CA1108299A - Method and portable apparatus for comparison of stored sets of data - Google Patents

Method and portable apparatus for comparison of stored sets of data

Info

Publication number
CA1108299A
CA1108299A CA 324163 CA324163A CA1108299A CA 1108299 A CA1108299 A CA 1108299A CA 324163 CA324163 CA 324163 CA 324163 A CA324163 A CA 324163A CA 1108299 A CA1108299 A CA 1108299A
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
data
means
portable
computing device
set
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA 324163
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Edward A. White
Original Assignee
Edward A. White
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q99/00Subject matter not provided for in other groups of this subclass

Abstract

A B S T R A C T

Method and portable processor for storing and comparing sets of personal data relating to personal prefer-ences and personality. First and second portable processing units each include a processor, a memory, an input device, a display device, and a connector. The owner of a portable processor can enter personal data via the input device of the portable processor in response to a questionnaire. The owner of that portable processor may then meet another person having a similar or identical portable processor storing that person's personal data. The two persons can interconnect the two portable processors by means of the connectors. Each portable processor transmits its data to other and compares its stored data with corresponding data received from the other portable processor. Stored algorithms in each portable processor operate on the compared data to compute a score representing the degree of personal compatibility of the two persons and display the score by means of the respective display devices.

Description

32a~9 i`

Background of the Invention The invention relates to portable processing units, and particularly to interconnectable portable processing units for storing and comparing sets of personal data stored therein and to methods of comparing such data.
A number of tests have been devised by psychologists to obtain personality profiles of individual men and women.
Usually, the man or woman answers a large number of questions to provide the personality data upon which such tests and comparisons are based. Such personality data can then be compared for an individual man and woman to provide an indica~
tion of their compatibility as potential marriage partners.
Many individuals, including persons who have never been married or recently divorced persons wishing to meet persons of the opposite sex with whom they are compatible, read such books and publications in an a-ttempt to obtain greater insights into their own personalities and personalities of others. Single persons who become personally involved and begin to seriously contemplate marriage to each other often consult professional counselors or psychologists, who administer various psychological tests, such as the Edwards Personal Preference Test, and advise the clients on the basis of data obtained from such tests. However, this approach is unsatisfactory during the early stages of a relationship between a man and a woman because of the inconvenience and expense involved. Up to now, no suitable method conducive to comprehensive comparison of the personality data between a man and a woman early in their relationship is available. Yet, it is early in the relationship that such a comparison migh-t be mos-t helpful, since it is well known that strong attachments may be formed between highly incompatible persons. Such attachments frequently result in unhappy marriages or unhappy endings to such relationships.

- 2 -2~9 Nowadays, single men and women frequently congregate in so-called "singles" organizations, such as Parents Without Partners, or in "singles bars". In such placesl and on many other occasions, a single person has the opportunity to meet a large number of persons of the opposite sex who are also interested in meeting persons with whom to date and become acquainted. In many instances it would be helpful for single persons to have a convenient, inexpensive, and reasonably reliable means of "screening" persons of the opposite sex they meet in order to get a preliminary indication of personality compatibility. It would be highly desirable that such means of "screening" not interfere with the ordinary inter~personal interaction by which single persons customarily get to know each other. In the past, computers have been utilized to store personality data for individuals. Computers have also been -~
utilized to compare sets of data for a pair of individuals to ~ ~
determine their areas of compatibility and/or incompatibility ;!~',' ~' . .'-:
as potential mates. However, the general purpose which computers have been utilized for is obviously unsatisfactory for "on-the-spot" analysis and/or comparison of personality data for a man and a woman at the scene of their first meetings. Computer- ;
ized dating services which select supposedly compa~ible "dates"
for subscribers to the dating services are known. However, -such dating service organizations are very expensive, and prevent the individual man or woman from having the freedom of spontaneously selecting dating partners. Further, due to the high cost and loss of privacy of such computerized dating services, the pool of available individuals from which supposedly compatible dating partners may be selected is very ~ 30 small.

; In summary, there exists a need for an inexpensive, yet convenient means for on-the-spot comparing of personality ' ' :, profiles of men and woman to aid them in cliscovering their various areas of basic compatibility with each other.

Summary of the Invention Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a low cost system and method for storing and comparing sets of data.
It is another object of the invention to provide a low cost portable system and apparatus especially suitable for storing and comparing sets of personal preference data and/or personality data and computing and displaying a compatibility score.
It is another object of the inventi.on to provide a por~able low cost system for storing and comparing sets of personality data, which system is sufficiently small in size to be easily carried in a person's pocket, purse, or worn as an ornament.
It is another object of the invention to provide a portable, inexpensive multi-purpose data comparison sys-tem.
; Briefly described, and in accordance with one embodi ment thereof, the invention provides a portable system and method for comparison of stored sets of data. The system includes two portable processors each having a memory for storing a data set and operating software. The respective owners of each portable processor can enter personal data into the memories of the respective por-table processors. The two portable processors can be interconnected by male and female connectors or by optical coupling devices such that the operating program of each causes it to transmit its stored data to the other portable processor and compare its stored data with corresponding data received from the other unit.

`' r~

The software of each portable processor causes tha-t portable processor to compute a score indicative of the degree of matching or compatibility be-tween the two se-ts of data and display that score by means of a display unit of that portable processor. In one embodiment of the invention, complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuits are utilized to implement the microprocessor, the read only memory, the random access memory and the interface circuitry, and an alphanumeric liquid crystal display unit is utilized to display 10 the compatlbility scores computed. In another embodiment of the invention, the portable processor, has storage elements for ^
temporarily storing data received from another portable proces-sor. The portable proce~sor is subsequently connected to a central data processing system to input the temporarily stored data to the central data processing system, which utilizes stored algorithms to analyze and compare the received data with the data of the owner of the portable processor being utilized to enter the data into central data processing system.
In yet another embodiment oE the invention, the portable pro-20 cessor includes expanded algorithms and storage capability for storing additional sets of data, and is capable of receiving and comparing data received from a separate portable processor with a different operating algorithm. In yet another embodi-ment of the inventionr the portable processor has its operating program and algorithm stored in an electrically alterable read only memory and may be connected to a central data pro-cessing system to update the operating software and algorithm by altering the contacts of the electrically alterable read only memory. Another embodiment of the invention is incorporated in an electronic timepiece or calculator.

A computing system for comparing first and second sets of corresponding data, which may be personal sets of data relating to flrst and second persons, includes first and -second computing devices, at least one ofwhich is portable, first and second storage devices for storing first and second sets of data in the first and second computing devices, respectively, a first transmitting device in the first computing device for transmitting data of the first set from the first computing device to the second computing device, a first receiving device in the second computing device for receiving : the transmitted data of the first set, and a comparing device in the second computing device for comparing the stored data in the second storage device with corresponding data received by the first receiving device from the first transmitting device, and a device for displaying the results of the comparing of data of the first and second sets. The computing system also includes a coupling device for coupling the first trans-mitting means to the first receiviny means for serially conducting bits of the first set of da-ta from the first transmitting device to the first receiving device. In one embodiment of the invention, the coupling means includes an optiGal transmitting ;
device in the first computing device for transmitting light ; signals representative of data of the first set to the first receiving device and a first optical receiving device in the second computing device for receiving the light signals from the first optical transmitting device. In one embodiment of the invention, the first and second computing devices respectively include keys for ef~ecting manual entry of the first and second sets of data into the first and second computing devices, respectively. The second computing device includes a microprocessor which computes a compatability score between the first and second sets of data.

- 5a -Brief Descript_ n of the Drawing Figure 1 is a diagram showing two portable proces sing units coupled together according to the invention.
Figure 2 is a diagram showing a portable processor having no data input keys, wherein a remote inputting device is utilized to enter a set of data into the portable processor.
Figures 3A and 3s together, constitute a schematic ~ ;
diagram of circuitry of one embodiment of the invention.
Figure 4 is a waveform showing the format of data 1~ serially transmitted by the portable processor circuit of Figures 3A and 3B.
" Figure 5 is a block diagram showing a complementary metal oxide semieonductor embodiment of the portable processor o~ the invention.
Figures 6A through 6E constitute a flow chart of the stored program which controls operation of the portable pro-cessor implemented by the circuitry of Figures 3A through 3E.
Figure 7 is a block diagram illustrating inputting of data from a portable processor to a central data processing system.
Figure 8 is a block diagram illustrating a central data proeessing system modifying the stored program of a portable proeessor.
Figure 9 is a diagram showing optieal coupling devices to effeet transmission of data between two portable processors.
Figure 10 is a diagram of a data comparison processor incorporated in a pocket calculator.
Figure 11 is a partial diagram of a wristwatch incorporating a data comparison processor and a calculator.

3%t~

Description of the Invention Figure 1 shows a portable processor 10 having a display unit 39 including four separate units 41, ~2, 43, and 44, each of which is a seven segment alphanumeric light emit-ting diode display unit. Portable processor unit 10 includes a switch 11, which may be utilized to connect power to the intexnal microprocessor, as explained subsequently. Portable processor unit 10 also includes five data entry keys 55, 56, 57, 58 and 59. Portable processor unit 10 includes five control - ~' keys, labelled 60, 61, 62, 63 and 64.
Portable processor unit 10 includes sockets 70', 71', and 72', which may be utilized to temporarily connect portable processor 10 to an identical or similar portable processor 10'.
Portable processor 10 further includes extendible prongs 70, 71, and 72, which may be extended outwardly from the side of portable processor 10 by means of lever 13, which slides to the right in slot 15, so that prongs 70, 71, and 72 are inserted into portable processor unit 10'.
As explained subsequently in greater detail, each of porkable processors 10 and 10' of Figure 1 store at least one set of personal data which has been previously entered into the respective portable processors by means of the above-mentioned control keys and data keys of the respective portable processors. Each of portable processors 10 and 10' include a microprocessor and a memory for storing a set of data and an operating program. Each portable processor stores an operating program which permits that unit to compare its own stored data set with the data set from the other portable processor, compute a "score" which indicates the level of personal compatibility between the persons from whom the two data se-ts were obtained.

As subsequen-tly explained with reference to Figures lO and ll, the por-table processors of the invention can be incorporated into ordinary pocket calculators or electronic wristwatches. Differently shaped units could be utilized for men's units and women's unlts. By incorporating ~.
all of the digital circuitry on a single integrated chip and utilizing miniature display units and input keys, the portable processors may be made sufficiently small to be easily carried in a pocket or purse, or even worn as an ornament.
If desired, the keys shown in Figure 1 may be eliminated, to provide a por-table processor such as 110 in Figure 2, and data may be entered -therein by means of a remote keyboard input unit lll as shown in Figure 2. Remote input unit 111 is coupled by means of an appropriate cable con-nector to portable processor unit 110. When two portable processors such as llO in Figure 2 are mated, they automatically exchange data and compute a compatibility score, which is then displayed in the display unit 39.
The detailed circuitry lOA for a working model of portable processor unit lO is shown in Figures 3A and 3B.
Referring now to Figures 3A and 3B, circuitry lOA
of portable processor lO includes microprocessor 12, which is an eight bit microprocessor. Microprocessor 12 can be implemented by utilizing the ~OS Technology Inc. model 6502 microprocessor; the same model of microprocessor is also manufactured by Synertek Corporation and North American Rockwell Corporation. A crystal oscillator circuit 14 pro-duces the clock signals required for operation of micro-processor 12. Microprocessor 12 has its data terminals D0-D7 coupled to the corresponding conductors of bidirectional data bus 16. The microprocessor address outputs A0-A9, indicated generally by reference numeral 18, are connected -to the cor-responding address inputs A0-A6 of random access memory 22 ; and to the corresponding address lnputs A0-A9 of read only memory 24.
Random access memory 22 can be implemented by utilizing a Motorola MCM6810 128 word by eight bit static random access memory. Two chip select inputs, CSl and CS2 of random access memory 22 are connected to the A14 and A15 address outputs, respectively, of microprocessor 12.
Random access memory 22 has its data input/output terminals ;
connected to bidirectional data bus 16.
, Random access memory 22 is utilized to store a plurality of pairs of values of X and Y r hereinafter referred to as X-Y data pairs, wherein X and Y are variables which represent answers given in response to questions -from a qùestionnaire and entered into portable processor lO. The questionnaire includes a plurality of questions which are grouped in pairs, each pair including a "X" question and a "Y" question. The response to each "X" question may be selected as an integer from 1 to 5, the numbers from 1 to 5 designating the "degree" or "weight" of the "X" variable for that question. For each "Y" question, the response selected is also an integer from 1 to 5. In this case, the integers from l to 5 indicate the "importance" of the previous "X"
variable to the person responding to the questionnaire.
The following six questions and selectable responses constitute three pairs of "X" ~uestions, and corresponding "Y" questions illustrative of the type and manner of data which may be entered into random access memory 22.

2~

. 1. My education is:
X
1 more than a college degree 2 a college degree 3 some college : 4 graduated from high school 5 less than high school diploma 2. My mate's education is:
y .
; 10 1 not impor-tant 2 somewhat of interest 3 at my own level

4 important to be at my level :~ 5 essential to be at my level 3. I believe that Bible is:
X
1 the literal truth 2 most, but not all of the Bible is literally true :~
3 some of the Bible is literally true, but all of it stands for the truth 4 the Bible is of no significance to me the Bible is merely writings of historical value 4. My mate's opinion of the Bible is~
Y
1 not important 2 somewhat of importance 3 desirable to be like mine 4 important to be like mine essential to be like mine

5. I prefer to live in:
X

1 a rural area 2 a town far from the city 3 a town near large city 4 a small city (50,000 to 150,000) a large city ;

6. My mate's preference:
Y : ,~
~ 1 ls of no importance -. 2 is somewhat of interest ' 3 desirable to be like mine 4 important to be like mine essential -to be like mine For example, question 1 is a "X" question. The ` respondent to the questionnaire selects one of the digits (1 to 5) and enters it as a value of X for the first X-Y data pair. He then selects one of the responses (1-5) to question 2, being the "Y" question of the first pair of questions, and enters the selected digit as the value of Y for the first ~`
X-Y data pair. In a similar manner, a large amount of data in the form of X-Y data pairs in response to a plurality of additional pairs o questions may be entered into random access memory 22.
Referring again to ~igures 3A and 3B, read only memory 24 can be implemented utilizing an Intel model 2758 erasable programmable read only memory. Address inputs A0-A9 of programmable read only memory 24 are connected to the corresponding A0-A9 inputs of microprocessor 12 by means of address bus 18. A chip select input is connected to conductor 26, which is also connected to inverter 27. Inverter 27 pro-duces the complement of the A15 address output of microproces-sor 12. Data bus -terminals D0-D7 of read only memory 24 are connected to bidirectional data bus 16.
Portable processor 10 includes a "power on reset"
circuit 30, including a "one-shot" integrated circuit 32, which may be implemented utilizing a National Semiconductor LM555 "one-shot" integrated circuit. The output of "power on reset" circuit 30 is applied to the reset inputs of micro-processor 12 and interface adaptor 34.

. The "power on reset" input signal produced on conductor 33 enables microprocessor 12 to internally initialize its circuitry, and also clears the appropriate internal registers of interface adaptor 34 to permit proper "start up" operation of portable processor 10.
Interface adaptor 34 iS implemen.ted utilizing a MOS Technology model 6520 programmable peripheral interface adaptor, which is identical to the Motorola MC6820 peripheral interface adaptor. The D0-D7 terminals of interface adaptor 34 are connected to bidirectional data bus 16. The interrupt conductors IRQA and IRQB are connected to conductor 36, which ~ ::
is connected to the IRQ input of microprocessor 12 and to : the five volt power supply by means of a resistor, which maintains conductor 36 at a logical "1" so that the interrupt circuitry of microprocessor 12 remains inactive. The register :
select inputs and chip select inputs of interface adaptor 34 are connected to the A0 and Al address inputs of microprocessor .
12 and to the A14 and A15 address outputs of microprocessor 12, - .
respectively.
Interface adaptor 34 has two eight-bit peripheral data busses, designated PBO-PB7 and PA0-PA7. The PBO-PB6 peripheral data bus outputs of interface adaptor 34 are utilized to drive eight inverters in block 40 oE Figure 3B, which inverters function as display drivers to drive the raw inputs of display units 41, 42, 43, and 44. Display units 41, 42, 43, and 44 may be either light emitting diode alphanumeric display units or liquid crystal alphanumeric display units. Peripheral data bus outputs PAO-PA3 of interface adaptor 34 are utilized to drive four inverters in block 46 to Figure 3B, the outputs of which inverters are connected to drive the bases of PNP
transistors 48, 49, 50, and 51, respectively. The collectors of transistors 48, 49, 50, and 51 are connected to drive the column inputs of alphanumeric display devices 41, ~2, 43, and 44 respectively.
The PA0-PA4 terminals of interface adaptor 34 are utilized to sense switch closures of five data switches generally indicated in block 54 of Figure 3B and five control switches in block 60 of Figure 3B. Each of data switches 55, ~
56, 57, 58, and 59 has a first terminal connected to the ~;
peripheral data bus terminals PA0, PAl, PA2, PA3, and PA4, respectively, which peripheral data bus terminals are initially programmed as inputs to interface adaptor 34 such that the switch closure information is transferred via bidirectional data bus 16 to microprocessor 12 during system operation. ;
Each of control switches 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 each also has a ~irst terminal connected, respectively, to the corresponding first terminals of the above data switches.
Data switches 55, 56, 57, 58 and 59 correspond to the above-described selectab~le values of the X variables and Y variables, namely the digits 1-5. Each of the data switches also has a second terminal connected to conductor 55. Conductor 55 is connected to the PA6 peripheral data bus of interface adaptor 34. The PA6 peripheral data bus terminal is programmed as an output having a predetermined ~ , logic level thereon during system operation. Each of the above control switches also has a second terminal connected to conductor 61j which is connected to the PA7 peripheral data bus terminal of interface adaptor 34. The PA7 peripheral data bus terminal is also programmed as an output during system operation. The control switches 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 are designated as the X, Y, increment (INC), decrement (DEC), and transmit (XMIT~ switches in Figure 3B.
The X and Y switches 61 and 62 are utilized ~or the purpose of determining whether the presently selected data B~

value inputted to portable processor 10 is a "X" value or a "Y" value. Increment switch 63 is utilized to increment to the next stored X-Y pair in random access memory 22 to permit displaying of the corresponding stored values of X and Y
for that X-Y data pair. Similarly, decrement switch 64 permits decrementing to the preceding X-Y pair stored in random access memory to permit display of the stored values thereof.
Transmit switch 65 is utiIized to cause the portable processor to initiate transmission of a reference pulse (as shown by reference numeral 80 in Figure 4) to portable processor 10', as shown in Figure 1, thereby initiating transmission of data stored in random access memory 22 of portable processor 10 to portable processor 10' to permit portable processor 10' to compare such received data with corresponding stored data in portable processor 10', as previously mentioned (and subse-quently described in greater detail).
As indicated above, with reference to Figure 1, all communication between computers 10 and 10' occurs over transmlt line 72 and receive line 70. Transmit line 72 is connected to the CA2 terminal of interface adaptor 3~, which can be programmed as either an input or an output of interface adaptor 34 durlng the initial start-up operation of the portable processor, so that stored data can be transferred from microprocessor 12 via a predetermined conductor of bidirectional data bus 16 into a corresponding bit of an internal register of interface adaptor 34 and then shifted serially out on transmit bus 72 to second portable processor 10' .
Receive conductor 70 permits portable processor 10 ; 30 to receive data in serial format from portable processor 10'.
Receive line 70 is connected to the PB7 terminal of interface adaptor 34. The PB7 terminal of interface adaptor 34 may be -- 1~

g initially programmed as an input by the operating software, so that data received from portable processor 10' is trans-mitted from interface adaptor 34 to microprocessor 12 via bidirectional data bus 16. The roles of transmit line 72 and receive line 70 may be reversed by the operating software, depending upon which of portable processors 10 and 10' has its transmit switch 65 closed first.
In order to avoid the.necessity of expensive precision timing circuitry for detecting whether signals transmitted on lines 70 and 72 are logical "ones" or "zeros", the operating software stored in read only memory 24 is programmed to permit each portable processor to transmit an initial signal to the other unit in response to activating of transmit switch 65, so that the receiving portable processor can measure the width of a reference pulse 80, as shown in Figure 4. The waveform shown in Figure 4 illustrates initial reference pulse 80, which has a width equal to the time duration between edge 82 and edge 84 of the subsequent pulse 83 which, for purposes of illustration, is chosen to have a width between points 84 and 85 equal to one third of the time elapsed between points 84 and 87. The elapsed time between points 84 and 87 is equal to the elapsed time between points 81 and 84. A pulse having ~ ;
a width equal to the width of pulse 83 followed by a "low"
level equal to the time be-tween points 85 and 87 is inter-preted by the receiving unit to be a logical "zero" on the basis of the initially measured width of reference pulse 80;
a wider pulse is interpreted as a logical "one'i. Thus, rela~ively imprecise timing generators such as 14 may be utilized for portable processors 10 and 10' without harming the reliability of detecting of logic levels of data serially transmitted between the two portable processors.

An algorithm which per~orms the interpretation of the received logic levels is stored in read only memory 24.
This algorithm awaits leading edge 81 of the reference pulse 80 received by the receiving portable processor and counts the number of machine cycles which occur until the arrival of edge 82. The receiving portable processor stores this count as a reference. The duration of each succeeding pulse received by the receiving portable processor is then compared to the ; stored reference, and if such duration is less the duration of the reference, that succeeding pulse is interpreted as a :
logical "zero", and if its duration exceeds the duration of : the reference pulse, it is interpreted as a logical "one".
A flow chart of the operating program stored in read only memory 24 is shown in Figures 6A-E. Referring now to Figures 6A-E, the stored program operates to continually produce signals required to display the appropriate alphanumeric characters on display elements 41-44 of Figures 1, 2, and 3B. .
The four alphanumeric characters represent the values of .~
selected X-Y data pairs stored in random access memory 22 .
: 20 or "scores" resulting from comparison of data stored in one of the portable processors and compared with corresponding data received from another portable processor. It will be ; recalled that there are a predetermined number of X-Y data pairs stored in random access memory 22. Each time the stored program displays one of the four digits, as indicated in ; block 124 of Figure 6A, the program enters decision block 126 to determine whether a "receive and full" condition is met.
If the 7'receive and full" condition has not been met, the : program enters decision block 128 to check the keyboard to determine if any of the data keys 55-59 or control keys 61-65 have been depressed. If none of the keys have been depressed, the program re-enters display routine 12~ to cause the next ~8%~

digit to be displayed~ Thus, the four alphanumeric display units are operated at approximately a twenty-five percent duty cycle at a sufficiently fast rate that the human eye will perceive all four display digits as being continuously displayed.
If the program detects that a key has been depressed, the program exits from the display routine. When a signal is received indicating that the depressed key has been released, the program re-enters display subroutine 124. If the key has not been released, decision block 132 i5 entered to determine which key is depressed. If a data input key has been depressed, the program then determines whether the switch closure represents a "X" data input or a "Y" data input. If the switch closure represents a "X" data input, that value of X is stored and a "1ag" is set to establish that the next data number received will be a "Y" data value. The program then selects an appropriate subroutine represented by block 122 to display the value of the inputted "X" data number.
If it is determined in decision block 134 that the inputted number is a "Y" value, that value is stored and the "number" of the X-Y pair is incremented and a "flag" is set to establish that the next data number inputted will be a "X" value~ If the X-Y pair number being inputted is equal to the maximum X-Y pair number permitted to be stored in random access memory 22, the program causes display routine 124 to display the word FULL in the alphanumeric display elements after that X-Y pair is inputted. Decision block 126 then performs the function of causing the program to enter the RECEIVE subroutine shown in Figure 6D.
Decision block 130 causes the program to jump back into display rou-tine 124 if the depressed key has not yet been released, but the information corresponding thereto has already been processed. In the event that the information corresponding to the still-depressed ]cey has not yet been processed, the program determines whether that key was a data input key or a control key in decision block 132.
If the program determines in block 132 that the depressed key is a data key and then determines (in decision block 134) that the inputted data number is an X value, the data number is stored in the appropriate part of random access memory 22, as indicated by block 136 of Figure 6A. The program then re-enters the display mode and further executes the instructions represented by b~ocks 122, 124, 126 and 128 of Figure 6A.
If the data number is a "Y" value, that value is stored in the appropriate location of random access memory 22.
Also, the current X-Y pair number is incremented, as indicated by block 142, since the X number and Y number of a X-Y data pair are always entered sequentially. The program then again enters the display mode and waits for additional key closures.
Each time the X-Y pair number is incremented, the program also checks to determine whether the maximum permitted X-Y pair number has been reached. If this condition is present, the program causes the display unit to display the word E`ULL, as indicated by block 144. Once the maximum X-Y pair number has been attained, all of the data to be compared has been entered ; into the portable processor. A flag bit is then set to permit the portable processor to receive data from another portable processor coupled thereto, as shown in Figure 1. In block 126, if the X-Y data pairs have all been inputted and the FULL condition has been attained, the program checks to determine if any data has been received on the receive line every time a keyboard check operation is performed.
If both interconnected portable processors 10 and 10' are in the "FULI." condition, either portable processor can -- lR --~ r~

receive an incoming digit transmitted by the other por-table processor, or the users can push the transmit button 65 on one of the two portable processors, thereby initiating transmission of X and Y data pairs between the two portable processors. Comparison of the two stored data sets in the respective portable processors then proceeds.
For a portable processor operating in the "receive"
mode, the received reference pulse 80 (Figure 4) is followed by four bits which are interpreted as logical "ones" or "zeros" by comparing their width to the width of reference pulse 80. The four bits represent a binary coded decimal digit. By convention, the first digit received is the first X value received from the sending portable processor, referred to as the first portable processor in the following discussion.
The receiving portable processor, referred to as the second ~ ;
portable processor in the following discussion, compares the received X value with the corresponding value of X stored in its own memory and stores the difference, as subsequently explained. Next, the second por-table processor sends its first X value to the first portable processor, which also compares its own stored value of X with the value of X received from the second portable processor. The second portable processor then awaits reception of the next digit, which, by convention is a Y digit of the first X-Y pair transmitted by the first `
portable processor. The second portable processor then processes that value of Y to determine and store the larger of the two Y values of the two first corresponding X-Y data pairs, as subsequently explained. The second portable proces-sor then sends the Y value of its first s-tored X-Y pair to the first portable processor, which also processes that Y
value in the same manner. At this point, both the first and ~82~g second portable processors each store the "partial results"
resulting from the above-described computations.
After the above-described procedure has been completed for all X-Y data pairs stored in both first and second portable processors, the cumulative stored results are processed as indicated in block 178. The result is displayed as indicated in block 179 of Figure 6s, for the first portable processor. slocks 168 and 169 of Figure 6D
apply to the second portable processor.
Once both portable processors are in the "display result" modes corresponding to blocks 169 of Figure 6D and 179 of Figure 6B, both portable processors are ready for new X and Y data to be entered or to perform another data comparison with other portable processors.
The PROCESS X subroutine shown in block 172 o:E
Figure 6B is shown in further detail in Figure 6C, and includes the steps of obtaining the difference between the stored and received values of X for the current X-Y data pair, determining whether the difference is negative, complementing the result if the difference is negative, and re-entering the TRANSMIT
subroutine of Figure 6B and entering the SEND Y block 173 of E'igure 6B. The PROCESS Y subroutine 175 is shown in Figure 6E, and involves determining and storing the larger of the corresponding Y values of the first and second portable processors and multiplying that larger value by the previously saved magnitude of the difference between the corresponding X values for the same X-Y data pair. The TRANSMIT and RECEIVE
subroutines each accumulate running totals of the par-tially processed results, as indicated by block 166 of Figure 6D
and block 176 of Figure 6B. Blocks 168 of Figure 6D and 178 of Figure 6B may incorporate any suitable subroutines or algorithms for interpreting, scaling, or otherwlse processing 2~

the cumulative results in order to compute a "score" representa-tive of the desired comparison between the stored data sets of the first and second portable processors.
The quantity which results when the magnitude of the difference between the corresponding X values which are compared as above is referred to herein as a "difference term".
A difference term establishes the differences between the belief or preferences of the two individuals whose data sets are being compared with respect to the subject matter of the particular X-Y data pair. The value of Y which is obtained by selecting the larger of the compared Y terms as described above is referred to herein as the "amplifier term". An amplifier term represents the level of importance of the particular subject matter in the eyes of the one of the two persons who are comparing their data who believes it to be the most important. Thus, little weight will be accorded to subject matter which neither party believes is very important to compatibility with a person of the opposite sex.
Low power consumption is an important consideration in implementing the portable processor of the invention. It is important that the power level be low so that small batteries can be utilized to power the random access memory 22 without danger of loss of stored data in a short period of time because of battery failure. A block diagram of a low power CMOS
(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) integrated circuit implementation of the circuitry 10A of the portable processor unit is shown in Figure 5, wherein CMOS circui-try is utilized to implement microprocessor 12', random access memory 22', read only memory 24' and input/output circuitry 34'. All of these circuit elements, in combination, can be powered utilizing several 1.5 disc-shaped batteries of the type commonly utilized to power electronic wristwatches. ~he liquid crystal 32~9 display unit 39' is utilized in this embodiment of the inven-tion to further reduce the power drain on the batteries over the power drain which would result from use of light emitting .
diode display units. Because of the very low power dissipa-tion of CMOS circuitry, the stored data set may be maintained in random access memory 22 for a length o:E time approaching the shelf life of the batteries for the embodiment of the invention of Figure 5. To further reduce the power drain on the batteries, switch ll, as shown in Figure l, can be utilized to turn off power to all elements of the portable processor except random access memory 22 when the portable processor is not being utilized.
It should be recognized that other types of personal data than data relating to compatibility of individuals as potential marriage partners can be compared, according to the present invention. For example, data concerning an ;
individuals professional abilities and aptitudes can be stored. .
Potential employers can also input sets of data, corresponding `.
:,: .
to their requirements for pote~~.tial employees, and the portable : ~:
processor can be connected to the employerls computer, which . can be a central data processin~ system or a similar portable processor, in order to obtain a quick matching of the applicant's qualifications with the qualifications required for a particular position.
Another category of personal data which can be stored in a portable processor of the invention i5 medical history data. This type of information can then be inputted to a central data processing system of a hospital or insurance company. The embodiment of the invention shown in Figure 7 includes a portable processor 10 coupled by means of busses 71 and 72 to a central data processing system. Thus, the portable processor can be utilized not only as a data compari-- 22 ~

son device, but also as a data storage device utilized as a means for conveniently inputting a large amount of personal data concerning an individual into a laxger data processing system for analysis by the larger data processing system.
The latter data processing system can then modify or update (on the basis of a physical examination, for example~ -the stored data, and write it back into the portable processor 10 . ! ~
According to one embodiment of the invention, different stored algorithms compare process such different subsets of data categories and produce separate "compatibility"
scores for each such subset, as well as an overall personal compatibility score. One embodiment of the invention has additional or dual function input keys to allow the user to select and display the separate subgroup scores. In one embodiment of the invention, the additional input keys are utilized by the user to select any particular subgroup or combination of subgroups of data. The portable processors then perform the previously described transmitting and comparing operations only for the selected subgroup or sub-groups. A compatibility score is then computed and displayed only for the selected su~roup or combination of subgroups.
In the above~described embodiment, wherein the stored data relates to professional qualifications of a person, that person inputs data into the portable processor in response to a questionnaire presented to him by a potential employer, trade or professional organization.
Yet another embodiment of the invention utilizes an electrically reprogrammable read only memory and means for coupling the electrically reprogrammable read only memory to a central data processing system which a]ters or updates the operating software of the portable processor by "writing"

2~v~

improved algorithms in the electrically reprogrammable read only memory.
Another embodiment of the invention includes a control which permits a first portable processox to retain the personal information received by the first portable processor from a second portable processor during the above described data comparison operation. The data can be retained in the first portable processor with permission of the owner of the second portable processor, wherein the permission is given in the form of activation of the control of the second portable processor, enabling the information to be retained in the first portable processor. The owner of the first portable processor unit can then input this information into a centralized data processing system to obtain a more compre-hensive analysis of his or her compatibility with the owner of the second portable processor.
Figure 9 shows an embodiment of the invention which avoids the need for sockets 70', 71.', and 72' and corresponding extendible prongs 70, 71, and 72 of Figure 1. In Figure 9, portable processors 10 and 10' in combination include two optical couplers designated by reference numerals 269 and 270.
Optical coupler 270 includes a light emitting diode 274 housed within portable processor 10 and connected to and controlled by circuit 271 responsive to transmit conductor 72 of Figure 3~. Circuitry 271 for activating light emitting diode 274 can readily be implemented by those skilled in the art, and therefore the details are not set forth herein. Portable processor 10 includes a transparent window designated by reference numerals 273, which window permits light emitted by light emitting diode 274 to propagate to the base of photo-transistor 278. Phototransistor 278 is housed in port-able processor 10' and is positioned adjacent a second trans-æ~

parent window 279 in portable processor 10', so that light, designated by reference numeral 281, emitted by light emitting diode 274 propagates to photo-transistor 278, increasing its collector-emitter current. The increased collector-emitter current of photo-transistor 278 is detected ~ ;
bv circuitry 277, which circuitry is connected to a receive conductor such as receive conductor 70 of Figure 3B.
Circuitry for detecting the increased photo-translstor collector-emitter current to produce a corresponding digital signal to be applied to the receive circuitry of portable processor 10' can readily be implemented by those s]cilled in the art. Consequently, ci.rcuitry 277 is not set forth in detail. Seal gaskets, designated by reference numeral 275, are formed around the perimeters of transparent windows 273 and 279 to prevent loss of light and reception of spurious light during communication of data between portable processor 10 and portable processor 10' by means of optical coupler 270.
Optical coupler 269 is formed, similarly to optical coupler 270, except that light emitking diode 283, responsive to circuitry 282, is housed in portable processor 10', and photo-transistor 284, whose current is detected by circuitry 272, is housed in portable processor 10. Thus, each portable processor can transmit data to the other and receive data from the other, so that the two data sets stored in the respective portable processors can be compared in the manner as previously described with respect to Figures 1, 3A and ~ -3~.
The portable processor of the invention can be incorporated in combination with a variety of other electronic computing devices, such as an ordinary pocket calculator 10'' shown in Figure 10. Pocket calculator 10'' includes an Z~

ordinary calculator keyboard, generally designated by reference numeral 350. ~Iowever, pocket calculator 10'' a]so includes a group of keys generally designated by 351 for permitting operation of pocket calculator 10'' as a portable processor to compare a set of personal data stored therein with corresponding sets of personal data stored in other mateable portable processors. Pocket calculator 10'' includes a "data comparison mode" input key 352 for activating circuitry such as the circuitry shown in Figures 3A and 3B to set device 10'' in the data comparison mode. "Calculate mode"
key 353 sets pocket calculator 10'' to a mode wherein keyboard 350 activates conventional calculator circuitry (not shown) to provide ordinary calculator functions such as add, subtract, multiply, and divide. For either mode of operation, alpha-numeric display unit 39 displays the results of operation of pocket calculator lO"in either the calcùlator mode or in the data set comparison mode. "Select" key 353 permits displaying of the values of an X-~ data pair number inputted to pocket calculator 10'' when it is in the data comparison utilizing keys 350. "Enter" key 354 permits entry of X and/or Y of a previously selected X/~ data pair selected by means of "select"
key 353 and keyboard 350. The respective X and Y values are selected by means of keyboard 350. Transmit key 65 operates in the manner previously explained with respect to Figures 1, 3A and 3B. Device 10'' can communicate with another portable processor by means of optical coupling devices 270', which includes a light emitting diode and a photo-transistor, housed in separate compartments and as explained previously with reference to Figure 9. Alternatively, extendible prongs and corresponding sockets can be utili~ed, as previously explained with respect to Figure 1.

The portable processor data comparison device of the present invention can be incorporated within an electronic wristwatch, as shown in Figure 11. The embodimen-t 110' shown in Figure 11 incorporates housing 284 and wristband 282.
I,iquid crystal display 39 displays the time of day when the wristwatch processor 110' is operating in the "time" mode, and displays the values of the X-Y data pairs being entered, as previously explained, or the results of a comparison of a stored set of personal data with a stored set of personal data of a separate unit, as previously e~plained. A miniature keyboard, generally indicated by reference numerals 349, includes data input keys and control keys, and, if an electronic calculator is also incorporated in wristwatch/pro-cessor, 110', the usual calculator function keys. The keys are sufficiently small to be depressed with a pencil tip or the like. A solar panel 280 is incorporated to provide power to charge the batteries which operate the time-keeping, computing, and data processing circuitry incorporated in this embodiment of the invention. Additional control keys such as 346, 347 and 348 are mounted on the front and sides of housing 284 to permit the user to easily chanye modes of operation of the device. An optical coupling unit 270' includes a photodiode in one compartment and a photo-transistor in another compartment, so that each can be mated with a corresponding optical coupling unit of a separate portable data processing device to permit bidirectional transmission of data between unit 110' and a corresponding unit.

~ ;

Claims (10)

THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. A system for comparing first and second sets of data, said system comprising:
(a) first and second computing devices, at least one of said first and second computing devices being portable;
(b) first storage means in said first computing device for storing said first set of data, and second storage means in said second computing device for storing said second set of data;
(c) first transmitting means in said first computing device for transmitting data of said first set from said first computing device to said second computing device;
(d) first receiving means in said second computing device for receiving data of said first set from said first computing device;
(e) first comparing means in said second computing device responsive to said second storage means and said first receiving means for comparing data of said second set with received data of said first set; and (f) first display means in said second computing device responsive to said first comparing means for displaying first information representative of the results of said comparing.
2. The system of claim 1 wherein said first computing device further includes second transmitting means for trans-mitting data of said second data set from said second computing device to said first computing device, second comparing means responsive to said first storage means for comparing data of said first set with received data from said second set, and second display means responsive to said second comparing means for displaying information representative of said comparing in said first portable computing device.
3. The system of claim 1 further including coupling means coupling said first transmitting means to said first receiving means for serially conducting bits of said first set of data to said first receiving means.
4. The portable computing device of claim 3 wherein said coupling means includes:
(a) first optical transmitting means responsive to said first transmitting means for transmitting light signals representative of data of said first set of data to said first receiving means; and (b) first optical receiving means coupled to said first receiving means for receiving said light signals from said first optical transmitting means.
5. The system of claim 1 wherein said first portable computing device further includes first data entry means for entering said first set of data into said first storage means.
6. The system of claim 5 wherein said first data entry means includes a plurality of depressable keys and a plurality of switches activated, respectively, by said depressable keys.
7. The system of claim 1 wherein said first and second storage means each include random access memories.

- Page 2 of Claims -
8. The system of claim 7 wherein said first portable computing device includes first microprocessor means coupled to said first storage means and said first transmitting means for controlling said transmitting of said data of said first set.
9. The system of claim 2 wherein said first and second sets of data include personal data of first and second persons, respectively.
10. The system of claim 9 further including computing means in said second computing device responsive to said first comparing means for computing a compatability score between said first and second persons, said first information containing said compatability score.

- Page 3 of Claims -
CA 324163 1978-04-04 1979-03-26 Method and portable apparatus for comparison of stored sets of data Expired CA1108299A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US89334278 true 1978-04-04 1978-04-04
US893,342 1978-04-04

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA1108299A true CA1108299A (en) 1981-09-01

Family

ID=25401403

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 324163 Expired CA1108299A (en) 1978-04-04 1979-03-26 Method and portable apparatus for comparison of stored sets of data

Country Status (5)

Country Link
JP (1) JPS6233628B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1108299A (en)
DE (1) DE2913310A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2422203B1 (en)
GB (1) GB2017988B (en)

Families Citing this family (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3011729C2 (en) * 1980-03-26 1982-05-19 Christoph 8219 Rimsting De Geissler
DE3014882C2 (en) * 1980-04-17 1983-08-11 Porst, Hannsheinz, 8500 Nuernberg, De
GB2079995B (en) * 1980-07-16 1984-07-11 Suwa Seikosha Kk Portable data processing apparatus
JPS59186063A (en) * 1983-04-07 1984-10-22 Shiibon Keshohin Sogo Honpo:Kk Makeup guide device
JPS60144154U (en) * 1984-03-07 1985-09-25
FR2607340B1 (en) * 1986-11-21 1989-03-31 Egregore Ste Civile Inventeurs game-like device televideo communication establishment more corresponding
DE4005448A1 (en) * 1990-02-21 1991-08-22 Jaroschinsky Achim Matching two personal data groups - selectively exchanging data via terminals which perform data group comparison
JPH04176235A (en) * 1990-11-08 1992-06-23 Nintendo Co Ltd Communication adaptor for game machine
US5459859A (en) * 1991-06-18 1995-10-17 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Apparatus and system for providing information required for meeting with desired person while travelling
DE19812469A1 (en) * 1998-03-23 1999-09-30 Angewandte Digital Elektronik Procedures for the use of watches in conjunction with smart cards
GB9919704D0 (en) * 1999-08-19 1999-10-20 Ncr Int Inc Digital data storage apparatus
DE102005041833A1 (en) * 2005-09-02 2007-03-15 Up Management Gmbh & Co Erzengel Food & Non-Food Distributions Kg Apparatus and method for finding two mutually matching persons

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3816722A (en) * 1970-09-29 1974-06-11 Nippon Electric Co Computer for calculating the similarity between patterns and pattern recognition system comprising the similarity computer
US4005388A (en) * 1973-11-21 1977-01-25 Termiflex Corporation Hand-held interactive terminal
US4079365A (en) * 1974-05-21 1978-03-14 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Group response and indication system
JPS5198924A (en) * 1975-02-26 1976-08-31

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JPS5513492A (en) 1980-01-30 application
DE2913310A1 (en) 1979-10-25 application
GB2017988A (en) 1979-10-10 application
JPS6233628B2 (en) 1987-07-22 grant
GB2017988B (en) 1982-07-28 grant
FR2422203A1 (en) 1979-11-02 application
FR2422203B1 (en) 1984-11-30 grant
CA1108299A1 (en) grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Ullman et al. The importance of drawing in the mechanical design process
Starner et al. Augmented reality through wearable computing
US6157982A (en) System and method for remotely managing memory in a portable information device from an external computer
US6556222B1 (en) Bezel based input mechanism and user interface for a smart watch
Ziefle et al. Mental models of a cellular phone menu. Comparing older and younger novice users
US3932859A (en) Electronic dictionary with word length responsive decoder
US6008810A (en) Mobile client computer programmed for system message display
US4763291A (en) Remote display device for a microcomputer
Edwards et al. Decision technology
US5873045A (en) Mobile client computer with radio frequency transceiver
US5905486A (en) Mobile client computer programmed to combine cursor, control and input functions
Jamison et al. Semiorders and the theory of choice
US5959611A (en) Portable computer system with ergonomic input device
US4158236A (en) Electronic dictionary and language interpreter
US4162610A (en) Electronic calendar and diary
US4218760A (en) Electronic dictionary with plug-in module intelligence
US4905213A (en) Medication reminder
US20070238936A1 (en) Portable Electronic Medical Assistant
US6266295B1 (en) System and method of displaying times corresponding to events on a calendar
US4425627A (en) Intelligent prompting terminal apparatus
US5812131A (en) Mobile client computer programmed to process table displays
US3955355A (en) Electronic calculator watch structures
US5784060A (en) Mobile client computer programmed to display lists and hexagonal keyboard
US5864340A (en) Mobile client computer programmed to predict input
US5805158A (en) Copying predicted input between computer systems

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
MKEX Expiry