CA2524595A1 - Portable cleaning machine - Google Patents

Portable cleaning machine Download PDF

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Publication number
CA2524595A1
CA2524595A1 CA 2524595 CA2524595A CA2524595A1 CA 2524595 A1 CA2524595 A1 CA 2524595A1 CA 2524595 CA2524595 CA 2524595 CA 2524595 A CA2524595 A CA 2524595A CA 2524595 A1 CA2524595 A1 CA 2524595A1
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
cleaning
suction hose
suction
handle
suction nozzle
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2524595
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
William G. Alford
Thomas G. Diamond
Douglas E. Gerber
Lon J. Haidet
Timothy T. Hertrick
John A. Leonatti
Adam C. Sclafani
Jackson W. Wegelin
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Techtronic Floor Care Technology Ltd
Original Assignee
Hoover Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US98142004A priority Critical
Priority to US10/981,420 priority
Application filed by Hoover Co filed Critical Hoover Co
Publication of CA2524595A1 publication Critical patent/CA2524595A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/28Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L11/00Machines for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L11/34Machines for treating carpets in position by liquid, foam, or vapour, e.g. by steam
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L11/00Machines for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L11/40Parts or details of machines not provided for in groups A47L11/02 - A47L11/38, or not restricted to one of these groups, e.g. handles, arrangements of switches, skirts, buffers, levers
    • A47L11/4036Parts or details of the surface treating tools
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L11/00Machines for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L11/40Parts or details of machines not provided for in groups A47L11/02 - A47L11/38, or not restricted to one of these groups, e.g. handles, arrangements of switches, skirts, buffers, levers
    • A47L11/408Means for supplying cleaning or surface treating agents
    • A47L11/4086Arrangements for steam generation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/225Convertible suction cleaners, i.e. convertible between different types thereof, e.g. from upright suction cleaners to sledge-type suction cleaners
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/28Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle
    • A47L5/32Suction cleaners with handles and nozzles fixed on the casings, e.g. wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle with means for connecting a hose
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/24Hoses or pipes; Hose or pipe couplings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/24Hoses or pipes; Hose or pipe couplings
    • A47L9/242Hose or pipe couplings
    • A47L9/244Hose or pipe couplings for telescopic or extensible hoses or pipes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/32Handles
    • A47L9/325Handles for wheeled suction cleaners with steering handle

Abstract

The cleaning apparatus includes a base portion for movement along the surface and a handle pivotally connected to the base portion. The handle includes a lower portion and an upper portion pivotally connected to the lower portion with the upper portion being pivoted between an upper position and a lower position. A
recovery container is removably mounted to one of the base portion and the handle. A
suction nozzle is secured to the base portion and in fluid communication with the recovery container. A suction source is in fluid communication with the suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt from the surface through the suction nozzle and into the recovery container. An adjustment mechanism is operatively associated with the handle. The adjustment mechanism adjusts the length of the handle at selected lengths when the handle is at the upper position.

Description

Hoover Case 2759 Patent Application PORTABLE CLEANING MACHINE
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a cleaning machine, and more specifically, to a portable carpet extractor.
to Background Information It is known in the prior art to provide a portable cleaning machine for cleaning surface. It would be desirable to provide such a cleaning machine that can be used for both floor cleaning and above the floor cleaning surfaces such as upholsteries and stairs. Further, it would be convenient to have the cleaning machine be converted from an upright type to a canister type for use in a variety of cleaning applications, such as vehicles, closets or other areas of limited maneuvering space. However, in many of theses cleaning machines, it requires some time and effort to convert the machine from one such cleaning mode or application to another. Often, additional parts such as an accessory hose with a suction nozzle and a conversion valve has to be incorporate in 2 o the cleaning machine so that it can be used to clean both the floor and above the floor cleaning surfaces. Also, it would be desirable to adjust the length of the handle to accommodate users of different heights.
Hence, it is an object of the present invention to provide a versatile cleaning machine that can be easily used by various users to clean various surfaces in a variety of cleaning areas.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The foregoing and other objects of the present invention will be readily apparent from the following description and the attached drawings. fn one aspect of the present invention, a cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface is provided. The cleaning apparatus includes a base portion for movement along the surface and a handle pivotally connected to the base portion. The handle includes a lower portion and an upper portion pivotally connected to the lower portion with the upper portion being pivoted between an upper position and a lower position. A recovery container is removably mounted to one of the base portion and the handle. A suction nozzle is secured to the base portion and in fluid communication with the recovery container. A
suction source is in fluid communication with the suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt from the surface through the suction nozzle and into the recovery container.
to An adjustment mechanism is operatively associated with the handle. The adjustment mechanism adjusts the length of the handle at selected lengths when the handle is at the upper position.
In another aspect of the present invention, a cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface is provided. The cleaning apparatus includes a base portion for movement is along the surface and a handle pivotally connected to the base portion. The handle includes a lower portion and an upper portion movably connected to the lower portion with the upper portion being moved between an upper position and a lower position. A
recovery.container is removably mounted to one of the base portion and the handle. A
suction nozzle is secured to the base portion and in fluid communication with the 2 o recovery container and includes an outlet. A suction source is in fluid communication with the suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt from the surface through the suction nozzle and into the recovery container. A suction hose assembly fluidly communicates the suction nozzle with the recovery container. The suction hose assembly has an upstream end detachably connected to the outlet of the suction 2 ~ nozzle. The upstream end is detached from the suction nozzle for above the floor use.

In still another aspect of the present invention, a cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface is provided. The cleaning apparatus includes a housing and a liquid distribution system mounted at least in part to the housing for dispensing liquid to the surface. The liquid distribution system includes a solution tank removably mounted to the housing for holding the cleaning solution. A recovery tank is removably mounted to the housing. A
suction nozzle is secured to the housing and in fluid communication with the recovery tank and includes an outlet. A suction source is in fluid communication with the suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt and liquid from the surface through the suction nozzle and into the recovery tank. A suction hose assembly fluidly communicates the 1 o suction nozzle with the recovery tank. The suction hose assembly has an upstream end detachably connected to the outlet of the suction nozzle with the upstream end being detached from the suction nozzle for above the floor use. The suction hose assembly is designed and constructed such that its length can be adjusted.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
The invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the attached drawings, of which:
Figure 1 is a front perspective view of the carpet extractor in the upright position according to the present invention;
Figure 2 is an exploded view of the carpet extractor of FIG.1 illustrating the 2 o principal elements thereof;
Figure 3 is an exploded view of the spine of the base assembly and related parts for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 4 is a side sectional view of the of the suction hose assembly vertically taken through the center for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
2 s Figure 5 is an exploded view of the brush assembly and nozzle assembly for the carpet extractor of F1G. 1;
Figure 6 is a bottom view of the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 7 is an exploded view of the recovery tank for the carpet extractor of FIG.
1;
Figure 8 is a right side view of the carpet extractor of FIG. 1 with the upper handle assembly folded down;
Figure 9 is an exploded view of the lower handle body and related parts for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 10 is an exploded view of the solution tank for the carpet extractor of FIG.
1;
Figure 11 is a left side view of the carpet extractor of FIG. 1 with the handle inclined working position for use in the floor cleaning mode;
Figure 12 is an exploded view of the handle switch assembly of the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 13 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuit for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 14 is an exploded view of the upper handle assembly for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1;
Figure 15 is a side sectional view of the of the upper handle assembly vertically 2 o taken through the center for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1 Figure 16 is an enlarge portion of the carpet extractor indicated in FIG. 15;
Figure 17 is top perspective view a portion of the carpet extractor of FIG. 1 with portions cut away illustrating the latching mechanism for the recovery tank and related parts;
2s Figure 18 is a rear perspective of a cutaway portion of the handle assembly for the carpet extractor of FIG. 1 illustrating the release lever and related parts for folding down the upper handle assembly;
Figure 19 is a partial sectional view showing the handle release lever;
Figure 20 is a partial section view taken along line 20-20 of FIG. 1; and s Figure 21 is a perspective view of a portion of the accessory hose assembly in an alternative embodiment.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
Referring FIG. 1, an upright carpet extractor 60 is shown, according to the preferred embodiment of the present invention. The extractor 60 includes a base 1 o assembly 62 that moves along a surface such as a carpet 74. The base assembly 62 includes a frame or housing 66 that houses in part a suction motor/fan assembly 68 with motor cover 70 as depicted in FIG. 2. The lower right portion of the motor cover defines an exhaust manifold cover 72 for exhaust manifold 77 of the working air from the suction motor/fan assembly 68. Further details of the motor/fan assembly 68 are 15 disclosed in U.S. patent 5,500,977, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.
A recovery tank 76 removably mounts upon the right rear portion of the housing 66 and is in fluid communication with the suction motor assembly 68. A handle assembly 64 is pivotally connected to the base assembly 62. A supply tank assembly 52 is removably mounted to the left portion of the handle assembly 64.
2 o A spine 85 is mounted to the housing and partially covers the motor cover 70 of the suction motor assembly. As seen in FIG. 3, the spine is form by left and right half shells 78, 80 mounted to each other by hot welding. The spine half shells 78, 80 also form a recovery duct 82 and an exhaust duct 84 when mounted to each other to form the spine 85. A u-shaped channel 86 is formed on the upper surface of the spine 85 for 25 receiving a suction hose assembly 88. The channel 86 extends from the front portion 90 to the rear portion 92 of the spine 85 and has a generally semicircular shaped cross section.
A solenoid pump 94 is mounted within a pocket of the housing 66 adjacent the left half shelf 78 and fluidly connected to the supply tank assembly 52 for drawing the s cleaning solution through a floor solution hose 96 to floor spray nozzles 98 of a spray nozzle assembly 114 provided on the base assembly 62 or through a solution hose 100 to a spray mechanism 102 (FIG. 4) for a suction hose assembly 88. In particular, a Tee connector 104 is inserted into the tubular outlet port 106 of the pump 94 and retained therein by elastic retaining tabs 108. The Tee 104 includes an outlet 110 fluidly connect to to the floor solution hose 96 for the floor spray nozzles 98 and an outlet 112 fluidly connected to the solution hose 100 (FIG. 2) for the spray mechanism of the suction hose assembly 88. The floor solution hose 96 is fluidly connected to inlet 116 of a spray nozzle assembly 114. The spray nozzle assembly 114 includes rectangularly shaped duct 118, which comprises a front cover portion 120 mounted to a rear plate 15 portion 122. The inlet 116 is integrally formed on the rear plate portion 122 and extends rearwardly. The spray nozzles 98 are attached to the front cover portion 120 and extend forwardly. A solenoid valve 124 is mounted in the housing 66 of the base assembly 62 and fluidly connected between the spray nozzle assembly 114 and floor solution hose 96. The pump 94 can be other suitable types, such as an air turbine 2 o driven type disclosed in the above-mentioned U.S. patent 5,500,977.
A vent cover 133 for the suction motor cooling air is mounted to the left spine half 80 and covers the spine half 80 and pump 94. The vent cover 133 is also positioned just below the solution tank 52 and mates with solution tank 52 when the handle assembly 64 is in the upright position to form with a sleek appearance with the solution 2 s tank 52. The vent cover 133 in combination with the solution tank also forms symmetrical side-by side appearance with the recovery tank 76, when the handle assembly 64 is in the upright position. The spray mechanism 102 is mounted to the underside of distal hose end 126 and operated by a trigger 132 as seen in FIG.
4. The hose end 126 defines a hose connector that comprises a plastic cover 128 sonically s welded to a plastic body 130. The hose connector 126 and trigger 132 are generally formed of a rigid material. The spray mechanism 58 can be any suitable device such as that disclosed in U.S. patent 5,870,798; the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.
A triangular shaped floor suction nozzle 134 is mounted to the front portion 90 of 1 o the spine 85 of the base assembly 62 by any suitable means such as an ultraviolet cured adhesive. As seen in FIG. 5, the floor suction nozzle 134 has a translucent front plate 136 mounted to a translucent rear plate 138. The floor suction nozzle 134 has an inlet 140 formed at its bottom extending across the width of the base assembly 62 as seen in FIG. 6. A brush housing 142 is integrally molded to the rear plate 138 and 15 positioned rearwardly adjacent the suction nozzle 134. The brush housing 142 covers a brush assembly 144, which is also positioned rearwardly adjacent the floor suction nozzle 134. The brush housing 142 can be composed of a translucent material for viewing the brush assembly. As depicted in FIG. 5, the brush assembly 144 includes a horizontal brush roll 146 having a dowel 148 laced with rows of bristle bundles 150 2 o formed in a chevron shaped pattern. Opposite end shafts 152 are molded to the ends of the dowel 148 and extend through thrust bearings 154 and bearings 156, which are rotatably connected to bearing supports 158. The bearing supports 158 are mounted to the brush housing 142. A brush gear pulley 160 is overmolded around the dowel and receives a drive belt 162 extending therearound, which is guided on the gear pulley 25 160 by the belt guide 164. A felt washer 166 is positioned adjacent the belt guide 164 to seal the belt guide 164 and gear pulley 160. A laterally extending .belt guard 168 covers the bushing support 158 and belt 162 to protect the belt 162 and prevent the belt 162 from touching the carpet 74. The belt guard 168 includes a row of bristle bundles 170 extending downwardly for scrubbing the surface 74. The belt 162 also extends around a pinion gear 174 connected to a shaft 176 of a brush motor 172. The brush motor 172 is mounted in a front pocket 178 of the housing 66 and covered by a brush motor cover 180 as seen in FIG. 2. Energizing the brush motor 172 rotates the pinion gear 174, which rotates the drive belt 162 and, in turn, the brush roll 146 for scrubbing the cleaning surface. Alternatively, a vertical axis brush assembly with rotating gear 1 o brushes or any other type of agitator can be used instead of the brush roll.
The floor suction nozzle 134 includes an upper sleeve portion 182 (FIG. 5) defining an outlet that selectively receives the distal hose end 126 of the suction hose assembly 88. In orderto releasably retain the hose end 126 to the upper sleeve portion 182 of the floor suction nozzle 134, a retaining nub 184 (FIG. 5) formed on the hose end 126 resiliently engages a through hole 186 of a resilient thumb tab 188 integrally formed on the upper sleeve portion 182. The hose end 126 is released from the sleeve portion 182 by pushing upwardly on the raised end portion 190 of the tab 180 a sufficient distance to disengage the hole 190 from the nub 184. The proximal hose end 192 defines an outlet 194 and is fluidly connected to a recovery duct 82 (FIG.
2) formed 2 o in the spine housing. The recovery duct 82 is in fluid communication with the recovery Referring to FIG. 20, the suction hose assembly 88 has a suction hose 196 that is formed from a helically coiled support member 198 such as a steel wire, and an extruded or helically wound outer jacket 200 formed from a suitable flexible material, such as vinyl. This arrangement allows the outer jacket 200 to move as the support 2s member 198 is extended and contracted, forming a stretch hose in which the length of s the hose can be adjusted. One example of this type of stretch hose is shown in U.S.
patent 3,486,532, which is hereby incorporated by reference. Although a steel wire and vinyl type stretch hose is preferred, a one-piece corrugated hose member could be used as shown in U.S. patents 3,572,393 and 5,395,278, which are hereby incorporated by reference. The solution tube 100 is placed inside the suction hose 196 in a helical coifed arrangement in order to allow it to extend and retract in response to the suction hose 196 extending and refracting to the desired length. It is preferred to use an outward convoluting suction hose 196, in which the support member 198 defines the inner diameter of the suction hose 196, while the excess outer jacket material is to displaced outwardly in the form a ring 197 from the support member 198 when the suction hose 196 is retracted. It is also preferred to orient the helical coils of the solution tube 100 opposite the orientation of the helically coiled support member 198.
Additionally, it is preferred that the solution tube 100 is not bonded to the outer jacket 200 of the suction hose 196 and is significantly shorter in straightened length than the straightened length of the helically coiled support member 198, to facilitate priming with cleaning solution. The solution tube 100 enters and leaves the suction hose 196 parallel to the longitudinal axis of the suction hose 196.
Alternatively, the solution tube 100 enters and leaves the suction hose 196 at a cuff member 199 tangentially to reduce clogging in the suction hose 196 as depicted in FIG.
21. The 2 o solution tube 100 may or may not be bonded to the suction hose 196. As depicted in FIG. 2, a hose grip collar 202 for gripping is mounted around the suction hose 196 just above the hose end 126. The collar 202 includes indentations 204 to aid in gripping the collar 202 and to minimize slippage of the hand of a user off the collar 202.
Referring to FIG. 7, the recovery tank 76 comprises right and left side halves 206, 208 welded together to define a bottom wall 210, an upstanding convexly curved right sidewall 220, and a left sidewall 222 opposite the right sidewall 220.
The recovery tank 80 includes lid assembly 256 covering its open top. An inverted cup shaped handle 224 is attached to the upper end of a recessed area 226 formed in the right sidewall 220 for grasping the recovery tank 76. Formed in lower portion of the left sidewali 222 of the recovery tank 76 is a recess 228, which covers a complimentary portion of the suction motor assembly 68 when the recovery tank 76 is mounted upon the housing 66. A pair of vertical flexible support plates or feet 230 depends downwardly from the bottom wall 210 of the recovery tank 76 and rest upon the manifold cover 72, which also functions to support the recovery tank 76, when it is 1 o mounted thereon. The feet 230 flex to absorb much of the impact force from the recovery tank 76 striking the manifold cover 72 or other object, thereby minimizing breakage of the recovery tank 76. Locating ribs 232 are integrally molded on the manifold cover 72 and cooperate with the feet 230 to substantially minimize front and rear movement of the recovery tank 76. The housing 66 includes an upstanding right is wall 234 that has an upper lip portion 236 extending above the manifold cover 72 that retains the lower portion of the recovery tank 76.
Referring to FIG. 15, the recovery tank lid assembly 256 has a generally inverted u-shaped body 258. The body 258 includes a right wall 260 that includes a downwardly extending tang 262 integrally molded to the bottom end 264 of the right waf I
260. The 2 o body 258 further includes a left wall 266 having a bottom end 268. A
rectangular shaped cut out portion 270 is formed in the center of the bottom end 268. An upper manifold 272 is mounted within the body 258 and comprises an inlet chamber 274 and outlet chamber 276, which is located forwardly adjacent the inlet chamber 274 at the front end 278 of the recovery tank 76. The inlet chamber 274 has an inlet port 2s (FIG. 2) that is in fluid communication with the outlet 284 (FIG. 3) of the recovery duct 304, when the recovery tank 80 is mounted to the handle assembly 62. The outlet chamber 276 has a side exit opening 282 from the recovery tank 76 in fluid communication with inlet 286 (FIG. 2) of the exhaust duct 84. A separator 288 is mounted to the underside of the manifold 272 and has an open top portion in fluid communication with the inlet chamber 274. A pair of rope seals 290, 292 is sandwiched between the separator 288 and manifold 272. Another rope seal 294 is secured to the lid assembly 256 to seal it with the top of the recovery tank 76, when the lid assembly 256 covers the recovery tank 76. The separator 288 includes a bottom wall 296 and an upstanding sidewall 298. An inner raised baffle portion 283, integrally formed with the 1 o bottom wall 374 and sidewall 298, extends to the center of the separator 288. A cut out portion in the right side of the sidewall 298 defines an outlet 300 of the separator 288.
A vertical groove 302 is formed on the right sidewall 220 for receiving a vertical baffle plate 304 attached to the inferior of the right sidewall 220 of the recovery tank 76 to guide the lid 256 to its proper mounting position on the top of the recovery tank 76;
In operation, when the extractor 60 is operated in the floor cleaning mode, working air, including entrained fluid and dirt, is drawn into the floor suction nozzle assembly 134, through the suction hose 196, recovery duct 82 and to the lid assembly 256 of the recovery tank 76. The recovered soiled liquid laden air enters the inlet port 280 of the inlet chamber 274 and is directed down to a channel 306 of the separator 2 0 368. The channel 306 is formed by the baffle portion 283, the bottom wall 296, and sidewall 298 of the separator 288. Side 308 of the baffle portion 283 opposite the rear portion of the sidewall 298 slopes upwardly and away therefrom to provide more area for the liquid to flow down to the channel 306 thereby slowing it down and aiding air/water separation. The liquid collects and flows through the channel 306 around the 2 s baffle portion 283 until it exits out the outlet 300 of the separator 288 and down to the bottom wall 210 of the recovery tank 76.
Near the forward end of the outlet is a barrier wall 310 formed between the baffle portion 283 and sidewall 298 of the separator 288. The barrier wall 310 and the vertical baffle plate 304 deflect any liquid away from the outlet chamber 276 and prevent the s liquid from entering the outlet chamber 276 and into the motor area. This serves to prevent the establishment of a "short circuited" working airflow from the outlet 300 of the separator 288 directly to outlet chamber 276. The deflection of the air from the baffles and walls and the re-circulation of the stream facilitate separation of the liquid from the air, due to the slowing of the stream, thereby allowing more time for the air to separate 1 o from the liquid. Further, when the stream of air is forced to turn, the relatively lighter air is able to negotiate the turn, where as the heavier liquid does not, thereby causing further separation. The working air separated from the liquid flows through the outlet chamber through inlet 286 of the exhaust duct 84 in fluid communication with the exit opening 282 of the outlet chamber 276. A seal or gasket 312 (FIG. 3) is provided 1s between the ducts 82, 84 and manifold 272. A plastic screen 314, attached to the seal 406, covers the inlet 286 of the exhaust duct 84 to filter out small particles in the air stream.
After traveling through the exhaust duct 84, the working air then travels through standpipe 316, and conduit 318 of vacuum manifold 320 (FlG. 6) to the eye of the fan 20 322 (FIG. 2) of the suction motor 324 of the suction motor assembly 66, which generates the suction to draw the air to the fan 322. As indicated by the arrows depicted in FIG. 2, the working air flows out of the eye of the motor fan 408 into exhaust manifold 77. The exhaust manifold 77 is formed by the housing or frame 83 and motor cover 70, and an upstanding side wall 326, which extends forwardly, terminating 2 5 adjacent the brush assembly 144. The working airflow is directed by the sidewall 326 to exhaust vent openings 328 (FIG.6) formed in the bottom of the housing 66 at the front end of the exhaust manifold 77. The exhaust manifold 77 and exhaust vent openings constrict the flow of air thereby increasing its temperature by transforming kinetic energy produced by the working fan into internal energy or heat, which is transferred to the warm, moist, separated exhaust air. Thus, additional heat is provided to the cleaning path. A gasket 329 is sandwiched between the manifold cover 70 and sidewall 326 to seal the exhaust manifold 77.
As depicted in FIG. 7, a float assembly 330 is mounted to the separator 288 to choke the flow of working air when the recovery tank 76 is full. The float assembly 330 1 o comprises a bottom float portion 332 connected to an elongated arm 334, which has a circular seal 336. The seal 336 is positioned in a cage 338, which is snap mounted to the top mounting flange 340 of the separator, and depends downwardly from entrance opening 342 of the outlet chamber 276.
When the Liquid level in the recovery tank 80 is not contacting the float portion 332, the air flows through the entrance opening 342 and to the motor air. As the liquid level in the recovery tank 76 rises after contacting the float portion 332, the float portion 332 and seal 336 move upward until the seal 336 closes the entrance opening 342, when the liquid rises to a predetermine level indicative of a full tank. In this position, the seal 336 chokes off the flow of working air through the recovery tank 76 and prevents 2 o the liquid from entering the motor area. The spaced apart distance between the float portion 332 and seal 336 prevents liquid from traveling to the seal 336 and entering the motor area due to, for example, sloshing of the liquid in the recovery tank 76 caused by moving the extractor 60 back and forth over the cleaning surface 74.
The lid assembly 256 is secured to the recovery tank 53 by lid locking tabs 2 s and the integrally molded locking tang 262. In particular, the lid locking tabs 344 are hingedly snap connected to the left side of the lid 256 and have two smaller slots 346 for securely receiving locking projections 348 (FIG. 2) projecting from the recovery tank 53 by a snap connection. The locking tang 262 engages a groove 350 formed on the inner side of the right wall 220 of the recovery tank 76. To unlock and remove the lid s assembly 256 from the recovery tank 76 to, for example, empty the recovered liquid from the recovery tank 76, a user first lifts the lid locking tabs 344 outward to disengage the slots 346 from the locking tabs 344 and thus unlock the lid assembly 256 from the recovery tank 53. The lid assembly 256 is then manipulated to disengage the tang 262 from the groove 350 and then lifted and removed from the recovery tank 76.
to As depicted in FIG. 3, a latching mechanism 238 mounted to the right spine half 80 latches the recovery tank 76 to the right spine half 80, yet allows the recovery tank 76 to be lifted off the base assembly 62 and removed therefrom. In particular, the latch mechanism 238 includes a laterally extending latch body 240 having a shaft 248 pivotally mounted in a channel formed in a retainer 244, which mounts the latch 15 mechanism 238 to the upper portion of the right spine half 80 as depicted in FIG. 17.
Torsions springs 246 are inserted around the opposite ends of the shaft 248.
Each of the torsion springs 246 has an upper horizontal leg 243 that bears against the underside of the latch body 240 and a lower vertical leg 245 that bears against a lateral support plate 249, attached to the right spine half 80, to bias the latch body 2 o upwardly as depicted in FIG. 17. The latch body 240 includes a nose 250 having an upwardly sloped beveled top side 252. A notch 254 is formed between the nose and shaft 248.
To removably mount the recovery tank 76 to the right portion of the base assembly 62, the recovery tank 76 is positioned upon the exhaust manifold cover 72 2 s and inside the upper lip 236 with the feet 230 placed outside the locating ribs 232 as seen in FIG. 8. The recovery tank 76 is then pivoted towards the spine until the portion 352 of the bottom end 268 at the cut out portion 270 of the left wall 266 cams against the top side 252 of the nose 250 of the latch body 240 urging the latch body downwardly until the portion 352 of the bottom end 268 of the left wall engages the notch 254 as seen in FIG. 17. The notch 254 and upper lip 236 prevent the recovery tank 76 from being removed from the lateral right and left side direction, and the cutout portion 270 fits over the front and rear ends of the latch body 240 to prevent the recovery tank 7c~ from being removed from the lateral forward and rearward direction.
To remove the recovery tank 76, a user grasp the handle 224 and lifts it upwardly until 1 o the portion 352 of the bottom end 268 disengages from the notch 254.
As seen in FIG. 1, the handle assembly 64 includes an upper handle assembly 354 pivotally connected to a lower handle body 356. Referring to FIG. 9, the lower handle body 356 comprises a front shell 358 mounted to a rear shell 360. The rear shell 360 includes lower extensions 3628, 362L on opposite sides of the rear shell 360 z5 that each has an inwardly extending projection 364. The projection 364 for the right lower extension 3628 is only shown and will only be described, since the projection 364 for the left lower extension 362L is similar in structure and function. A stop member 366 with a front notch 368 is integrally molded to the projection 364 and extends inwardly.
The projections 364 are rotatably received in their respective arcuate cutout portions 2 0 3708, 370L on the housing 66 to allow pivotal movement of the handle assembly 64.
Brackets 3728, 372L are mounted on the housing 66 over the projections 364 to secure the handle assembly 64 to the base assembly 62. Two laterally displaced wheels 3748, 374L are rotatably connected via axles 376 to the lower extensions and rear of the housing 64 to support the base assembly 62 for movement along the cleaning 25 surface 74. The wheel axles 376 extend through the projections 364 at approximately 1 /8 of an inch rearward of the axis of the axle 376. E-clips 378 are secured around the axles 376 to prevent their removal. Upper and lower cord holders 379, 381 are mounted to the rear of the rear shell for storage of the electrical cord of the extractor 60.
The front shell 358 includes a curved carry handle 380 mounted to the top s portion for carrying the extractor unit 60. A reservoir assembly 382 is connected to lower support member 359 of the front shell 358. The reservoir assembly 382 comprises a top cover 498 with an upstanding peripheral wall 500 surrounding an opening 502. The cover 498 is mounted on a bottom plate 494 having a pin 496 extending through the opening 502. A retaining wall assembly 384, which retains the 1 o solution tank 52 thereon, surrounds the reservoir assembly 382. Captured between the front and rear shells 358, 360 is a power switch assembly 386. The power switch assembly 386 is electrically connected to the suction motor assembly 68 and power supply 388 (FIG. 13) and thus, is used to turn on and off the suction motor 324 of the suction motor assembly 68. The switch assembly 386 includes a mounting plate 15 and a circuit breaker 402 secured to the mounting plate 400. The circuit breaker includes a reset button 404 extending up through an opening in the top of the mounting plate 400. Guide channel 406 formed on the mounting plate 400 slidably receives a switch lever 408. The lever 408 has a flap 410 extending over the reset button 404 of the circuit breaker 402. A switch button 412 from a switch body 414 extends through an 2 o aperture 416700 in the lever 408 and aperture 418 in the mounting plate 400. A slide button 420 located on the exterior side of the lower handle body 356 snap fits into a second aperture 422 formed in the lever 408.
Thus, movement of the slide button 420 longitudinally with respect to the handle assembly 64 will correspondingly move the switch button 412 longitudinally turning it on 2s and off, and also reset the circuit breaker 402 for the agitator motor 172 when slid down. Thus, when the slide button 420 is slid up to the on position, the suction motor 324 in the motor/fan assembly 68 is energized, and when the slide button 420 is slid down to the off position, the suction motor 324 is denergized and the flap 410 engages the reset button 404, resetting the circuit breaker 402 when tripped.
s As seen in FIG. 8, an accessory tool holder 422 is mounted to the right side of the lower handle body 356 and receives an accessory tool 424 for storage. The accessory tool 424 comprises a suction nozzle 426 and brush 428 (FIG. 6) with a similar mounting arrangement as that of the floor suction nozzle 134. In particular as seen in FIG. 9, a resilient thumb tab 430 with through hole 432 is integrally formed on outlet 434 of the tool 424 and engages the nub 184 of the hose end 126 when mounted. The hose end 126 is released from the outlet 434 by pushing upwardly on the raised end portion 436 of the tab 430 a sufficient distance to disengage the hole 432 from the nub 184. As depicted in FIGS. 8 and 9, the lower handle body 356 has a middle leg portion 357 that is offset from the spine 85 at the left portion of the base assembly 62 to allow the suction hose assembly 88 to be easily accessed, removed, and mounted on the spine 85 by the user. Such a cutout portion 359 further provides sufficient room for the suction hose assembly 88 to maneuver.
The solution tank 52 is removably mounted on the reservoir assembly 382 with its rear side forwardly adjacent the leg portion 357 of the lower handle body 356 and 2 o retained thereon by the retaining wall assembly 384. As seen in FIG. 10, the solution tank 52 comprises right and left side halves 4388, 438L mounted together and bonded with ultraviolet cured adhesive to define a bottom wall 440, an upstanding convexly curved left sidewall 442, and a right sidewall 444 opposite the left sidewall 442. An inverted cup shaped handle 490 is attached to the upper end of a recessed area 2 5 formed in the left sidewall 442 for grasping the solution tank 52. Pin 496 (FIG. 9) acts to open solution tank valve 506 of the solution tank 52 as tank 52 is placed upon the reservoir assembly 382 and secured in place. The solution tank valve 506 is removably mounted into bottom wall 508 of the solution tank 52. The solution tank valve comprising valve seat 510 having an elongate plunger 512 extending coaxiafiy upward therethrough. The plunger 512 has an outside diameter less than the inside diameter of valve seat 510. The plunger 512 is provided with at least four flutes 514 to maintain alignment of plunger 512 within valve seat 510 as plunger 512 axially translates therein and permits the passage of fluid therethrough when plunger 512 is in the open position.
An open frame housing 518 is located atop valve seat 510 having a vertically 2o extending bore 516 slidingly receiving therein the upper shank portion of plunger 512.
An elastomeric circumferential upper seal 520 circumscribes plunger 512 for sealingly engaging valve seat 510. Seal 520 is urged against valve seat 510 by action of compression spring 522. Spring 522 circumscribes plunger 512 and is positioned between housing 518 and seal 520. A lower seal 521 is position around the outlet of the housing 518. Solution tank valve 506 is normally in the closed position.
However, as solution tank 52 is placed upon reservoir assembly 382 of handle assembly 64, pin 496 aligns with plunger 512 and with the weight of the solution tank 52 forces plunger 576 upward, compressing spring 522 and opening valve seat 510 permitting cleaning solution to flow from solution tank 52 into reservoir assembly 382. Upon removal of 2 o solution tank 52 from reservoir assembly 382, the energy stored within compression spring 522 closes valve seat 510. A threaded cap 524 is threadily secured on a boss 526 (FIG. 9), integrally molded on the bottom wall 504, to removably mount the solution tank valve 506 to the bottom wall 504 of the solution tank 52. A check valve 528 in the form of an elastomeric umbrella valve is provided in the solution tank 52 near the top portion to assure that the ambient pressure within tank 52 remains equal to atmospheric, as cleaning solution is drawn from tank 52.
As seen in FIG. 2, a handle release pedal mechanism 530 allows the handle to pivot down to the working position (shown in FIG. 11 ). The pedal mechanism includes a rear pedal portion 532 integrally molded to a u-shaped pivot member 534. A
front s spring leg 536 is integrally molded to the pivot member 534 and bears against the housing 66 to bias the pivot member 534 upwardly. When the handle assembly 64 is in the upright position, the pivot member 534 engages the notches 368 in the stop members 366, which prevents the handle assembly 64 from pivoting. To place the handle assembly 64 in the working position, a user depresses the pedal portion 532 a 1 o sufficient distance to disengage the pivot member 534 from the notches 368 and then pivots the handle assembly 64 down to the working position. Also, in the upright position a forwardly extending projection 538 (FIG. 9) on the front shell 358 of the handle assembly 64 extends into a notch 540 (FIG. 7) formed on the rear side of the recovery tank 76, thereby preventing its removal. Pivoting the handle assembly 64 back is about twenty degrees disengages the projection 538 from the notch 540 to allow the removal of the recovery tank 76 as seen in FIG. 8.
A handle switch assembly 542 (FIG. 2) is mounted to the base assembly 62 for turning off the brush assembly 144, when the handle assembly 62 pivots in the upright position, and for turning back on the brush assembly 144 when the handle assembly 64 2 o pivots in the inclined working position. In particular, as depicted in FIG. 12, the handle switch assembly 542 includes a base portion 544 having clips 546 that retain a microswitch 548 mounted thereon. The microswitch 548 includes a lever 550 that extends over a spring-loaded pushbutton 552. A spring-loaded actuator rod 554 is received in a recess 556 formed in the base portion 544 and biased upwardly by a 2 s coiled spring 558 provided between the base portion 544 and rod 554. A
projection 560 is attached to the outer surface of the rod 554 and includes an outwardly and upwardly beveled bottom side 562. A switch cover 564 is mounted to the base portion 544 and includes a through hole 566 in which the rod 554 extends therethrough. When the handle assembly 64 is moved to the upright position, the underside of the bottom plate s 494 of the reservoir assembly 382 engages the rod 554 and pushes it downward so that the beveled bottom side 562 of the projection 560 cams against the lever arm 554, causing it to depress the push button 552 of the microswitch 548. With the push button 552 depressed, the electrical circuit (FIG. 13) between the brush motor 172 and power source 388 is broken, which deenergizes the brush motor 172, thereby stopping any 1 o rotation of the brush assembly 144.
When the handle assembly 64 pivots down about twenty degrees from vertical, the underside of the bottom plate 494 of the reservoir assembly 382 disengages from the rod 554, thereby allowing the rod 554 to move upwardly from the biasing force of the spring 558 as seen in FIG. 11. This causes the projection 560 to disengage from 15 the lever arm 550 and thus allows the push button 552 to extend. With the push button 552 extended, the electrical circuit between the brush motor 172 and power source 388 is closed as seen in FIG. 13, which engergizes the brush motor 172, thereby causing rotation of the brush assembly 144, if the power switch 388 is also turned on.
Alternatively, the handle switch assembly 542 can be mounted to the handle assembly 20 64. As seen in FIG. 13, the circuit breaker 402 is electrically coupled to the agitator motor 172 for turning off the agitator motor 172 when the current exceeds a certain value as in the case of a jammed agitator. A bridge rectifier 568 is electrically coupled between the handle switch assembly 542 and agitator motor 172 to convert the alternating current info a direct current for operating the agitator motor 172.
25 Referring to FIG. 14, the upper handle assembly 354 includes a telescoping arrangement that comprises an inner upper tube 570 inserted into an outer lower tube 572. The upper tube 570 has a series of longitudinally spaced detents 574 that correspond to various lengths of the upper handle assembly 354 at which the upper and lower tubes are locked together. In particular, an elastic grip collar 576 with grip s recesses 578 is wrapped around the intersection ofthe upper and lower tubes 570, 572.
As depicted in FIG. 16, the collar 576 includes a pin 580 that extends through a slot 582 (FIG. 14) in the lower tube 572. The pin 580 has one end integrally molded to the inner side of the collar 576 and the other end engaging a pocket 584 of a slid block or clutch 586. The slide block 586 is slidably mounted to the upper tube 570 and is biased to downwardly by a coiled spring 588. A roller pin 590 is located between the tubes. In the rest position in which no upward force is applied to the collar 576, the slide block 586 includes a lower end 592 portion that the covers the pin 590, which is seated in one of the detents 574, and prevents the pin 590 from disengaging from the decent 574, thereby locking the upper tube 570 to the lower tube 572.
15 To adjust the length of the upper handle assembly 354, a user grasps the collar 576 and slides it upwardly (using sufficient force to overcome the biasing force of the spring 588) which in turn slides the slide block 586 upwardly. The user slides the collar 576 upwardly a distance in which the slide block 586 no longer covers the roller pin 588 so that the roller pin 588 is now free to move out of the detent 574, thereby unlocking 2 o the upper tube 570 from the lower tube 572. With the slide block 586 in this position, the user then slides the upper tube 570 at a desired position corresponding to one of the selected detents 574. The user then releases the upward force on the collar 476, which causes the spring 588 to urge the slide block 586 down such that the lower end portion 592 of the slide block 586 engages the roller pin 590 and seats it into the 25 selected detent, thereby locking the upper tube 570 to the lower tube 572.
Another coiled spring 588 is attached between the collar 476 and the lower tube 572 on the other side of the lower tube 572 to balance the biasing force on the collar 576. Each of the tubes has bushings 594, 596 to allow them to slide with ease.
The upper handle assembly 354 pivots or folds down behind the lower handle body 356 for storage or if desired, when the extractor unit is used for above the floor cleaning as seen in FIG. 8. Specifically as seen in FIG. 18, a release lever 598 is used to releasably lock the upper handle assembly 354 in the upright position. The release lever 598 includes a shaft 600 pivotally mounted to the lower handle body 356 within a u-shaped cut out portion 602 (FIG. 9) and a locking plate 604 integrally molded to the to shaft 600 and extending rearwardly. The right end 606 (FIG. 9) of the shaft 600 is square shaped and is fixedly received in a complimentary pocket portion 608 (F1G. 9) of a rotating knob 510. The knob 610 includes a central rib 612 for grasping and rotating the knob 610. The lever 598 is biased upwardly to a generally horizontal position by a torsion spring 618 (FIG. 9). As depicted in FIG. 2, the upper handle assembly 354 has 1~ trunnions 6228, 622L at its lower proximal end 626 that are rotatably engage arcuate surfaces 624 in the lower handle body 356.
When the upper handle assembly 354 is in the upright position, the locking plate 604 engages a notch 620 (best seen in FIG. 15) formed on the under side of the lower proximal end 626 of the upper handle assembly 354, thereby locking the upper handle 2 o assembly 354 to the lower handle body 356 and thus, preventing the upper handle assembly 354 from pivoting or folding down. Rotation of the knob 610 in the clock wise direction, causes the lever 598 to pivot down and away from the notch 620, thereby unlocking the upper handle assembly 354 from the lower handle body 356 and allowing the upper handle assembly 354 to pivot down behind the lower handle body 356 as 2 5 shown in FIG 8. Pivoting the upper handle assembly 354 back to the upright position allows the spring 618 (FIG. 9) to urge the locking plate into the notch 620 to lock the upper handle assembly 354 to the lower handle body 356.
The upper handle assembly 354 includes a handgrip 628 that is formed by front and rear portions 630, 632 mounted to each other as seen in FIG. 14. A trigger switch s assembly 630 is mounted within the handgrip 628 for selectively operating the solenoid valve 124 (FIGS. 2 and 13) to deliver cleaning solution to the spray nozzles 98. In particular, the trigger switch assembly 630 includes a trigger 640 pivotally attached within the handgrip 628 at pivot members 634. The pivot members 634 are integrally molded to a trigger support mount 636 and extend rearwardly therefrom. In particular to as depicted in FIG. 15, the pivot members 634 snappingly receive lateral pins 638, integrally molded on opposite sides of the trigger 640.
Integrally molded onto trigger 640 and extending upwardly are two elastic arms 642, one on each lateral side thereof, that bear against the inner side of the front portion 630 of the handgrip 628. Elastic arms 642 produce a biasing force and urge 15 trigger 640 outwardly or downwardly, which places the solenoid shut off valve 124 in the closed position. In particular as depicted in FIG. 16, an arm 644 having an angled end portion 646 extends forwardly and downwardly from the pivot pins 638 of the trigger 640 terminating adjacent a microswitch 648 of the trigger switch 821. The trigger support mount 636, trigger 640, and microswitch 648 are captured within the handgrip 628 of 2 o the upper handle assembly upon the front and rear portions being mounted to each other. A lever arm 650 is connected to the microswitch 648 and extends over a spring-loaded push button on the microswitch 648. When the upper portion of the trigger 640 is positioned downwardly, the angled end portion 646 is spaced from the lever arm 650.
In this position with reference to FIG. 13, the microswitch 648 opens the circuit 2 s between the solenoid shut off valve 124 and the main power source 388, thereby denergizing the solenoid valve 124 and closing it. Upon the operator squeezing the trigger 640, elastic arms 642 yield thereby permitting counterclockwise rotation of trigger 640 about the pivot members 634 as viewed from the left side of the trigger 640. When the upper portion of the trigger 640 is squeezed or depressed, the angled end portion 646 cams against the lever arm 650 such that the lever arm 650 depresses the push button on the microswitch 648. Upon depression of the push button, the microswitch 648 closes the circuit as depicted in FIG. 13 between the solenoid shut off valve 124 and the main power switch assembly 386. If the main power switch assembly 386 is switched on to connect the power source 388 to the solenoid shut off valve 124 and the 1 o trigger 640 is squeeze or depressed, the selected solenoid shut off valve 124 energizes and opens to allow cleaning solution to flow to the spray nozzles 98.
When the carpet extractor 60 is operated in the floor cleaning position as shown in FIG. 11, the suction hose assembly 88 sits in the channel 86 of the spine 85 and the hose end 126 is attached to the outlet of the suction nozzle assembly 134. The upper ZS handle assembly 354 is pivoted up and locked to the lower handle body 356 at one of the detents 574. The handle assembly 64 is pivoted down in the incline working position. A user grasps the handgrip 628 and squeezes the trigger 640 to selectively distribute the cleaning solution on the surface 74. As the user moves the carpet extractor 60 over the cleaning surface 74, the brush assembly 146 scrubs the cleaning 2 o solution into the surface and the soiled cleaning liquid is extracted from the carpet by the floor suction nozzle 134. The liquid and dirt travels through the suction hose assembly 88 into the recovery tank 76 where the liquid is separated by the air and collects on the bottom of the tank 76. A vacuum is created in the recovery tank 76 by the suction motor fan assembly 68 that draws air from the recovery tank 76 and 2 s exhausts the air to the carpeted surface 74.

W hen the carpet extractor 60 is operated in the above the floor cleaning position as seen in FIG. 8, the upper tube 570 is retracted or slidably inserted fully into the lower tube 572 such that the handle is adjusted at its shortest length. The upper handle assembly 354 is then folded or pivoted down behind the lower handle body 572.
The hose end 126 is detached from the outlet of the floor suction nozzle 134 and the accessory cleaning ool 424 is attached to the hose end 126 as seen by the phantom lines. Alternatively, for convenience of use, the hose end 126 could define a suction nozzle that is detachably connected to the floor suction nozzle hose to eliminate the step of attaching a separate accessory too(. Also, other nozzles or accessory tools 1 o such as a crevice toot or a suction nozzle with an attached rotating brush could be attached to the hose 60 instead of the accessory tool 424. The user grasps the hose end 126 and squeezes the hose trigger 132 to selectively distribute the cleaning solution on the surface 74. As the user moves the accessory tool 424 over the cleaning surface, soiled cleaning liquid is scrub into the surface by the brush assembly 428 and extracted from the carpet by the suction nozzle 426 of the accessory cleaning tool 424 and travels through the suction hose assembly 88 into the recovery tank 76 where the liquid is separated by the air and collects on the bottom of the tank 76.
The present invention has been described by way of example using the illustrated embodiment. Upon reviewing the detailed description and the appended 2 o drawings, various modifications and variations of the preferred embodiments will become apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art. All such obvious modifications and variations are intended to be included in the scope of the present invention and of the claims appended hereto.

Claims (28)

1. A cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface comprising:
a) a base portion for movement along the surface;
b) a handle pivotally connected to said base portion, said handle includes a lower portion and an upper portion pivotally connected to said lower portion, said upper portion being pivoted between an upper position and a lower position;
c) a recovery container removably mounted to one of said base portion and said handle;
d) a suction nozzle secured to said base portion and in fluid communication with said recovery container;
e) a suction source in fluid communication with said suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt from the surface through said suction nozzle and into said recovery container; and f) an adjustment mechanism operatively associated with said handle, said adjustment mechanism adjusting the length of said handle at selected lengths when said handle is at said upper position.
2. The cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein said adjustment mechanism includes at least a first portion telescopically connected to a second portion, wherein said first portion is slid with respective to said second portion at selected positions corresponding to various lengths of said handle.
3. The cleaning apparatus of claim 2 wherein said second portion includes a series of longitudinally spaced adjustment detents corresponding to the selected positions.
4. The cleaning apparatus of claim 3 wherein said adjustment mechanism includes a locking member selectively engaging any one of the longitudinally spaced adjustment detents to releasably lock said first portion to said second portion.
5. The cleaning apparatus of claim 1 including a liquid distribution system mounted at least in part to said base portion for dispensing cleaning solution to the surface, said liquid distribution system including a solution tank removably mounted to one of said base portion and said handle for holding the cleaning solution.
6. The cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein said suction nozzle includes an outlet, a suction hose assembly fluidly communicating said suction nozzle with said recovery container, said suction hose assembly having an upstream end detachably connected to said outlet, said upstream end being detached from said suction nozzle for above the floor use.
7. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein said base portion includes a channel formed therein for removably receiving at least a portion of said suction hose assembly.
8. The cleaning apparatus wherein said suction hose assembly is designed and constructed such that its length can be adjusted.
9. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein said suction hose assembly includes a corrugated elastic suction hose.
10. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein said suction hose assembly includes a suction hose composed of a helically coiled support member and a flexible outer jacket.
11. The cleaning apparatus of claim 10 including a liquid distribution system mounted at least in part to said base portion for dispensing cleaning solution to the surface, wherein said suction hose assembly includes a coiled solution tube positioned inside said suction hose and fluidly connected to said liquid distribution system.
12. The cleaning apparatus of claim 11 wherein said support member is wound in a first direction, said solution tube being wound in a second direction opposite said first direction.
13. The cleaning apparatus of claim 11 wherein said solution tube enters said suction hose at a tangential direction with respect to said suction hose.
14. The cleaning apparatus of claim 11 wherein said support member is composed of steel wire and said outer jacket is composed of vinyl.
15. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein said handle includes a cut out portion to allow said suction hose assembly sufficient room to maneuver when said suction hose assembly is detached from said suction nozzle for above the floor use.
16. A cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface comprising:
a) a base portion for movement along the surface;
b) a handle pivotally connected to said base portion, said handle includes a lower portion and an upper portion movably connected to said lower portion, said upper portion being moved between an upper position and a lower position;
c) a recovery container removably mounted to one of said base portion and said handle;
d) a suction nozzle secured to said base portion and in fluid communication with said recovery container, said suction nozzle includes an outlet;
e) a suction source in fluid communication with said suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt from the surface through said suction nozzle and into said recovery container; and f) a suction hose assembly fluidly communicating said suction nozzle with said recovery container, said suction hose assembly having an upstream end detachably connected to said outlet of said suction nozzle, said upstream end being detached from said suction nozzle for above the floor use.
17. The cleaning apparatus of claim 16 wherein said upper portion is pivotally connected to said lower portion, said upper portion being pivoted between said upper position and lower positions.
18. The cleaning apparatus of claim 16 including a liquid distribution system mounted at least in part to said base portion for dispensing cleaning solution to the surface, wherein said suction hose assembly includes a suction hose and a coiled solution tube positioned inside said suction hose and fluidly connected to said liquid distribution system.
19. The cleaning apparatus of claim 18 wherein said suction hose is composed of a helically coiled support member and a flexible outer jacket.
20. The cleaning apparatus of claim 19 wherein said support member is wound in a first direction, said solution tube being wound in a second direction opposite said first direction.6. The cleaning apparatus of claim 5 wherein said second handle includes at least a first portion telescopically connected to a second portion, said first portion telescoping substantially into said second portion to place said handle in said second position.
21. The cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein said handle includes a cut out portion to allow said suction hose assembly sufficient room to maneuver when said suction hose assembly is detached from said suction nozzle for above the floor use.
22. A cleaning apparatus for cleaning a surface comprising:
a) housing;
b) a liquid distribution system mounted at least in part to said housing for dispensing liquid to the surface, said liquid distribution system including a solution tank removably mounted to said housing for holding the cleaning solution.
c) a recovery tank removably mounted to said housing;
d) a suction nozzle secured to said housing and in fluid communication with said recovery tank, said suction nozzle includes an outlet;
e) a suction source in fluid communication with said suction nozzle for generating suction to draw dirt and liquid from the surface through said suction nozzle and into said recovery tank;
f) a suction hose assembly fluidly communicating said suction nozzle with said recovery tank, said suction hose assembly having an upstream end detachably connected to said outlet of said suction nozzle, said upstream end being detached from said suction nozzle for above the floor use;
g) wherein said suction hose assembly is designed and constructed such that its length can be adjusted.
23. The cleaning apparatus of claim 22 wherein said suction hose assembly includes a corrugated elastic suction hose.
24. The cleaning apparatus of claim 22 wherein said suction hose assembly includes a suction hose composed of a helically coiled support member and a flexible outer jacket.
25. The cleaning apparatus of claim 24 wherein said suction hose assembly includes a coiled solution tube positioned inside said suction hose and fluidly connected to said liquid distribution system.
26. The cleaning apparatus of claim 25 wherein said support member is wound in a first direction, said solution tube being wound in a second direction opposite said first direction.
27. The cleaning apparatus of claim 25 wherein said solution tube enters said suction hose at a tangential direction with respect to said suction hose.
28. The cleaning apparatus of claim 25 wherein said support member is composed of steel wire and said outer jacket is composed of vinyl.
CA 2524595 2004-11-04 2005-10-27 Portable cleaning machine Abandoned CA2524595A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

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US10/981,420 2004-11-04

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KR101462952B1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2014-11-20 삼성전자주식회사 A handle assembly rotatable in all directions and a cleaner having the same
WO2009132317A1 (en) * 2008-04-24 2009-10-29 Evolution Robotics Application of localization, positioning & navigation systems for robotic enabled mobile products
US8291546B2 (en) * 2010-09-01 2012-10-23 Techtronic Floor Care Technology Limited Recovery tank for an extractor cleaning machine
AU2013205936B2 (en) * 2012-05-29 2017-06-29 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Extraction cleaner
GB2512025B (en) * 2013-01-11 2017-03-01 Techtronic Floor Care Tech Ltd Surface treatment device
CN105903591B (en) * 2015-02-24 2018-08-03 拉瓦沃希股份公司 High pressure water spray machine
AU2017272322B2 (en) * 2016-12-20 2019-11-07 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Extraction cleaner with quick empty tank

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US4660246A (en) * 1986-04-14 1987-04-28 The Singer Company Versatile vacuum cleaning appliance
US5996175A (en) * 1998-07-23 1999-12-07 Fusco; Edward Adjustable vacuum handle construction
US6951045B2 (en) * 2002-08-20 2005-10-04 Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. Vacuum cleaner having hose detachable at nozzle
US7152274B2 (en) * 2003-04-17 2006-12-26 The Hoover Company Handle and latch for a removable dirt separation system

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GB2419812B (en) 2008-05-21
GB0522583D0 (en) 2005-12-14
GB2419812A (en) 2006-05-10

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