GB2314683A - Semiconductor device - Google Patents

Semiconductor device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
GB2314683A
GB2314683A GB9713846A GB9713846A GB2314683A GB 2314683 A GB2314683 A GB 2314683A GB 9713846 A GB9713846 A GB 9713846A GB 9713846 A GB9713846 A GB 9713846A GB 2314683 A GB2314683 A GB 2314683A
Authority
GB
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
layer
refractory metal
portion
step
metal nitride
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
GB9713846A
Other versions
GB9713846D0 (en )
Inventor
Masanobu Zenke
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
NEC Corp
Original Assignee
NEC Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L28/00Passive two-terminal components without a potential-jump or surface barrier for integrated circuits; Details thereof; Multistep manufacturing processes therefor
    • H01L28/40Capacitors
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L27/00Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate
    • H01L27/02Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components specially adapted for rectifying, oscillating, amplifying or switching and having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier; including integrated passive circuit elements with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier
    • H01L27/04Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components specially adapted for rectifying, oscillating, amplifying or switching and having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier; including integrated passive circuit elements with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier the substrate being a semiconductor body
    • H01L27/10Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components specially adapted for rectifying, oscillating, amplifying or switching and having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier; including integrated passive circuit elements with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier the substrate being a semiconductor body including a plurality of individual components in a repetitive configuration
    • H01L27/105Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components specially adapted for rectifying, oscillating, amplifying or switching and having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier; including integrated passive circuit elements with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier the substrate being a semiconductor body including a plurality of individual components in a repetitive configuration including field-effect components
    • H01L27/108Dynamic random access memory structures
    • H01L27/10805Dynamic random access memory structures with one-transistor one-capacitor memory cells
    • H01L27/10808Dynamic random access memory structures with one-transistor one-capacitor memory cells the storage electrode stacked over transistor

Abstract

A stacked storage capacitor (13) of a dynamic random access memory cell has an accumulating electrode (13c) increased in surface area by growing hemispherical silicon grains (13b) on an amorphous silicon layer (13a), and a barrier layer (12f) of titanium nitride is previously formed between a source region (11c) of an associated field effect transistor (11) and the amorphous silicon layer so that phosphorous dopant is prevented from diffusing from the amorphous silicon layer into the source region.

Description

SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE This invention relates to a semiconductor device, in particular to a semiconductor device having a capacitor increased in capacitance and, more particularly, to a structure of the semiconductor device and a process of fabricating the semiconductor device.

A typical example of the ultra large scale integration is a random access memory device, and the real estate assigned to each memory cell has been reduced. The dynamic random access memory cell stores a data bit in the form of electric charge, and a designer is expected to further decrease the real estate assigned to the storage capacitor without reduction of the capacitance. The manufactures have proposed various kinds of three dimensional storage capacitor such as a trench storage capacitor and a stacked storage capacitor. The trench storage capacitor is embedded into the semiconductor substrate, and the stacked storage capacitor is fabricated over the semiconductor substrate.

A standard storage capacitor is fabricated as follows. The stacked storage capacitor forms a dynamic random access memory cell together with a switching transistor, and the switching transistor is firstly fabricated on a semiconductor substrate. The switching transistor is covered with a first inter-level insulating layer, and polysilicon is grown over the first inter-level insulating layer. Dopant impurity is introduced into the polysilicon layer, and a photo-resist etching mask is formed on the doped polysilicon layer by using lithographic techniques. Using the photo-resist etching mask6 the doped polysilicon layer is patterned into an accumulating electrode through a plasma-assisted dry etching.

Subsequently, a dielectric layer is grown over the accumulating electrode, and is covered with a doped polysilicon layer. The doped polysilicon layer is patterned into a counter electrode as similar to the accumulating electrode.

The switching transistor is overlapped with the prior art standard stacked storage capacitor, and the dynamic random access memory cell occupies a real estate narrower than that of a standard planar dynamic random access memory cell. The capacitance of the stacked storage capacitor is dominated by the surface area of the accumulating electrode opposed to the counter electrode, and the manufacturers have proposed to make the surface of the accumulating electrode rough.

One of the surface roughening technologies is disclosed in Japanese Patent Publication of Unexamined Application No. 5-304273, and is called as HSG (Hemi-sphere-Grain) technology. Figures 1A to 1D illustrates the prior art process called as the HSG technology.

A silicon substrate la is prepared, and silicon oxide is deposited over the major surface of the silicon substrate la. The major surface of the silicon substrate la is covered with a silicon oxide layer ib. A photoresist etching mask (not shown) is formed on the silicon oxide layer ib by using lithographic technologies, and the silicon oxide layer ib is selectively etched away so as to form a contact hole ic therein as shown in figure 1A.

Subsequently, phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon is deposited over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a chemical vapor deposition. The material gases are Si2H6 and PH3 at 0.1 torr to 2 torr, and the deposition is carried out at 500 degrees to 600 degrees in centigrade. Si2H6 may be replaced with SiH4. The phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon fills the contact hole 1c, and swells into a phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer of 200 nanometers to 500 nanometers thick.

A photo-resist etching mask (not shown) is formed on the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer, and the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is selectively etched away so as to form an amorphous silicon strip 2a as shown in figure 1B.

The resultant semiconductor structure is exposed to silicon-containing gas at 10-3 torr for 1 to 2 minutes, and is heated to 540 degrees to 650 degrees in centigrade for 1 to 10 minutes after the exposure of the silicon-containing gas. The silicon-containing gas contains Si2H6, and the Si2H6 is regulated to 20 sccm to 30 sccm. Hemi-spherical silicon grains are grown on the amorphous silicon strip 2a, and an accumulating electrode 2c is formed on the silicon oxide layer Ib as shown in figure 1C.

Subsequently, the accumulating electrode 2c is covered with a dielectric layer 2d, and polysilicon is deposited over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure. Phosphorous is introduced into the polysilicon layer, and the phosphorous doped polysilicon layer is patterned into a counter electrode 2e by using the lithographic techniques and a dry etching. The resultant semiconductor structure is shown in figure 1D.

The stacked storage capacitor fabricated through the prior art process encounters a problem in that the hemi-spherical silicon grains do not increase the capacitance as expected.

It is therefore an object of at least the preferred embodiments of the present invention to provide a process through which a storage capacitor widely increases the capacitance.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, there is provided a semiconductor device fabricated on a semiconductor substrate having a contact area, said device comprising, a capacitor including an accumulating electrode formed of conductive material doped with a dopant impurity and having a first portion electrically connected to said contact area and a second rough surface portion merged with said first portion, a dielectric film structure covering at least said rough surface portion, a counter electrode held in contact with said dielectric film structure, and a conductive barrier layer formed between said contact area and said first portion to protect said contact area from diffusion of dopant impurities from said accumulating electrode.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method of manufacturing a semiconductor device, comprising the steps of: a) preparing a semiconductor substrate having a contact area; b) forming a barrier layer covering said contact area and formed of a conductive material for protecting said contact area from a dopant impurity; c) forming a first portion of an accumulating electrode formed of semiconductor material doped with said dopant impurity and held in contact with said barrier layer; d) growing a second, rough surface portion of said accumulating electrode on said first portion of said accumulating electrode by using a high-temperature growing technique; e) covering said rough surface portion with a dielectric layer; and f) forming a counter electrode on said dielectric layer.

The present inventor contemplated the problem inherent in the stacked storage capacitor fabricated through the prior art process, and found that the hemi spherical silicon grains contained a negligible amount of phosphorous. The present invention investigated the cause of the shortage of phosphorous, and found the following facts. First, the phosphorous was freely diffused in the amorphous silicon during the heat treatment for the growth of the hemi-spherical silicon grains, and the surface portion of the accumulating electrode 2a contained a negligible amount of phosphorous upon completion of the growth of the hemi-spherical silicon grains 2b. The phosphorous was hardly diffused into the hemi-spherical silicon grains 2b after the growth of the hemi-spherical silicon grains 2b, because the hemi-spherical silicon grains were constricted at the boundaries to the amorphous silicon strip 2a.

The hemi-spherical silicon grains 2b thus containing a negligible amount of phosphorous allowed a depletion layer to be widely extended from the boundary of the dielectric layer 2d, and the wide depletion layer decreased the capacitance of the stacked storage capacitor.

The present inventor firstly increased the phosphorous concentration of the amorphous silicon strip 2a before the growth of the hemi-spherical silicon grains.

When the phosphorous concentration was equal to or greater than 1020 atom/cm3, the large amount of phosphorous prevented the stacked storage capacitor from reducing the capacitance. However, a large amount of phosphorous was diffused into the semiconductor substrate la during a heat treatment after the growth of hemi-spherical silicon grains, and deteriorated the switching transistor. The effective phosphorous concentration effective against the reduction of the capacitance without deterioration of the switching transistor was so narrow that the increase of the phosphorous concentration was not practical.

The present inventor noticed that a barrier layer would protect the switching transistor from the phosphorous diffused from the accumulating electrode, and proposed inserting a barrier layer between an accumulating electrode of an impurity region formed in a semiconductor substrate.

Preferred features of the present invention will now be described, purely by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figs. 1A to 1D are cross sectional views showing the process disclosed in Japanese Patent Publication of Unexamined Application No. 5-304273; Figs. 2A to 2H are cross sectional views showing a process of fabricating a dynamic random access memory cell; Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view showing a parasitic transistor used for an evaluation of the stacked storage capacitor of the dynamic random access memory cell; Fig. 4 is a graph showing the relation between a threshold and a distance between impurity regions for investigation of influences of diffused phosphorous; Fig. 5 is a graph showing capacitance-to-voltage characteristics of samples fabricated for an evaluation of a barrier layer; Figs. 6A to 6D are cross sectional views showing a process of fabricating a stacked storage capacitor; and Figs. 7A to 7E are cross sectional views showing another process of fabricating a stacked storage capacitor.

Figures 2A to 2H illustrate a process of fabricating a dynamic random access memory cell.

The process starts with preparation of a p-type silicon substrate 10. Though not shown in the drawings, a thick field oxide layer is selectively grown on the major surface of the p-type silicon substrate 10, and defines an active area assigned to a pair of dynamic random access memory cells. Desdription is hereinbelow focused on one of the dynamic random access memory cells.

A thin gate oxide layer lia is grown on the active area, and polysilicon is deposited over the thick field oxide layer and the thin gate oxide layer ?lea. Thus, a polysilicon layer is laminated on the thin gate oxide layer gila.

Photo-resist solution is spun onto the polysilicon layer, and is baked so as to form a photo-resist layer on the polysilicon layer. A pattern image is transferred from a photo-mask (not shown) to the photo-resist layer, and a latent image is formed in the photo-resist layer. The latent image is developed, and a photo-resist etching mask is formed on the polysilicon layer. Using the photo-resist etching mask, the polysilicon layer is selectively etched away so as to form a gate electrode lib on the thin gate oxide layer lia. Thus, the polysilicon layer is patterned into the gate electrode by using lithographic techniques followed by the etching.

N-type dopant impurity is ion implanted into the active area without a photo-resist ion-implantation mask, and heavily doped n-type source/drain regions lic/ild are formed in the active area in a self-aligned manner with the gate electrode lib. The thin gate oxide layer lia, the gate electrode lib and the heavily doped n-type source/drain regions lic/lid as a whole constitute an nchannel enhancement type switching transistor 11.

Subsequently, silicon oxide is deposited over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure, and the n-channel enhancement type switching transistor 11 is covered with a silicon oxide layer 12a. A photo-resist etching mask (not shown) is formed on the silicon oxide layer 12a by using the lithographic techniques, and the silicon oxide layer 12a is selectively etched away so as to form a node contact hole 12b by using a dry etching. The heavily doped n-type source region lic is exposed to the node contact hole 12b as shown in figure 2A.

Titanium is deposited to 5 nanometers to 50 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a sputtering or a chemical vapor deposition, and a titanium layer 12c topographically extends along the silicon oxide layer 12a and the heavily doped n-type source region lic as shown in figure 2B.

The resultant semiconductor structure is placed in nitriding ambience. Nitrogen, ammonia or gaseous mixture thereof creates the nitriding ambience, and the resultant semiconductor structure is heated to 500 degrees to 700 degrees in centigrade. The titanium on the source region Ilc reacts with silicon, and the titanium and the silicon produces a titanium silicide layer 12d. On the other hand, the titanium on the silicon oxide layer 12a is nitrided, and the silicon oxide layer 12a is covered with titanium nitride layers 12e as shown in figure 2C.

Subsequently, the resultant semiconductor structure is dipped into etching solution containing ammonia and hydrogen peroxide at room temperature to 100 degrees in centigrade, and the titanium nitride layers 1 2e are selectively etched away as shown in figure 2D. The titanium nitride layers 12e may be selectively removed by using etching solution containing sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide at 60 degrees to 100 degrees in centigrade. Upon completion of the wet etching, the titanium silicide layer 12d is left on the heavily doped ntype source region lic.

The resultant semiconductor structure is placed in the nitriding ambience at 700 degrees to 1000 degrees in centigrade. Nitrogen, ammonia and gaseous mixture thereof creates the nitriding ambience. The titanium silicide reacts with the nitriding gas, and is converted to siliconcontaining titanium nitride. The titanium silicide layer 12d is converted to a silicon-containing titanium nitride layer 12f as shown in figure 2E, or the titanium silicide layer 12d is covered with a silicon-containing titanium nitride layer.

Subsequently, phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon is deposited to 200 nanometers to 500 nanometers thick rover the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a chemical vapor deposition. Gaseous mixture containing Si2H6 and PH3 or gaseous mixture containing SiH4 and PH3 is used in the chemical vapor deposition, and is regulated to 0.1 torr to 2 torr. The chemical vapor deposition is carried out at 500 degrees to 600 degrees in centigrade, and the amorphous silicon contains the phosphorous at 1 x 1020 atom/cm3 to 5 x 1020 atom/cm3.

A photo-resist etching mask (not shown) is provided on the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching, and the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is patterned into an amorphous silicon strip 13a as shown in figure 2F.

Subsequently, hemi-spherical silicon grains are grown on the surface of the amorphous silicon strip 13a. For example, Si2H6 gas is introduced into a reactor of a chemical vapor deposition system at 10-3 torr or less, and the flow rate of Si2H6 gas ranges from 20 sccm to 30 sccm.

The resultant semiconductor structure is 540 degrees to 650 degrees in centigrade, and Si2H6 gas is continuously supplied for 1 to 2 minutes. Thereafter, Si2H6 gas is stopped, and the resultant semiconductor structure is continuously heated for 1 minute to 10 minutes. Then, the hemi-spherical silicon grains 13b are grown on the surface of the amorphous silicon strip 13a as shown in figure 2G.

The hemi-spherical silicon grains 13b increase the surface area of an accumulating electrode 13c twice as wide as amorphous silicon strip 13a.

Silicon nitride is deposited to 5 nanometers to 10 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and gaseous mixture containing SiH2C12 and NH3 is used in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The accumulating electrode 13c is covered with a silicon nitride layer.

The resultant semiconductor structure is placed in a high-temperature oxidizing ambience, and a surface portion of the silicon nitride layer is oxidized as to cover the accumulating electrode 13c with a composite dielectric film structure 13d.

Subsequently, polysilicon is deposited to 100 nanometers to 300 nanometers thick over the composite dielectric film structure 1 3d by using a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and a polysilicon layer is laminated on the composite dielectric film structure 13d.

Phosphorous is introduced into the polysilicon layer by using a thermal diffusion or an ion-implantation. A photoresist etching mask is provided on the phosphorous-doped polysilicon layer by using the lithographic techniques, and the phosphorous -doped polysilicon layer is patterned into a counter electrode 13e by using a dry etching. As a result, a storage capacitor 13 is fabricated on the silicon oxide layer 12a as shown in figure 2H.

After the deposition of the amorphous silicon, the amorphous silicon strip 13a is heavily doped with the phosphorous, and the phosphorous is never diffused into the p-type silicon substrate 10 during the repetition of heat treatment, because the silicon-containing titanium nitride layer 1 2f does not allow the phosphorous to pass therethrough. As a result, the accumulating electrode 13c maintains the high phosphorous concentration, and the stacked storage capacitor 13 is not reduced in capacitance.

The present inventor evaluated the stacked storage capacitor 13 as follows. The present inventor fabricated samples of a parasitic transistor shown in figure 3. A thick field oxide layer 20a was grown on a silicon substrate 21, and impurity regions 20b/20c were. formed in the silicon substrate 21 on both sides of the thick field oxide layer 20a. A titanium nitride layer 20d was formed on the impurity region 20c, and a phosphorous-doped polysilicon strip 20e was stacked on the titanium nitride layer 20c. The samples were different in the distance D between the impurity regions, and were heated to 900 degrees in centigrade for 30 minutes. The present inventor investigated relation between the threshold Vth of the parasitic transistor and the distance D. The present inventor measured the threshold Vth, and plotted the threshold Vth in terms of the distance D. Plots PL1 represented the relation between the threshold Vth and the distance D for the samples.

The. present inventor further fabricated comparative samples of a parasitic transistor which was similar to the parasitic transistor shown in figure 3 except for the titanium nitride layer 20d. The comparative samples were also different in the distance D, and were heated to 900 degrees in centigrade for 30 minutes. The present inventor measured the threshold Vth of the comparative samples, and the threshold Vth was plotted in terms of the distance D.

Plots PL2 represented the relation between the threshold Vth and the distance D for the comparative samples.

As will be understood from plots PL1 and PL2, although the comparative samples decreased the threshold Vth together with the distance D from 0.9 micron, the samples shown in figure 3 maintained the threshold Vth until the distance D of 0.5 micron. This was because of the fact that the titanium nitride layer 20d protected the silicon substrate from undesirable influences of the phosphorous diffused from the phosphorous-doped polysilicon strip 20e.

The present inventor further evaluated the. stacked storage capacitor through the capacitance-to-voltage characteristics. The present inventor prepared three kinds of samples. The hemi-spherical silicon grains were grown on the accumulating electrodes of the first and second samples, and the third sample did not have a hemi-spherical silicon grain. The first sample had the titanium nitride layer 12f between the accumulating electrode 13c and the heavily doped n-type source region 11c, and the titanium nitride layer 12f was deleted from the second sample.

Plots PL3, PL4 and PL5 represent the capacitance-to-voltage characteristics of the first sample, the capacitance-to-voltage characteristics of the second sample and the capacitance-to-voltage characteristics of the third sample, respectively. The first sample achieved a constant capacitance twice as large as the capacitance of the third sample. Although the capacitance of the second sample was as large as that of the first sample at positive potentials, the capacitance was decreased at the negative potentials due to the depletion layers at the boundary between the accumulating electrode and te composite dielectric film structure. The present inventor measured the phosphorous concentration of the first, second and third samples. The first sample was doped at 1 x 1020 atom/cm3, the second sample was doped at 7 x 1019)cam31 and the third sample was doped at 7 x 1019/cm3. Thus, the present inventor confirmed that the titanium nitride layer 12f was surely effective against the undesirable diffusion from the accumulating electrode 13c.

Figures 6A to 6D illustrate a process for manufacturing a stacked storage capacitor. A silicon substrate 30 is prepared, and a silicon oxide layer 31a is laminated on the major surface of the silicon substrate 30. A photo-resist etching mask (not shown) is prepared on the silicon oxide layer 31a by using the lithographic techniques, and the silicon oxide layer 31a is partially etched away so as to form a contact hole 31b as shown in figure 6A.

Titanium nitride (TiN) is deposited over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a chemical vapor deposition. The titanium nitride fills the contact hole 31b, and swells into a titanium nitride layer 32a of 100 nanometers to 600 nanometers thick as shown in figure 6B. Tetrakis-dimethyllamino-titanium (Ti(N(CH3)2)4? or tetrakis-diethylamino-titanium (Ti{N(C2H5)2}4 may be pyrolyzed at 400 degrees to 500 degrees in centigrade.

Alternatively, gaseous mixture containing TiCl4 and NH3 may be introduced into a diode parallel plates plasma chemical vapor deposition system so as to produce the titanium nitride at 500 degrees to 700 degrees in centigrade.

Subsequently, the titanium nitride layer 32a is uniformly etched away without an etching mask by using SF6 gaseous etchant. A titanium nitride plug 32b is left in the contact hole 31b as shown in figure 6C. The titanium nitride plug 32b may be annealed in ammonia ambience at 600 degrees to 900 degrees in centigrade so as to make the titanium nitride dense.

As similar to the first embodiment, phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon is grown to 200 nanometers to 500 nanometers thick on the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is patterned into a phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon strip 33a by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching. Hemi-spherical silicon grains 33b are grown on the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon strip 33a, and an accumulating electrode 33c is produced from the hemi-spherical silicon grains 33b and the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon strip 33a. The hemi-spherical silicon grains are grown as follows. Si2H6 gas is supplied to the reactor at 540 degrees to 650 degrees in centigrade at 70-3 torr or less for 1 minute to 2 minutes, and the flow rate of Si2H6 gas is regulated to 20 sccm to 30 sccm.

Thereafter, the resultant semiconductor structure is maintained in the high-temperature ambience for 1 minute to 10 minutes. The accumulating electrode 33c is twice as wide in the surface area as a standard accumulating electrode without the hemi-spherical silicon grains.

Subsequently, SiH2Cl2 gas and NH3 gas are introduced into a reactor of a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system, and silicon nitride is deposited to 5 nanometers to 10 nanometers thick. The accumulating electrode 33c is topographically covered with a silicon nitride layer, and a surface portion of the silicon nitride layer is oxidized so as to laminate a silicon oxide layer. The remaining silicon nitride layer and the silicon oxide layer form in combination a composite dielectric film.

Polysilicon is deposited to 100 nanometers to 300 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the composite dielectric film by using a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and phosphorous is introduced into the polysilicon layer by using an ion-implantation or a thermal diffusion. Finally, the phosphorous-doped polysilicon layer and the composite dielectric film are patterned into a dielectric layer 33d and a counter electrode 33e.by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching. The resultant semiconductor structure is shown in figure 6D.

The titanium nitride plug 31b does not allow the phosphorous to be diffused from the accumulating electrode 33a into the silicon substrate 30, and the phosphorous concentration of the accumulating electrode 33a is equal to or greater than 1020 atom/cm3 after the formation of the counter electrode 33e. As a result, the undesirable depletion layer never widely extends under the reverse biasing condition, and the stacked storage capacitor maintains the capacitance. Moreover, the contact hole 31b is plugged with the piece 32b of titanium nitride concurrently with the formation of the barrier layer, and the process sequence is made simple.

Figures 7A to 7D illustrates yet another process of fabricating a dynamic random access memory cell having a stacked storage capacitor.

Firstly, a thick silicon oxide 40a is selectively grown on a silicon substrate 40b. A gate oxide layer (not shown) is grown on a major surface of the silicon substrate 40b, and a polysilicon layer (not shown) is laminated on the silicon oxide layer. The polysilicon layer is patterned into a gate electrode (not shown) by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching, and side wall spacers (not shown ) are formed on both side surfaces of the gate electrode. While a silicon oxide layer is formed into the side wall spacers, the gate oxide layer is removed from the major surface of the silicon substrate exposed to the etchant. A gate oxide layer and word lines for other memory cells are seen in the figures, and are labeled with references 41a and 41b, respectively. A part of the word line 41b serves as a gate electrode for another switching transistor of the other memory cell.

Using the gate electrode and the side wall spacers as an etching mask, dopant impurity is ion implanted into the silicon substrate 40b, and a source region 41c and a drain region (not shown) are formed in the silicon substrate 40b.

Thus, a switching transistor is firstly formed on the silicon substrate 40b.

Silicon oxide is formed over. the surfaces of the word lines 47b and, accordingly, the gate electrodes so as to cover them with a silicon oxide layer 40c as shown in figure 7A.

Titanium nitride is deposited to 30 nanometers to 600 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a sputtering or a.chemical vapor deposition, and the titanium nitride layer is patterned into a titanium nitride strip 40d by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching. The titanium nitride strip 40d covers at least the source region 41c as shown in figure 7B. The titanium nitride strip 40d may be increased in density by using a lamp annealing in nitrogen ambience or ammonia ambience at 600 degrees to 900 degrees in centigrade. Alternatively, titanium is deposited by using a sputtering or a chemical vapor deposition, and the titanium layer may be lamp annealed in the nitrogen ambience or the ammonia ambience at 600 degrees to 900 degrees in centigrade so as to nitride the titanium layer.

Subsequently, silicon oxide is deposited to 300 nanometers to 800 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a chemical vapor deposition, and the silicon oxide layer 40c and the titanium nitride strip 40d are covered with a silicon oxide layer 40e as shown in figure 7C.

A contact hole 40f is formed in the silicon oxide layer 40e by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching, and the titanium nitride strip 40d is exposed to the contact hole as shown in figure 7D.

Subsequently, as similar to the first embodim-ent, phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is deposited over the entire surface of the resultant semiconductor structure by using a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is 200 nanometers to 500 nanometers thick. The phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon layer is patterned into a phosphorous-doped amdrphous silicon strip by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching. Hemi-spherical silicon grains 41e are grown on the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon strip 41d as follows. Si2H6 gas is supplied to the reactor at 540 degrees to 650 degrees in centigrade at 10-3 torr or less for 1 minute to 2 minutes, and the flow rate of Si2H6 gas is regulated to 20 sccm to 30 sccm.

Thereafter, the resultant semiconductor structure is maintained in the high-temperature ambience for 1 minute to 10 minutes so as to form an accumulating electrode 41f.

The accumulating electrode 41f is twice as wide in the surface area as a standard accumulating electrode without the hemi-spherical silicon grains.

Subsequently, SiH2Cl2 gas and NH3 gas are introduced into a reactor of a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system, and silicon nitride is deposited to 5 nanometers to 10 nanometers thick. The accumulating electrode 41f is topographically covered with a silicon nitride layer, and a surface portion of the silicon nitride layer is thermally oxidized so as to laminate a silicon oxide layer. The remaining silicon nitride layer and the silicon oxide layer form in combination a composite dielectric film.

Polysilicon is deposited to 100 nanometers to 300 nanometers thick over the entire surface of the composite dielectric film by using a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, and phosphorous is introduced into the polysilicon layer by using an ion-implantation or a thermal diffusion. Finally, the phosphorous-doped polysilicon layer and the composite dielectric film are patterned into a dielectric layer 41g and a counter electrode 41h by using the lithographic techniques and the dry etching. The resultant semiconductor structure is shown in figure 7E.

The third embodiment achieves all the advantages of the first embodiment. Although the titanium nitride strip 40d is patterned from the titanium nitride layer, the deposition of the titanium nitride is not expected to form a good coverage. The manufacturer would select the first embodiment or the third embodiment depending upon the constitution of the fabrication line. The titanium nitride layer 40d extends on the insulating layer 40c and the field oxide layer 40a, and allows the manufacturer to mis-align the contact hole 40f with the impurity region 41c, because the conductive titanium nitride layer connects the accumulating electrode 41d to the impurity region 41c.

Although particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

The present invention is applicable to any capacitor incorporated in an ultra large scale integration, and is never restricted to a dynamic random access memory cell.

The dynamic random access memory cell may be formed in a well opposite in conductivity type to the source and drain regions of the switching transistor.

Any conductive material is available for the barrier layer in so far as it blocks the semiconductor substrate or the impurity region from dopant impurity introduced into the accumulating electrode. Examples of such a conductive material is tungsten nitride and tantalum nitride.

The composite dielectric film structure may be formed from a silicon nitride layer, a silicon oxide layer and a silicon nitride layer.

Phosphorous-doped polysilicon may be deposited over the barrier layer so as to form phosphorous-doped polysilicon plug from the phosphorous-doped polysilicon layer. In this instance, the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon is deposited over the phosphorous-doped polysilicon plug, and the hemi-spherical silicon grains are grown on the phosphorous-doped amorphous silicon strip.

Non-doped amorphous silicon may be deposited. In this instance, phosphorous is ion implanted into the nondoped amorphous silicon before the growth of the hemispherical silicon grains.

If the contact hole 31b/40f has a large aspect ratio, the deposition of non-doped amorphous silicon and an ionimplantation of phosphorous are repeated so as to fill the contact hole therewith.

The hemi-spherical silicon grains may be grown on a non-doped amorphous silicon strip. In this instance, phosphorous is ion implanted after the growth of the hemi-spherical silicon grains.

The dopant impurity is not limited to phosphorous. Another dopant impurity such as, for example, arsenic may be introduced into the amorphous silicon.

Finally, any conductive material is available for the barrier layer in so far as it blocks a semiconductor substrate from a dopant impurity introduced into an accumulating electrode.

Each feature disclosed in this specification (which term includes the claims) and/or shown in the drawings may be incorporated in the invention independently of other disclosed and/or illustrated features.

The text of the abstract filed herewith is repeated here as part of the specification.

A stacked storage capacitor of a dynamic random access memory cell has an accumulating electrode increased in surface area by growing hemi-spherical silicon grains on an amorphous silicon strip, and a barrier layer of titanium nitride is previously formed between a source region of an associated field effect transistor and the amorphous silicon strip so that phosphorous is hardly diffused from the amorphous silicon strip into the source region.

Claims (26)

1. A semiconductor device fabricated on a semiconductor substrate having a contact area, said device comprising; a capacitor including; an accumulating electrode formed of conductive material doped with a dopant impurity and having a first portion electrically connected to said contact area and a second, rough surface portion merged with said first portion, a dielectric film structure covering at least said rough surface portion, a counter electrode held in contact with said dielectric film structure, and a conductive barrier layer formed between said contact area and said first portion to protect said contact area from diffusion of dopant impurities from said accumulating electrode.
2. A semiconductor device according to Claim 1, wherein said contact area is implemented by a source region of a field effect transistor, and forms a dynamic random access memory cell together with said field effect transistor.
3. A semiconductor device according to Claim 2, wherein said first portion extends through a contact hole formed in an inter-level insulating layer covering said field effect transistor.
4. A semiconductor device according to any preceding claim, wherein said rough surface portion is formed over an inter-level insulating layer, and said first portion is electrically connected through a contact hole formed in said inter-level insulating layer to said barrier layer.
5. A semiconductor device according to Claim 4, wherein said barrier layer is formed in a bottom portion of said contact hole, and said first portion extends through a remaining portion of said contact hole so as to be held in contact with said barrier layer.
6. A semiconductor device according to Claim 5, wherein said barrier layer is formed of titanium nitride.
7. A semiconductor device according to Claim 4, wherein said contact hole is plugged with said barrier layer.
8. A semiconductor device according to Claim 7, wherein said barrier layer is formed of titanium nitride.
9. A semiconductor device according to any preceding claim, wherein said rough surface portion is formed by hemi-spherical semiconductor grains grown from said first portion.
10. A semiconductor device according to Claim 9, wherein said hemi-spherical semiconductor grains are formed of silicon.
11. A method of manufacturing a semiconductor device, comprising the steps of: a) preparing a semiconductor substrate having a contact area; b) forming a barrier layer covering said contact area and formed of a conductive material for protecting said contact area from a dopant impurity; c) forming a first portion of an accumulating electrode formed of semiconductor material doped with said dopant impurity and held in contact with said barrier layer; d) growing a second rough surface portion of said accumulating electrode on said first portion of said accumulating electrode by using a high-temperature growing technique; e) covering said rough surface portion with a dielectric layer; and f) forming a counter electrode on said dielectric layer.
12. A method according to Claim 11, wherein said step a) includes the sub-steps of: a-l) depositing insulating material over a surface of said semiconductor substrate so as to cover the surface with an inter-level insulating layer, and a-2) forming a contact hole in said inter-level insulating layer so as to expose said contact area, said step b) including the sub-steps of: b-l) depositing a refractory metal over the entire surface of the resultant structure of said step a-2) so that said refractory metal topographically extends over an upper surface of said inter-level insulating layer, an inner surface of said interlevel insulating layer exposed to said contact hole and said contact area.
b-2) heating said refractory metal in a nitriding atmosphere so as to convert a part of said refractory metal on said contact area and a remaining part of said refractory metal on said upper surface and said inner surface to a refractory metal silicide layer and a refractory metal nitride layer, respectively, and b-3) removing said refractory metal nitride layer so as to leave said refractory metal silicide layer on said contact area as said barrier layer.
13. A method according to Claim 12, wherein said refractory metal is titanium.
14. A method according to Claim 12 or 13, wherein said nitriding atmosphere contains gas selected from the group consisting of nitrogen and ammonia.
15. A method according to any of Claims 12 to 14, wherein said refractory metal nitride layer is etched by using one of first etching solution containing ammonia and hydrogen peroxide and second etching solution containing sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide.
16. A method according to Claim 11, wherein said step a) includes the sub-steps of: a-1) depositing an insulating material over a surface of said semiconductor substrate so as to cover the surface with an inter-level insulating layer, and a-2) forming a contact hole in said inter-level insulating layer so as to expose said contact area, said step b) including the sub-steps of: b-l) depositing a refractory metal nitride so as to fill said contact hole therewith and from a refractory metal nitride layer extending over an upper surface of said inter-level insulating layer, and b-2) etching said refractory metal nitride layer so as to leave a portion of said refractory metal nitride in said contact hole, said portion of refractory metal nitride serving as said barrier layer.
17. A method according to Claim 16, wherein said step b) further includes the sub-step of: b-3) annealing said portion of refractory metal nitride in an atmosphere containing at least one of nitrogen and ammonia.
18. A method according to Claim 16, wherein one of tetrakisdimethylamino- titanium and tetrakis-diethylamino-titanium is pyrolized so as to deposit said refractory metal nitride in said step b-l).
19. A method according to Claim 16, wherein said refractory metal nitride is produced from a gaseous mixture containing TiCl4 and NH3 in said step b-l).
20. A method according to Claim 11, wherein said step a) includes the sub-steps of: a-l) fabricating a field effect transistor having source and drain regions and a gate electrode on said semiconductor substrate, one of said source and drain regions serving as said contact area, and a-2) covering said gate electrode with a first insulating layer, said step b) including the sub-steps of: b-l) depositing a refractory metal nitride so that a refractory metal nitride layer extends over said one of said source and drain regions and said first insulating layer, b-2) patterning said refractory metal nitride layer into a refractory metal nitride strip covering at least said one of said source and drain regions, b-3) depositing an insulating material so as to cover the resultant structure of said sub-step b-2) with a second insulating layer, and b4) forming a contact hole in said second insulating layer so as to expose said one of said source and drain regions thereto.
21. A method according to Claim 20, wherein said refractory metal nitride layer is deposited by using one of a sputtering and a chemical vapor deposition.
22. A method according to Claim 11, wherein said step a) includes the sub-steps of: a-l) fabricating a field effect transistor having source and drain regions and a gate electrode on said semiconductor substrate, one of said source and drain regions serving as said contact area, and a-2) covering gate electrode with a first insulating layer, said step b) including the sub-steps of: b-l) depositing a refractory metal so that a refractory metal layer extends over said one of said source and drain regions and said first insulating layer, b-2) heating said refractory metal layer in a nitriding atmosphere so as to produce a refractory metal nitride layer from said refractory metal layer, b-3) patterning said refractory metal nitride layer into a refractory metal nitride strip covering at least said one of said source and drain regions, b4) depositing insulating material so as to cover the resultant structure of said sub-step b-2) with a second insulating layer, and b-5) forming a contact hole in said second insulating layer so as to expose said one of said source and drain regions thereto.
23. A method according to Claim 11, wherein said step d) includes the sub-steps of: d-l) supplying a gas containing Si2H6 at 20 sccm to 30 sccm for 1 minute to 2 minutes to a low pressure high-temperature reactor chamber at 10-3 torr or less where the resultant structure of said step c) is heated to 540 degrees to 650 degrees in centigrade, and d-2) growing hemi-spherical silicon grains serving as said rough surface portion in said low-pressure high-temperature reactor chamber for 1 minute to 10 minutes.
24. A method according to Claim 23, wherein said hemi-spherical silicon grains are grown on said first portion formed of amorphous silicon doped with said dopant impurity.
25. A semiconductor device substantially as herein described with reference to and as shown in any of Figures 2H, 6D and 7E of the accompanying drawings.
26. A method of manufacturing a semiconductor devices substantially as herein described with reference to any of Figures 2, 6 or 7 of the accompanying drawings.
GB9713846A 1996-06-28 1997-06-30 Semiconductor device Withdrawn GB2314683A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP16894996A JP3156590B2 (en) 1996-06-28 1996-06-28 Semiconductor device and manufacturing method thereof

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
GB9713846D0 true GB9713846D0 (en) 1997-09-03
GB2314683A true true GB2314683A (en) 1998-01-07

Family

ID=15877534

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
GB9713846A Withdrawn GB2314683A (en) 1996-06-28 1997-06-30 Semiconductor device

Country Status (2)

Country Link
JP (1) JP3156590B2 (en)
GB (1) GB2314683A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2324654A (en) * 1997-04-22 1998-10-28 Nec Corp Method of manufacturing an electrode for a semiconductor device
GB2324653A (en) * 1997-04-23 1998-10-28 Nec Corp Method of manufacturing an electrode for a semiconductor device
GB2333178A (en) * 1997-10-18 1999-07-14 United Microelectronics Corp Forming capacitor electrodes for integrated circuits

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP3191757B2 (en) 1998-02-03 2001-07-23 日本電気株式会社 A method of manufacturing a semiconductor device
JP3244049B2 (en) 1998-05-20 2002-01-07 日本電気株式会社 A method of manufacturing a semiconductor device
JP3501006B2 (en) * 1999-02-26 2004-02-23 日産自動車株式会社 Arrangement structure of the vehicle battery cooling duct
JP2001015706A (en) 1999-06-30 2001-01-19 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Semiconductor device and manufacture thereof
KR100944323B1 (en) 2003-06-30 2010-03-03 주식회사 하이닉스반도체 Method of semiconductor memory device high dielectric capacitor

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5192703A (en) * 1991-10-31 1993-03-09 Micron Technology, Inc. Method of making tungsten contact core stack capacitor
US5563090A (en) * 1995-02-27 1996-10-08 Lg Semicon Co., Ltd. Method for forming rugged tungsten film and method for fabricating semiconductor device utilizing the same
US5612558A (en) * 1995-11-15 1997-03-18 Micron Technology, Inc. Hemispherical grained silicon on refractory metal nitride

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5192703A (en) * 1991-10-31 1993-03-09 Micron Technology, Inc. Method of making tungsten contact core stack capacitor
US5563090A (en) * 1995-02-27 1996-10-08 Lg Semicon Co., Ltd. Method for forming rugged tungsten film and method for fabricating semiconductor device utilizing the same
US5612558A (en) * 1995-11-15 1997-03-18 Micron Technology, Inc. Hemispherical grained silicon on refractory metal nitride

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2324654A (en) * 1997-04-22 1998-10-28 Nec Corp Method of manufacturing an electrode for a semiconductor device
US6090681A (en) * 1997-04-22 2000-07-18 Nec Corporation Method of forming an HSG capacitor layer via implantation
GB2324653A (en) * 1997-04-23 1998-10-28 Nec Corp Method of manufacturing an electrode for a semiconductor device
US6228749B1 (en) 1997-04-23 2001-05-08 Nec Corporation Method of manufacturing semiconductor device
GB2324653B (en) * 1997-04-23 2002-01-23 Nec Corp Method of manufacturing a semiconductor device
GB2333178A (en) * 1997-10-18 1999-07-14 United Microelectronics Corp Forming capacitor electrodes for integrated circuits
GB2333178B (en) * 1997-10-18 1999-11-24 United Microelectronics Corp Method of fabricating a hemispherical grain silicon structure

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JPH1022467A (en) 1998-01-23 application
GB9713846D0 (en) 1997-09-03 application
JP3156590B2 (en) 2001-04-16 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6133096A (en) Process for simultaneously fabricating a stack gate flash memory cell and salicided periphereral devices
US6808991B1 (en) Method for forming twin bit cell flash memory
US5754390A (en) Integrated capacitor bottom electrode for use with conformal dielectric
US5438009A (en) Method of fabrication of MOSFET device with buried bit line
US5489546A (en) Method of forming CMOS devices using independent thickness spacers in a split-polysilicon DRAM process
US6159839A (en) Method for fabricating borderless and self-aligned polysilicon and metal contact landing plugs for multilevel interconnections
US5286668A (en) Process of fabricating a high capacitance storage node
US5702968A (en) Method for fabricating a honeycomb shaped capacitor
US6004857A (en) Method to increase DRAM capacitor via rough surface storage node plate
US5352623A (en) Method for manufacturing a semiconductor device
US5396093A (en) Vertical DRAM cross point memory cell and fabrication method
US5792687A (en) Method for fabricating high density integrated circuits using oxide and polysilicon spacers
US5595928A (en) High density dynamic random access memory cell structure having a polysilicon pillar capacitor
US5429977A (en) Method for forming a vertical transistor with a stacked capacitor DRAM cell
US5436188A (en) Dram cell process having elk horn shaped capacitor
US6326658B1 (en) Semiconductor device including an interface layer containing chlorine
US5552334A (en) Method for fabricating a Y-shaped capacitor in a DRAM cell
US5250456A (en) Method of forming an integrated circuit capacitor dielectric and a capacitor formed thereby
US6300215B1 (en) Methods of forming integrated circuit capacitors having composite titanium oxide and tantalum pentoxide dielectric layers therein
US5643819A (en) Method of fabricating fork-shaped stacked capacitors for DRAM cells
US5766994A (en) Dynamic random access memory fabrication method having stacked capacitors with increased capacitance
US5877052A (en) Resolution of hemispherical grained silicon peeling and row-disturb problems for dynamic random access memory, stacked capacitor structures
US6143604A (en) Method for fabricating small-size two-step contacts for word-line strapping on dynamic random access memory (DRAM)
US6037220A (en) Method of increasing the surface area of a DRAM capacitor structure via the use of hemispherical grained polysilicon
US5023683A (en) Semiconductor memory device with pillar-shaped insulating film

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
WAP Application withdrawn, taken to be withdrawn or refused ** after publication under section 16(1)