GB2191953A - Indoor game pieces - Google Patents

Indoor game pieces Download PDF

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Publication number
GB2191953A
GB2191953A GB08615572A GB8615572A GB2191953A GB 2191953 A GB2191953 A GB 2191953A GB 08615572 A GB08615572 A GB 08615572A GB 8615572 A GB8615572 A GB 8615572A GB 2191953 A GB2191953 A GB 2191953A
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United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
sets
game pieces
indicia
game
pieces
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Withdrawn
Application number
GB08615572A
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GB8615572D0 (en
Inventor
Brian Kevin Byrne
Original Assignee
Brian Kevin Byrne
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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Publication date
Application filed by Brian Kevin Byrne filed Critical Brian Kevin Byrne
Priority to GB08615572A priority Critical patent/GB2191953A/en
Publication of GB8615572D0 publication Critical patent/GB8615572D0/en
Publication of GB2191953A publication Critical patent/GB2191953A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/20Dominoes or like games; Mah-Jongg games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F2001/008Card games adapted for being playable on a screen
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F1/04Card games combined with other games
    • A63F2001/0416Card games combined with other games with numbers
    • A63F2001/0433Card games combined with other games with numbers with domino dots
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F2003/00996Board games available as video games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/0669Tesselation
    • A63F2009/067Tesselation using a particular shape of tile
    • A63F2009/0683Tesselation using a particular shape of tile quadrangular
    • A63F2009/0687Rectangle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/0669Tesselation
    • A63F2009/0695Tesselation using different types of tiles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for

Abstract

A set of game pieces, such as dominoes or cards, comprises a number of subsets, one such of which is shown in Figure 1. Each subset has its own indicia (the filled circle) on every piece and twice on one piece. The other pieces of the subset also bear one of a series of indicia (the hollow circles). This series is common to each of the subsets. Some or all of the pieces may be replaced by two pieces (Figures 2,3). Some of the pieces of the set may be removed for play. Electronically generated representations of the pieces may replace the actual pieces. <IMAGE>

Description

SPECIFICATION New families of sets of game pieces for playing games Description This invention relates two families of sets of game pieces such as dominoes,tiles or cards used for playing games.

According to the present invention there are provided families of sets of game pieces used for playing games, sets being automatically designed in outline on specifying independent positive whole numbers forx and n, by rules and procedures giving effect to (a) through to (g) below; (a) determining the numberof subsets in a set, (b) deciding the number of game pieces in each subset, (c) defining the number and type of categories of indicia in a set, (d) fixing the maximum number (rank) of the multiple indicia category, (e) allocating categories of indicia to the subsets, (f) assigning categories of indicia to the game pieces in the subsets, (g) organising the indicia on the individual game pieces of each subset.

These rules and procedures, given in detail on pages 3 and 6, specify complete twin region sets and unless stated otherwise the game pieces, subsets etc. described arefortwin region sets. Single region and mixed twin and single region sets are derived from twin region sets and are described separately on page 7. Reduced and enlarged sets are described on pages 8 & .

Sets are labeled according to the numerical values of x and n employed, for example [x,n] set could be [6,6] or [5,10] or [15,7] etc., where the value for xis always placed before thatfor n.

All game pieces carry distinguishing marks or indicia and these marks or indicia are classified into categories. The game pieces are grouped into subsets according to one category of the indicia carried and a set is made up of a number of these subsets.

On choosing values of x and n for a set, the following rules and procedures determine the outline design of the set; (a) The number of subsets in the set is x.

(b) The numberofgame pieces in each subset is n+1.

(c) the number of categories ofindicia in a set isx+1, made up of one multiple category M, and xsingle categories S or (d) the maximum number or rankofthe multiple indicia category is n, (e) two categories of indicia are allocated to each subset, M and one of S(x), each S(x) category being allocated in turn to each subset, (f) both M and S(x) categories are assigned to each of n game pieces and only S(x) indicia to the remain ing game piece in each subset, (g) in then game pieces of each subset assigned M indicia, one region only of each piece is marked successively with one through ton with M indicia, all the remaining regions on all the n+1 pieces in the subset are marked with a solitary indicium of S(x).

The design ofthe set is completed by detailing the indicia, and sizing, positioning and grouping them on the individual game pieces.

Figures 1,2 & 3 show typical twin region, single region and mixed twin and single region subsets respectively, all subsets from [6,6] sets.

Figures 4,5,6 & 7show examples of reduced twin region [6,6] sets.

The game pieces can be made from a wide range of materials, singly or in combination. Suitable materials include plastics, bone, wood, stone, metal, glass, ceramic, paper, card, impregnated fabric or otherwovem material. The indicia carred by the game pieces can take any one, two or three dimensional form including lines, flat circular discs (spots) and sections of spheres. The indicia can be painted, printed, cast, inserted, carved, stuck, or transferred etc. on, in orto the game pieces.

Alternatively, representations of the game pieces can be electronically generated and stored by a computer,and shown for example on one or more Visual Display Units ormonitorscreens, allowing games to be played by either persons alone, in pairs or other small groups against a computer program, or persons alone, in pairs or other small groups with the aid of a computer program, against other such persons alone or in groups.

The individual game pieces are usually flat two sided laminae of any shape although rectangular shapes are preferred. It is usual for one face only of the game pieces to carry indicia, the "game" face; the otheror "back" face is left blank or marked with an abstract pattern or a picture, symbol, advertisement etc., singly or in combination. A set can be unified by employing these or similar devices and/orthe same base colouron the backfaces; and also by employing the same or a different unifying base colour on the game faces. The game faces are divided into two regions or "halves" usually but not necessarily of equal area, separated by a real or an imaginary line or marker.This line or marker can be straight, curved or even jagged and is normally drawn between the mid-pojnts of the long sides of rectangularfaces, but it could be drawn elsewhere, for instance diagonally across a rectangular face, or otherwise for alternatively shaped game faces. Each region of a game face carries an indicium or indicia of one category only and no region is left blank.

Categories ofindicia The indicia marking the game faces have the following parameters, shape, colour, number, size and position. They are usually categorised according to the shape, colour and number combination, but othercategories based on these five parameters are possible. For a complete [x,n] set of game pieces the number (x+ 1 ) of these shape/colour/number combinations or other categories of indicia are selected and exclusively used in the set.

(1) Shape Indicia can be linear, flat and two dimensional, or three dimensions; and of regular orirregular shape. Examples could include straight or curved lines, circular and semi-circular discs, spherical and semi-spherical forms, triangular, square, pentagonal etc. shapes, five and six pointed stars, "lightning flashes", etc., etc..

(2) ColourThe base colour or colours chosen forthe indicia are clearly defined and differentiated from each other. The colours span the full spectrum of colours and include "non-colours" such as black and white, and colours formed from combining any two or more of these colours. Shadow and/or highlighted areas of different colours can be superimposed on and around two dimensional indicia to give an illusion ofthree dimensions, or other effects simulated by the addition, subtraction or superimposition of various colours on or around the indicia.

(3) NumberOfthe (x+ ) categories of indicia chosen for a set, ONE only is designated for multiple use and is labeled M. All the remaining x categories of indicia, jointly labelled S or S(x) and belonging to the family S(1 ),S(2), S(x), are designated for single use.

Single use means that a solitary indicium is thesole occupant of the region on each game piecetowhich it is assigned.

Multiple use means that indicia occupy the region on each game piece to which they are assigned in numbers which rangefrom one successively through to a maximum of n, as illustratedfor n = 6 in Figure 1 game pieces (b) to (gj.The multiple indicia markings of one through to non individual game pieces arecalled numbered ranks, and when present in numbers of two or more (ie. of second rank and above) can be arranged in various configurations, groups, clusters, or randomly or in any combination ofthese.

(4) Size,PositionWithin a set the size of the indicia of each shape/colour/number or other category, and their positions within the regions ofthe game pieces to which they are assigned, can separately or in combination be either fixed and constant orvary and differ.

Subsets TWO categories of indicia are allocated to each subset, the multiple indicia of category M, and ONE ofthe single indicia categories S(1 ),S(2), S(x); each S(x) category being assigned in turn to each ofthe subsets making up the complete set.

Within each subset n game pieces are assigned both categories of indicia, the remaining one being assigned only category 5(x) indicia.

The game piece assigned only category S(x) indicia is the double, a single S(x) indicium occupying both regions of the game piece. In the other n game pieces of the subset one region of each piece is occupied bya single indicium of category S(x),the remaining region of each piece being marked successively with one through ton indicia of category M, ie. with 1st to nth ranks of category M indicia.

Acomplete subset from a [6,6] set is shown in Figure 1, in which (a) is the double and (b) to (g)the remaining n = 6 game pieces.

A complete [x,n]set A complete [x,n]set is composed of x subsets, each subset containing a double and one from each rank of multiple indicia game pieces. A complete twin region [x,n] set is therefore made up of x doubles together with x of each ofthe n ranks of multiple indicia game pieces, a total of x.(n+ 1 ) game pieces.

Single region sets Single region sets are derived from theirtwin region counterparts by splitting or separating each twin region garne piece into two along the real/imaginary line between the two regions, doubling the number of game pieces but eliminating doubles as such within the set. Individual game faces in single region sets carry indicia of only one category.

Single region sets have different playing characteristics to theirtwin region counterparts and greaterflexibility and freedom is provided with these sets when constructing reduced or enlarged sets described below.

Figure 2 shows the single region version of the Figure 1 subset.

Mixed region sets Mixed region sets are derived from theirtwin region counterparts by splitting some but not all twin region game pieces into two single region game pieces. These sets are therefore made up of a mixture of both single and twin region game pieces. The pieces split are either specifically or randomly chosen.

Mixed region sets have different playing characteristics to both theirtwin and single region counterparts, and to alternative mixed region versions of these same counterparts. Mixed region sets provide greatflex ibilityand freedom when constructing reduced or enlarged sets described below.

Figure3 shows a mixed region version ofthe Figure 1 subset.

Reduced sets Any complete [x,n]set described in this document can be reduced by withdrawing a number of game pieces. Reduced sets with "tailor-made" or known properties and playing characteristics can be produced by the removal of specific game pieces. Doubles are preferrablytreated as a group and are either all left or all removed.

Figures 4to 7 show four examples of reduction applied to twin region [6,6]sets in which the doubles are all retained.

S = single category indicia, the six categories being coded 1 - 6.

M = multiple category indicia,the six ranks being shown.

D = doubles, and occupy the bottom row in each Figure.

Any square on the grid shown in each of these Figures can be linked to a specific game piece in thecomplete set, the row indicating rank of category M indicia orthe double, the column identifying the S(x) category of indicia.

Atick indicates inclusion in the reduced set.

A blank indicates exclusion from the reduced set.

In Figures 4,5 & two game pieces are removed from the six in each rank of the complete set. In Figure7 two game pieces are removed from each of the ranks 6,5,2 & 1 and only one game piece removed from each ofranks3 & .

The playing characteristics of the sets illustrated can be written; Figure4,(42424). Figure5,(33333).

Figure6,(43234). Figure7,(43434).

These are just a few the numerous playing characteristics which can be devised for reduced sets, for every one of which numerous permutations are possible by interchanging the codes for the S(x) indicia.

Reduced sets with partially ortotally unknown properties and playing characteristics can be created by the mainiy "blind" removal of game pieces according to such procedures as, (a) random "blind" selection from each (or not) of the n complete ranks of M multiple indicia game pieces, (b) random "blind" selection from the undifferentiated complete set, (c) a combination of (a) and (b), (d) known selective removal together with any combination of (a),(b) & c).

These procedures must be used judiciously as unplayable sets are easily created.

Enlarped orcombined sets Enlarged sets can be created using any of the sets described, in a number of ways alone or in combination, for example; (a) pieces selected for removal from complete sets to produce any of the reduced sets described above are added to other complete sets to produce enlarged sets, or (b) by amalgamating, (i) two or more complete sets, or (ii) two or more reduced sets, or (iii) one or more complete sets with one or more reduced sets.

Enlarged sets can be designed to have "tailor-made" or known, as well as partially known and unknown playing characteristics.

Embodiments (1) In one important embodiment sets of game pieces with visual links with the game of SNOOKER orany of its derivatives can be produced. The "snooker-linked" embodiment would usually have: (a) x=6, (b) n = 15, or 15,or10,or6,oranyintegerbetween 15and6, (c) all indicia circular or spherical, or part thereof, (d) all indicia of identical size, (e) the sixS(x) categories of single indicia coloured yeilow, green, brown, blue, pink and black, (f) the multiple M indicia coloured red, (g) a unifying game face base colour, preferrably a shade of green but not excluding other colours such as white or even black.

Figures 1 to 7 apply to "snooker-linked" [6,6]sets.

(2) In another embodiment sets of game pieces based on the game of POOL can be produced. The pool based embodiment would normally be played with enlarged or combined sets. A complete setwquld usually have: (a) x=2, (b) n = 7, or any integer between 15 and 6, (c) all indicia circular or spherical, or part thereof, (d) S(x) indicia of identical size and largerthan M indicia, (e) the two S(x) categories of indicia of different colours, or if of identical colourthen one category bearing an additional mark or marks such as a differently coloured spot or spots, (f) the M indicia of a different colourfrom the S(x) indicia, (g) a unifying game face colour, preferrably a shade of green.

Claims (1)

  1. (1) Families of sets of game pieces used for playing games, each set being automatically designed in outline on specifying independent positive whole numbers forx and n, by the following rules and pro- cedures; (a) thenumberofsubsets inthesetisx, (b) the number of game pieces in each subset is n+ 1 (c) the numberofcategories ofindicia in a set isx+1, made up of one multiple category M,andxsingle categories S or (d) the maximum numberor rankofthe multiple indicia category is n, (e) two categories of indicia are allocated to each subset, M and one of S(x), each S(x) category being allocated in turn to each subset, (f) both M and S(x) categories are assigned to each of n game pieces and only 5(x) indicia to the remaining game piece in each subset, (g) in then game pieces of each subset assigned M indicia, one region only of each piece is marked successively with one through ton with M indicia, all the remaining regions on all the n+1 pieces in the subset are marked with a solitary indicium of S(x).
    (2) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games as claimed in claim 1 wherein all the twin region game pieces are replaced by equivalent single region game pieces.
    (3) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games as claimed in claim 1 wherein some but not all the twin region game pieces are replaced by equivalent single region game pieces.
    (4) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2 & 3 wherein each set a number of specific game pieces are removed, endowing the reduced sets with known playing characteristics.
    (5) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2 & 3 wherein each seta number of specific game pieces plus a number of game pieces selected at random are removed, endowing the reduced sets with partially known playing characteristics.
    (6) Families offsets ofgame pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2 & wherein each set a number of game pieces selected at random are removed, endowing the reduced sets with unknown playing characteristics.
    (7) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2 & 3 wherein game pieces selected for removal from sets according to claims 4,5 & 6 are added to other sets, producing enlarged sets with playing characteristics which are known, partially known or unknown respectively.
    (8) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2 & 3 wherein complete sets are combined to produce enlarged sets with known playing characteristics.
    (g) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2,3,4,5 & 6 wherein complete and reduced sets are combined into enlarged sets with known, partially known or unknown playing characteristics.
    (10) Families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2,3,4,5 & 6 wherein reduced sets are combined into enlarged sets with known, partially known or unknown playing characteristics.
    (11) Groups of setswithin thefamilies of sets of game piecesfor playing games claimed in claims 1,2,3, 4,5,6,7,8,9 & 10 wherein each set is linked to the game of snooker our derivatives of the game of snookerby choosing; (a) x=6, (b) n = 15,100r6,oranyintegerbetween 15and6, (c) the colours yellow, green, brown, blue, pink and black for each of the six S(x) categories of indicia, (d) the colour red for theM category of indicia.
    (12) Groups of sets within the families of sets of game pieces for playing games claimed in claims 1,2,3, 4,5,6,7,8,9 & 10 wherein each set is based on the game of pool or derivatives of the game of pool and in which; (a) x=2, (b) n = 7, or any integer between 15 and 6.
GB08615572A 1986-06-26 1986-06-26 Indoor game pieces Withdrawn GB2191953A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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GB08615572A GB2191953A (en) 1986-06-26 1986-06-26 Indoor game pieces

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GB08615572A GB2191953A (en) 1986-06-26 1986-06-26 Indoor game pieces

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GB2191953A true GB2191953A (en) 1987-12-31

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2669836A1 (en) * 1990-11-30 1992-06-05 Lombard Emile Device for parlour games based on the identification and correct naming of various subjects represented or evoked in the form of images
EP0811405A2 (en) * 1996-06-03 1997-12-10 Masato Watanabe Board game and playing process
US5791652A (en) * 1995-06-26 1998-08-11 Nielsen; Rodney D. Domino and interchangeable suit cards, games, and methods of play
US6971649B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2005-12-06 Jeff Richardson Zero-sum tiling game
EP1852159A3 (en) * 2006-05-04 2007-11-14 Waterleaf Ltd. Domino roulette
US7380792B2 (en) * 2006-05-31 2008-06-03 Caribbean Cage, Llc Wager-based domino games
US8099919B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-01-24 Faus Group Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
US8448400B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2013-05-28 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB438579A (en) * 1935-05-30 1935-11-19 Julian Elmer Stone Contract bridge game cards
GB1377528A (en) * 1972-03-07 1974-12-18 Schohn W Parlour game
US4125263A (en) * 1977-07-07 1978-11-14 Hamilton Joe W Domino game
GB2058585A (en) * 1979-08-13 1981-04-15 Drake B R Domino game

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB438579A (en) * 1935-05-30 1935-11-19 Julian Elmer Stone Contract bridge game cards
GB1377528A (en) * 1972-03-07 1974-12-18 Schohn W Parlour game
US4125263A (en) * 1977-07-07 1978-11-14 Hamilton Joe W Domino game
GB2058585A (en) * 1979-08-13 1981-04-15 Drake B R Domino game

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2669836A1 (en) * 1990-11-30 1992-06-05 Lombard Emile Device for parlour games based on the identification and correct naming of various subjects represented or evoked in the form of images
US5791652A (en) * 1995-06-26 1998-08-11 Nielsen; Rodney D. Domino and interchangeable suit cards, games, and methods of play
EP0811405A2 (en) * 1996-06-03 1997-12-10 Masato Watanabe Board game and playing process
EP0811405A3 (en) * 1996-06-03 1998-09-09 Masato Watanabe Board game and playing process
US5839729A (en) * 1996-06-03 1998-11-24 Watanabe; Masato Board game and playing process
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
US6971649B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2005-12-06 Jeff Richardson Zero-sum tiling game
US8448400B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2013-05-28 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US8099919B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-01-24 Faus Group Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US7976025B2 (en) 2006-05-04 2011-07-12 Waterleaf Limited Domino roulette
EP1852159A3 (en) * 2006-05-04 2007-11-14 Waterleaf Ltd. Domino roulette
US7380792B2 (en) * 2006-05-31 2008-06-03 Caribbean Cage, Llc Wager-based domino games

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