CA2658046A1 - Surface cleaning apparatus - Google Patents

Surface cleaning apparatus

Info

Publication number
CA2658046A1
CA2658046A1 CA 2658046 CA2658046A CA2658046A1 CA 2658046 A1 CA2658046 A1 CA 2658046A1 CA 2658046 CA2658046 CA 2658046 CA 2658046 A CA2658046 A CA 2658046A CA 2658046 A1 CA2658046 A1 CA 2658046A1
Authority
CA
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
cyclone
cleaning apparatus
surface cleaning
dirt
outlet
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2658046
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Wayne Ernest Conrad
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
G B D Corp
Original Assignee
G B D Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/24Hand-supported suction cleaners
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1658Construction of outlets
    • A47L9/1666Construction of outlets with filtering means

Abstract

A surface cleaning apparatus comprises at least one cyclone and at least one dirt collection chamber. The at least one cyclone has a cyclone air inlet, a cyclone air outlet and a removably mounted shroud surrounding the cyclone air outlet. The at least one dirt collection chamber comprises an opening and an openable door covering the opening.
The shroud is removable through the opening when the door is open.

Description

y s2 - :2 L, TITLE: SURFACE CLEANING APPARATUS

FIELD
The specification relates to surface cleaning apparatu; , and particularly, to cyclonic surface cleaning apparatus. In a particularly preferre d embodiment, the specification relates to cyclonic hand vacuum cleaners having remova )ly mounted screen.
INTRODUCTION
The following is not an admission that anything discusse d below is prior art or part of the common general knowledge of persons skilled in the art.

Cyclonic separators, including those used in vacuum c eaners are known in the art. Typically, a cyclonic separator has an inlet for fluid (air, liquic c-r and air and liquid mix) to be treated and an outlet for treated fluid. Dirt may be collectei I
either in the cyclone chamber itself (e.g. in the bottom) or in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the cyclone separator. Various such constructions are known in the art.

Typically, a screen or shroud is provided in a cyclone chamber surrounding the air outlet. The purpose of the screen is to retain hair and th like in the cyclone chamber. Accordingly, material may build up on a screen or shroud, t:c airing the screen or shroud to be cleaned. The shroud may be cleaned while mounted to ; racuum cleaner. For example, in US 4,853,111, a vacuum cleaner having s second cyc one nested within an outer cyclone is disclosed. The outer cyclone casing was removable. Once the outer cyclone casing was removed, then the shroud was exposed, permi ting the shroud to be cleaned. US200710209334 disclosed a design wherein a screen is c otifigured so as to be removable through or with the fluid outlet of a cyclone.

Cyclonic hand vacuum cleaners have also been deve loped. These vacuum cleaners have typically used similar operating principles as full iii;e cyclonic vacuum cleaners. See for example PCT publication WO 2008/009890; PC,T publication WO
2008/009888; PCT publication WO 20081009883; and United States )a tent 7,370,387.

SUMMARY
(0001] The following introduction is provided to introduce ft e reader to the more detailed discussion to follow. The introduction is not intended to limit or define the claims.

Mt y..

According to one broad aspect, a surface cleaning a )paratus is provided wherein a screen of shroud (hereinafter "shroud") is positioned at leas partially internal of a cyclone chamber such that the air will pass through the shroud a; is exits the cyclone chamber. The cyclone has an associated dirt collection chamber that is openable to empty dirt collected therein. When opened, the shroud, which is remov ably mounted in the cyclone, may be removed. The dirt collection chamber may be in the )ottom of the cyclone chamber. In such a case, a cyclone casing may have an openable b )tlom door.
The door may be positioned to face the cyclone outlet. When the door is opene, 1, a user may remove the screen for cleaning. Alternately, the dirt collection chamber mi y be external of the cyclone chamber. For example, the cyclone chamber may have a d rt outlet at an end of the cyclone opposed to the air outlet. The dirt collection chamber may have an openable bottom door. The door may be positioned to face the cyclone outl ;t. When the door is opened, a user may remove the screen for cleaning.

Accordingly, a cyclone unit may have only one openab e portion that is used to remove accumulated dirt and also to remove a screen for cleaning Ii will be appreciated that the reference to "bottom" is a convenience. In use, a cyclone : may be oriented in various directions.

In one embodiment, a surface cleaning apparatus has s front end, a rear and and an air flow passage extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet. A first cyclone unit is positioned in the air flow passage. The first cyclone unit comprises at least one cyclone and at least one dirt collection chamber. The at least one i .yolone has a cyclone air inlet, a cyclone air outlet, and a removably mounted shroud surroinding the cyclone air outlet. The at least one dirt collection chamber comprises an open ling and an openable door covering the opening. The shroud is removable through the opining when the door is open. A suction motor is positioned in the air flow passage.

In some example, the dirt collection chamber is externa to the cyclone, In some examples, the at least one cyclone further corr prises a dirt outlet, the opening is provided in the at least one dirt collection chamber an( the openable door is mounted facing the dirt outlet The surface cleaning apparatus may be a hand vacuun , cleaner.

In some examples, a vortex finder is provided in the cyc foie, and the shroud comprises a screen surrounding the vortex finder.

In some examples, the door is removable. The door m; ty be openable when the first cyclone unit is mounted to the surface cleaning apparatus and/or when the first cyclone unit is removed from the surface cleaning apparatus.

In some examples, the at least one cyclone is positio ied interior of the at least one dirt collection chamber. The at least one cyclone may be defined by a cyclone casing that is sized to permit a user to insert a hand in an annular I -o,'tion of the cyclone chamber positioned between the shroud and the cyclone casing.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus coml iri:aes a hand vacuum cleaner and the door is positioned at the front end.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus comp )ri;es a hand vacuum cleaner and the first cyclone unit is positioned forward of the suction n iol:or.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus corn }rises a hand vacuum cleaner, the at least one cyclone has a cyclone front end, and a cycl )ne rear end, and the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are at the same end. Thi ;
cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet may be at the cyclone rear end.

In some examples, a separation plate is mounted in fat -ing relation to the dirt outlet, preferably at an end opposed to the air outlet.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus com Dr sea a hand vacuum cleaner, the cyclone has a separation plate that is mounted in fac nci relation to the dirt outlet, the dirt outlet is positioned at the cyclone front end, and th, .
clone front end is positioned at the front end of the hand vacuum cleaner. The sel 'aration plate may be mounted to the door.

In some examples, the dirt collection chamber is remo cable from the surface cleaning apparatus as a sealed unit for emptying. The dirt collection chamber may be removable from the surface cleaning apparatus with the first cyclone it it.

In some examples, the shroud has a dirt outlet and ar d the dirt outlet end is positioned proximate the dirt outlet.

In some examples, the first cyclone unit has a single cy( lone and a single dirt collection chamber.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus further comprises a suction motor housing. The suction motor may be positioned in the c uction motor housing and the first cyclone unit may be removably mounted to the suction m, )tar housing.

In some examples, the surface cleaning apparatus fi. rther comprises a second cyclone unit downstream from the first cyclone unit.

It will be appreciated that a surface cleaning apparatus may incorporate one or more of the features of each of these examples.

DRAWINGS

In the detailed description, reference will be made to tl e following drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a side plan view of an example of a hand vac utim cleaner;
Figure 2 is a top plan view of the hand vacuum cleaner i -f =igure 1;
Figure 3 is a front plan view of the hand vacuum cleaneL of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a partially exploded rear perspective view of the hand vacuum cleaner of Figure 1;

Figure 5A is a front perspective view of the hand vacua Ti cleaner of Figure 1, showing a door in an open configuration;

Figure 5B is a front perspective view of the hand vacua n cleaner of Figure 1, showing a door removed from the hand vacuum cleaner;

Figure 6 is a cross section taken along line 6-6 in Figure 2;

Figure 7A is a bottom perspective view of the hand vac uum cleaner of Figure 1; and, Figure 7B is a rear perspective view of the hand-vacui. m cleaner of Figure 1, showing the cyclone unit removed from the hand vacuum cleaner.

DESCRIPTION OF VARIOUS EXAMPLES

Various apparatuses or methods will be described he ow to provide an example of each claimed invention. No example described belo% - limits any claimed invention and any claimed invention may cover processes or app., retuses that are not described below. The claimed inventions are not limited to appal st lses or processes having all of the features of any one apparatus or process describec below or to features common to multiple or all of the apparatuses described below. I is possible that an apparatus or process described below is not an embodiment of any cl: cirned invention.

In the drawings attached hereto, the surface clf ailing apparatus is exemplified as used in a hand vacuum cleaner that uses a cyclone. It will be appreciated that the vacuum cleaner 100 may be of various types (e.g., an upric ht vacuum cleaner, a canister vacuum cleaner, an extractor, etc.) and configurations (e.g , different positioning and orientation of the cyclone unit and the suction motor and differ n(j cyclone units that may comprise one or more cyclones and one or more filters).

Referring to Figures 1 to 7B, a first example of a surfa(a cleaning apparatus 100 is shown. The surface cleaning apparatus 100 (also referred to herein as vacuum cleaner or cleaner 100) is a hand vacuum cleaner 100, and is mova )le; along a surface to be cleaned by gripping and maneuvering handle 102. The vacuum cl. saner 100 includes an upper portion 104, a lower portion 106, a front end 108, and a r :a r end 110.
In the example shown, handle 102 is provided at the upper portion 104. I i alternate examples, handle 102 may be provided elsewhere on the vacuum cleaner 100,13r example at the rear end 110, and may be of any design.

In the example shown, the vacuum cleaner 100 compr se:s a nozzle 112 and a first cyclone unit 114, which together preferably form a surface cle aping head 116 of the vacuum cleaner 100. In the example shown, the surface cleaning I egad 116 is preferably provided at the front end 108 of the vacuum cleaner 100.

Nozzle 112 engages a surface to be cleaned, and con prises a dirty air inlet 118, through which dirty air is drawn into the vacuum cleaner 100 An airflow passage extends from the dirty air inlet 118 to a clean air outlet 120 of thi :
cleaner 100. In the example shown, clean air outlet 120 is at the rear end 110 of the clef near 100.

I I

Cyclone unit 114 is provided in the airflow passage, dc Nnstream of the dirty air inlet 118. The cyclone unit 114 comprises at least one cyclone aid at least one dirt collection chamber. In the example shown, the cyclone unit 114 cc mprises one cyclone 122, and one dirt collection chamber 124, which are integrally Or ned. In alternate examples, the cyclone unit 114 may include more than one cyclonic stage, wherein each cyclonic stage comprises one or more cyclones and one or nc-re dirt chambers.
Accordingly, the cyclones may be arranged in parallel and/or in soq fence.
Further, in alternate examples, the cyclone 122 and dirt collection chamber 1'A4 may be separately formed.

In the example shown, the nozzle 112 is positioned at th q lower portion 106 of the vacuum cleaner 100. Preferably, as exemplified, nozzle 11'Z i:3 positioned at the bottom of the vacuum cleaner 100, and, preferably, beneath ti a cyclone unit 114.
However, it will be appreciated that nozzle 112 may be connected to he:
cyclone unit or dirt collection chamber at alternate locations.

Preferably, as exemplified, nozzle 112 may be on I wirer surface 157 of cyclone unit 114 and may share a wall with the cyclone unit 114. For example in a particularly preferred design, the upper wall of the nozzle may bf a lower wall of the cyclone unit 114. As shown in Figure 6, dirt chamber 124 surround; >:he lower portion of cyclone 122. Accordingly, the upper wall of nozzle 112 may be part c f the lower wall of the dirt chamber. It will be appreciated that if dirt chamber 124 does r of extend around the lower portion of cyclone 122, then the upper wall of nozzle 112 may )e part of a lower wall of cyclone 122.

Preferably, in the example shown, the nozzle 112 is fig eclly positioned at the lower portion 106 of the vacuum cleaner 100. That is, the nozzle 11 is not movable (e.g., rotatable) with respect to the remainder of the vacuum cleaner 1C ), and is fixed at the lower portion 106 of the vacuum cleaner 100.

As shown in Figures 3 and 5, nozzle 112 has a width VAIN, and cyclone unit 114 has a width W0. In the example shown, WN, and We are ]bout the same. An advantage of this design is that the nozzle 112 may have a cleaning a~ th that is essentially as wide as the hand vacuum itself.

Preferably, nozzle 112 comprises an airflow chamber 136 wherein at least a portion, and preferably a majority, of the lower surface of the chamb ar 136 is open. In an alternate design, nozzle 112 may be an enclosed passage and accordingly may have a lower wall that the closes lower end. Accordingly, nozzle 112 may he of various designs and may be an open sided passage or a closed passage. In either (=rrbodiment, it will be appreciated that nozzle 112 may be mounted or provided on cycl me unit 114 and as exemplified on a lower portion of the dirt collection chamber so as to he removable with the dirt collection chamber.

An open sided nozzle design is exemplified in Figure 7. \ wherein nozzle 112 comprises an upper nozzle wall 126. In the example shown, the t peer nozzle wall 126 comprises a portion 119 of a wall 115 of the cyclone unit. Accoi tingly, nozzle 112 is integral with cyclone unit 114.

Preferably, one or more depending walls 128 extend downwardly from the upper nozzle wall 126. The depending wall 128 is preferably genet 311V U-shaped. In one embodiment, depending wall is provided rearward of opening 138. 11 other embodiments, depending walls may alternately or in addition be provided on the Ia :eial sides of opening 138. It is preferred that depending walls are provided on each later.- I ,;ide of opening 138 and rearward thereof. Further, depending walls 128 may extend a ; ubstantial distance to the front end 108 and, preferably, essentially all the way to front enc 108.
The depending wall 128 may be continuous to define a single wall as shown, or may )e discontinuous. The depending wall 128 is preferably rigid (e.g., integrally molded wi :h cyclone unit 114).
However, they may be flexible (e.g., bristles or rubber) or moveabl / mounted to cyclone unit 114 (e.g., hingedly mounted).

Preferably, the lower end 132 of depending wall 128 i, spaced above the surface being cleaned when the hand vacuum cleaner is placec on a surface to be cleaned. As exemplified in Figure 6, when vacuum cleaner 100 is pla ed on a floor F, lower end 132 of depending wall 128 may be spaced a distance H abov : the floor.
Preferably distance H is from 0.01 to 0.175 inches, more preferably from 0.04 to 0.08 inches.

The height of the depending wall (between upper noz :le wall 126 and lower end 132) may vary. In some examples, the depending wall may ha' le a height of between about 0.05 and about 0.875 inches, preferably between about 0,125, nil about 0.6 inches, and more preferably between about 0.2 and about 0.4 inches. The hei ]ht of depending wall may vary but is preferably constant.

As exemplified, the open end of the U-shape defines an open side 130 of the nozzle 114, and forms the dirty air inlet 118 of the cleaner 100. In the example shown, the open side 130 is provided at the front of the nozzle 114. In use, whet, optional wheels 135 are in contact with a surface, the open side 130 sits above and is adj scent a surface to be cleaned (e.g. floor F). As mentioned hereinabove, preferably, lower a nd 132 of depending walls 128 is spaced above floor F. Accordingly, some air may enter r :)zzle 114 by passing underneath depending wall 132. In such a case, the primary air entr I to nozzle 114 is via open side 130 so that dirty air inlet 118 is the primary air inlet, with a secondary air inlet being under depending wall 128.

In the example shown, the lower end 132 of the depen ling wall 128 defines an open lower end 134 of the nozzle 114. The open lower end 134 preferably extends to the front 108 of the cleaner 100, and merges with the open sic a 130. In use, the exemplified nozzle has an open lower end 134 that faces a surface to be) cleaned, in the example shown, a plurality of wheels 135 ara mounted to the depending wall 128, and extend lower than the lower end 132 of the cepending wall 128.
Accordingly, in use, when wheels 135 are in contact with a surface, the lower end 132 of the depending wall 128 is spaced from the surface to be cleaned, at d the space between the lower end of the depending wall 128 and the surface to be cleans d form the secondary dirty air inlet to the vacuum cleaner 100. It will be appreciated that wt eels 135 are optional.
Preferably, wheels 135 are positioned exterior to the airflow path thri iu!lh nozzle 112, e.g., laterally outwardly from depending wall 128. Preferably a pair of 'rc,nt wheels 135 are provided. Preferably, the wheels are located adjacent front 108. Optionally, one or more rear wheels 108 may be provided. In an alternate embodiment no wheels may be provided.

The upper nozzle wall 126, depending wall 128, and c pon lower end 134 of the nozzle 112 define the open sided airflow chamber 136 of the nozzle. In use, when wheels 135 are in contact with a horizontal surface, the nozzle 112 a, id the airflow chamber 136 extend generally horizontally, and preferably linearly along a r o;:zle axis 113 (see Figure 7A).

An opening 138 may be provided in the upper nozzle wall 126, and is in communication with the airflow chamber 136. Opening 138 may b,: of any size and configuration and at various locations in upper nozzle wall 126. In u: se when wheels 135 are in contact with a surface, the opening 138 faces a surface to be c vaned, air enters the dirty air inlet 118, passes horizontally through the airflow chamber 13(, and passes into the opening 138. Opening 138 is in communication with a cyclone inlet r as-sage 139, which is in communication with a cyclone air inlet 140 of cyclone 122.

Cyclone 122 may of any configuration and orientation . Preferably, cyclone 122 comprises a cyclone casing 142, which in the example shown, is cylindrical. The cyclone chamber is located inside cyclone casing 142. The cyclone 2:2 extends along an axis 123, which, in the example shown, is preferably parallel to ht: nozzle axis, and preferably extends generally horizontally when cleaner 100 is in use and wheels 135 are seated on a surface. Cyclone 122 has a first end 196, which in the ,xample shown is the front of the cyclone, and a second end 198, which in the example si ioNn is a rear 198 of the cyclone. The cyclone air inlet and air outlet may be at v ar ous locations and configurations.

As exemplified, the cyclone air inlet 140 may be defined bf an aperture in the cyclone casing 142, and may be at the rear 198 of the cyclone 12!. As can be seen in Figure 5, the inlet passage 139 is configured such that air enters. th-s cyclone 122 in a tangential flow path, e.g., passage 139 may be arcuate. The air trave s in a cyclonic path in the cyclone, and dirt In the air is separated from the air. The air ex its the cyclone via air outlet 145. Outlet 145 may be in rear wall 179 of the cyclone u it 114.
Accordingly, cyclone inlet 140 and outlet 145 may be at the same end of the cy, :Ic ne 122.
Preferably, the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are at the same end c f the cyclone 122 and the dirt outlet is at an opposed end.

In the exemplified embodiment, a vortex finder 144 is pi ovided in the cyclone, upstream from and in communication with the dirt outlet 145. As E xe:mplified, the vortex finder is a cylindrical conduit, having an inlet 176 facing the outlet 141.

Preferably, a shroud 182 surrounds the cyclone air out el. The shroud 182 serves to prevent elongate material and larger, lighter dirt from passe nci through dirt outlet 145. As exemplified, the shroud 182 surrounds the vortex finder 144.
Preferably, as shown, the shroud 182 comprises a plate 174 at a first end 189 then of. The plate 174 is spaced from and facing the inlet 176 to vortex finder 144. Legs 178 E Kt4?nd from plate 174, along vortex finder 144. A ring 185 is at a second end 191 of the shroud 182, which is positioned proximate the dirt outlet 145. The second end 191 ma f also be referred to herein as the air outlet and 191. The ring 185 is integral with leg ; 178 and surrounds vortex finder 144. The ring and legs provide a mount for plate 174. , k ;screen 183 extends from plate 174, around legs 178, to ring 185. Accordingly, the scree 1 -183 is positioned in the air flow path of air exiting the cyclone chamber and entering the vortex finder 144. It will be appreciated that in alternate embodiments, the shroud may )e any other suitable configuration. For example, a plate 174 need not be provided. End 119 may be covered by screen 183. Screen 183 may be made of a wire mesh. Alternately, ';h'oud 182 may be a molded plastic covering vortex finder 144 and may have a plurality of :
rpsrtures therein.
The dirt collection chamber may be internal or ext ;real to the cyclone chamber. Preferably, as exemplified, the dirt collection chamber 124 is ;
External. That is, the cyclone 122 may be positioned interior of or adjacent the dirt collection chamber 124. The dirt collection chamber may be in communication with the cyclone ct arnber by any means known in the art. Accordingly, one or more dirt outlets may be provide 1.

In the exemplified embodiment, the cyclone chamber ic, positioned internal of the dirt collection chamber 124. Accordingly, the cyclone chamber s provided with a dirt outlet 146. Dirt outlet 146 may be of various designs provided access is provided to access shroud 182. Preferably as exemplified, dirt outlet 146 faces the air c it et and according in the exemplified design, is at the front 196 of the cyclone 122, and furl nor, is at the front end 108 of the cleaner 100.

Preferably, as in the example shown, dirt collection cli ariber 124 comprises two portions. A first portion 148 is provided immediately adjacent the dirt outlet 146, and is at the front end 108 of the cleaner 100. A second portion 150 is cone ar,tric with the cyclone 122. A lower portion 152 of the second portion 150 is below the cy,;lcne. As exemplified, nozzle 112 may be positioned below first portion 148, and lower porti sn 152.
Accordingly, dirt chamber 124 may comprise an annular chamber surrounding the ( yc lone 122.

A separation plate 154 may be provided in the dirt col action chamber 124, adjacent the dirt outlet 146, and in facing relation to the dirt outlet. The separation plate 154 aids in preventing dirt in dirt collection chamber 124 from re-( ntering cyclone 122.
Preferably, plate 154 is spaced from dirt outlet 146. Plate 154 may be mounted by any means to any component in cyclone unit 114. As exemplified, thu : ;eparation plate is preferably mounted to a front wall 158, which is at the front 108 of the cleaner 100 and preferably faces the dirt outlet 146. The separation plate 154 is mou itod to front wall 158 by an arm 156, which preferably extends from front wall 158.

Cyclone unit 114 may be emptied through an opening ' 87, which is covered by a removable door. The door may be removable while the cyclone snit is mounted to the vacuum cleaner. Alternately, or in addition, the door may be remove )le when the cyclone unit has been removed from the vacuum cleaner. The door may be =einovably secured to the cyclone unit or another portion of vacuum cleaner 100 by any me,, n:,. For example, one or more latches 159 may secure the door in position. Alternately, the door may be opened, e.g., pivoted open, and then be removable. For example,.as exemplif sad in Figures 4 to 5B, front wall 158 covers opening 187, and is pivotally mounted to the q clone unit wall 115 at pivots 177. Front wall 158 serves as an openable door 158 of the d rt chamber 124, such that dirt collection chamber 124 is openable, and dirt collection c lmmber 124 may be emptied through opening 187. As shown in Figure 6, pivots 177 a ,e separable into two portions. As exemplified, pivots 177 have an upper recess 199 tt at is semi circular in transverse section and define an axis in which an axle 197 provided on front wall 158 may rotate. When front wall 158 is pivoted to the open position, the axle. 197 may be lifted off the pivots 177 thereby permitting front wall 158 to be lifted off the vac ium cleaner.

The removable door is preferably provided at the front c f t he vacuum cleaner, or on a surface that does not face another component of the vacuun, cleaner.
Accordingly, the dirt collection chamber is openable both when the dirt collection c hamber is mounted to the hand vacuum cleaner, or when it is removed. When door V ;B is pivoted away or i i removed from the remainder of the cyclone unit 114, separation pl. ità 154 and arm 156 also pivot away from the remainder of the cyclone unit.

The rear portion of the dirt collection chamber 124 may t e closed by wall 179 Preferably, as shown in Figures 4 to 58, the shroi d 182 is removably mounted to the cyclone 122, and is removable through opening 187 avhen the door 158 is open. The shroud 182 may be removably mounted in any manner, tco any portion of the cleaner 100. For example, the ring 185 of the shroud 182 may fri(:tionally mount to the vortex finder 144. Alternately, the ring 185 of the shroud may be me astable to wall 179 or vortex finder 144 by a bayonet mount- Alternately, the ring 185 c f the shroud may be provided with screw threads that screw into screw threads on wall 119 :)r vortex finder 144 or magnets may be used to secure the shroud in position.

In an alternate embodiment, dirt collection chamber m; iy be a portion of the cyclone (i.e. internal of the casing defining the cyclone chamber). Ir ,c,uch a case a plate 154 may be provided inside the cyclone chamber to define the dirt cc Iiection chamber 124.
In any event, a door may be provided so as to empty the cyclone at id the shroud may be removable through the door.

Preferably, the cyclone casing 142 is sized to permit a i se;r to insert a hand in the annular portion of cyclone chamber 122 positioned between the , shroud 1.82 and the cyclone casing 142. Accordingly, the user may grip the shroud 182 to remove the shroud 182 from the cyclone 122. Preferably, a portion of shroud 182 is loca ed adjacent dirt outlet 146 such that a user may grasp the shroud without having to insert r iuch of their hand into the cyclone casing.

The clean air exiting cyclone 122 passes through outlo:t 145 of vortex finder 144, exits surface cleaning head 116, and passes into the clean :r body 160.
As the example shown, a cleaner body 160 may be positioned rearward c f I he surface cleaning head 116. The cleaner body may comprise a suction motor housing 1438, which houses an optional pre-motor filter 162, a suction motor 164 and may house in optional post motor filter 166.

In the example shown, suction motor housing 168 furtt er houses a pre-motor filter 162. Pre-motor filter 162 is provided in the airflow path adjac4 .ni and downstream of the vortex finder 144, and facing the outlet 145. Pre-motor filter 102 serves to remove remaining particulate matter from air exiting the cyclone 122, and mad " be any type of filter, such as a foam filter. One or more filters may be used. In the exen plified embodiments, the vacuum cleaner has a linear configuration. If the vacuum clear or- is of a non-linear configuration, then pre-motor filter 162 need not be located adjacent v )rlex finder 144.

Suction motor 164 is provided in the airflow path adjace it and downstream of the pre-motor filter 162. The suction motor 164 may be any type o suction motor. The suction motor draws air into the dirty air inlet 118 of the cleaner 15), through the airflow path past the suction motor 164, and out of the clean air outlet 120. 1 ho suction motor 164 has a motor axis 165. In the example shown, the motor axis 165 anc the cyclone axis 123 preferably extend in the same direction and are preferably genf rally parallel. In the exemplified embodiments, the vacuum cleaner has a linear configu =a-:ion. If the vacuum cleaner is of a non-linear configuration, then motor 164 need not be lo,,ated adjacent pre-motor filter 162.

The cleaner body 160 further comprises a post-motor I Itur housing 170. A
post motor filter 166 is provided in the post-motor filter housing 170. The post-motor filter 166 is provided in the airflow path downstream of, and preferably adjacent, the suction motor 164. Post motor filter 166 serves to remove remaining partir elate matter from air exiting the cleaner 100. Post-motor filter 166 may be any type of fi ter, such as a HEPA
filter. If the vacuum cleaner is of a non-linear configuration, then post rriotor filter 166 need not be located adjacent suction motor 164.

Clean air outlet 120 is provided downstream of post-m Dtur filter 166. Clean air outlet 120 may comprise a plurality of apertures formed in housing 170.

Referring to Figure 7B, the dirt collection chambr r 124 is preferably removable from the hand vacuum cleaner 100 and, more preferabl ' as a sealed unit for emptying. In the example shown, the cyclone unit 114 compris s the dirt collection chamber 124. Accordingly, the cyclone unit 114 is removable fn,rr the hand vacuum cleaner, and the dirt collection chamber 124 is removably from the i nd vacuum cleaner 100 with the cyclone unit 114. As the cyclone unit 114 is integra with nozzle 112 and airflow chamber 136, nozzle 112 and airflow chamber 136 are remo' Kahle from the cleaner 100 with cyclone unit 114. In the exemplified embodiment, the cyclone unit 114 is removably mounted to the suction motor housing 168.

As can be seen in Figure 713, when the cyclone unit 11, i;; removed from the hand vacuum cleaner, and particularly from motor housing 168, it is t ;e.aled, except for the fluid flow passages leading to and from the first cyclone unit (i.e. of erring 138 and outlet 145). That is, wall 179 and front wall 158 seal the cyclone unit 114. In order to empty the dirt collection chamber 124, the front wall 158 may be removed, arid the dirt may be emptied from dirt chamber 124.

As exemplified, in order to remove cyclone unit 114 frog i the surface cleaning apparatus, the cyclone unit comprises a first mounting member 173, and the suction motor housing 168 has a second mounting member 175. The first 173 and 5e cond 175 mounting members are releasably engageable with each other. In the exampl : ;shown, the first 173 and second 175 mounting members comprise a bayonet mount. In a, to =nate examples, the first and second mounting members may be another type of mount ng member, such as mating screw threads, magnets, mechanical members such as scree s or any other type of mounting members.

One or more rear wheels 180 may be mounted to how ing 161, preferably at lower portion 106, and may be used in conjunction with wheels 13!i.
Preferably, a single rear wheel 180 is provided. Preferably, rear wheel 180 is located c n a centre line of the vacuum cleaner and rearward of the depending wall 128.

In an alternate embodiment (not shown), the surface cl -aning apparatus may further comprise a second cyclone unit. The second cyclone unit may comprise one or more cyclones. The cyclones may be arranged in series or in paralle. The second cyclone unit may be mounted in motor housing 168, or in a separate housinc. The second cyclone unit may be removably mounted to the first cyclone unit 114, or to the motor housing 168.

Claims (22)

1. A surface cleaning apparatus comprising:
(a) a front end and a rear end:
(b) an air flow passage extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet;
(c) a first cyclone unit positioned in the air flow passage, the first cyclone unit comprising at least one cyclone and at least one dirt collection chamber, the at least one cyclone having a cyclone air inlet, a cyclone air outlet, and a removably mounted shroud surrounding the cyclone air outlet, the at le,, at one dirt collection chamber comprising an opening and an openable door mounted in the opening, the shroud is removable through the opening when the door is open and, (d) a suction motor positioned in the air flow passage.
2. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the dirt collection chamber is external to the cyclone.
3. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 2 wherein the at least one cyclone further comprises a dirt outlet, the opening is provided in the at least one dirt collection chamber and the openable door is mounted facing the dirt outlet.
4. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-3 wherein a vortex finder is provided in the cyclone, and the shroud comprises a screen surrounding the vortex finder.
5. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-4 wherein the door is removable.
6. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-5 wherein the door is openable when the first cyclone unit is mounted to the surface cleaning apparatus
7. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-6 wherein the at least one cyclone is positioned interior of the at least one dirt collection chamber and the at least one cyclone is defined by a cyclone casing that is sized to permit a user to insert a hand in an annular portion of the cyclone chamber positioned between the shroud and the cyclone casing.
8. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-7 wherein he surface cleaning apparatus comprises a hand vacuum cleaner and the door is positioned at the front and,
9. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-8 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus comprises a hand vacuum cleaner and the first cyclone unit is positioned forward of the suction motor.
10. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-9 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus comprises a hand vacuum cleaner, the at least one cyclone has a cyclone front end, and a cyclone rear end, and the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are at the same end.
11. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 10 wherein the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are at the cyclone rear end.
12. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-7 wherein the at least one cyclone has a first end, and a second end, and the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are at the same end.
13. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 10-12 wherein a separation plate is mounted in facing relation to the dirt outlet.
14. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 10-12 wherein he surface cleaning apparatus comprises a hand vacuum cleaner, the cyclone has separation plate that is mounted in facing relation to the dirt outlet and the dirt outlet is positioned at the cyclone front end and the cyclone front end is positioned at the front end of the hand vacuum cleaner.
15. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 13-14 wherein the separation plate is mounted to the door.
16. The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-15 wherein the dirt collection chamber is removable from the surface cleaning apparatus as a sealed unit for emptying.
17.The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-16 wherein the dirt collection chamber is removable from the surface cleaning apparatus with the first cyclone unit.
18.The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1 -17 wherein he shroud has a dirt outlet end and the dirt outlet end is positioned proximate the dirt outlet.
19.The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-18 wherein the first cyclone unit has a single cyclone and a single dirt collection chamber.
20, The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-19 further comprising a suction motor housing, the suction motor is positioned in the suction motor housing and the first cyclone unit is removably mounted to the suction motor housing.
21.The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-20 further comprising a second cyclone unit downstream from the first cyclone unit.
22.The surface cleaning apparatus of any of claims 1-7, 11-13 and 15-21 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus is a hand vacuum cleaner.
CA 2658046 2009-03-11 2009-03-11 Surface cleaning apparatus Abandoned CA2658046A1 (en)

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US12720584 US20100229325A1 (en) 2009-03-11 2010-03-09 Surface cleaning apparatus

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