GB1567122A - Tubular flixible instruments - Google Patents

Tubular flixible instruments Download PDF

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Publication number
GB1567122A
GB1567122A GB1195978A GB1195978A GB1567122A GB 1567122 A GB1567122 A GB 1567122A GB 1195978 A GB1195978 A GB 1195978A GB 1195978 A GB1195978 A GB 1195978A GB 1567122 A GB1567122 A GB 1567122A
Authority
GB
United Kingdom
Prior art keywords
tube
porous
ptfe
solid
melt point
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
GB1195978A
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Gore W L and Associates Inc
Original Assignee
Gore W L and Associates Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to JP52036711A priority Critical patent/JPS6051912B2/ja
Priority to JP3991077U priority patent/JPS5626738Y2/ja
Application filed by Gore W L and Associates Inc filed Critical Gore W L and Associates Inc
Publication of GB1567122A publication Critical patent/GB1567122A/en
Application status is Expired legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0043Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by structural features
    • A61M25/0054Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by structural features with regions for increasing flexibility
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0067Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the distal end, e.g. tips
    • A61M25/0068Static characteristics of the catheter tip, e.g. shape, atraumatic tip, curved tip or tip structure
    • A61M2025/0073Tip designed for influencing the flow or the flow velocity of the fluid, e.g. inserts for twisted or vortex flow
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0009Making of catheters or other medical or surgical tubes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0067Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the distal end, e.g. tips
    • A61M25/0068Static characteristics of the catheter tip, e.g. shape, atraumatic tip, curved tip or tip structure
    • A61M25/007Side holes, e.g. their profiles or arrangements; Provisions to keep side holes unblocked

Description

(54) IMPROVEMENTS IN AND RELATING TO TUBULAR FLEXIBLE INSTRUMENTS (71) We, W. L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC, a Corporation organised and existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, of 555, Paper Mill Road, Newark, Delaware, 19711, United States of America, do hereby declare the invention, for which we pray that a patent may be granted to us, and the method by which it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement: This invention relates to tubular flexible instruments for insertion into a body cavity.

In many surgical or diagnostic procedures it is necessary that a tubular instrument be placed within a body cavity. This instrument accomplishes a variety of purposes including the injection of fluids into the body or the withdrawal of fluids therefrom. Common examples of these types of instruments are catheters and infusion cannula tubes.

Catheter tubes in operation are inserted in the tortuous conduits of the body vessels (e.g. blood vessels) for several deca centimeters. The catheter tubing, therefore, is required to have the appropriate degree of stiffness to ensure a smooth insertion combined with the necessary flexibility to allow its advance along the tortuous vessels without impairing the walls. Other important requirements for catheter tubes include dimensional stability, chemical and biological inertness and surface smoothness. These requirements apply equally to blood vessel catheters, urethra catheters and infusion cannula tubes.

Conventional tubular medical instruments for these purposes are made of rather stiff plastics such as polyethylene or nylon. Con ventional infusion cannula tubing is about 12 or 13 cm in length and has an outside diameter (O.D.) of about 1.5 mm with an inside diameter (I.D.) of about 0.8 mm. These tubes are fitted at one end with an adapter through which a liquid medicine may be injected into, or a liquid extracted from, the body cavity via the tube. A metal piercing needle is inserted through the tube, the sharp tip of the needle projecting beyond the tube. This needle with the tubing thereon is then thrust through the skin into a blood vessel and both pushed forward until they reach the appropriate position. The needle is then withdrawn, leaving the infusion cannula and attached adapter in position. The adapter is closed with a plug.

When an injection of medicine into, or an extraction of blood from the patient is desired, the plug is removed and the adapter is connected to a syringe or suction device.

In order to prevent the infusion cannula tubing from slipping out, the exposed position must be affixed to the patient by some attaching means, commonly sutures or adhesive tape. In this fixed state, the conventional infusion cannula tubing, being rather rigid, will cause pain and discomfort should the patient move the area of the body in which the tubing is lodged. This problem is particularly acute since the insertion is usually made in a leg, arm, or thigh, thus, greatly restricting the movement of that limb.

According to the present invention there is provided a tubular flexible instrument for insertion into a body cavity comprising a sintered polytetrafluoroethylene tube comprising solid and porous wall portions, said solid and porous portions alternating along the length of said tube.

The invention will now be particularly described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which: Figs. 1 to 3 are diagrammatic representations of catheter tubing in accordance with the invention; Figs. 4 to 6 show infusion cannula tubing according to the invention; Fig. 7 shows a needle used for inserting the tube into the body cavity, and Fig. 8 shows the infusion cannula in position.

As shown in Fig. 1, the PTFE catheter tube of the present embodiment is fabricated so that the wall of the tube has solid ring portions 10 and porous textured ring portions 12 which are arranged alternately. The lengths of the solid ring portions 10 and porous ring portions 12 can be varied according to need.

For example, in a catheter tube measuring 2.5 mm O.D. and 1.5 mm I.D., solid portion 10 would be about 5 mm in length and porous fibrillated portion 12 would be about 15 mm in length.

Fig. 2 shows another embodiment of this invention. In this embodiment, solid wall portions 10 and porous portions 12 alternate in a spiral fashion. The width and pitch of the spiral can be varied according to the required performance.

Fig. 3 shows a further embodiment of this invention in which the top portion 28 (the portion entering the body cavity first) is porous and closed at the end 30. In this manner, gases from the blood or body fluids can be collected without the blood or body fluid penetrating the fine pores into the interior of the tubing.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 4, the use as an infusion cannula is shown. The tip or top 14 of the tube is a solid wall portion as is the end 15 which is attached to the adapter 18. These portions 14 and 15 are rather stiff and inflexible.

Sandwiched between the two solid portions 14 and 15 is a porous fibrillated portion 16 that is flexible.

To one end of the cannula tubing 13 is fitted an adapter 18 to give a complete infusion cannula. The adapter 18 is connected to the solid wall portion 15 of the tube 13 by an attaching means herein shown as a metal fastener 20.

Figs. 5 and 6 show infusion cannula tubing in which there is a series of solid wall portions 14 and porous fibrillated portions 16 alternating as rings in Fig. 5 and as a spiral in Fig. 6.

The infusion cannula tubing embodiment of the present invention can be used as pr viously described for conventional cannula tubing.

Fig. 8 shows tubing 13 in use. A smooth piercing of the skin into the blood vessel is achieved due to the rigidity of the solid wall portion 14. The middle wall portion 16 is porous and flexible and, as a result, after the tubing 13 is fixed in position by attaching means 22 at portion 15, the tube can bend with less pain and discomfort to the patient permitting a greater mobility of limbs.

The tubing, bending at the flexible wall portion 16, rather than tending to force the embedded tip 14 up against the vessel wall, results in less discomfort and less pain.

The present invention as embodied in the catheter tubing and infusion cannula tubing, described above, can provide the following advantages: 1) An appropriate balance of rigidity and flexibility is achieved by alternating along the length of the tube a solid rigid portion and flexible porous portion; 2) Dimensional stability and/or freedom from kinking under small bend radius due to the presence of the solid portion; 3) As a result of the tubing being pure PTFE, both the inner and outer surfaces are extremely smooth. This results in easier movement of the tube into, and out of, the body vessels and prevents adherence of foreign matter to either surface; 4) The excellent heat and chemical resistance of PTFE permit the use of high temperatures and/or strong chemicals for sterilization; 5) Efficient extraction of blood or body fluid gases can be achieved through the finely porous tip 28 of the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 3; and 6) Ejection of a liquid medicine, which has a low surface tension, can be achieved by the embodiment in Fig. 3.

The following examples describe methods of preparing the above described embodiments of the present invention. The stretching step is preferably done according to the teachings of U.S. Patent 3,953,566 herein incorporated by reference. It is, however, anticipated that stretching rates lower than 10% may be used.

The fibrillated porous portion refers to a microstructure comprising a series of nodes interconnected by fibrils. When a porous PTFE structure is raised above its crystalline melt point, unrestrained, it will collapse on itself to form a solid structure. The examples below are meant to illustrate but not limit the scope of the present invention.

Example I 1) Following the conventional paste extrusion technique, a PTFE fine powder, available under the Teflon registered trademark from E. I. DuPont de Nemours, Co., Inc. or the Fluon registered trademark from Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., is mixed with a liquid lubricant such as white oil. The paste is preformed and then ram-extruded through an appropriate die into tubing having the desired diameter and wall thickness depending on the intended use, such as a blood catheter, urethra catheter or infusion cannula tube.

2) The liquid lubricant may now be removed by appropriate means such as heat evaporation. This step, though preferable, is not essential.

3) The tubing is then placed on a solid metal rod and insulated intermittently along its length by wrapping with metal foil with space therebetween. The tube on the rod is then placed with its ends unrestrained, in an electrically heated oven or a molten salt bath and raised to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, preferably in the range of 3600C. The uninsulated portions will become sintered and shrink lengthwise to form solid portions.

4) The metal insulating foil is removed, the whole tube still on the metal rod is heated to around 2500--2600C and expanded to form unsintered porous portions between sintered solid portions.

5) The resulting tubing is then restrained by clamping the ends on the rod and placed in a constant temperatiure oven and raised to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE to produce a catheter tube as shown in Fig. 1.

Example II The material from step 2 of Example I is expanded producing a completely porous tube.

This tube is placed on a metal rod and then wrapped with intermittent metal foils with spaces therebetween and heated, unrestrained, above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. The metal foil is removed, the tubing is then restrained as in Example I and heated again above the crystalline melt point of PTFE.

This is an alternate method of producing the tube shown in Fig. 1.

Example III The porous tube from Example II, after placing on a metal rod, was spirally wrapped with a heat conductive tape and the tape raised, unrestrained, to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE providing a spirally sintered solid portion. The resulting tube was restrained and heated above the crystalline melt point to produce a tube as shown in Fig. 2 with solid and porous portions in a spiral mode.

In the above examples, the tip portion of the tubes can be rendered porous as described and then the open end closed by suturing or heat sealing. Also, in order that the position of the catheter in the body can be followed, x-ray detectable fillers such as metal powder or BaSO4 may be incorporated at paste formation state.

Example IV The expanded porous tube made according to Example II is cut to a length of about 13-16 cm. The tube is placed on a metal rod, both ends are exposed and the center portion is enclosed in an insulator. The tube Is raised, unrestrained, to above the crystal line melt point of PTFE. The end portions shrink back lengthwise to form a solid sintered portion, the middle portion remains porous.

The center portion insulator is removed and the tube again raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, this time restrained by damping at the ends to prevent shrinkage. A tube as shown in Fig. 4 is suitable for use as an infusion cannula tubing, after the attach anent of adapter, is produced.

Example V The porous center portion of tubing made as in Example IV is placed on a metal rod and wrapped with ring heaters with spaces between adjacent heaters. The heaters are raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, the tube being unrestrained lengthwise. Thus, the portions beneath the heaters are sintered and rendered solid by shrinkage. The heaters are then removed, the tube restrained by clamping at the ends, and again raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. A tube, as shown in Fig. 5, is thereby produced.

Example VI The porous center portion of tubing made as in Example IV is placed on a metal rod and spirally wrapped with a heating tape and the tape raised to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, the tube being unrestrained lengthwise. The heater tape is removed, the tube restrained as before, and again, raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. A tube, as shown in Fig. 6, is thereby produced.

While the invention herein has been dis closed, using specific embodiments and examples, these are intended to be illustrative only and not limitative, and changes, modifi cations or equivalents can be used by those skilled in the art. Such changes within the principles of the invention are intended to be within the scope of the claims below.

WHAT WE CLAIM IS: 1. A tubular flexible instrument for inSertiOn into a body cavity comprising a sintered polytetrafluoroethylene tube comprising solid and porous wall portions, said solid and porous portions alternating along the length of said tube.

2. A tubular flexible instrument according to Claim 1 in which said solid and porous wall portions alternate spirally along the length of said tube.

3. A tubular flexible instrument according to Claim 1 in which a single said porous por tion separates two said solid portions.

4. A tubular flexible instrument according to any preceding claim in which the micro structure of the or each said porous portion is a series of nodes connected by fibrils.

5. A tubular flexible instrument according

**WARNING** end of DESC field may overlap start of CLMS **.

Claims (6)

  1. **WARNING** start of CLMS field may overlap end of DESC **.
    whole tube still on the metal rod is heated to around 2500--2600C and expanded to form unsintered porous portions between sintered solid portions.
    5) The resulting tubing is then restrained by clamping the ends on the rod and placed in a constant temperatiure oven and raised to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE to produce a catheter tube as shown in Fig. 1.
    Example II The material from step 2 of Example I is expanded producing a completely porous tube.
    This tube is placed on a metal rod and then wrapped with intermittent metal foils with spaces therebetween and heated, unrestrained, above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. The metal foil is removed, the tubing is then restrained as in Example I and heated again above the crystalline melt point of PTFE.
    This is an alternate method of producing the tube shown in Fig. 1.
    Example III The porous tube from Example II, after placing on a metal rod, was spirally wrapped with a heat conductive tape and the tape raised, unrestrained, to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE providing a spirally sintered solid portion. The resulting tube was restrained and heated above the crystalline melt point to produce a tube as shown in Fig. 2 with solid and porous portions in a spiral mode.
    In the above examples, the tip portion of the tubes can be rendered porous as described and then the open end closed by suturing or heat sealing. Also, in order that the position of the catheter in the body can be followed, x-ray detectable fillers such as metal powder or BaSO4 may be incorporated at paste formation state.
    Example IV The expanded porous tube made according to Example II is cut to a length of about 13-16 cm. The tube is placed on a metal rod, both ends are exposed and the center portion is enclosed in an insulator. The tube Is raised, unrestrained, to above the crystal line melt point of PTFE. The end portions shrink back lengthwise to form a solid sintered portion, the middle portion remains porous.
    The center portion insulator is removed and the tube again raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, this time restrained by damping at the ends to prevent shrinkage. A tube as shown in Fig. 4 is suitable for use as an infusion cannula tubing, after the attach anent of adapter, is produced.
    Example V The porous center portion of tubing made as in Example IV is placed on a metal rod and wrapped with ring heaters with spaces between adjacent heaters. The heaters are raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, the tube being unrestrained lengthwise. Thus, the portions beneath the heaters are sintered and rendered solid by shrinkage. The heaters are then removed, the tube restrained by clamping at the ends, and again raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. A tube, as shown in Fig. 5, is thereby produced.
    Example VI The porous center portion of tubing made as in Example IV is placed on a metal rod and spirally wrapped with a heating tape and the tape raised to a temperature above the crystalline melt point of PTFE, the tube being unrestrained lengthwise. The heater tape is removed, the tube restrained as before, and again, raised above the crystalline melt point of PTFE. A tube, as shown in Fig. 6, is thereby produced.
    While the invention herein has been dis closed, using specific embodiments and examples, these are intended to be illustrative only and not limitative, and changes, modifi cations or equivalents can be used by those skilled in the art. Such changes within the principles of the invention are intended to be within the scope of the claims below.
    WHAT WE CLAIM IS: 1. A tubular flexible instrument for inSertiOn into a body cavity comprising a sintered polytetrafluoroethylene tube comprising solid and porous wall portions, said solid and porous portions alternating along the length of said tube.
  2. 2. A tubular flexible instrument according to Claim 1 in which said solid and porous wall portions alternate spirally along the length of said tube.
  3. 3. A tubular flexible instrument according to Claim 1 in which a single said porous por tion separates two said solid portions.
  4. 4. A tubular flexible instrument according to any preceding claim in which the micro structure of the or each said porous portion is a series of nodes connected by fibrils.
  5. 5. A tubular flexible instrument according
    to any preceding claim in which the tip portion is porous.
  6. 6. A tubular flexible instrument substantially as herein described with reference to any one of the embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
GB1195978A 1977-03-31 1978-03-28 Tubular flixible instruments Expired GB1567122A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP52036711A JPS6051912B2 (en) 1977-03-31 1977-03-31
JP3991077U JPS5626738Y2 (en) 1977-03-31 1977-03-31

Publications (1)

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GB1567122A true GB1567122A (en) 1980-05-08

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HK (1) HK63083A (en)

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU576753B2 (en) * 1983-03-31 1988-09-08 Kiyoshi Inoue Catheter
WO1993001855A3 (en) * 1991-07-23 1993-04-01 Intermed Inc Catheter tube
US5383890A (en) * 1993-10-27 1995-01-24 Baxter International Inc. Low-profile single-lumen perfusion balloon catheter
US5873906A (en) 1994-09-08 1999-02-23 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US5876432A (en) 1994-04-01 1999-03-02 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expandable helical intravascular stent and stent-graft
US5925061A (en) 1997-01-13 1999-07-20 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Low profile vascular stent
US6001123A (en) 1994-04-01 1999-12-14 Gore Enterprise Holdings Inc. Folding self-expandable intravascular stent-graft
US6042605A (en) 1995-12-14 2000-03-28 Gore Enterprose Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant stent-graft
US6331188B1 (en) 1994-08-31 2001-12-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US6352553B1 (en) 1995-12-14 2002-03-05 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Stent-graft deployment apparatus and method
US6352561B1 (en) 1996-12-23 2002-03-05 W. L. Gore & Associates Implant deployment apparatus
US6551350B1 (en) 1996-12-23 2003-04-22 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant bifurcated prosthesis
US6719738B2 (en) * 1998-11-17 2004-04-13 Henri Mehier Device for directly delivering an active substance within a cell tissue, means for implanting said device and appliances for injecting active substance into said device
US6893429B2 (en) * 2001-08-30 2005-05-17 Medtronic, Inc. Convection enhanced delivery catheter to treat brain and other tumors
US6974448B2 (en) 2001-08-30 2005-12-13 Medtronic, Inc. Method for convection enhanced delivery catheter to treat brain and other tumors
US7662140B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2010-02-16 Medtronic, Inc. Method of delivering drug to brain via spinal cord
US8043281B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2011-10-25 Medtronic, Inc. Catheters incorporating valves and permeable membranes
US8246602B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2012-08-21 Medtronic, Inc. Catheters with tracking elements and permeable membranes

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU576753B2 (en) * 1983-03-31 1988-09-08 Kiyoshi Inoue Catheter
EP0925802A2 (en) * 1991-07-23 1999-06-30 Intermed, Inc. Catheter tube
US5222949A (en) * 1991-07-23 1993-06-29 Intermed, Inc. Flexible, noncollapsible catheter tube with hard and soft regions
EP0670169A3 (en) * 1991-07-23 1996-01-31 Intermed Inc Catheter tube.
US5695482A (en) * 1991-07-23 1997-12-09 Intermed, Inc. UV treated catheter
EP0925802A3 (en) * 1991-07-23 2001-11-07 Intermed, Inc. Catheter tube
WO1993001855A3 (en) * 1991-07-23 1993-04-01 Intermed Inc Catheter tube
US5383890A (en) * 1993-10-27 1995-01-24 Baxter International Inc. Low-profile single-lumen perfusion balloon catheter
US6165210A (en) 1994-04-01 2000-12-26 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expandable helical intravascular stent and stent-graft
US5876432A (en) 1994-04-01 1999-03-02 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expandable helical intravascular stent and stent-graft
US6017362A (en) 1994-04-01 2000-01-25 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Folding self-expandable intravascular stent
US6001123A (en) 1994-04-01 1999-12-14 Gore Enterprise Holdings Inc. Folding self-expandable intravascular stent-graft
US6517570B1 (en) 1994-08-31 2003-02-11 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US6331188B1 (en) 1994-08-31 2001-12-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US8623065B2 (en) 1994-08-31 2014-01-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US5873906A (en) 1994-09-08 1999-02-23 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US6015429A (en) 1994-09-08 2000-01-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US5919225A (en) 1994-09-08 1999-07-06 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US6613072B2 (en) 1994-09-08 2003-09-02 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US6042605A (en) 1995-12-14 2000-03-28 Gore Enterprose Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant stent-graft
US6361637B2 (en) 1995-12-14 2002-03-26 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Method of making a kink resistant stent-graft
US6352553B1 (en) 1995-12-14 2002-03-05 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Stent-graft deployment apparatus and method
US6520986B2 (en) 1995-12-14 2003-02-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant stent-graft
US6551350B1 (en) 1996-12-23 2003-04-22 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant bifurcated prosthesis
US7682380B2 (en) 1996-12-23 2010-03-23 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink-resistant bifurcated prosthesis
US6352561B1 (en) 1996-12-23 2002-03-05 W. L. Gore & Associates Implant deployment apparatus
US5925061A (en) 1997-01-13 1999-07-20 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Low profile vascular stent
US6719738B2 (en) * 1998-11-17 2004-04-13 Henri Mehier Device for directly delivering an active substance within a cell tissue, means for implanting said device and appliances for injecting active substance into said device
US6893429B2 (en) * 2001-08-30 2005-05-17 Medtronic, Inc. Convection enhanced delivery catheter to treat brain and other tumors
US6974448B2 (en) 2001-08-30 2005-12-13 Medtronic, Inc. Method for convection enhanced delivery catheter to treat brain and other tumors
US8043281B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2011-10-25 Medtronic, Inc. Catheters incorporating valves and permeable membranes
US8137334B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2012-03-20 Medtronic, Inc. Reduction of inflammatory mass with spinal catheters
US8216177B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2012-07-10 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable drug delivery systems and methods
US8246602B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2012-08-21 Medtronic, Inc. Catheters with tracking elements and permeable membranes
US7662140B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2010-02-16 Medtronic, Inc. Method of delivering drug to brain via spinal cord

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Publication number Publication date
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PE20 Patent expired after termination of 20 years

Effective date: 19980327