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Voice recognition

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Publication number
EP0141497A1
EP0141497A1 EP19840305702 EP84305702A EP0141497A1 EP 0141497 A1 EP0141497 A1 EP 0141497A1 EP 19840305702 EP19840305702 EP 19840305702 EP 84305702 A EP84305702 A EP 84305702A EP 0141497 A1 EP0141497 A1 EP 0141497A1
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EP
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
fig
speech
tes
time
voice
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
EP19840305702
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German (de)
French (fr)
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EP0141497B1 (en )
Inventor
Reginald Alfred King
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Domain Dynamics Ltd
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Reginald Alfred King
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10LSPEECH ANALYSIS OR SYNTHESIS; SPEECH RECOGNITION; SPEECH OR VOICE PROCESSING; SPEECH OR AUDIO CODING OR DECODING
    • G10L15/00Speech recognition
    • G10L15/08Speech classification or search
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10LSPEECH ANALYSIS OR SYNTHESIS; SPEECH RECOGNITION; SPEECH OR VOICE PROCESSING; SPEECH OR AUDIO CODING OR DECODING
    • G10L15/00Speech recognition
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10LSPEECH ANALYSIS OR SYNTHESIS; SPEECH RECOGNITION; SPEECH OR VOICE PROCESSING; SPEECH OR AUDIO CODING OR DECODING
    • G10L25/00Speech or voice analysis techniques not restricted to a single one of groups G10L15/00-G10L21/00
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10LSPEECH ANALYSIS OR SYNTHESIS; SPEECH RECOGNITION; SPEECH OR VOICE PROCESSING; SPEECH OR AUDIO CODING OR DECODING
    • G10L19/00Speech or audio signals analysis-synthesis techniques for redundancy reduction, e.g. in vocoders; Coding or decoding of speech or audio signals, using source filter models or psychoacoustic analysis

Abstract

An automatic voice recognition system uses time encoded speech format. This has previously only been proposed for digital speech transmission.

Description

  • [0001]
    This invention relates to a method of and system for recognising voice signals.
  • [0002]
    In the IEEE Transactions and Communications Vo. Com-29 No. 5, May 1981, there is described the state of the art.
  • [0003]
    M.H. Kuhn of Philips GmbH., Hamburg, in European Electronics Issues 6, 1981 to Issue 1, 1982 has written a series of articles describing the theory of voice recognition and the systems devised by Texas Instruments, Philips and Bell Laboratories.
  • [0004]
    Then again, Messrs. B.E. Ray and C.R. Evans of the National Physical Laboratories, Teddington/Middlesex., wrote an article in Int.J. Man-Machine Studies (1981) 14, 13 to 27, describing their work in developing a practical system of speech recognition.
  • [0005]
    These various papers describe complete analyses and in most cases attempt to recognise a large vocabulary and even continuous speeach.
  • [0006]
    In some applications only a limited vocabulary is required such as ten or twenty differenct instruction words to operate a machine.
  • [0007]
    Such voice recognition equipments are already commercially available, e.g.:-
    • Nippon Electric Co. DP-200
    • Interstate Electronics VRC-100-1
    • Votan V-5000
    • Auricle T-950
    • Intel i SBC-570.
  • [0008]
    They are relatively expensive and complex, operating on the principle of dividing the sounds into frequency bands with filters and analysing the energy levels in each band.
  • [0009]
    We have now discovered that a technique previously only used for speech encoding in, for example digital speech transmission applications, can be used for speech recognition in a relatively cheap, effective way.
  • [0010]
    According to the present invention there is provided a method of recognising voice signals characterised by utilising time encoded speech (TES).
  • [0011]
    According to a further aspect of the present invention there is provided a voice recognition system, characterised in that voice signals are encoded in a TES format, and that the relationships between at least some of the parameters comprising the TES symbol stream and a test signal (or signals) are examined to provide an output signal indicative of the nature of the voice signal as a result of the examination.
  • [0012]
    Time encoded speech has previously only been considered in respect of digital speech transmission. See for example published patent application 2020517A.
  • [0013]
    In order that the invention can be more clearly understood reference will now be made to the accompanying drawing, in which:-
    • Fig. 1 is a random speech waveform;
    • Fig. 2 represents the quantised duration of each segment of the waveform of Fig. 1;
    • Fig. 3 represents the maxima or minima occurring in each segment of the waveform of Fig.l;
    • Fig. 4 is a symbol alphabet derived for use in an embodiment of the present invention;
    • Fig. 5 is a flow diagram of a voice recognition system according to the embodiment of the present invention;
    • Fig. 6 shows a block diagram of the encoder part of the system of Fig. 5;
    • Fig. 7 shows a symbol stream for the word SIX generated in the system of Fig. 5 to be read sequentially in rows left to right and top to bottom.;
    • Fig. 8 shows a two dimensional "A" matrix for the symbol stream of Fig. 7;
    • Fig. 9 shows a flow diagram for generating the A matrix of Fig. 8, and
    • Fig. 10 is a diagram of the application of the system of Fig. 5 to a loudspeaking telephone.
  • [0014]
    Time encoded speech is a form of speech waveform coding. The speech waveform is broken into segments between successive real zeros. As an example Fig. 1 shows a random speech waveform and the arrows indicate the points of zero crossing. For each segment of the waveform the code consists of a single digital word. This word is derived from two parameters of the segment, namely its quantised time duration and its shape. The measure of duration is straightforward and Fig. 2 illustrates the quantised time duration for each successive segment - two, three, six etcetera.
  • [0015]
    The preferred strategy for shape description is to classify wave segments on the basis of the number of positive minima or negative maxima occurring therein, although other shape descriptions are also appropriate. This is represented in Fig. 3 - nought, nought, one etcetera. These two parameters can then be compounded into a matrix to produce a unique alphabet of numerical symbols. Fig. 4 shows such an alphabet. Along the rows the "S" parameter is the number of maxima or minima and down the columns the D parameter is the quantised time duration. However this naturally occurring alphabet has been simplified based on the following observations. For economical coding it has been found acoustically that the number of naturally occurring distinguishable symbols produced by this process may be mapped in a non-linear fashion to form a much smaller number ("Alphabet") of code descriptors and in accordance with a preferred feature of the invention such code or event descriptors produced in the time encoded speech format are used for Voice Recognition. If the speech signal is band limited - for example to 3.5 kHz - then some of the shorter events cannot have maxima or minima. In the preferred embodiment quantising is carried out at 20 Kbits per second. The range of time intervals expected for normal speech is about three to thirty 20 Kbit samples, i.e. three 20 Kbit samples represent one half cycle at 3.3 kHz and thirty 20 Kbit samples represent one half cycle at 300 Hz.
  • [0016]
    Another important aspect associated with the time encoded speech format is that it is not necessary to quantise the lower frequencies so precisely as the higher frequencies.
  • [0017]
    Thus referring to Fig. 4, the first three symbols (1, 2 and 3), having three different time durations but no maxima and minima, are assigned the same descriptor (1), symbols 6 and 7 are assigned the same descriptor (4), and symbols 8, 9 and 10 are assigned the same descriptor (5) with no shape definition and the descriptor (6) with one maximum or minimum. Thus in this example one ends up with a description of speech in about twenty-six descriptors.
  • [0018]
    It is now proposed to explain how these descriptors are used in Voice Recognition and as an example it is appropriate at this point to look at the descriptors defining a word spoken by a given speaker. Take for example the word "SIX". In Fig. 7 is shown part of the time encoded speech symbol stream for this word spoken by the given speaker and this represents the symbol stream which will be produced by an encoder such as the one to be described with reference to Figs. 5 and 6, utilising the alphabet shown in Fig. 4.
  • [0019]
    Fig. 7 shows a symbol stream for the word "SIX", and Fig. 8 shows a two dimensioned plot or "A" matrix of time encoded speech events for the word "SIX". Thus the first figure 239 represents the total number of descriptors (1) followed by another descriptor (1). The Figure 71 represents the number of descriptors (2) followed each by a descriptor (1). The Figure 74 represents the total number of descriptors (1) followed by a (2). And so on.
  • [0020]
    This matrix gives a basic set of criteria used to identify a word or a speaker in a preferred embodiment of the invention. Many relationships between the events comprising the matrix are relatively immune to certain variations in the pronounciation of the word. For example the location of the most significant events in the matrix would be relatively immune to changing the length of the word from "SIX" (normally spoken) to "SI....IX", spoken in a more long drawn-out manner. It is merely the profile of the time encoded speech events as they occur, which would vary in this case, and other relationships would identify the speaker.
  • [0021]
    It should be noted that the TES symbol stream may be formed to advantage into matrices of higher dimensionality and that the simple two dimensional "A"-matrix is described here for illustration purposes only.
  • [0022]
    Referring back now to Fig. 5, there is shown a flow diagram of a voice recognition system according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0023]
    The speech utterance from a microphone tape recording or telephone line is fed at "IN" to a pre-processing stage 1 which includes filters to limit the spectral content of the signal from for example 300 Hz to 3.3 kHz. Dependent on the characteristics of the microphone used, some additional pre-processing such as partial differentiation/integration may be required to give the input speech a predetermined spectral content. AC coupling/DC removal may also be required prior to time encoding the speech (TES coding).
  • [0024]
    Fig. 5a shows one arrangement in which, following the filtering, there is a DC removal stage 2, a first order recursive filter 3 and an ambient noise DC threshold sensing stage 4 which responds only if a DC threshold, dependent upon ambient noise, is exceeded
  • [0025]
    The signal then enters a TES coder 5 and one embodiment of this is shown in Fig. 6. Referring to Fig. 6 the band-limited and pre-processed input speech is converted into a TES symbol stream via an A/D converter 6 and suitable logic RZ logic 7, RZ counter 8, extremum logic 9 and positive minimum and negative maximum counter 10. A programmable read-only-memory 11, and associated logic acts as a look-up table containing the TES alphabets of Fig. 4 to produce an "n" bit TES symbol stream in response to being addressed by a) the count of zero crossings and b) the count of positive minimums and negative maximums such for example as shown for part of the word "SIX" in Fig. 7.
  • [0026]
    Thus the coding structure of Fig. 4 is programmed into the architecture of the TES coder 5. The TES coder identifies the DS combinations shown in Fig. 4, converts these into the symbols shown appropriately in Fig. 4 and outputs them at the output of the coder 5 and they then form the TES symbol stream.
  • [0027]
    A clock signal generator 12 synchronises the logic.
  • [0028]
    From the TES symbol stream is created the appropriate matrix by the matrix feature-pattern extractor 31, Fig. 5, which in this example is a two dimensional "A" matrix. The A-matrix appears in the Feature Pattern Extractor box 31. In this case the pattern to be extracted or the feature to be extracted is the A matrix. That is the two dimensional matrix representation of the TES symbols. At the end of the utterance of the word "six" the two dimentional A matrix which has been rormed is compared with the reference patterns previously generated and stored in the Reference Pattern block 21. This comparison takes place in the Feature Pattern Comparison block 41, successive reference patterns being compared with the test pattern or alternatively the test pattern being compared with the sequence of reference patterns, to provide a decision as to which reference pattern best matches the test pattern. This and the other functions shown in the flow diagram of Fig. 5 and within the broken line L are implemented in real time on a Plessey MIPROC computer. A PDP11 has been used as a system builder and loader and to analyse results.
  • [0029]
    A detailed flow diagram for the matrix formation 31 is shown in Fig. 9. Boxes 34 and 35 correspond to the speech symbol transformation or TES coder 5 of Fig. 5 and the feature pattern extractor or matrix formation box 31 of Fig. 5 corresponds with boxes 32 and 33 of Fig. 9. The flow diagram of Fig. 9 operates as follows:-
    • 1. Given input sample [xn], define "centre clipped" input:-
    • 2. Define an "epoch" as consecutive samples of like sign.
    • 3. Define "Difference" [dn]
    • 4. Define "Extremum" at n with value e if sgn(dn+1) sgn(d ) * e=sn, 0 accorded +ve sign.
    • 5. From the sequence of extrema, delete those pairs whose absolute difference in value is less than a given "fluctuation error".
    • 6. The output from the TES analysis occurs at the first sample of the new epoch. It consists of the number of contained samples and the number of contained extrema.
    • 7. If both numbers fall within given ranges, a TES number is allocated according to a simple mapping. This is done in box 34 "Screening" in Fig. 9.
    • 8. If the number of extrema exceeds the maximum, then this maximum is taken as the input. If the number of extrema is less than 1, then the event is considered as arising from background noise (within the value of the [+ve] fluctuation error) and the delay line is cleared.
    • 9. If the number of samples is greater than the maximum permitted then the delay line is also cleared.
    • 10. The TES numbers are written to a resettable delay line. If the delay line is full, then a delayed number is read and the input/output combination is accumulated into an N dimensional matrix, and in this example N=2. Once reset, the delay line must be reaccumulated before the histogram is updated.
    • 11. The assigned number of highest entries ("Significant events") are selected from the histogram and stored with their matrix coordinates, in this example "A" matrix these are two dimensional coordinates to produce for example Fig. 8.
  • [0030]
    One application of the voice recognition system is illustrated in Fig. 10 of the accompanying drawings. A telephone set comprises a voice recogniser 102 such as already described with reference to Figs. 5 and 5a. A microphone 103 receives the acoustic signals and feeds them to the recogniser 102 which has a control switch 104/1 for switching it on or off, coupled with a hook switch 104/2. This switch would be pressed to operate each time the 'phone is used and would maintain the recogniser active for a predetermined period until a recognised command had been received. Such commands would include the word "DIAL". There would then follow, for example, the number as a series of digits "ZERO", "ONE" etcetera to "NINE". The word "PAUSE" would cause a pause in the dialling sequence for inserting dialling pauses for say level nine PABX's. Other commands would include "CANCEL", "OFF HOOK", "ON HOOK" or their equivalent. The command "DIAL" could be arranged to effect the "OFF HOOK" condition for dialling for example.
  • [0031]
    The TES recogniser would be implemented on a single chip computer such as INTEL 8049 etcetera.
  • [0032]
    The recogniser has another switch 105, which could also be implemented by voice commands, to switch between a recognising mode in which the telephone is operable, to a training or learning mode, in which the recognisable patterns are generated in the reference pattern store 21, Fig. 5, updated with a changed voice, such as might be necessary when the operator has a cold or with a different-from-usual operator. In a continuous learning machine, the last recognised pattern would be used as a new input to the reference patterns, to replace that reference pattern which had been least frequently used up until that time. By this means as the input voice gradually changes, the recognition matrix would change with it, without the machine having to be specifically re-programmed.
  • [0033]
    The telephone set has an automatic dialling chip TCM5089 which is controlled by the recogniser 102.
  • [0034]
    The reference patterns are generated by speaking the various command words while the system is switched to the traning mode. The system will then store the test pattern, e.g. for the word "SIX" in the set 21 of reference patterns.
  • [0035]
    In the recognition mode the word "SIX" is converted into the A matrix and in the software the feature pattern correlation is carried out whereby all the A or higher dimensional matrices held in store are compared in turn with the A or higher dimensional matrices generated by the spoken command and looks for a relationship which may be a correlation. A delay will be imposed to enable the comparison to be made.
  • GENERAL
  • [0036]
    The 26 symbol alphabet used in the current VR evaluation was designed for a digital speech system. The alphabet is structured to produce a minimum bit-rate digital output from an input speech waveform, band-limited from 300 Hz to 3.3 kHz. To economise on bite-rate, this alphabet maps the three shortest speech segments of duration 1, 2, and 3, time quanta, into the single TES symbol "I". This is a sensible economy for digital speech processing, but for voice recognition, it reduces the options available for discriminating between a variety of different short symbol distributions usually associated with unvoiced sounds.
  • [0037]
    We have determined that the predominance of "1" symbols resulting from this alphabet and this bandwidth may dominate the 'A' matrix distribution to an extent which limits effective discrimination between some words, when comparing using the simpler distance measures. In these circumstances, more effective discrimination may be obtained by arbitrarily exluding "1" symbols and "1" symbol combinations from the 'A' matrix. Although improving VR scores, this effectively limits the examination/comparison to events associated with a much reduced bandwidth of 2.2 kHz. (0.3 kHz - 2.5 kHz). Alternatively and to advantage the TES alphabet may be increased in size to include descriptors for these shorter events.
  • [0038]
    Under conditions of high background noise alternative TES alphabets could be used to advantage; for example pseudo zeros (PZ) and Interpolated zeros (IZ).
  • [0039]
    As a means for an economical voice recognition algorithm, a very simple TES converter can be considered which produces a TES symbol stream from speech without the need for an A/D converter. The proposal utilises Zero Crossing detectors, clocks, counters and logic gates. Two Zero Crossing detectors (ZCD) are used, one operating on the original speech signal, and the other opeating on the differentiated speech signal.
  • [0040]
    The d/dt output can simply provide a count related to the number of extremum in the original speech signal, over any specified time interval. The time interval chosen is the time between the real zeros of the signal viz. the number of clock periods between the outputs of the ZCD associated with the undifferentiated speech signal. These numbers may be paired and manipulated with suitable logic to provide a TES symbol stream.
  • [0041]
    This option has a number of obvious advantages for commercial embodiments but it lacks the flexibility associated with the A/D version. Nevertheless, it represents a level of 'front end' simplicity which could have a dramatic impact on a number of important commercial factors.

Claims (12)

1. A method of recognising voice signals characterised by utilising Time Encoded Speech (TES).
2. A method as claimed in claim 1 characterised by utilising Time Encoded Speech (TES) symbol event desriptors.
3. A voice recognition system, characterised in that voice signals are encoded in a TES format, and that the relationships between at least some of the parameters comprising the TES symbol stream and a test signal (or signals) are examined to provide an output signal indicative of the nature of the voice signal as a result of the examination.
4. A voice recognition system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that the parameters include events comprising the symbol stream and/or the structure of the symbol stream and/or the location occupied, trajectory followed or movement occurring of the symbol stream.
5. A voice recognition system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that the test signal is a test voice signal or a stylised or artificial version of that signal.
6. A system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that numerical descriptions of the or each parameter are derived for some or all of them and compared with the test signal.
7. A system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that a parameter examined comprises positive minimums.
8. A system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that a parameter examined comprises negative maximums.
9. A system as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that the number of positive minimums and negative maximums are counted for each time segment, the quantised time duration of each time segment is measured and a numerical descriptor assigned in dependance thereon.
10. A system as claimed in claim 9, characterised in that the input speech signal is bandwidth limited and higher frequency signals within the band are not checked for positive minimums or negative maximums.
11. A system as claimed in claim 9, characterised in that lower frequency signals within the band are assigned the same numerical description despite differences detected in the parameter measured whereby to economise on coding.
12. A telephone set having an automatic dialling facility characterised in that it is controlled by a method as claimed in claim 1 or a system as claimed in claim 3.
EP19840305702 1983-09-01 1984-08-22 Voice recognition Expired EP0141497B1 (en)

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GB8323481A GB2145864B (en) 1983-09-01 1983-09-01 Voice recognition
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WO1992015089A1 (en) * 1991-02-18 1992-09-03 Reginald Alfred King Signal processing arrangements
US6748354B1 (en) 1998-08-12 2004-06-08 Domain Dynamics Limited Waveform coding method

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US6748354B1 (en) 1998-08-12 2004-06-08 Domain Dynamics Limited Waveform coding method

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JP2619852B2 (en) 1997-06-11 grant
GB2145864A (en) 1985-04-03 application
GB2145864B (en) 1987-09-03 grant
US5091949A (en) 1992-02-25 grant
DE3480569D1 (en) 1989-12-28 grant
EP0141497B1 (en) 1989-11-23 grant
JPS6078500A (en) 1985-05-04 application

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