CA1200443A - Decorative surface coverings and process for manufacturing same - Google Patents

Decorative surface coverings and process for manufacturing same

Info

Publication number
CA1200443A
CA1200443A CA000411045A CA411045A CA1200443A CA 1200443 A CA1200443 A CA 1200443A CA 000411045 A CA000411045 A CA 000411045A CA 411045 A CA411045 A CA 411045A CA 1200443 A CA1200443 A CA 1200443A
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
surface covering
coating
substantially translucent
defined
foamable
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA000411045A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
John W. Wiley
David Wang
Charles H. Brower
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Mannington Mills Inc
Original Assignee
Mannington Mills Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US06/304,164 priority Critical
Priority to US06/304,164 priority patent/US4409280A/en
Application filed by Mannington Mills Inc filed Critical Mannington Mills Inc
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA1200443A publication Critical patent/CA1200443A/en
Application status is Expired legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/22Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed
    • B32B5/24Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/022Non-woven fabric
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/024Woven fabric
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44CPRODUCING DECORATIVE EFFECTS; MOSAICS; TARSIA WORK; PAPERHANGING
    • B44C3/00Processes, not specifically provided for elsewhere, for producing ornamental structures
    • B44C3/04Modelling plastic materials, e.g. clay
    • B44C3/044Chemical modelling
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44FSPECIAL DESIGNS OR PICTURES
    • B44F9/00Designs imitating natural patterns
    • B44F9/08Designs imitating natural patterns of crystalline structures, pearl effects, or mother-of-pearl effects
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06NWALL, FLOOR OR LIKE COVERING MATERIALS, e.g. LINOLEUM, OILCLOTH, ARTIFICIAL LEATHER, ROOFING FELT, CONSISTING OF A FIBROUS WEB COATED WITH A LAYER OF MACROMOLECULAR MATERIAL; FLEXIBLE SHEET MATERIAL NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06N7/00Flexible sheet materials not otherwise provided for, e.g. textile threads, filaments, yarns or tow, glued on macromolecular material, e.g. fibrous top layer with resin backing, plastic naps or dots on fabrics
    • D06N7/0005Floor covering on textile basis comprising a fibrous substrate being coated with at least one layer of a polymer on the top surface
    • D06N7/0028Floor covering on textile basis comprising a fibrous substrate being coated with at least one layer of a polymer on the top surface characterised by colour effects, e.g. craquelé, reducing gloss
    • D06N7/0034Floor covering on textile basis comprising a fibrous substrate being coated with at least one layer of a polymer on the top surface characterised by colour effects, e.g. craquelé, reducing gloss two or more different colour layers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24479Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness
    • Y10T428/24496Foamed or cellular component
    • Y10T428/24504Component comprises a polymer [e.g., rubber, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24479Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness
    • Y10T428/24496Foamed or cellular component
    • Y10T428/24504Component comprises a polymer [e.g., rubber, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24512Polyurethane
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24479Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness
    • Y10T428/24612Composite web or sheet
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24851Intermediate layer is discontinuous or differential
    • Y10T428/24868Translucent outer layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24851Intermediate layer is discontinuous or differential
    • Y10T428/24868Translucent outer layer
    • Y10T428/24876Intermediate layer contains particulate material [e.g., pigment, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24893Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.] including particulate material
    • Y10T428/24901Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.] including particulate material including coloring matter
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24893Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.] including particulate material
    • Y10T428/24909Free metal or mineral containing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24942Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including components having same physical characteristic in differing degree
    • Y10T428/2495Thickness [relative or absolute]
    • Y10T428/24967Absolute thicknesses specified

Abstract

Abstract of the Invention There is disclosed a process for manufacturing surface coverings including the steps of printing a design on a base layer; overlying the printed base layer with a coating of sub-stantially transparent or translucent material; printing a subsequent design using an ink including decorative particles on such transparent or translucent overlying material; and over-lying the ink printed design with a substantially transparent or translucent material prior to subsequent processing, such as heat curing to ensure an effectively fused produce of the resulting surface covering. The present invention may include the required processing steps of chemical or mechanical embossing as more clearly hereinafter described.

Description

Decorative Surface Coverings and Process for ~anufacturiny Same Field of Invention:
This invention relates to decorative surface coverings, and more par-ticularly to decorative surface coverings having embossed surfaces for use as floor, wall and ceiling coverings, desk, table and counter tops; sur:Eace layers on leather, fabrics, paper, wood, metals, glass, etc; upholstery, drapery, and clothing materials; interiors for cars, trucks, boa-ts, airplanes, and other means of transporta-tion; covers for books and other publications;
and like articles.
Backqround of -the Inven-tion Decorative surface coatings have been manufactured for many years. In United States Paten-t No. 3,660,187 to Shortway et.
al, there are disclosed processes for incorporating small decorative chips or flakes of various colors and hues in the wear layer of a floor covering. These relatively small decorative chips or flakes of various hues and colors are included and are present substantially uniformly visible or discernible by persons viewing the resilient floor covering. When a pattern or design is provided in the resilient floor covering, the relatively small decorative chips or flakes of various colors and hues are visible and discernible in substantially all parts of the pattern or design. And, if the resilien-t floor covering is of the embossed type, whether chemically embossed, mechanically embossed, or otherwise, the relatively small decorative chips or flakes are visible and discernible in both the raised and depressed portions of the resilient embossed floor covering.
This substantially uniform appearance of the eye-catching, rela-tively small decorative particles, chips or flakes is normally not undesirable or objectionable but sometimes there are occasions when it is desired that -the decora-tive particles chips or flakes be limited or confined to cer-tain selected portions of the pattern or design, or to certain raisecl or depressed portions, if an embossed or textured type of resilient floor covering is involved~ This is rather difficult to accomp-lish, inasmuch as the easiest and mos-t economical way to include the decorative chips or particles in the product is simply to incorporate such decorative chips or particles in the formulation of the wearlayer whereby such decorative chips or particles become substantially uniformily dispersed during the mixing of the formulation subsequently applied to the main portion of the resilient floor covering.
In United States Patent No. ~,126,727 to Kaminski, there are diselosed proeesses for overcoming the problems of the visible and discernible partieles, chips or flakes in all parts of the pattern or design wherein the relatively small, eye-catehing deeorative partieles, ehips or flakes of various colors and hues may be incorporated substantially uniformly in the wearlayer during formulation and mixing, but wherein such relatively small, eye-eatching deeorative partieles, ehips or flakes are diseernible or visible only in those portions where it is desired to be diseernible or visible and be indiseernible or invisible in those o-ther portions where their appearance is not desired or required.
Such processes included the uniform distribution of decorative particles, ehips or flakes, over the full surfaee area and thus exeessive deeorative partieles requirements for any design. Additionally, the latter diselosure demanded excess proeessing requirements, i.e. extrusion of a sheet of a blend of decorative particle in a resinous base followed by granulation of the thus formed sheet prior to blending such granulated particles in another resinous base preparatory to extrusion or calendaring of a sheet of the blended granula-ted par-tieles for J - 2 ~

;~.2~

overlylng a gelled printed foamable resinous polymer composition.
Objects oE the_ nvention An object of the present invention is to provide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings.
Another objec-t of the present invention is to provide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings perrr,it-ting of reduced decorative particle requirements.
Still another object oE the present invention is to provide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings of improved three dimensional aesthetic effects.
A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings of simplified processing requirements.
A still further object of -the present invention is to provide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings permitting of decorative designs of more closely registered sequences.
Yet another object of the present invention is to pro-vide a novel process for forming decorative surface coverings permitting of substantially improved production rates.
Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a novel decorative surface covering.
Surnmary of the Invention According to one aspect of the present invention there is provided a process for manufacturing a surface covering, which comprises: (a) applying a base design on a substrate; (b) overlying said base design with a coating of substantially translucent to transparen-t non-foamable material; (c) selective-ly depositing in a subse~uent design an ink containing decora-tive particles on said initial coating of said substantially translucent to transparent material; (d) overlying said subse-quent design with a second coating of a substantially trans--- 3 ~

lucent to transparent ma-teri.al to form a composite surface cover-ing; and (e) curing said composite of step (d) to forrn said sur~ace covering.
According to another aspect of the invention there is provided the process for manufacturing a surface covering, which comprises: (a) applying a base design on a substrate ~herein said substrate comprises a sheet material coated with a heat-foamable resinous composition and heated sufficiently to produce a gel layer before printing of the base design and which heat-foamable resinous composition foams during the curing step; (b)overlying said base design wlth a coating of substantially trans-lucent to transparent non-foarnable material; (c) selectively de-positing in a subsequent design an ink containing decorative par-ticles on said initial coating of said substantially translucent to transparent material; (d) overlying said subsequent design with a second coating of a substantially translucent to trans-parent material to form a composite surface covering; and (e) curing said composite of step (d) to form said surface covering.
A~cording to a further aspect of the invention -there is provided a surface covering, which comprises: (a) a substrate;
(b) a base design on said substrate; (c) a coating of substant-ially translucent to transparent non-foamable material overlying said base design; (d) a subsequent design of an ink con'caining decorative particles selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent material, and (e) a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material overlying said subsequent design to form a composite surface covering.
According to yet another aspect of the invention there is provided a surface covering, which comprises: (a) a base design on a substrate wherein said substrate comprises a sheet material coated ~ith a neat-foamable resinous composition, the heat-foamable resinous composition upon sufficient heatlng producing a gel layer beEore printing of the base design, and the resinous composition foaming during curing' (b) a coating of subs-tantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material ~;
overlying said base design; (c) a subsequent design of an ink containing decorative particles selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent material; and (d) a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material overlying said subsequent design to form a composite surface covering.
Description of the Drawing Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent by reference to the following detailed description of an embodiment thereof when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:
Figure 1 is a flow diagram of an embodiment of the process of the present invention;
Figure 2 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of an intermediate product of the process of the present invention; and Figure 3 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of a final product of the process of the present invention.
Figures 2 and 3 have not been drawn precisely to exact scale. Some portions -thereof have been drawn to a slightly larger scale, whereas certain other portions thereof have been drawn to a sliyhtly smaller scale. This has been done -to `~ amplify more clearly the details of the smaller portions and to accentuate some of the more important features of the present invention.
Detailed Description of the Invention Although the presenl invention relates to decorative ; 30 surface coverings encompassing floor/ wall and ceiling coverings and the like, the following detailed description relates to a a preferred embodiment of the present invention related to embossed sheet vinyl floor coverings. Methods of achieving embossed sheet vinyl floor covering include chemical embossing by the use of the hereinabove discussed known printing techni-ques to produce a printed deslgn, or silk screen method of apply-ing different plastisols -to produce an inlaid design.
Figure 1 illustrates the stepwise processing procedures of manufacturing chemically embossed sheet vinyl flooring of the present invention. In producing chemically embossed sheet vinyl floor covering a relatively flat, backing sheet material 11 is employed as the base portion of the product. Mormally such backing sheet material 11 may be a felted or matted fibrous sheet; a non-woven or woven constructed fabric; a release paper;
or like sheet materials. Fibrous sheet materials comprising inorganic ~ibers, such as asbestos; or organic fibers r such as cellulose; or synthetic or man-made fibers and/or filaments, such as non-woven fiberglass, are the most popular backing sheet materials~ but many others are suitable and utilizable, and are set forth in the previously cited Vnited States Patent and in the references to be hereinafter cited. To overcome problems of porosity, absorbency and dimensional stability, a sizing coat and barrier coat, such as vinyl plastisol dispersion; paint, such as organic solvent or latex base; lacquer or the like, may be applied to the backing sheet material 11 as shown in E'igure 2.
Following the preparation of the backing sheet material 11, a foamable resinous composition layer is then applied. The formulation and preparation of the foamable resinous composition are known in the art and are dependen-t on the type of product to be produced. For chemically embossed vinyl sheet floor covering, the foamable resinous cornposition contains portions of many constituents. For example, synthetic resin, such as a polymer or a co-polymer of vinyl chloride; a blowing or foarning agent, such as azodicarbonamide; various accelerators or ';'' /~

catalysts, such as dibasic lead phosphate or zinc oxlde, to lower the decomposition temperature of the blowing or foaming agent or to narrow the decomposition temperature range; stabil-izers to reduce the harmful effec-ts of degradation due to light, heat, etc.; primary and secondary plasticizers such as butyl benzyl phthalate, dioctyl phthalate and dodeceyl benzene re-spectively; pigments and fillers, such as titanium dioxide and calcium carbonate; and other conventional and well-known additives.
Althougll a medium molecular weight polymer or a copoly~
mer of vinyl chloride is the preferred synthetic resin to be in-corporated in the foamable resinous polymer composition, many other synthetic resins of appropriate molecular weights are equally utilizable. Many of such other suitable synthetic resins are set forth in the previous mentioned United States Patents cited herein May 13, 1985. Azodicarbonamide is indicated as the preferxed blowing or foaming agent, but many ot~er equivalent blowing and foaming agents are also applicable to the principles of the present invention. Many of such other blowing and foam-ing agents are also set forth in the United States Patents cited herein and reference thereto are incorporated herein. Similarly, many other accelerators, catalysts, viscosity modifiers, light and heat stabilizers, ~V absorbers, plasticizers, pigments, antioxidants, bacteriostats and bacteriocides, and other additives may be included in the resinous polymer composition.
The specific nature and the particular physical and chemical characteristics as well as the properties of the various con-stituents of the foamable resinous composition do not relate to the essence or critical features of the present invention and further specific elaboration is not believed necessary.
The foamable resinous composition is applied to the backing sheet material 11 substantially uniformly by reverse 1' ~2)~

roll coating, knife coating, air knife, flexible blade or by other procedures known in the industry. The thickness of the applied foamable resinous composi-tion is dependent upon the specifications of the surface covering to be manufactured; nor-mally the range is between 7 and 30 mils of wet application.
After coating of the backing sheet material 11 with the foamable resinous composition layer, the combination is heated in an oven for a period of time at a temperature sufficient to gel the foamable resinous composition but not sufficiently high enough to activate or to decompose the blowing or foaming agent present in the Eoamable resinous composition. Such layer is then cooled forming a pre-gel 13~ which together with the backing sheet material 11 forms a base layer, generally indicated as 14.
The base layer 14 may then be printed with printing ink compositions as indicated as 15 in Figure 2, in a desired design and with the desired colors. Techniques to accomplish this in-clude direct or indirect rotogravure printing, offset printing, flexographics or screen printing. For chemical embossing, at least one of the prlnting ink compositions 15 contain a blowing agent modifier which applied to the pre-gel 13 and after total processing cause differential blowing in those areas of a pre-gel 13, yielding a desired textural effect. The printing ink composi-tion containing the blowing agent modifier indicated as 17 in Figures 2 and 3.
Typical well-known and conventional printing ink com-positions 15 with and without blowing agent modifiers are to be noted in the rJnited States Patents cited herein and further speci-fic elaboration thereof is not believed necessary or required.
After the base layer 14 is printed with the printing ink compositions 15 and 17 forming the first printed pattern layer, generally indicated as 19 the composite is dried in an 3L~

oven and i.s then ready for application tllereto of a first wear-layer plastisol composition which after required heating will become a first wearlayer 21. Normally, the first wearlayer plas-tisol composition is applied wet in the range of from 5 to 25 mils, preferably 10 to 15 mils for maximum visual effect.
The first wearlayer plastisol composition is formulated from a synthetic resin, such as a polymer or a copolymer of vinyl chloride, preferably a high molecular weight polyvinyl chloride, to which synthetic resin is added well~known and conventional agents, such as plasticizers, light and heat stabilizers, W
absorbers, solvents, etc. Such constituents are similar to the constituents found in the foamable resinous composition, except that blowing agents or opaque materials are not included in the formulation. After the firs-t wearlayer plastisol composition is heated and fused to the pre-gel 13, at a temperature suffi-cient to cause blowing of the foamable resinous composition, there is formed a translucent or transparent, first wearlayer 21.
The wearlayer 21 is then cooled in preparation for printing with a second pigmented ink composition 23.
The techniques of printing on the first wearlayer 21 are the same as previously descri~ed for printing on the base layer 14. The pigmented ink compositions 23 can be applied in an overall pattern on the first wearlayer 19 or they can be applied in registration with the design of the first printed layer 19 applied on the base layer 14~ The pigmented inks 23 contain pigment bases including nacreous or pearlescent particles, metallic flakes or the like. The inclusion of any particular pigment base is dependent on the desired effect.
Followillg application and drying of the pigmented ink compositions 23 forming a second printed pattern layer 25, a se-cond wearlayer plastisol composition is applied to the resulting _ g ~
.~

composite in a like manner as previously hereinabove described.
The formulation of the second wearlayer composition is simi]ar to that composition that forms -the first wearlayer 19. Wet application of the second wearlayer plastisol composition is at a thickness in the xange of from 5 to 20 mils. To obtain maxi-mum visual effect a thickness of from 10 -to 15 mils of wearlayer composition is preferably applied resulting in maximum clarity and thereby exhibiting a sense of depth.
Following application of the second wearlayer plastisol composition, the multi-layer assembly comprising the backing sheet material 11, the pre-gel 13, the first printed pattern layer 19 which may selectively comprise a blowing agent modifier in one or more of the desired printed portions, the first wear-layer 21, which is a translucent or transparent, the second print-ed pattern layer 25 and the second wea:rlayer plastisol composi-tion is then heated to an elevated temperature sufficient to fuse both the pre-gel 13 and the first wearlayer 21 to the second wearlayer plstisol composition forming the second wearlayer 27, which is also a transparent or translucent sheet. Further heat-ing at appropriate temperatures activates the blowing or foaming agent in the pre-gel 13-to initiate the blowing or foaming action.
The temperature of the entire mass must reach the fusion temperature of the resins in order to obtain a product of maxi-mum strength. Using a preferred vinyl chloride polymer or co-polymer, fusion is attained at a temperature of from about 325F.
to about 450F. to produce a final product 29, as illustrated in Figure 3. If modifiers for blowing agent were not incorporat-ed in the first printing ink composi-tion 15 or 17 and embossing and texturing is required this can be accomplished by mechanical techniques.
Although the present invention has been described with reference to techniques for chemical embossing, it is understood by one skilled in the art -that -the same visual effects are achieved by using rotary screen methods of printing. Ra-ther than printing the desired designs with pigmented inks containing the desired decorative particles, the decorative particles may be selectively deposited by rotary screen technique using plastisol formulations containing the desired decorative particles and pigments after application of the first wearlayer and prior to the application of the second wearlayer. This screen printed decoration can be either randomly printed or printed in registra-tion with the base pattern.
The following specific examples will further illustrate the embodiments of this invention. In these examples, all parts given are by weight~
EXAMPLE I
This example relates to the process of using the present invention with rotogravure printing techniques. The following are the formulations for practicing this technique.

Formula No. 1 - Foamable P]astisol Polyvinylchloride Resin (Med. Mol Wt.) - 100.0 parts Zinc Oxide - 1.5 parts Azodicarbonamide - 2.5 parts Dioctyl Phthalate - 55.0 parts Dodecyl Benzene - 10.0 parts Titanium Dioxide - 5.0 parts Formula No. 2 - Clear Layer Formula Polyvinylchloride Resin (High Mol. Wt.) - 100.0 parts Butyl Benzyl Phthalate - 40.0 parts Dodecyl Benzene - 7.0 parts Epoxidized Soya Oil - 5.0 par-ts Stabilizer (Calcium/Zinc Phosphite) - 3.0 par-ts Rotorgravure Ink Formulas No. A No. B No. C
Regular Pearlescent Foam Retarder Vinyl Chloride/
Vinyl Acetate Co-polymer 10 parts 10 parts 10 parts Methyl Ethyl Ketone 75 parts 75 parts 75 parts Pigment Base 15 parts -- 15 parts Fumaric Acid -- -- 10 parts Pearlescent Color -- 10 parts --Note: The concentration of pearlescent color can be varied from

2 to 25 parts depending on the effect desired.
To a web of asbestos flooring felt, .030" thick, apply a uniform layer of foamable plastisol (Formula 1) .015" thick, using a rigid knife coater. Gel the coating by exposure in a hot air oven at an equivalent of 325F. for one minute and cool to room temperature. Following this formation of a pre-gel, apply a first print design to the pre-gel using a rotogravure printer, and color vinyl inks (ink formula A). In areas whereone desires foam retardation an ink (ink formula C) should be used. Follow-ing this procedure the inks should be dried.
Using a reverse roll coater, apply between .010" - .015"
of clear layer plastisol (Formula 2). Gel the clear layer plastisol by exposure in a ho-t air oven at 325~F. for one minute -~J - 12 -and cool to room temperature. Then apply a second printed pattern with a rotogravure prin-ter, using inks con-taining pearlescent coloration s (Ink Formula C). The pearlescen-t ink shou]d -then be dried. Using a reverse roll coater, apply be-tween .010" - .015" of clear vinyl plastisol (Formula 2). Fuse the clear layers and foam the foamableplastisol by exposure in a hot air oven for four minutes at an average temperature of 400F. Upon cooling one will have produced a product with the desired decorative effects.
EXAMPLE II
When using the process of the present invention with rotary screen printing the foamable plas-tisol and the clear layer formulas will be the same as in formulas l and 2. The change will be in the screen printing ink formulas which are:

No. D No. E
Regular Pearlescent Polyvinylchloride (high Mol.Wt.) 100.0 parts 100.0 parts Butyl Benzyl Phthalate 40.0 parts 40.0 parts Dodecyl Benzene 7.0 parts 7.0 parts Epoxidized Soya Oil5.0 parts 5.0 parts Stabilizer (Calcium/Zinc Phosphite) 3.0 parts 3.0 parts Pigment Base 15.0 parts --Pearlescent Color -- 10.0 parts Note: The concentration of pearlescent color can be varied from two to 25 parts, depending on the effect desired.
To a web of asbestos flooring felt, .030" thick apply a uniform layer of foamable plastisol (Formula 1), .015"
thick, using a rigid knife coater. Gel the coating by expo-sure in a hot air oven at an equivalent of 325F for oneminu-te and cool to room temperature. Using a rotary screen printer, print a 5 mil thickness of screen printing plastisol inks (Formula D) in a desired pattern. If multiple screens are used, gel the printed plastisol ink by exposure in a hot air oven a-t 350F. for 30 seconds, then cooling to room tem-perature before the next plastisol ink applica-tion.
Using a rigid knife coater, apply between .010" -.015" of clear layer plastisol (Formule 2). Gel the clear plastisol by exposure in a hot air oven at an equivalent of 350F. for one minute. Cool to room temperature.
Following cooling, print a 5 mil thickness of screen printing plastisol inks containing pearlescent colorations (Formula E) using a rotary screen printer. If multiple screen are used, gel the printed plastisol ink by exposure in a hot air oven at 350F. for 30 seconds. Cool to room temperature before the next plastisol ink applica-tion.
Following the cooling, apply between .010" - .015"
of clear vinyl plasstisol (Formula 2) with a rigid knife coater.
Finally fuse the clear layers and foam the foamable plastisol by exposure in a hot air oven at an average of 400F. for 4 minutes.
~pon cooling one will produce a product with the desired effects.
Numerous modifications and variations of the above disclosed invention are possible in light of the above teachings and therefore, within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced other wise than as particularly des-cribed.

.

Claims (21)

THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. A process for manufacturing a surface covering, which comprises:
(a) applying a base design on a substrate;
(b) overlying said base design with a coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material;
(c) selectively depositing in a subsequent design an ink containing decorative particles on said initial coating of said substantially translucent to transparent material;
(d) overlying said subsequent design with a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material to form a composite surface covering; and (e) curing said composite of step (d) to form said surface covering.
2. The process for manufacturing a surface covering, which comprises:
(a) applying a base design on a substrate wherein said substrate comprises a sheet material coated with a heat-foamable resinous composition and heated sufficiently to produce a gel layer before printing of the base design and which heat-foamable resinous composition foams during the curing step;
(b) overlying said base design with a coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material;
(c) selectively depositing in a subsequent design an ink containing decorative particles on said initial coating of said substantially translucent to transparent material;
(d) overlying said subsequent design with a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material to form a composite surface covering; and (e) curing said composite of step (d) to form said surface covering.
3. The process for manufacturing a surface covering as defined in claim 2 wherein said initial coating of substantially translucent to transparent material is of a thickness of from 5 to 25 mils.
4. The process for manufacturing a surface covering as defined in claim 2 wherein said thickness is preferably 10 to 15 mils.
5. The process for manufacturing a surface covering as defined in claim 2 wherein said second coating of substan-tially translucent to transparent material is of a thickness of 5 to 20 mils.
6. The process for manufacturing a surface covering as defined in claim 2 wherein said thickness of said second coating of substantially translucent to transparent material is preferably 10 to 15 mils.
7. A surface covering, which comprises:
(a) a substrate;
(b) a base design on said substrate;
(c) a coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material overlying said base design;

(d) a subsequent design of an ink containing decorative particles selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent material; and (e) a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material overlying said subsequent design to form a composite surface covering.
8. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said decorative particles are pearlescent or nacreous pigments.
9. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said decorative particles are metallic flakes.
10. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material is of a thickness of from 5 to 25 mils.
11. The surface covering as defined in claim 10 wherein said coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material is of a preferred thickness of from 10 to 15 mils.
12. The surface covering as defined in claim 10 wherein said second coating is of a thickness of from 5 to 20 mils.
13. The surface covering as defined in claim 12 wherein said second coating is of a preferred thickness of from 10 to 15 mils.
14. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said substrate comprises a sheet material coated with a heat-foamable resinous composition, the heat foamable resinous composition upon sufficient heating producing a gel layer before printing of the base design, and the resinous composition foaming during curing.
15. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said ink containing decorative particles are selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material by rotogravure printing techniques.
16. The surface covering as defined in claim 7 wherein said ink containing decorative particles are selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material by rotary screen printing techniques.
17. A surface covering, which comprises:
(a) a base design on a substrate wherein said substrate comprises a sheet material coated with a heat-foamable resinous composition, the heat-foamable resinous composition upon sufficient heating producing a gel layer before printing of the base design, and the resinous composition foaming during curing;
(b) a coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material overlying said base design;
(c) A subsequent design of an ink containing decorative particles selectively deposited on said substantially translucent to transparent material; and (d) a second coating of a substantially translucent to transparent material overlying said subsequent design to form a composite surface covering.
18. The surface covering as defined in claim 17 wherein said coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material is of a thickness of from 5 to 25 mils.
19. The surface covering as defined in claim 18 wherein said coating of substantially translucent to transparent non-foamable material is of a thickness of from 10 to 15 mils.
20. The surface covering as defined in claim 18 wherein said second coating of substantially translucent to transparent material is of a thickness of 5 to 20 mils.
21. The surface covering as defined in claim 18 wherein said second coating of substantially translucent to transparent material is of a thickness of 10 to 15 mils.
CA000411045A 1981-09-21 1982-09-09 Decorative surface coverings and process for manufacturing same Expired CA1200443A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06/304,164 1981-09-21
US06/304,164 US4409280A (en) 1981-09-21 1981-09-21 Decorative surface coverings

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA1200443A true CA1200443A (en) 1986-02-11

Family

ID=23175355

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA000411045A Expired CA1200443A (en) 1981-09-21 1982-09-09 Decorative surface coverings and process for manufacturing same

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US4409280A (en)
AU (1) AU552329B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1200443A (en)
NZ (1) NZ201638A (en)

Families Citing this family (59)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4675212A (en) * 1981-09-21 1987-06-23 Mannington Mills, Inc. Process for manufacturing decorative surface coverings
US4456643A (en) * 1982-07-29 1984-06-26 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Decorative laminate
US4530856A (en) * 1982-07-29 1985-07-23 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Method for making decorative laminate
US4547245A (en) * 1982-07-29 1985-10-15 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Method for making decorative laminate
US4595621A (en) * 1984-10-29 1986-06-17 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Simulated embossing on floor covering
US4699820A (en) * 1984-12-03 1987-10-13 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Decorative materials comprising crinkled chips
US4605584A (en) * 1984-12-03 1986-08-12 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Decorative materials comprising crinkled chips
US4880689A (en) * 1985-10-18 1989-11-14 Formica Corporation Damage resistant decorative laminate
US4684264A (en) * 1985-12-20 1987-08-04 Paperno Steven H Protective overlay for watch crystal
US4863782A (en) * 1986-06-12 1989-09-05 Mannington Mills, Inc. Decorative embossed surface coverings having platey material and inlaid appearance
US4756951A (en) * 1986-06-12 1988-07-12 Mannington Mills Inc. Decorative surface coverings having platey material
JPS6328646A (en) * 1986-07-22 1988-02-06 Inax Corp Marble-like thin-type decorative board
JPH045539B2 (en) * 1986-07-26 1992-01-31
JPH0431498B2 (en) * 1986-10-15 1992-05-26
US5342666A (en) 1986-10-28 1994-08-30 Rexham Industries Corp. Injection molded plastic article with integral weatherable pigmented film surface
US4931324A (en) * 1986-10-28 1990-06-05 Rexham Corporation Decorative sheet material simulating the appearance of a base coat/clear coat paint finish
US4810540A (en) * 1986-10-28 1989-03-07 Rexham Corporation Decorative sheet material simulating the appearance of a base coat/clear coat paint finish
US4943680A (en) * 1986-10-28 1990-07-24 Rexham Corporation Method of making a decorative sheet material simulating the appearance of a base coat/clear coat paint finish
GB2205768B (en) * 1987-06-01 1991-04-24 Armstrong World Ind Inc Surface covering material
US5073425A (en) * 1988-10-07 1991-12-17 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Polyvinyl chloride surface covering compositions having reduced electrical resistivities
JPH07106625B2 (en) * 1989-03-10 1995-11-15 大日本印刷株式会社 Decorative sheet
US5169681A (en) * 1989-04-06 1992-12-08 Kim Jae Duck Method of producing an ornamental sticker without a separate cutting step
US5021275A (en) * 1989-04-06 1991-06-04 Kim Jae Duck Ornamental stickers necessitating no separate cutting process and the manufacturing method thereof
US5178912A (en) * 1990-03-29 1993-01-12 Congoleum Corporation Use of reverse roll coater to make flooring material
US5601929A (en) * 1990-08-01 1997-02-11 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Floor covering having a highly filled terpolymer ink
US5458953A (en) * 1991-09-12 1995-10-17 Mannington Mills, Inc. Resilient floor covering and method of making same
US7014802B1 (en) 1997-02-20 2006-03-21 Mannington Mills, Of Delaware, Inc. Methods to make a surface covering having a natural appearance
US6228463B1 (en) 1997-02-20 2001-05-08 Mannington Mills, Inc. Contrasting gloss surface coverings optionally containing dispersed wear-resistant particles and methods of making the same
DE19735189C2 (en) * 1997-08-14 2000-06-21 Akzenta Paneele & Profile Gmbh Covering element for buildings surfaces o. The like. A method, as well as its preparation
US6187415B1 (en) * 1998-09-26 2001-02-13 Premark Rwp Holdings, Inc. Solid surfacing dimensional laminate, and methods for making and using same
US6368667B1 (en) * 1998-12-30 2002-04-09 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Masking patterns to enhance apparent opacity of paper products
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
ES2168045B2 (en) 1999-11-05 2004-01-01 Ind Aux Es Faus Sl New direct laminated floor.
SE516696C2 (en) * 1999-12-23 2002-02-12 Perstorp Flooring Ab Process for the production of surface elements which comprises a decorative upper layer and surface elements prepared determined in accordance with the method
FR2807772B1 (en) * 2000-04-12 2002-07-26 Porcher Ind printable media fire resistant
EP1180431A1 (en) * 2000-08-18 2002-02-20 Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Laminate having three-dimensional appearance
US20030072919A1 (en) * 2001-09-13 2003-04-17 Frank Watts Surface covering having differential gloss in-register and method of making
US20030152734A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2003-08-14 Scolaro James M. Surface enhancement and modification system
US6716504B2 (en) * 2002-02-16 2004-04-06 Sang G. Song Decorative sticker sheet
DE10214100B4 (en) * 2002-03-28 2009-03-12 Armstrong Dlw Ag Floor covering of a multilayer plastic sheet or plate with three-dimensional optics and method for its production
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US6691480B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2004-02-17 Faus Group Embossed-in-register panel system
US7836649B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
DE10252863B4 (en) 2002-11-12 2007-04-19 Kronotec Ag Wood fiber board, in particular floor panel
US7294363B2 (en) * 2002-12-19 2007-11-13 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Methods of forming decorative veils
ITVR20030054A1 (en) * 2003-05-07 2004-11-08 Cartiere Fedrigoni & C Spa A process for the production of coated paper with pearlescent effect
US20080067713A1 (en) * 2004-12-14 2008-03-20 Robert Bordener Method of producing and business model for applying a thin laminate sheet of a decorative material
US20050255296A1 (en) * 2004-05-11 2005-11-17 Robbins Edward S Iii Desk pad
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US20060182975A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2006-08-17 Reichhold, Inc. Thermoset polymer substrates
US8097108B2 (en) * 2005-06-08 2012-01-17 The Boeing Company Method and apparatus for forming a fireworthy laminate
GB2432136A (en) * 2005-09-21 2007-05-16 Field Group Plc Printing method
CN103052282B (en) * 2011-10-13 2017-07-07 深圳富泰宏精密工业有限公司 Electronic device housing and its manufacture method
US9205635B2 (en) 2012-09-06 2015-12-08 Xamax Industries, Inc. Composite sheet material and method for forming the same
US9138943B2 (en) 2012-09-06 2015-09-22 Xamax Industries, Inc. Composite sheet material and method for forming the same
ITMI20130979A1 (en) * 2013-06-13 2014-12-14 Gruppo Cordenons Spa A paper material as holographic effect and pearlescent and metallic relative manufacturing method
US10392813B2 (en) * 2014-05-07 2019-08-27 Berry Alloc NV Panel and method for manufacturing panels
US9855721B2 (en) * 2014-09-25 2018-01-02 The Boeing Company Nonwoven decorative laminates and methods of making the same

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3560322A (en) * 1968-01-18 1971-02-02 Eugene A Magid Fabric-simulating laminated sheet structure and method for manufacturing the same
US4126727A (en) * 1976-06-16 1978-11-21 Congoleum Corporation Resinous polymer sheet materials having selective, decorative effects

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CA1200443A1 (en)
AU8770582A (en) 1983-03-31
NZ201638A (en) 1986-02-21
US4409280A (en) 1983-10-11
AU552329B2 (en) 1986-05-29

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3591401A (en) Flocked,foamed,embossed surface covering
US3844814A (en) Foamed decorative covering material and method of manufacture
US3345234A (en) Continuous method for making decorative floor covering
US3399106A (en) Embossed resinous compositions and process for preparing same
US5405674A (en) Resilient floor covering and method of making same
US4093766A (en) Three-color high pressure decorative laminate having registered color and embossing
CA1306411C (en) Plush textured multicolor flock transfer and method for making same using precolored flock
US3895153A (en) Friction-surface sheet
US5203941A (en) Process for manufacturing plastic siding panels with outdoor weatherable embossed surfaces
US5506031A (en) Plastic siding panels with outdoor weatherable embossed surfaces
US9567713B2 (en) Method of producing decorative paper and decorative laminate comprising such decorative paper
EP0455849B1 (en) Method and apparatus for transfer of a colour design to a plastic substrate or a decorated plastic substrate
US3121642A (en) Process for producing decorative surface covering
DK173934B1 (en) Laminate
US4034134A (en) Laminates and coated substrates
TWI228077B (en) Method of manufacturing decorative melamine sheet laminated floor covering
US3194856A (en) Method of producing decorative surface covering
US4126727A (en) Resinous polymer sheet materials having selective, decorative effects
JP3954157B2 (en) Decorative sheet and manufacturing method thereof
CA1237955A (en) Vinyl chloride polymer laminate
US6300279B1 (en) Method for applying decorative designs to wood substrates
US4349597A (en) Production of synthetic leather
EP1004432B1 (en) Hot melt calendered or extruded wear layer for embossed substrates and method of manufacture
EP1276621B1 (en) Method for producing floor-finish and wall-finish with differential gloss decoration effect
CA1125974A (en) Methods and apparatus for making decorative inlaid types of resilient sheet materials and the like

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
MKEX Expiry