduced due to the elimination of a tortuous slurry path prior to its entry into the casing perforations. This perforation alig-hM'ent feature also at least potentially reduces the required proppant slurry pressure required.

Moreover, after the proppant slurry is pumped into the production zone the stimulated zone is then automatically isolated from the casing and the other production zones during the termination of the same single downhole trip - i.e., as the workstring is pulled out of the well. This automatic isolation feature of the invention further desirably provides for well pressure balance control during the su. bsequent- perforation and stimUlation of other production zones in the subterranean well. Finally, the one-trip method of this invention automatically provides for immediate proppant flow-back control, by shutting off the second perforations, at the end of the stimulation portion of the method.

While the axial force exerted on, the workstring to maintain the alignment between the first and second perforations is preferably an overpull tension force, it could also be an axial compression force'. Additionally, while the one-trip method of the present invention may be advantageously utilized to perforate and stimulate a production zone, it may also be used to perforate and then create a resulting production fluid upIlow through the side wall perforations in the still lowered workstring by simply eliminating the stimulating step and permitting' the production zone fluids to flow inwardly through the workstring side wall perforations.

Moreover, instead of utilizing a drop-off type perforation, gun within a longitudinal portion of the workstring to be perforated by the gun prior to the production zone stimulation step. in an alternate method of the present inventi ion a low debris casing gun is utilized and installed in-line with the workst' ring, thereby placing the individual detonation portions of the gun in direct facing relationship with the perforable side wall portion of the nipple. This eliminates the need to drop and then catch the gun, thereby shortening the overall workstring length. After firing the gun the detonation portions create first side wall -9perforations in the tubular housing of the gun which are alified with the resulting second perforations extending through the nipple, the cement and into the production zone. The proppant slurry may then be pumped downwardly through the interior of the still in-place gun housing and outwardly through its side wall perforations. Alternatively, if the stimulation step is not used, production fluid may be flowed inwardly through the gun side wall perforations and upwardly therethrough into the workstring for delivery therethrough to the surface.

Reference is now made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional view through a longitudinally foreshortened vertical portion of a subterranean well, including two dedicated perforable easing nipples, extending through two representative production zones; FIGS. IA-IC are schematic cross-sectional views throu-h the lowermost perforable nipple and sequentially illustrate the performance in the well an embodiment of a perforation and proppant stimulation operation according to the- present invention; FIG. 2 is a.schematic cross-sectional view similar to that in FIG. 1, but with a differently configured perforable casing nipple being installed in the wellbore casing; FIGS. 2A-2C are schematic cross-sectional views through the FIG. 2 perforable nipple and sequentially illustrate the performance in the well of an alternative embodiment of the perforation and proppant stimulation operation shown in FIGS. 1A- I C; FIG. 3 is a s chematic cross-sectional view similar to that in FIG. IA and partially illustrates an alternative embodiment of a one-trip perforation and production flow producing method according to the present invention; and FIG. 4 is a schematic cross-sectional view illustrating the use of a low debris type in-line casing gun in place of the drop-off type perforating gun shown in FIGS. I A and 2A.

10- Cross -sectionally illustrated in FIG. 1 in schematic form is a longitudinally foreshortened representatively vertical portion of a subterranean well 10 that extends through a spaced plurality of production zones Z including an uppermost production zone Zi and a lowermost production zone ZN. Well 10 includes a metal casing 12 cemented, as at 14, into a wellbore 16 and.having at each product ion zone a perforable ' ple portion 18. Each nipple 18 has, from top to bottom along Mp its interio-,r_.an annular locator profile 20, a reduced diameter top annular seal surface 22, a radially thinned tubular perforable side wall area 24, and a reduced diameter bottom annular seal surface 26.

Turning now to FIG. 1A, in which the lowermost nipple 18 C1 is representatively illustrated, the present invention provides for each of the production zones Z a unique one-trip perforation and stimulation process which yields, as later described herein, a variety of improvements over conventional multi-trip production zone stimulation techniques. To carry out this one-trip process a specially designed tubular workstring assembly 28 is used.

Workstring assembly 28 includes a length of workstring, tubing 30 which is extendable downwardly through the wellbore casing 12, and its Derforable nipple portions 18, as later described herein. The lower end portion of the workstrinz assembly 28 illustrated in FIG. 1A includes.. frOM top to bottom, (1) a conventional locator key I0J2 exteriorili mounted on the tubing. 30; (2) an upper annular seal structure 3-11 externaliv carried on the tubing 30; (3) a Ion--i-cudinal gun carrying portion 130a of the tubi--z 30: (41) a lower annular seal structure 36 externally carried on a lon--17ucim'all-y- intermediate section of the cr tubing portion gun carrying.

ty c 10a. (5) a locking tv-De locaror key 38; (6) a conventional screened tubular slidinside door assembly 40 having upper and lower external annular end seals 42 and 44 and installed in its closed position in the workstring assembly 28; and (7) an open lower end 46 of the tubing 30.

The locator key 32 is of a conventional construction and may be passed downwardly through the nipple profile 20, but once the key 32 has passed downwardly through the profile 20 the profile functions to engage key 32 and prevent it from passing upwardly through the profile 20... However, when sufficient upward force is exerted on the key 32 it may be disabled to permit it to be moved upwardly through the profile 20. Locator key 32 could alternatively be another type of locator device known in this art, such as, for example, a collet, slugs or Cings.

A conventional drop-off type perforating gun 48, having upper and lower ends 50 and 52, is operatively supported within an upper end section of the gun carrying portion 30a, of the workstring tubing 30. The lower end of the workstring gun carrying portion 30a. is connected to the portion of the workstring tubing 30 below it by a suitable releasable connection 54 such as, for example, that typically used in a lock mandrel running tool. Directly above the releasable connection 54, within the tubing 30, is a standing check valve structure 56 that functions to permit upward fluid flow therethrough and pr eclude downward 'fluid flow therethrough. The standing check valve 56 is directly below an internal no-go structure 58 which, as later described herein, functions to catch the perforating gun 48 after. it has been fixed and drops off its mounting structure within the tubing 30. Check valve 56 could alternatively be positioned above the gun 48, with a suitable plug structure disposed below the gun, 'and thus still function to permit fluid flow into the tubular workstring structure while precluding fluid flow outwardly therefrom.

Stil.1 referrina to FIG. 1A, when it is desixed to perforate and stimulate the illustrated subterranean production zone ZN the illustrated lower end portion of the workstring assembly 28 is lowered through the easing 12 until the locator key 32 is positioned beneath the nipple 18 disposed within the production zone ZN.

Workstring assembly 28 is then raised to its FIG. 1A position in which (1) the 12- locator key 32 is operatively engaged by th ni c) e ipple profile 20 to stop further upward movement of the workstring assembly 28; (2) the perforating g-un 48 is disposed between the upper and lower internal nipple seal areas 22 and 26, with the side of the g-un facing the perforable side wall area 24 of the nipple 18; and (3) the upper and lower tubing seals 34,36 respectively engaging the upper and lower nipple areas 22,26 and thereby sealing off the interior of the perforable nipple area 24 from the interior nipple portions above and below it.

Next, as indicated by the arrow 60 in FIG. 1A, the portion of the workstring tubing above the locator key 32 is tensioned by creating a substantial overpull force therein, representatively about 20,000 pounds of upward force. The gun 48 is then fired to create a spaced series of first perforations 62 in the side wall of the gun carrying workstring portion 30a, and a spaced series of second perforations 64 aligned with the first perforations 62 and extending outwardly through the perforable nipple side wall area 24, the cement 14 and into the production zone ZN.

Alternatively, the first perforations 62 may be pre-formed in the gun carrying workstring portion 30a, before it is lowered into the casing 12, and appropriately aligned with the series of detonation portions on the perforating gun 48. When the gun is later fired, it fires directly outwardly through the pre-formed perforations 62, thereby reducing the overall metal wall thickness which the gun must perforate.

After the firin- thereof, and the resulting provision of the circumferentiallv and axially aligned sets of perforations 62 and 64, the gun 48 automatically drops- C oE its mountinc, structure within the tubing 30 and falls downwardly through the tubing 30 to the dotted line position of the gun 48 in which it is caught within a lower end section of the work-string gun carrying portion 30a by the no-go structure 58. In this "caught" position of the dropped gun 48 its upper end 50 is disposed beneath the lowermost aligned perforation set 62,64 as indicated in FIG. 1A.

13- After the perforation g-un 48 drops, and while still maintaining the overpul-1 force 60 on the tubing 30 above the locator key 32, the production zone ZN i is stimulated by pumping stimulation fluid, i such as a suitable proppant slurry 66, downwardly through the workstring tubing 30, outwardly through the tubing perforations 62 and into the production zone ZN through the perforations 64'Which are aligned with the perforations 62 both circumferentially and axially.

At this point it is important to note that the stimulation process for the representative production zone ZN hs- been completed not with the usual plurality of downhole trips, but instead with but a single trip with the workstring.

Additionally, and in accordance with another feature of the present invention, during the pumping and workstring discharge of the proppant slurry 66, the workstring discharge perforations 62 are kept in their initial firing alignment with the nipple, cement and production perforations 64. The high pressure streams of proppant slurry 66 exiting the workstring discharge perforations 62 are jetted essentially directly into their corresponding aligned perforations 643 thereby eliminating the conventional tortuous path, and resulting abrasion wear problems, of discharged proppant slurry resulting from perforation misalignments occurring in conventional multi-trip stimulation operations. Additionally, this perforation alignment feature also at least potentially reduces the stimulation pumping pressure required.

The maintenance of the desirable, abrasion reducing alignment between the, Perforations sets 62 and 64 during the proppant slurry phase of the overall stimulation process is facilitated by the -Previously. mentioned overpull force 60.maintained during slurry pumping. Such overpull force, coupled with the. forcible i.ipward engagement of the locator key 32 with the corresponding nipple locator profile 20, automatically builds into the'-tubing 30 compensation for thermal and pressure forces imposed on the tubing 30 during proppant slurry delivery that otherwise might shift the perforations 62 relative to their directly facing -14perforations 64.

While the axial force used to maintain the alignment between the perforations 62,64 is preferably a tension force, it could alternatively be an axial compression force maintained on the portion of the workstring 30 above the key 32. To use this alternate compression force it is simply necessary to reconfigure the key 32 so -that will pass upwardly through the nipple profile 20 but is releasably precluded from passing downwardly therethrough.

If desired, after the proppant -glurry pumping step is completed a cleanout step may be carried out to remove residual proppant slurry from the interior of nipple 18. To do this, the overpull force 60 is relaxed, and the workstring assembly 28 is lowered, as indicated by the arrow 68 in FIG. 1A, until the upper annular Seal structure 34 on the tubing 30 moves downwardly past its corresponding upper nipple seal area 22. A suitable cleaning fluid 70 (such as a brine solution) is then pumped downwardly through.the workstring tubing 30, outwardly through the tubing side wall perforations 62, and then upwardly through the annular space between the nipple 18 and the workstring, to upwardly flush out residual proppant slurry from the nipple interior. After this optional cleanout step is performed, the workstring is raised

again to return it to its FIG. 1A position in which the locator key 32 is received m and. upwardly abuts the nipple profile 20. The workstring 30 is then pulled upwardly with a force sufficient to "shear ouC and disable the locator key 32, thereby permitting the locator key 32 to pass upwardly through the nipple profile 20, and then further pulled upwardly until, as indicated in FIG. 1B, the locking locator key 38 locks into the nipple profile 20 to halt further upward workstring movement. At this point, the annular upper and lower sliding side door end seals 42,44 sealingly engage the annular internal nipple sealing surface areas 22 and 26, respectively, with the screened tubular sliding side door structure 40 longitudinally extending between the sealing surfaces 22,26.

Finally, an upward pull is exerted on the portion of the workstring tubing 30 above the locking locator 38 with sufficient force to separate the workstring assembly at the releasable connection 54, thereby leaving the indicated lower longitudinal portion of the workstring assembly 28 in place within the nipple 18 as indicated in FIG. 1C. If the previously described optional slurry cleanout step is not performed, this step is performed directly after the slurry supply pumping portion of one-trip perforation and stimulation process.

As can be seen by comparing-FIGS. IB and FIG. 1C, a further desirable feature of the one-trip method is that the spent perforating gun 48 is automatically retrieved with the upper workstring portion upon completion of the method instead of being simply dropped into the well's rat hole as is typically the case when a drop-off type perforating gun is used in conventional midti-trip perforation and stimulation methods.

Still referring to FIG. 1C, as previously mentioned, the screened sliding side door structure 40 was initially installed in its closed position in the work. string assembly 28. Accordingly, the sliding side door structure 40, when left in place within the nipple 18 at the end of the one-trip perforation and stimulation process,.

serves to isolate the stimulated production zone ZN from the balance of the well system by blocking inflow of production fluid from production zone ZN through the perforations 64 and then upwardly through either the workstring tubing 30. or the nipple 18.

The overall method just described is thus utilized, in a sinzle downhole trip, to sequentially carry out in a unique fashion a perforation function, a stimulati ion function, and a subsequent production zone isolation function. As will be readily appreciated, similar one-trip methods may be subsequently performed on upwardly successive ones of the production zones Z to perforate, stimulate, and isolate them in readiness for later well fluid delivery therefrom.

After each subterranean production zone Z has e'en readied for well fluid delivery in this manner, any zone (for example, the production zone ZN Shown in FIG. 1Q may be selectively re-communicated with the interior of its associated workstring section simply by runmin- a conventional shift ing tool (not shown) down the well and using it to downwardly shift the door portion of the selected zone's sliding side door structure 40, as indicated by the arrow 72 in FIG. 1C, to thereby permit production fluid 74 to flow from the production zone ZN inwardly through its perforations 64, into the now opened screened sliding side door structure 40, and then upwardly through the workstring section 30 and the casing 12 to the surface. Alternatively, of course, the sliding side door structure could be rotationally shiftable between its open and closed positions instead of axially shiftable therebetween.

While the present invention, as described above, provides a unique onetrip perforation, stimulation and subsequent production zone isolation method, principles of the invention may also be used to provide a onetrip perforation and production flow creating method without the us Z2 e of its stimulation portion as schematically illustrated in FIG. 3. Specifically, representatively using a slightly modified version ofthe previously described apparatus of FIG. 1A, after the gun 48 has been fired and permitted to drop and be caught within an underlying longitudinal portion of the workstring 30, the previously described proppant slurry pumping step is sl-MDlv eliminated and production.zone fluid 74 permitted to flow inwardly through the 1Derforations 64. the perforations 62, and then ulDwardly throueh the still lowered workstring 30 to the surface.

-As may be seen bi comparing the workstring apparatus FIG. 3 to that in ty t> in FIG. LA, in the FIG. 3 version of such apparatus the releasable connection 54, the lockinz ke 38 and the sliding side door 40 are eliminated from y the FIG. 3 workstring apparatus, with the open lower workstring end 46 being positioned i=mediately below the standing check valve 56, 17- Shown in FIG. 4 is the use of a conventional low debris in-line casing gun 96 used in place of the previously described drop-off type perforating gun 48. The gun 96 has a top end 98 and a bottom end 100 and, instead of being mounted within a longitudinal portion of the workstring 30 for released movement axially therethrough, is axially interposed between adjacent portions.of the workstring with the tubular housing of the gun 96 defining, in effect, a longitudinal portion of the overall Workstring structure- Firing of the gun 96 just prior to the previously described p-roppant slurry pumping gt-ep creates the first perforations 62 directly in the gun housing side wall, with the perforations 62 being aligned with the resulting second perforations 64. Accordingly, when the proppant slurry 66 is subsequently pumped downwardly through the workstring 30 it is forcibly discharged through the gun housing perforations 62 and then outwardly through the perforations 64 aligned therewith into the production zone ZN.

Since the gun 96 is not released after it is fired, the no-go structures 58 (see FIG. 1A) may be eliminated and the' check valve.56 positioned downwardly adjacent the lower end 100 of the gun 96. This shortens the necessary length of the overall work-string structure by about the length of the gun 96. Additionally, as can be seen in FIG. 4, the gun 96 does not have to create perforations in a workstrm-g side wall surrounding it. Accordingly, more of the detonation power of the gun 96 is available for perforating the nipple 18 and the surrounding production zone ZN.

In FIGS. 2-2C an alternate embodiment of the previously described one-t rip perforation and stimulation method is illustrated as being performed in a slightly moomed well 10a (see FIG. 2). For ease in comparison, components of the well 10a. and the combination peri'Oration, stimulation and isolation apparatus used in conjunction therewith, which are similar to their counterparts in FIGS. 1-1C have, for the most part, been given the same reference numerals, but with the subscripts a is- As illustrated in FIG. 2, at each production zone Z the casing 12a has installed therein a modified perforable nipple structure 80 in which the perforable side wall area 24a extends between the top annular seal surface 22a and a vertically elongated lower annular seal surface area 82. Slidingly and sealingly received within the seal surface area 82 is a tubular sleeve member 84 having upper and lower annular exterior end seals 86 and 88. The nipple and sleeve structure 80,84 is similar to that illustrated and described in U.S. patent 5,361,843 antitled "DEDICATED PERFORATABLE NIPPLE WITH INTEGRAL ISOLATION SLEEVE".

Sleeve member 84 is originally installed in an open position within the nipple 80 in which the sleeve member 84 is downwardly offset fxom the perforable nipple side wall area 24a and sealingly received entirely within the lower seal surface area 82 as shown in FIG. 2. As later described herein, the sleeve member 84 is upwardly shiftable within the nipple 80 to a closed position (see FIG. 2Q in which the sleeve member side wall is positioned inwardly over the perforations 64a, with the upper sleeve seal 86 sealingly engaging the nipple seal surface 22a, and the lower sleeve seal 88 sealingly engaging the nipple seal surface 82.

As shown in FIG. to utilize this alternate one-trip method of perforating and stimulating a production zone, such as the representatively illustrated production zone ZN, a modified workstring assembly 90 is provided. Workstrm-cr assembly 90 is similar to the workstring assembly 28 previously described 'm conjunction with FIGS. IA-1C except that its bottom end portion (below the standing check valve 56a) the workstring assembly 90 does not have the locking key 38 or the screened sliding side door structure 40. Instead, the lower open end of the workstring tubing 30 has mounted thereon a conventional shifter member 92 which is operative, when pulled upwardly through the sleeve member 84, to sequentially engage the sleeve member 84, shift it upwardly to its FIG. 2C closed position within the nipple 80, and then disengage from the sleeve member 84 to -19leave it in its upwardly shifted closed position within the nipple 80.

The one-trip perforation and stimulation method using the workstrint,,,, assembly 90 is similar to that performed using the previously described workstring assembly 28, with the exception of the final production zone isolation step that occurs in response to pulling the workstrMig, together with the spent perforation gun retained therein, out of the well. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 2A, the workstring assembly 90 is lowered through the casing until the locator key 32a is positioned -below the nipple 80. TEe workstring assembly 90 is then pulled up until the locator key 32a operatively engages the locator profiLle 20a at which time the perforating gun 48a is vertically aligned with the perforable nipple side wall area 24a and the workstring tubing seals 34a,36a respectively engage the upper and lower internal nipple seal surface areas 22a,82.

While an overpull force 60a is maintained on the portion of the workstring tubing Wabove, the locator key 32a the gun 48a is fired to create the aligned perforation sets 62a,64a after which the spent gun 48a automatically drops to its dotted line position within a lower section of the gun carrying portion 30a of the workstring tubing 30. During the continued application of the overpull force 60a on the workstring tubing 30, proppant slurry 66a is then pumped down the workstring tubing 80 and outwardly into the production zone ZN via the aligned perforation sets 62a,64a as previously described.

If desired, the optional proppant slurry cleanout step may be performed by lowering the workstring assembly 90, as indicated by the arrow 68a in FIG. 2A, and flushing out the casing interior with cleanout fluid 70a pumped down the tubing 30 and outwardly through the tubing -perforations 62a as previously described. After the cleanout step (or after the proppant slurry pumping step if the cleanout step is not performed), the workstring tubing 30 is pulled upwardly with a force 93 (see FIG. 2B) sufficien t to disable the locator key 32 and pull it upwardly through its associated nipple profile 20a, thereby upwardly moving the 20, shifter member 92 upwardly toward the lower end of the shiftable sleeve inember 84 as the workstring, and the spent perforating gun 48a retained there ty t> in, are pulled out of the well.

As previously described, as the upwardly moving shifter member 92 on the lower end of the work-string tubing 30 engag s the sleeve member 84 it moves it rn b ge upwardly to its closed position as indicated by the arrow 94 in FIG. 2C, and then automatically disengages from the sleeve member 84, leaving it i i in its closed position. ---Insuch closed position the upwardly shifted sleeve member 84 isolates the stimulated production zone ZN from the interior of the casing 12 until a suitable shifting- tool (not shown) is run back down the well to engage the sleeve 84 R5 and shift it downwardly to its FIG. 2B open position at which time product' ion fluid from the stimulated zoneZN can flow inwardly through the perforations 64a and upwardly through the casing 12a to the earth's surface.

In the foregoing detailed description of embodiments of the present invention representatively illustrated in the accompanying figures, directional terms, such as "upper", "lower", "upward", "downward", etc. are used in relation to the representatively vertical orientation of the illustrated 'rkstring assemblv embodiments as they are depicted in the accompanying figures. It is to be understood, however, that the workstring assembly embodiments may be utilized in vertical, horizontal, inverted or inclined orientations without: deviai;Mz fromthe p.Tinciples ofthe preseni: invention.

The foreRoinQ detailed descriDtion is to be clearly understood a s being given by way of illustration and example only. The invention may be modified with the scope of the appended claims.

21

Claims (14)

CLAIMS:
1 Subterranean well production zone perforation apparatus comprising: a tubular structure; a perforating gun supported on the tubular structure; a check valve mounted in the tubular structure operative to permit fluid flow into the tubular structure and preclude fluid flow outwardly therefrom; and a locator device exteriorly mounted on the tubular structure proximate to the supported gun and operatively engageble with an interior profiled on a preforable casing nipple to permit travel of the locator key in one axial direction therethrough and releasably preclude subsequent return therethrough in the opposite axial direction.
2. Apparatus according to Claim 1, wherein the perforating gun is a dropoff type perforating gun supported within the tubular structure to drop downwardly therethrough in response to firing the gun.
3. Apparatus according to Claim 1 or 2, further comprising: a catch projection disposed in the tubular structure and positioned between the bottom of the supported gun and the check valve, the catch projection being operative to catch the dropped gun and preclude further downward travel thereof through the tubular structure.
4. Apparatus according to Claim 3, wherein the supported gun has an axial length, a top end and a bottom end, and the catch projection is spaced downwardly apart from the bottom end of the supported gun a distance at least equal to the axial length of the supported gun.
5. Apparatus according to Ciaim 2, wherein the tubular structure has a spaced series of side wall perforations therein, and the perforating gun has a spaced series of detonation portions disposed thereon and inwardly aligned with the side wall perforations.
22
6. Apparatus according to any one of Claims 1 to 5, wherein the perforating gun is an exposed low debris type casing gun connected at its opposite ends to facing ends of axially spaced sections of the tubular structure.
7. Apparatus according to any one of Claims 1 to 6, wherein the tubular structure has a bottom end s ection extending downwardly beyond the check valve.
8. Apparatus according to Claim 7, wherein the bottom end section has an open lower end.
9. Apparatus according to Claim 7 or 8, wherein, from top to bottom along its length, the bottom end section of the tubular structure has mounted thereon a releasable connection structure, a locking type locator device, and a shiftable fluid flow control device.
10. Apparatus according to Claim 9, wherein the shiftable fluid flow control device is a sliding side door structure.
11. Apparatus according to Claim 7, 8, 9 or 10, wherein the bottom end section of the tubular structure has mounted thereon a tubular closure sleeve shifter member.
12. Apparatus according to any one of Claims 1 to 11, wherein said check valve is mounted in a downwardly spaced relationship with the supported gun.
13. Apparatus according to any one of Claims 1 to 12, wherein said locator device is a locator key.
14. Apparatus according to Claim 1, wherein said locator device is mounted above the supported gun.
GB0107221A 1997-02-03 1998-02-03 Apparatus for completing a well Expired - Fee Related GB2358033B (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08/792,743 US5865252A (en) 1997-02-03 1997-02-03 One-trip well perforation/proppant fracturing apparatus and methods
GB9802350A GB2323397B (en) 1997-02-03 1998-02-03 Method of, and apparatus for, completing a well

Publications (3)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB0107221D0 GB0107221D0 (en) 2001-05-16
GB2358033A true GB2358033A (en) 2001-07-11
GB2358033B GB2358033B (en) 2001-09-05

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GB0114032A Expired - Fee Related GB2360805B (en) 1997-02-03 1998-02-03 Method of completing a well
GB0107221A Expired - Fee Related GB2358033B (en) 1997-02-03 1998-02-03 Apparatus for completing a well

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB0114032A Expired - Fee Related GB2360805B (en) 1997-02-03 1998-02-03 Method of completing a well

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Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4633945A (en) * 1984-12-03 1987-01-06 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Permanent completion tubing conveyed perforating system
US5361843A (en) * 1992-09-24 1994-11-08 Halliburton Company Dedicated perforatable nipple with integral isolation sleeve
GB2299113A (en) * 1994-08-04 1996-09-25 Marathon Oil Co Apparatus and method for perforating and fracturing

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4269278A (en) * 1977-10-17 1981-05-26 Peabody Vann Method and apparatus for completing a slanted wellbore

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4633945A (en) * 1984-12-03 1987-01-06 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Permanent completion tubing conveyed perforating system
US5361843A (en) * 1992-09-24 1994-11-08 Halliburton Company Dedicated perforatable nipple with integral isolation sleeve
GB2299113A (en) * 1994-08-04 1996-09-25 Marathon Oil Co Apparatus and method for perforating and fracturing

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GB2358033B (en) 2001-09-05
GB2360805B (en) 2001-11-21
GB0107221D0 (en) 2001-05-16
GB2360805A (en) 2001-10-03
GB0114032D0 (en) 2001-08-01

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Effective date: 20040203