AU2013327132B2 - Product securement and management system - Google Patents

Product securement and management system Download PDF

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Publication number
AU2013327132B2
AU2013327132B2 AU2013327132A AU2013327132A AU2013327132B2 AU 2013327132 B2 AU2013327132 B2 AU 2013327132B2 AU 2013327132 A AU2013327132 A AU 2013327132A AU 2013327132 A AU2013327132 A AU 2013327132A AU 2013327132 B2 AU2013327132 B2 AU 2013327132B2
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AU
Australia
Prior art keywords
product
system
shelf
window
door
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Active
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AU2013327132A
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AU2013327132A1 (en
Inventor
Tony DIPAOLO
Stephen N. Hardy
John Wildman
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RTC Ind Inc
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RTC Ind Inc
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Priority to US201261708967P priority Critical
Priority to US61/708,967 priority
Priority to US13/858,574 priority
Priority to US13/858,574 priority patent/US9526351B2/en
Application filed by RTC Ind Inc filed Critical RTC Ind Inc
Priority to PCT/US2013/063093 priority patent/WO2014055664A1/en
Publication of AU2013327132A1 publication Critical patent/AU2013327132A1/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of AU2013327132B2 publication Critical patent/AU2013327132B2/en
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F1/00Racks for dispensing merchandise; Containers for dispensing merchandise
    • A47F1/04Racks or containers with arrangements for dispensing articles, e.g. by means of gravity or springs
    • A47F1/12Racks or containers with arrangements for dispensing articles, e.g. by means of gravity or springs dispensing from the side of an approximately horizontal stack
    • A47F1/125Racks or containers with arrangements for dispensing articles, e.g. by means of gravity or springs dispensing from the side of an approximately horizontal stack with an article-pushing device
    • A47F1/126Racks or containers with arrangements for dispensing articles, e.g. by means of gravity or springs dispensing from the side of an approximately horizontal stack with an article-pushing device the pushing device being urged by spring means

Abstract

A merchandising system (2000) that improves the merchandising of product by limiting the number and the frequency with which product can be removed from, for example, a merchandising shelf. The merchandising system may include a base (2030)configured to support product and a housing (2050) configured to engage the base (2030). The housing (2050) may comprise a top wall (2052), a first side wall (2054), a second side wall (2054), and a front retaining wall. The merchandise system (2000) may be configured to hold a number of products, such as cans (for example, baby formula cans) in the merchandise system that would be accessible to the customer one at a time out of the front of the merchandise system. The front of each merchandise system may include its own individual security window attached to the merchandise system that allows the customer to remove one can at a time.

Description

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 PRODUCT SECUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Cross Reference to Related Applications 5 This application claims benefit to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/708,967, filed October 2, 2012. This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial No. 13/858,574, filed on April 8, 2013, which is a continuation of U.S. Application Serial No. 13/544,363, filed on July 9, 2012, now U.S. Patent No. 8,413,823, which is a continuation of U.S. Application Serial No. 13/230,362, filed on September 12, 2011, now U.S. Patent 10 No. 8,235,227, which is a continuation of U.S. Application Serial No. 12/872,721, filed August 31, 2010, now U.S. Patent No. 8,047,385, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial No. 12/496,389, filed July 1, 2009, now U.S. Patent No. 8,113,601, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial No. 11/858,545, filed September 20, 2007, now U.S. Patent No. 7,621,409, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. 15 Application Serial No. 11/685,530, filed March 13, 2007, now U.S. Patent No. 7,451,881, which claims benefit to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/782,000, filed March 13, 2006, and which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial No. 11/612,210, filed December 18, 2006, now U.S. Patent No. 7,299,934, which is a continuation of U.S. Application Serial No. 11,140,023, filed May 27, 2005, now U.S. Patent No. 7,150,365, 20 which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Application Serial No. 11/047,915 filed February 1, 2005, now U.S. Patent No. 7,661,545, which claims benefit to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/541,804 filed February 3, 2004. Field of the Invention 25 The present invention relates to a merchandising system. For example, the invention relates generally to shelf assemblies for use in merchandising product and more particularly to shelf assemblies that improve the securement and management of merchandised product. 30 Background of the Invention It is known that retail and wholesale stores, such as drug stores, grocery stores, discount H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -2 stores, toy stores, and the like require and use a large amount of shelving both to store product and to display the product to consumers. In displaying product to consumers to promote and improve store sales, these stores situate or position the product toward the front of the shelf so that the product is visible and easily accessible to consumers. This 5 desirable positioning has certain drawbacks. For instance, with this desirable "front facing" of product, the stores are finding that relatively small products or packages of high value can be the target of thieves. Certain items can represent a high value to potential thieves who can either resell the items or use them for other illegitimate purposes, as in the case of certain pharmaceutical products. This theft is increasing and is now a significant 10 cost to the retailer because thieves prefer to steal many products at once or in as short amount of time as possible. To do this, for example, thieves will "sweep" the shelf with their arm collecting the items into a purse, bag or coat very quickly and exit the store without drawing attention. 15 Theft can be the result of both customers and employees actions and has been difficult to eliminate. Attempts to deter and prevent theft have proven to be only partially effective. For instance, in-store cameras often do not observe the theft clearly enough to catch or prosecute the thief. In addition, in-store security personnel are rarely in the correct position to actually observe a thief in action. As a result, theft continues to be a significant 20 problem and cost in the management of product inventory. The present invention is directed at overcoming these and other known drawbacks and problems with existing shelving systems. 25 It is generally desirable to overcome or ameliorate one or more of the above described difficulties, or to at least provide a useful alternative. Summary of the Invention 30 According to the present invention, there is provided a merchandising system, comprising: a base configured to support product; a housing configured to engage with the base, comprising a top wall, a first side H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -3 wall, and a second side wall; a pusher movably mounted on the base; a window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the housing; and 5 a trigger axle located adjacent to the hinge point of the window, wherein when the window is rotated, the trigger axle is rotated. According to the present invention, there is also provided a merchandising system, comprising: 10 a first merchandise system that includes: a first base configured to support product, a first housing configured to engage the first base, a first pusher movably mounted on the first base, a first window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a 15 hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the first housing, and a first trigger axle that includes a first male connector on one end and a first female connector on an opposite end to the first male connector, wherein when the first window is rotated, the first trigger axle is rotated; and a second merchandise system that includes: 20 a second base configured to support product, a second housing configured to engage the second base, a second pusher movably mounted on the second base, a second window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the second housing, and 25 a second trigger axle that includes a second male connector on one end and a second female connector on an opposite end to the second male connector, wherein when the second window is rotated, the second trigger axle is rotated, wherein the first male connector engages the second female connector and further wherein when the first trigger axle rotates, the second trigger axle is rotated. 30 Preferred embodiments of the present invention overcomes the above-mentioned problems H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -4 by addressing the securement and management of product in a retail setting. As will become evident below, the invention has the ability to inhibit "sweeping" of product by a thief and to limit the taking of large amounts of product from a shelf in a short period of time. Using one or more methods such as placing the shelves closer together, using 5 product dividers that extend from the front edge of the shelf and between the shelves, using a merchandising system that controls the speed of a pusher, placing front walls having a specific height that results in a smaller opening to limit access to product, using an electronic control unit and an electronic lock-out mechanism which locks the merchandising shelf and multiple shelves when too many products are removed at one 10 time, the present invention will inhibit sweeping of product and the removal of numerous products at a time. The present invention also has the ability to alert store or security personnel and security cameras of a potential theft situation, while minimizing the impact on access to product by legitimate shoppers. 15 In an embodiment, a merchandising system comprises a base configured to support product, a housing configured to engage with the base, comprising a top wall, a first side wall, and a second side wall, a pusher movably mounted on the base, a rotatable window from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the housing, and a trigger axle located adjacent to the hinge point of the window, wherein 20 when the window is rotated, the trigger axle is rotated. The trigger axle may include a cantilever that is attached to the trigger axle. The merchandising system may further include an audio box configured to sound an alarm. When the window is rotated, the trigger axle and/or the cantilever may rotate against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box. In another embodiment, the merchandising system may 25 include an audio box configured to sound an alarm, wherein the trigger axle includes a cantilever that is attached to the trigger axle, wherein when the window is rotated, the cantilever rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box. Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the 30 art upon review of the following detailed description, claims and drawings in which like numerals are used to designate like features.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -5 Brief Description of the Drawings Preferred embodiments of the present invention are hereafter described, by way of non 5 limiting example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 depicts a front elevation view of an exemplary embodiment of a product securement and management system; Figure 2 depicts a partial side elevation view of the exemplary securement and 10 management system of Figure 1; Figure 3 depicts a bottom view of an exemplary embodiment of a pullout shelf that may be used with the present invention; Figure 4 depicts front elevation view of an exemplary embodiment of the product securement and management system of the invention incorporating the pullout shelf; 15 Figure 5 depicts a side elevation view of an exemplary pullout shelf illustrating the product dividers and the restocking of product on the shelf; Figure 6 depicts a side elevation view of an exemplary mounting of a front retaining wall and a secondary retaining wall to the shelf in addition to an exemplary pusher mechanism; Figure 7 depicts a front elevation view of an exemplary embodiment of a front retaining 20 wall and a secondary retaining wall; Figure 8 depicts a front elevation view of an exemplary embodiment of a front retaining wall and a secondary retaining wall with product displayed on the shelf; Figure 9 depicts a bottom view of an exemplary alert device mounted to the exemplary securement and management system of Figure 1; 25 Figure 10 depicts an exemplary lock mechanism that may be used with the present invention; Figure 11 depicts an exemplary embodiment of a movable barrier and barrier extension that may be used with the present invention; Figure 12 depicts a close up view of the movable barrier and barrier extension of Figure 30 11; Figure 13 depicts a close up view of an exemplary handle that may be used with the movable barrier or barrier extension of Figure 11; H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -6 Figure 14 depicts a close up view of the movable barrier and barrier extension of Figure 11 defining an opening and mounting structure for receiving the lock mechanism of Figure 10; Figure 15 depicts a partial front elevation view of the exemplary securement and 5 management system of Figure 1 including the use of a security camera; Figure 16 depicts a partial front elevation view of the exemplary securement and management system of Figure 1 including the use of a video monitor; Figure 17 depicts a diagram of an exemplary switching operation between a camera image and an image from a video player on the monitor of Figure 16; 10 Figure 18 depicts another exemplary lock mechanism that may be used with the present invention; Figure 19 depicts another view of the exemplary lock mechanism of Figure 18; Figure 20 depicts a back view of the exemplary lock mechanism of Figure 18; Figure 21 depicts yet another exemplary lock mechanism that may be used with the present 15 invention; Figure 22 depicts another view of the exemplary lock mechanism of Figure 21; Figure 23 depicts a close-up view of the lock plate of the exemplary lock mechanism of Figure 21; Figure 24 depicts another view of the lock plate of Figure 23; 20 Figure 25 depicts an exemplary embodiment that includes the use of a clip that may be used to further secure a side wall to the shelf; Figure 26 depicts an isometric view of the clip of Figure 25; Figure 27 depicts a close-up view of the mounted clip of Figure 25; Figure 28 depicts an exemplary electrical power bar that may be used with the invention; 25 Figure 29 depicts another view of the power bar of Figure 28; Figure 30 depicts an exemplary embodiment that includes a side wall that may be used to provide further security for product on a shelf or a portion of a shelf; Figure 31 depicts another view of the wall of Figure 30; Figure 32 depicts an isometric view of a clip that may be used to further secure a side wall 30 to the shelf; Figure 33 depicts another view of the clip of Figure 32; H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -7 Figure 34 illustrates an isometric view of an embodiment of a box shelf, Figure 35 illustrates a cross-sectional view of an embodiment a box shelf with a slideable shelf in a second position; Figure 36 illustrates a cross-sectional view of an embodiment a box shelf with a slideable 5 shelf in a first position; Figures 37A-37B depict cross-sections of an embodiment of a hinge plate engaging a blocking lip; Figure 38 depicts an embodiment of two box shelves stacked on top of each other; Figure 39 illustrates a partial exploded view of an embodiment of a box shelf; 10 Figures 40A-40D illustrate various views of an embodiment a housing; Figure 41 illustrates a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a housing and a door; Figures 42-45 illustrate views of an embodiment of a box shelf with various features omitted to provide additional details; Figure 46 illustrates a cross-section of a slideable shelf with a divider; 15 Figure 47 illustrates a partially exploded view of a slideable shelf; Figures 48A-48C illustrate various view of an embodiment of a support surface of a slideable shelf; Figures 49 and 50 depict cross-sections of a portion of an embodiment of support surface of a slideable shelf; 20 Figure 51 illustrates an embodiment of a portion of a slideable shelf; Figure 52A-52C illustrates an isometric, partially exploded view of an embodiment of a hinge plate and construction; Figures 53A-53E illustrate a number of views of an embodiment of a hinge plate; Figures 54A-54F illustrate a number of views of an embodiment of a hinge base 25 configured to couple with the hinge plate of Figure 53; Figures 55A-55D illustrate a number of views of an embodiment of a shelf support; Figure 56 illustrates a cross-section of portions of a shelf support configured to engage vertical rails; Figure 57 illustrates a cross-section of an embodiment of a rail; 30 Figures 58A-58E illustrate various views of an embodiment of a housing of a box shelf, Figures 59A-59D illustrate various view of an embodiment of slideable shelf; H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 Figure 60 is a side view of an exemplary low profile shelf support; Figure 61 is an exploded isometric view of a shelf system incorporating the low profile shelf support of Figure 60; Figure 62 is another exploded isometric view of a shelf system incorporating the low 5 profile shelf support of Figure 60; Figure 63 is a side view of a shelf system incorporating the low profile shelf support of Figure 60 and an alert device and moveable barrier; Figure 64 is a partial enlarged view of the shelf system of Figure 63 further illustrating the moveable barrier in contact with a linkage which is also in contact with the alert device; 10 Figure 65 is a partial enlarged view of the shelf system of Figure 63 further illustrating the alert device in contact with a linkage which is also in contact with the moveable barrier; Figure 66 is an isometric view of the shelf system of Figure 61 with a box shelf mounted to the shelf; Figure 67 is an isometric exploded view of the box shelf of Figure 66; 15 Figure 68 is a side view of the shelf system of Figure 66; Figure 69 is a partial enlarged view of the shelf system of Figure 68; Figure 70 is an isometric view of the shelf system of Figure 61 with signage mounted to the shelf; Figure 71 is a side view of the shelf system of Figure 70; 20 Figure 72 is an isometric exploded view of the shelf system of Figure 61 with multiple low profile shelf supports and with optional mounting brackets; Figure 73 is an isometric view of the shelf system of Figure 72; Figure 74 is an isometric view of an adjustable wall that may be used to provide further security for product on a shelf or a portion of a shelf; 25 Figure 75 is a side view of the adjustable wall of Figure 74; Figure 76 is an end view of the adjustable wall of Figure 74; Figure 77 is an isometric view of the adjustable wall of Figure 74; Figure 78 is another isometric view of the adjustable wall of Figure 74; Figure 79 is an isometric view of an exemplary merchandising system; 30 Figure 80 is another isometric view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; Figure 81 front view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -9 Figure 82 is a side view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; Figure 83 is a partial side view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; Figure 84 is a top view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; Figure 85 is another front view of the merchandising system of Figure 79; 5 Figure 86 is another front view of the merchandising system of Figure 79 illustrating product being removed from the merchandising system; Figure 87 is another isometric view of the merchandising system of Figure 79 illustrating product being moved toward the front end of the merchandising system; Figure 88 is a bottom view of an exemplary merchandising system; 10 Figure 89 is a partial bottom view of the merchandising system of Figure 88; Figure 90 is a side view of an exemplary merchandising system; Figure 91 is another side view of the merchandising system of Figure 90 illustrating product being removed from the merchandising system; Figure 92A is partial exploded view of an embodiment of a merchandise system; 15 Figure 92B is an isometric view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 93 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 94 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 95 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 96 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; 20 Figure 97 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 98A is a partial bottom view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 98B is a partial bottom view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A; Figure 99 is a side view of the merchandise system of Figure 92A in accordance with one or more aspects of the present invention illustrating the opening of the door; 25 Figure 100 is an isometric view of multiple merchandise systems with an electronic control unit; Figures 101A-C depict an alternative embodiment of the door spacer bar of the invention; Figures 102 through 106E depict various views of an alternative embodiment of a merchandise system; 30 Figure 102 is an isometric view of an alternative embodiment of a merchandise system; Figure 103A is a front view of the merchandise system illustrated in Figure 102; H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 10 Figure 103B is another isometric view of the merchandise system illustrated in Figure 102; Figures 103C and 103D are isometric views of a track of the of the merchandise system illustrated in Figure 102; Figures 104A and 104B illustrate top-down isometric views of the merchandise system 5 illustrated in Figure 102; Figures 105A through 105E illustrate isometric views of the example merchandise system illustrated in Figure 102 in operation with a product; Figures 106A through 106E illustrate isometric views of the example merchandise system illustrated in Figure 102 connecting and in operation with multiple merchandise systems; 10 Before the embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or being 15 carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. Rather, the phrases and terms used herein are to be given their broadest interpretation and meaning. The use of "including" and "comprising" and variations thereof is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as 20 additional items and equivalents thereof. The use of the terms "mounted," "connected," "coupled," ''positioned," ''engaged" and similar terms, is meant to include both direct and indirect mounting, connecting, coupling, positioning and engaging. Detailed Description of the Invention 25 The present invention relates to the securement, management, and distribution of products in settings such as a retail setting and includes numerous embodiments. One embodiment involves a shelf management and display system that resides either on a standard or existing "dealer" shelf typically found in a retail store or on a shelf designed with certain 30 advantages in securing products and deterring theft. The embodiment may include uprights of a pre-existing shelving system or may be a stand alone unit. The display system includes front-facing systems, which force product to the front of a shelf Such H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 11 systems may use various methods, such as gravity, friction, magnetism, or spring-urged pushers or paddles to bring product to the front of a shelf near the aisle. Many examples of spring-urged systems that orient products toward the front of a shelf exist and include the systems described in U.S. Patent No. 6,041,720 to Hardy, U.S. Patent No. 4,830,201 to 5 Breslow, and International Application No. PCT/US02/15760 and corresponding International Publication No. WO 02/091885 Al to Hardy, which are incorporated herein by reference. Referring to Figures 1 and 2, in one embodiment of the present invention, a shelf 10 management and display system 100 includes vertical uprights 102 and product shelves 104 removably mounted to the uprights. The shelves 104 may be mounted at various positions along the uprights 102 depending on the desired positioning and spacing of the shelves 104. Similarly, the shelves 104 may be moved or relocated to different positions along the uprights 102 as necessary. As shown in Figures 4 and 5, the shelves 104 may be 15 pull-out shelves that pull away from the uprights 102 like drawers. As illustrated by Figure 3, the shelf 104 may incorporate a locking device 117 which involves cooperating catches that contact each other in the locked position and substantially release this contact in the unlocked position and that when released will permit the shelf 104 to pull-out and away from the uprights. The shelves or uprights may involve other locking devices, such 20 as magnets, latches, notches, binders, tension or the like. Once pulled away, the store personnel can restock the shelf with product and then slide the shelf 104 back to its original position and relock the shelf. A back wall 106 may be mounted to the uprights 102 through known mounting techniques 25 to aid in containing the products and to prevent access to the products from the back of the display system 100. A lock box 108 may be mounted to the uprights 102 also through known mounting techniques. The lock box 108 may be used for storing and locking additional product and shelving components for quick retrieval by the store personnel. The lock box 108 may be positioned at any position on the uprights 102, including the depicted 30 positioning at or near the top of the display system 100. In an alternative embodiment, the lock box 108 may be secured to a shelf 104 as opposed to the uprights 102. With either H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 12 mounting location, the additional product and shelving components are located at the display system 100 and can therefore be readily retrieved by store personnel. An exemplary embodiment of the invention may include a series of walls or dividers 110 5 that are placed between product rows, lanes or facings, and at the ends of the facings, to deter product "sweeping" by a thief These walls 110 are sometimes referred to as "product dividers." As used herein, the terms "vertical walls," "product dividers" and "dividers" are meant to include any wall (including vertical and non-vertical), divider, barrier, or separator that may be used between product rows, lanes or facings. The product 10 dividers 110, when positioned in a spaced-apart manner on the display system 100, form product lanes 112 for locating and separating product to be merchandised. The product dividers 110 or side walls also are positioned at the sides of the product facing to prevent access to the product from the side of the display system 100. In one 15 embodiment, these dividers or side walls may include telescoping features that permit them to extend vertically or horizontally to provide additional product securement. Significantly, these dividers or side walls may be used in numerous applications as the size and extent of these can be adjusted to fit most shelves, shelving or display systems, or applications. 20 A pusher 126 can be used to urge product forward. This pusher can incorporate a coil spring to assist in urging product forward. The divider 110 in some embodiments can include a base or floor. In some embodiments this floor includes a pusher track 128. Figure 6 shows the floor on one side of the divider wall. A second floor can be on the 25 opposite side of the divider wall. With floors on both sides of the vertical divider wall, product can rest on these floors. In one such embodiment, a product can rest on one floor of one divider and a second floor of a second divider. The product dividers 110 define a height, shape and configuration that deter the removal of 30 product over the product dividers 110. The dividers 110 extend in a vertical or non vertical manner between the shelves 104 and from the front of the shelf 104 to the back H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 13 wall 106. The dividers 110 have a generally rectangular shape; however, other shapes and configurations of the dividers, such as non-rectangular, oval, repeating patterns or the like, may be used with the invention. Depending on the product to be merchandised and the desired degree of access to the products, the front edge 114 of the product dividers 110 5 may extend vertically between the shelves 104, or may extend non-vertically to make the products more accessible to the consumer and easier to remove from the shelf. In one embodiment, the divider 110 defines a front edge 111 that includes a front edge portion 113 protruding outward from the front edge 111, as shown in Figure 5. The protruding portion of the front edge will assist in holding the retaining wall or tab 122 in position to 10 prevent slidable movement of the retaining wall or tab 122, as described below. The product dividers 110 may be mounted to the display system 100 using numerous techniques. As an example, the dividers 110 may be inserted into tracks formed in the shelf 104 or tracks formed in a base that attaches to the shelf 104. Similarly, the dividers 15 110 may be formed integral or as a unitary unit with a base that is mounted to the shelf. Also, the dividers 110 may be mounted to a rail, channel, or groove as understood by those skilled in the art. The dividers 110 should be sufficiently rigid to retain the product within the product lanes. Examples of dividers that may be used with invention are described in U.S. Patent No. 6,041,720 to Hardy, U.S. Patent No. 4,830,201 to Breslow, and 20 International Application No. PCT/US02/15760 and corresponding International Publication No. WO 02/091885 Al to Hardy, which are incorporated herein by reference. One skilled in the art will appreciate that other dividers and techniques for mounting the dividers to the shelves are known and may be used with the teachings of the invention. 25 In one embodiment, the dividers 110 may have a step down or decline near its rear edge, or a decrease in wall height, to allow the wall 110 to be lifted and disengaged from the rail on which it is mounted. With this configuration, the dividers 110 may be moved laterally without interfering with the shelf above it. In one embodiment, the vertical wall or divider 110 has a step down beginning approximately 2/3 of the wall length from its front edge. 30 In an embodiment, it may be desired to provide enhanced security for items on only a H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 14 portion of a shelf. These items may be located in the center of the shelf or on a side of the shelf. Security features such as those referenced herein can be added to only a portion of the shelf, while the remainder of the shelf contains fewer or none of the security features. Where high security items are placed in the center of a shelf, these items can be segregated 5 from the remainder of the shelf through the use of walls. These walls can provide the side barriers for the high security portion of the shelf. These walls can be made of strong construction, such as metal, and can extend from the floor of a shelf to a distance fairly near the top of the shelf. These walls also can be attached to the shelf as well as the other security features to limit the possibility of the walls being bent, removed or otherwise 10 thwarted and to assist in limiting access to the items being merchandised on the shelf Referring to Figures 25, 30 and 31, walls 340 and 350 are used to segregate a shelf into a higher security area and a lower security area. Walls 340 and 350 can be made from steel and can extend from at or near the floor of the shelf to an area at or near the ceiling of the 15 shelf. The walls also can be adjustable. In an embodiment, the walls can be comprised of a top section 344 and a bottom section 346. As shown in figure 31, these two sections can overlap to provide a continuous barrier. The top section 344 of wall 340 and the bottom section 346 of wall 340 can include apertures that align the two walls. A fastener 348 such as a screw, bolt, pin, rod or other fastener can be used to join the two walls at a particular 20 height. The walls also can comprise a floor 342 which includes apertures and can be connected to the floor of the shelf through a fastener 349 such as a screw, bolt, pin, rod or other fastener. Referring to Figures 74-78, in an alternative embodiment, the walls 340 and 350 may be in 25 the form of an adjustable wall 702 that is slidably movable and repositionable. The wall 702 defines one or more elongated channels or slots 704 that permit movement of the wall 702 and adjustment of the location of the wall 702 to a desired position. In an exemplary embodiment, the channels 704 may be vertically and horizontally oriented on the adjustable wall 702. The wall 702 may be moved and positioned, as desired, and secured 30 to a lower wall portion 706 through the use of fasteners 708, such as screws, bolts, pins, rods or or the like. The lower wall portion 706 may include numerous holes 709 for H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 15 receiving the fasteners 708 and may include a floor 710 which may include a plurality of holes 711 for mounting the floor 710 to the to the floor of the shelf as described above. For convenience in adjusting the wall 702 relative to the lower wall portion 706, a tool 714, such a hex key, wrench, screw driver, or the like, may be mounted to the lower wall 5 portion 706 to be used by a user to make the desired adjustments of the location of the wall 702. As should be readily apparent, the elongated channels 704 provide for numerous mounting positions of the wall 702 relative to the lower wall portion 706. In an exemplary position, 10 the wall 702 is fastened to the lower wall portion 706 such that the fasteners 708 are located at positions 716a and 716b in the elongated channel 704. In this position, as shown by Figure 75, the wall 702 will be in an unextended position. In one of the numerous alternate positions, the wall 702 may be positioned and the fasteners 708 may be located at positions 716c and 716d. In this position, the wall 702 will be in an extended position such 15 that the wall 702 extends upward relative to the lower wall portion 706 and away from the lower wall portion. In this position, the wall 702 may serve as an additional barrier to inhibit access to the shelf and thereby further secure the products on the shelf As yet another example, the wall 702 may be positioned and the fasteners 708 may be located at positions 716b and 716e. In this position, the wall 702 will be in an extended position such 20 that the wall 702 extends away from the lower wall portion and will be at the same height as the lower wall portion. It should be readily apparent that numerous other positions of the wall 702 relative to the shelf are possible depending on the desired level of security and the configuration of the shelf, and the tool 714 provides convenience and ease of adjustment of the wall 702. It should be understood that the elongated channel may define 25 numerous other configurations that still permit movement and adjustment of the wall 702 relative to the lower portion. The system illustrated by Figures 74-78 may further be configured and mounted on either or both ends of the shelf, and if desired, to the front or rear of the shelf. Also, the wall may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. 30 Referring to Figures 25-27, 30-33 a clip or clip member 320 or 360 may be used to further H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 16 secure the wall 340, 350 to the shelf 104 and in particular the walls that separate secure products from non-secure products. The clip 320, 360 also can be used to secure divider 110 to a shelf 104 (embodiment not shown). The clip 320, 360 may be used to strengthen the wall 340, 350 to prevent the bending or moving of the wall. With the use of the clip 5 320, 360, the wall 340, 350 may be made of a thinner, less costly material because the clip 320, 360 will prevent potential bending or twisting of the wall to access the product on the shelf. The walls 140, 150 also are known as side walls. In an exemplary embodiment, the clip 320, 360 is configured at one end to engage a hinge 10 rail 322, which is used to hinge the barrier 140, discussed below, to the shelf 104. The hinge rail 322 is mounted to a shelf The clip 320, 360 mounts to the shelf through its interaction with hinge rail 322. The clip 320, 360 is further configured at an opposite end to engage the wall 340, 350. More particularly, the clip 320 includes a blade portion 324 that is configured to engage with the hinge rail 322 and at any of the multiple positions 15 along the hinge rail 322, thus providing flexibility in the placement of the clip 320. The blade portion 324 may take on numerous shapes and configuration and may be connected to or joined with a clip body 328. The clip body 328 is further connected to or joined with opposing wall mounting members 330. The wall mounting members 330 are configured to be positioned on opposing sides of a wall 340 with the wall passing between the mounting 20 members 330. The wall mounting members 330 further define aligned holes 332 for receiving a mounting fastener 334 that may be used to secure the mounting members 330 to the wall 340, as depicted by Figure 27. The aligned holes 332 may be thru holes or threaded holes. As can be appreciated, any type of fastener or securement technique may be used to secure the clip 320 to the wall 340. 25 Where a wall 340 or 350 is placed at the side end of a shelf, a clip 360 can be used to further secure the wall 340, 350 to the shelf 104. At the edge of the shelf, the hinge rail ceases (not shown). Clip 360 includes a blade portion 362 that extends in only one direction from the clip body 364. The blade portion 362 is configured to engage the hinge 30 rail 322. In an embodiment, the blade portion engages only a single hinge piece or knuckle of the hinge rail. For example, in figure 27, a single hinge piece or knuckle is designated H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 17 by 323. The blade portion 362 includes a first blade portion 363 and a second portion 366 that can be at an angle to first portion 363. The second portion 366 can be configured to interact with the side 324 of knuckle 323. The blade 362 may take on numerous shapes and configuration and may be connected to or joined with a clip body 364. The clip body 5 364 is further connected to orjoined with opposing wall mounting members 368. The wall mounting members 368 are configured to be positioned on opposing sides of a wall 350 with the wall passing between the mounting members 368. The wall mounting members 368 further define aligned holes 370 for receiving a mounting fastener (not shown) that may be used to secure the mounting members 368 to the wall 350. The aligned holes 370 10 may be thru holes or threaded holes. As can be appreciated, any type of fastener or securement technique may be used to secure the clip 360 to the wall 340 or 350. A front retaining wall 116 may be positioned along the front edge of the shelf 104. The front retaining wall 116 can serve as a "fence" to restrain the product in the product lanes 15 112 and assist in preventing the product from falling off the front of the shelf 104. The retaining wall 116 stops the forward movement of product that is caused by the urging of the pushers, described below. As exemplified by Figure 6, the retaining wall 116 may be mounted to a channel or rail 118 that extends along the front edge 119 of the shelf 104. The channel or rail 118 may be mounted to existing holes in a standard dealer shelf, or 20 secured by any other known manner to the shelf 104. The retaining wall 116 may be mounted to or on the channel or rail 118. The front retaining wall 116 may be made of a clear plastic to permit visualization of the product on the shelf and provide a more aesthetically pleasing organization to the merchandised product. The front retaining wall 116 can also be created from opaque or semi-transparent material, or from wire, and can be 25 adaptable to display graphics. The front retaining wall 116 can have a variety of configurations, such as rectangular, oblong, repeating patterns or the like. As more clearly shown in Figure 7, the front retaining wall 116 may also include holes or openings 120 extending therethrough that are spaced along the wall 116. The holes 120 30 permit the consumer and store personnel to push the product back and away from the retaining wall 116 for ease of insertion and removal of the product.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 18 As shown in Figures 1 and 2, the retaining wall 116 can have a height that permits the removal of a single product at a time or, depending on the desired level of security, a couple of products or a few products at a time. In other words, the height of the retaining 5 wall 116 can permit limited access to and removal of product from the display system 100. Stated another way, the retaining wall 116 is not so tall as to prohibit any access to the product, but is sized to allow the consumer or store personnel to access and lift a limited number of product over the retaining wall 116 at one time. This limited removal of products is accomplished through the use of the retaining wall 116 and the close proximity 10 of the shelf 104 positioned above the product. That is, in one embodiment, the shelf 104 located above the product will be positioned in close proximity to the top edge of the product, or the top edge of the product divider 110, whichever is taller. The shelf 104 located above the product, the product dividers 110, and the retaining wall 116 will form an opening or window 131 through which only a single, two, or possibly a few, product(s) 15 can be removed at one time or in a single motion. This configuration also deters "sweeping" of product from the shelf 104. The size of the window 131 can be adjusted by adjusting the location of the shelf 104 above the product, the dividers 110, and/or the retaining wall 116, or through the use of a second retaining wall 122, barrier 130, and/or barrier 140, described below. This window 131 adjustment permits flexibility with the 20 system and allows the store to set the window 131 size depending on the product size and how many products they want to permit consumers to remove at a time. In an exemplary embodiment, if taller products are merchandised on the shelves 104, or if a smaller window 131 is desired, a second retaining wall 122 may be positioned behind or 25 possibly in front of the retaining wall 116 to serve as a retainer for the product. As used herein, the second retaining wall 122 may be referred to as a "tab" and may include any retaining structure or "fence" that can be selectively configured or mounted to the shelves 104 to provide selective theft prevention of specific products, such as high theft items. Consequently, the second retaining wall or tab 122 may have many configurations, shapes 30 and designs, and may be used in front of individual rows of product or groups of rows of product.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 19 As shown in Figures 6 and 7, the second retaining wall or tab 122 may be mounted to or on a second channel or rail 124 that extends parallel with the channel or rail 118. The retaining wall or tab 122 may be slidable relative to the shelf 104 or rail 124, or may be 5 fixed relative to the shelf 104 or rail 124. The tab 122 can be positioned between adjacent dividers 110 and held in position between the dividers 110. In other words, the tab 122 may not be permitted much slidable movement in or on the channel or rail 124 because the dividers 110 will hinder such slidable movement. In some embodiment, the dividers 110 contain a portion that serves as a stop to prevent the tab or first retaining wall from moving 10 laterally. Such configuration further prevents theft of the product as potential thieves will not be permitted to simply slide the tab 122 to the side and remove numerous products at a time. The second retaining wall or tab 122 will have a height that permits access to and removal 15 of a limited number of product. If desired, the tab 122 may have a height that permits removal of only one product at a time. With the use of tabs 122, the display system 100 will have flexibility in that tabs 122 of varying height may be positioned in front of the product lanes 112 to accommodate various sized products. That is, if a row of product has a product height that is different than a product in an adjacent row, tabs 122 of varying 20 height can be used to provide the proper level of security and access to the product. In one embodiment, the tabs 122 may be sized to extend across one product lane 112 or in front of a single row of product. In an alternative embodiment, the tab 122 may be sized and shaped to extend across multiple product lanes 112. In this embodiment, the tabs 122 25 could include slots or channels to permit the tabs to "straddle" the dividers 110 and thereby extend across multiple product lanes. In addition, the dividers 110 could extend through the slots or channels and thereby inhibit slidable movement of the tabs 122. The second retaining wall or tab 122 may also be used in place of the retaining wall 116. 30 In other words, the front "fence" on a product facing may be the tabs 122 of varying height, length and width, or of the same dimensions. In this configuration, the channel or H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 20 rail 118 may be used to mount dealer-shelf accessories, such as clip-in signage, price tag holders, and the like. The tab 122 also can be attached to the divider 110 or can be formed such that the tab 122 and divider 110 are an integral piece. A wall or partial wall structure such as tab 122 can exist at the front of the divider 110 and can extend to the left or right or 5 to both the left and right of the divider. This wall or partial wall can be used with or without a front retaining wall 116. In an exemplary embodiment, the tabs 122 may include holes or openings 125 through the tab 122, similar to the holes or openings 120 in the retaining wall 116, to permit the 10 consumer and store personnel to push the product back and away from the retaining wall 116 and tab 122 for ease of insertion and removal of the product. In other words, the holes or openings 126 allow product to be replaced by a consumer who removes it and decides not to purchase the product. To this end, the holes or openings 120, 125 are constructed to allow finger access therethrough to push back the row of product. Once the products are 15 pushed backward, the consumer or store personnel can replace the removed products back into the facing. It should be understood that tabs 122 also can be used that do not include the holes or openings 125. In an exemplary embodiment, the tab 122 may provide securement for an individual row of 20 a product facing. That is, it may be desirable to provide additional theft deterrence for an individual row of product. In this configuration, the tab 122 having the desired dimensions may be positioned in front of a desired product row to provide additional securement for just that row of product. This embodiment will provide the stores with additional flexibility with their planograms and product facings in that individual tabs 122 of different 25 dimensions may be placed at various locations across the facing to enhance the securement of particular products. In an embodiment, retainer tabs 122 can be used on an individual facing basis for specific products. If a shelf is merchandised with product packages of variable height, the retainer 30 wall 116 must be of a height that allows the shortest product package to be lifted over it. If a shelf 104, barrier 130, or barrier 140 is employed above the product, then the shelf 104 or H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 21 barriers 130, 140 must be located at a height above the product to allow the placement of the tallest product below it. This may allow a thief easy access to the taller product by being able to easily lift the taller product in quantity over the relatively short retainer wall 116. It can be desirable, then, to increase the height of a front barrier only in front of the 5 taller product. The second retaining wall or tab 122 can be of a taller height than the retaining wall 116 and can be generally taller than required for the small product packages. The retainer wall or tab 122 can therefore be constructed and used to limit access to the taller product and removal of several taller products at a time or in one motion, further securing product and deterring theft. Similarly, the retainer wall or tab 122 can be 10 constructed and used to limit access to smaller but deeper products and to limit the removal of several smaller but deeper products at a time or in one motion. The retainer tab 122 thus allows flexible placement of product on a shelf by the retailer and manufacturer, no matter the size, shape, and configuration of the product. 15 The retaining wall 116 and tab 122 may be mounted, directly or indirectly, to the shelf 104 using numerous techniques. The retaining wall 116 and tab 122 may be slidably mounted to or receivable in the channels or rails 118, 124, which are secured to the front edge of the shelf through fasteners, adhesives, friction, tension, magnetism, or other restraining techniques and methods. The retaining wall 116 and tab 122 may also be directly mounted 20 or connected to the shelf 104 also through the use of fasteners, adhesives, friction, tension, magnetism, or other restraining techniques and methods. The retaining wall 116 and tab 122 may be fixed to the shelf 104 or removably mounted to the shelf 104 to permit additional flexibility in the design and level of security of the system. 25 Pushers 126 may be placed behind product between the back wall 106 and the front edge of the shelf 104 to push the product forward so that it may be removed from the front of the shelf. The retaining wall 116 and tabs 122, if used, in some embodiments can stop the forward movement of product that is caused by the urging of the pushers. Known pushers may be used with the invention, including the pushers and pusher systems described in 30 U.S. Patent No. 6,041,720 to Hardy, U.S. Patent No. 4,830,201 to Breslow, and International Application No. PCT/US02/15760 and corresponding International H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 22 Publication No. WO 02/091885 Al to Hardy, all of which are incorporated herein by reference. The pushers 126 may be spring-urged pushers that move along a track 128 to push product toward the front edge of the shelf 104, as shown in Figure 6. Track 128 can form a floor on one side of the divider. A second floor, with or without a track, can be 5 located on the other side of the divider. In an embodiment, the pushers 126 may have a pusher face or paddle 129 that may extend laterally to increase the pushing surface of the pusher to thereby pusher wider product more effectively. In other words, the pusher 126 may have an extendable pusher face to 10 push either narrow product or wide product. The pusher face or paddle 129 may be extendable from a retracted position to one of several extended positions. The extended pusher face locates the product pushing surface behind the center or near the center of the wider product, thereby greatly enhancing the pushing leverage on the wider product. Numerous other types of pushers and pusher faces may be used with the invention, 15 including the systems and pushers described in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 10/772,134 to Hardy, which is incorporated herein by reference. The pushers 126 may be stand-alone units that are mountable to the shelf 104 using any known technique, including the channel mounting technique depicted in the figures. That 20 is, in one embodiment, the pusher 126 may be mounted to a front rail or channel 133, as shown in Figure 6, and may be slidably adjustable within or on that rail or channel. Alternatively, the pushers 126 may be used in conjunction with dividers 110 and may be operatively mounted to the dividers 110, as disclosed in the above referenced patents and application, or as known in the art. 25 In another embodiment, the pushers 126 may incorporate spring mechanisms, such as coil springs, that include an indicia strip. The indicia strip is provided on spring mechanism and contains data relating to the position of the pusher 126. A sensor assembly may scan the indicia strip and transmit data representative of the product and the position of the 30 pusher on the display system to a store computer or some other suitable device, such as a portable computer or controller. The transmitted data can be used to determine inventory H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -23 levels and can be done so in real time. With this embodiment, the amount of product removed from a particular location in the store can be determined. This information can be used to determine the effectiveness of product placement and promotional displays, particularly when a product can be obtained from various places within the retail store. 5 And with respect to deterring theft, a deviation in the typical purchasing habits of the consumer can trigger an alarm. That is, the alarm can be used to alert security personnel to the fact that too much product has been removed from the shelf at one time and thus a potential theft has occurred. The location of the incident can also be used to alert a security camera so as to focus the camera in the direction of the potential theft, as 10 discussed below. With this embodiment, numerous types of sensors and detection techniques may be used to monitor the relative position and movement of the pusher 126. For example, in an embodiment, the indicia strip may contain numerous types of patterns that can be optically readable or can be read using several different types of detection methods, such as passive variable capacitance, inductance, resistance, magnetics, or active 15 signal detection. Numerous other types of sensors and detection techniques are possible with the invention for detecting unusual movement of the pusher 126 that may be indicative of a potential theft situation, including the systems and techniques described in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 10/772,010 to Swafford et al., which is incorporated herein by reference. 20 In other exemplary embodiments, the merchandised product may be urged toward the front of the shelf 104 through other techniques, including friction, gravity and/or magnetism. Each of these techniques may be used with the display system 100 and the teachings of the present invention. These techniques may be used with or without dividers 110, depending 25 on the desired application. In one embodiment, the shelf is not completely horizontal but has an incline or decline from back to front. In another embodiment, the merchandised product may be urged toward the front of the shelf 104 through vibration or quick movements that orient products in a particular 30 direction on the shelf 104. Vibration can cause products to move forward on the shelf 104 and prevent them from moving backward so that the product is front facing. This vibration H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 24 may be applied through mechanical, electrical or other structures or designs. In one embodiment, directed vibration moves product toward the front of the shelf The directed vibration causes product to move in particular directions or in one direction and 5 not to move in other directions. Through this vibration, which is instituted through the shelf 104, upright 102, floor, wall, ceiling or other structure, or through a vibrative pulse or signal traveling through the air, the product moves in a particular direction, such as frontward. 10 In another embodiment of the vibration technique for urging product forward on the shelf 104, general undirected vibration is applied to the system. This vibration may be applied through the shelf 104, upright 102, floor, wall, ceiling, other structure or through vibration or a signal traveling through the air. Directors, such as small toggles, ridges, flanges, fingers, or the like, cause product to move in a particular direction depending on their 15 configuration, shape, and orientation. These directors can channel the energy from unspecific vibration and force product in a particular direction, such as frontward. The directors can be placed on the shelf 104, divider 110, floors, walls or ceilings of the system and can be incorporated into the product itself. 20 In an embodiment of the vibration technique, product sits on a floor and friction moves product toward the front of the shelf. In one embodiment, the floor may be a flat surface panel operatively coupled to a motion providing device. In use, product is placed on the flat surface panel and a combination of gravity and friction hold the product in place on the flat surface panel. The motion providing device then slowly moves the flat surface panel 25 toward the retaining wall 116 located at the front of the shelf 104. After a preset amount of time, or through product position sensing techniques, the motion providing device quickly, in a jerking motion, pulls the flat surface panel in the opposite direction or, in other words, toward the back of the shelf. By doing so, the quick motion of the flat surface panel breaks the bond of friction between the product and the flat surface panel causing the flat surface 30 panel to slide relative to the product and the product to remain at its location. The motion providing device will then repeat the previously described process and begin to slowly H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 25 move the flat surface panel toward the retaining wall 116. Examples of such vibration techniques for urging product forward on a shelf are disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 60/541,859 to Hardy, which is incorporated herein by reference. 5 As indicated above, the dividers 110, retaining wall 116 and tabs 122 assist in preventing a thief from sweeping a number of products into his or her coat or bag or from taking several products in the same facing. To even further limit the access to the product, in another exemplary embodiment, a horizontal barrier 130 (Figure 2) may be included above the product packages and secured to the front edge of the shelf 104 positioned above the 10 product. The barrier 130 may be fixed to the front edge of the shelf 104 or may be fixed to uprights 102. The barrier 130 further deters unobstructed access to the product in the product facing by reducing the area, window or opening through which product could be removed from the shelf. The barrier 130 may be constructed separate from the shelf or may be integral with the shelf. The barrier 130 may span one row of product on a facing, 15 or may span multiple rows of product, depending on the desired level of security. Alternatively, the barrier 130 may comprise another shelf 104 positioned just above the product. In this embodiment, the shelf 104 above the product is positioned in close proximity to the product. The barrier 130 restricts access from the front of the shelf 104 to only one or a few products positioned behind the front product in a facing row to permit 20 the removal of only a few products from a shelf, or a product pusher, at one time or in one motion. The retaining walls 116 and tabs 122 may be used conjunctively with the barrier 130 to prevent product from being easily removed from the shelf 104. In other words, the present invention contemplates the use of one, two or multiple barriers or walls to prevent several products from being removed from the shelf at a time or in one motion. The 25 barrier 130 may be made of various materials and may be secured to the front of the shelf 104 through any known technique. A further embodiment of the invention incorporates a barrier 140 that spans across one or two, some, all or the majority of the top of the product on a shelf 104. The barrier 140 30 functions similar to a door in that it may be hinged or movably mounted to the edge of the shelf 104, or the barrier 130, just above the product to be protected. As used herein, the H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 26 term "barrier" is meant to include any structure that will prevent, inhibit or obstruct access to the product on the shelf 104. The barrier can embody numerous shapes and configurations. The barrier 140 may be mounted to the shelf 104 using existing mounting holes on the shelf The barrier 140 also may be mounted on the front edge of a front rail 5 from the shelf above it. The front edge of the shelf can have hooks or "j" shapes on its underside. The barrier 140 can have apertures which fit within the hooks or "j" shapes. The barrier 140 defines a bottom lip or edge that may meet or overlap the top edge of the retaining wall 116 or tab 122. Such meeting or overlap further closes off access to the product except with deliberate action. In an exemplary embodiment, as shown in Figure 10 13, the barrier 140 may include a handle 202 to assist in moving the barrier 140 from a closed position to an open position, and vice versa. The handle may be molded with the barrier 140 along the edge of the barrier as exemplified by Figure 13, or the handle may be a separate component attached, mounted, secured, or adhered to the barrier 140 using any known technique. One skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention is not limited by 15 a particular shape or configuration of the handle and that the handle may define numerous shapes or configurations. Moreover, the barrier 140 may be configured with a reinforcing rim that extends along the edge of the barrier 140. The reinforcing rim provides additional structural integrity and rigidity to the barrier 140. The reinforcing rim may also be equipped or configured with a handle. If the barrier 140 is configured with a locking 20 mechanism as described herein the reinforcing rim will assist in preventing a potential thief from bending or breaking the barrier 140 and thus giving the thief access to the product that is intended to be locked and secured on the shelf. A hole or opening 204 may be located in the barrier 140 through which may be mounted a 25 cable lock or similar locking mechanism, as discussed below. In an alternative embodiment, the product display system includes inverted features. The aspects of the invention that are placed on a floor or a shelf and extend upward can be placed on a ceiling or extend downward, and vice versa. For example, the barrier 140 and 30 retaining wall 116, the dividers 110, and tabs 122 may be inverted. It is contemplated that in some embodiments the retaining wall 116, the dividers 110, and/or tabs 122 may be H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 27 configured above the barrier 140 which would extend upwardly from the shelf 104. The retaining wall 116, the dividers 110 and/or tabs 122 may be placed on the underside of the shelf above the product and extend downward. Pushers 126 and/or tracks 128 can be secured to the underside of a shelf such that the pushers extend downward and the pusher 5 springs are located near or behind the portion of the pusher that is near the underside of the shelf. In some embodiments, to access product behind the barrier 140, the barrier 140 must be moved or lifted, which requires a deliberate movement and the use of one hand to hold the 10 barrier 140 in place. While the barrier 140 is lifted or moved, the product can be removed. A consumer or store personnel who uses one hand to hold the barrier 140 in place, will need to use the other hand to remove product from the display system 100. This embodiment is constructed to inhibit the ability of a consumer to access product with two hands at the same time. While product is accessible to the consumer or store personnel, 15 the removal of large amounts of product in a short period of time is deterred. The barrier 140 can be created from a clear, opaque or semi-transparent material and may be hinged or slidable in a variety of common ways. Referring to Figures 11 and 12, an adjustable and removable barrier extension 206 may be 20 configured with the barrier 140. The barrier extension 206 may be used to provide additional product security by creating a larger barrier to prevent or limit access to the product on the shelf The barrier extension 206 may be selectively mounted to the barrier 140 through the use of mounting holes 208 and fasteners 210. As shown in the figures, several mounting holes 208 can be located on either the barrier 140 or the barrier extension 25 206 or both. These mounting holes can be aligned vertically or non-vertically. The several mounting holes 208 permit the barrier extension 206 to be adjusted relative to the barrier 140 to permit the barrier extension 206 to extend a desired distance, depending on the application, the desired level of security, or the placement of the shelves. Other techniques for mounting or attaching the barrier extension 206 to the barrier 140 are possible with the 30 invention, including techniques using other types of fasteners or adhesives.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 28 The barrier extension 206 can define numerous shapes and configurations depending on the desired application and level of product securement. For example, the barrier extension 206 can be configured to extend across one row of product, one facing, or more than one row or facing. The barrier extension 206 may also be made of a clear, 5 transparent, or semi-transparent material to permit or prevent the product on the shelf to be visible to a consumer or stock person. The barrier extension 206 may also include a handle similar to the handle 202 described above. The barrier extension 206 may include a reinforcing rim 212 that provides additional 10 structural integrity and rigidity to the barrier extension 206 to further provide additional product security. The reinforcing rim 212 may also be equipped or configured with a handle 214. If the barrier extension 206 is configured with a locking mechanism as described herein, or configured to be in a locked position, the reinforcing rim 212 will assist in preventing a potential thief from bending or breaking the barrier extension 206 15 and thus giving the thief access to the product that is intended to be locked and secured on the shelf. A locking mechanism may be further added to the barrier 140 to further hinder or prevent access to the product on the shelf In an exemplary embodiment, as shown in Figure 10, a 20 cylinder lock 200 may be used to secure and lock the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 in a closed position to prevent access to the product. The lock 200 may be mounted to the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206, through a opening or hole 216 (Figure 14), and may be configured to mount through the openings 120 in the retaining wall 116. 25 In one embodiment, the lock 200 may engage an arcuate-shaped wall portion 117 configured in or formed with the retaining wall 116. The arcuate-shaped wall portion 117 will further secure the lock 200 to the retaining wall 116 by permitting the locking tab of the cylindrical lock 200 to more securely seat on, or be held in place relative to, the retaining wall 116. With the use of a lock, such as lock 200, a consumer or store personnel 30 will need to use a key, special tool, or access card to open the lock prior to moving or lifting the barrier 140.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 29 In one embodiment, the lock 200 may engage an arcuate-shaped wall portion 117 configured in or formed with the retaining wall 116. The arcuate-shaped wall portion 117 will further secure the lock 200 to the retaining wall 116 by permitting the locking tab of 5 the cylindrical lock 200 to more securely seat on, or be held in place relative to, the retaining wall 116. With the use of a lock, such as lock 200, a consumer or store personnel will need to use a key, special tool, or access card to open the lock prior to moving or lifting the barrier 140. 10 Referring to Figures 18-20, another exemplary lock mechanism is depicted. A lock 280 may be a key-locked rotating oval-shaped lock. The lock 280 is secured to the retaining wall 116 through a hole 282 formed in the retaining wall 116. More specifically, and referring to Figure 20, the lock 280 includes an anchoring bolt that defines a bolt head 284. The bolt head 284 and washer, if used, will secure the lock 280 to the retaining wall 116. 15 As can be seen in Figure 20, numerous holes 282 may be positioned along the retaining wall 116 to provide flexibility in the location and placement of the lock 280, as well as providing for the use of numerous locks 280. The lock 280 also can include flanges 290, 292 that interact with retaining wall 116. 20 Referring to Figures 18 and 19, the barrier 140, or barrier extension 206 if used, defines an oval-shaped opening 286. Similar to the flexibility provided by the numerous holes 282, numerous openings 286 may be placed along the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 to provide the same flexibility. As shown in Figure 18, when the lock 280 is in a locked position, the opening 286 prevents the lock 280 from passing through the opening 286. As 25 illustrated by Figure 19, when the lock 280 is moved to an unlocked position through the use of a key 288, the oval-shaped lock 280 will to pass through the oval-shaped opening 286 thus permitting the opening of the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206. With the use of the lock 280 and its mounting to the retaining wall 116, as opposed to a lock mounted on the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 and extending into the shelf, there will be no 30 interference with product on the shelf, as may sometimes occur with the barrier-mounted locks. In addition, the lock 280 can, but need not, interact with the channels or rails 118, H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 30 124 and can leave these channels or rails substantially free to receive other objects such as a retaining wall or tab 122. As can be appreciated, the invention is not limited to the depicted oval-shape lock 280 and opening 286 as well as the illustrated placement of the lock and opening; rather, many various shaped keyed or keyless locks may be used with 5 similarly shaped openings formed in the barrier or barrier extension and placed in numerous locations and still achieve the benefits of the invention. Alternatively, Figures 21-24 depict an additional locking mechanism. A lock plate 302 can extend through an opening or slot 304 formed in the retaining wall 116 and through an 10 opening 306 formed in the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206. The lock plate 302 is configured to receive the padlock 300. One or more of the openings or slots 304 may be formed in the retaining wall 116 at various positions along the retaining wall including the depicted positions between the holes or openings 120 in the retaining wall 116. The openings or slots 304 are configured to receive the lock plate 302 and to secure the lock 15 plate 302 onto the retaining wall 116, as described below. While the openings or slots 304 are depicted as vertical slots, other shapes and configurations of the openings or slots 304 are possible with the invention. Padlock 300 may be used to secure and lock the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 in a closed position to prevent access to the product. The padlock 300 may be any known keyed or keyless padlock and may be mounted to the 20 barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 through the use of a movable lock plate 302. As can be appreciated, depending on the desired level of security, one or more lock plates 302 may be used to secure and lock the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 in a closed position to prevent access to the product. The lock plates 302 are movable in that they can 25 be positioned within any of the openings or slots 304 along the retaining wall 116. Being movable also permits the barrier 140 or barrier extension 206 to be made in various widths to protect only those products on the shelf that must be protected. In addition, the lock plate 302 need not interact with the channels or rails 118, 124 and can leave these channels or rails substantially free to receive other objects such as a retaining wall or tab 122. 30 In an exemplary embodiment, the lock plate 302 may be made of any suitable metal or H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -31 plastic material and may define a nose 310 that will extend through the retaining wall 116 and barrier 140 or barrier extension 206, if used. The nose 310 further defines an opening or hole 312 for receiving the padlock 300, as illustrated by Figure 21. The nose 310 also defines a notch or cut-away 314 that, when assembled, will seat on the bottom edge of the 5 opening or slot 304, as shown in Figure 24. Once in this position, the notch or cut-away 314 will prevent the lock plate 302 from being slid or pushed back out of the slot 304 and behind the retaining wall 116. The nose 310 is connected to or formed with a back plate 316. The back plate 316 10 includes legs or retaining members 318 that, when assembled, will be positioned behind the retaining wall 116 and assist in holding the lock plate 302 on the retaining wall 116. The back plate 316 and retaining members 318 may take on numerous configurations that aid in holding the lock plate 302 to the retaining wall 116. The lock plate 302 may be configured to not only extend through the retaining wall 116 and barrier 140 or barrier 15 extension 206, it may also extend through and be used with the tab 122. One skilled in the art will appreciate that any known locking mechanism can be used with the invention, including a cable lock that may be mounted with the hole 204 (Figure 13), and any known key, special tool, access card, electronic, magnetic or wireless means (for 20 keyless locking mechanisms) can be used to open the locking mechanism. As depicted in Figure 8, an exemplary embodiment of the invention incorporates a system that causes an alert to store or security personnel that a potential theft situation exists. In one embodiment, lifting or moving the barrier 140 activates a mechanical or electronic 25 alert device 142, generally depicted in the figures, that provides a signal, such as an audible, inaudible, infrared, radio-frequency, cellular, ultrasonic or electronic signal (including digital and analog signals), or a combination of these signals. This alert signal may be a sound, tone or voice annunciation that alerts store or security personnel that the barrier 140 has been opened or has been opened for an unusually long period of time and 30 potentially represents a theft situation. The alert device 142 also may send an electronic or other signal to play a voice message via the store paging system, to activate a local or H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -32 remote strobe or annunciator light, or to send a signal to a receiver, such as a store computer, a pager, cellular device, or other portable device carried by store or security personnel. The alert device 142 may also activate a security video camera to monitor the particular area or vicinity, or activate a monitor that is placed in the area or vicinity which 5 would show the camera image to the consumers and potential thief, or transmit the camera image to security or store management via a web connection, cellular telephone, personal data assistant, or any other signal receiving device. The alert device 142 also may activate an advertisement, informational announcement or other statement or display that is provided through voice, video or video and voice. This advertisement, announcement or 10 statement can be directed to the particular product or product type associated with product behind the barrier that activates the alert device. The alert device can be located such that barriers of a width of no more than one product facing will activate the alert device when lifted. 15 As used herein, the term "alert device" is meant to include any device or component that may provide an alert, warning and/or signal concerning a condition, situation, and/or circumstance. The alert device 142 may be hard-wired to the store's security system or may be a wireless system. Wireless systems, if used, provide increased flexibility in installation and can be readily installed in existing shelves without the need to install wires 20 for either power or communication. In addition, the use of a wireless system allows for the gradual installation of a system. For example, items of high value (and therefore suffering from an increased likelihood of being stolen) or items that tend to have significant variations in customer demand can be monitored first. With a wireless system, the alert signal may be sent to not only the store's security system or computer, but also any 25 portable device or receiver, such as a controller, personal data assistant, pager or cellular telephone that may be carried by store personnel or security. Also with the wireless or wired system, the store's computer can process further the alert signal to determine whether a theft situation exists and can generate reports which can be analyzed to fine tune product placement, placement of cameras, alert devices, sensors, and so forth, as well as 30 fine tune the delays and actions initiated by potential theft situations. As understood by those skilled in the art the store's computer can be configured with the network server and H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 33 can be accessible remotely through the world-wide web or other network, and can be controlled remotely through the world-wide web or other network. In an exemplary embodiment, the alert device 142 is positioned on the shelf 104, either 5 underneath, as depicted in Figure 8, or on top of the shelf Existing mounting holes on the standard dealer shelf may be used to secure the alert device to the shelf. The alert device 142 may be positioned near to or adjacent to the barrier 140. The alert device 142 may be operatively connected to the barrier 140 through numerous techniques. In one embodiment, the alert device 142 includes a switch 144, such as a push-button switch, that 10 will activate when the barrier 140 is moved or opened. That is, as the barrier 140 moves and comes in contact with the switch 144, either directly or through the use of an activator plate 145, the switch 144 is activated. Alternatively, in a closed-barrier position, the switch 144 is pressed, as the barrier 140 moves to an open position the barrier 140 moves away from the switch 144, thereby releasing the switch 144 and thus activating the alert 15 device 142. The alert device 142 may be operatively connected or coupled to the barrier to detect movement of the barrier through other methods or techniques. For instance, a motion sensor or similar sensory devices, such as a light-emitting diode sensor assembly, may be 20 used to detect movement of the barrier and communicate that information to the alert device 142. The sensor may be mounted in a variety of locations including on the barrier itself or next to the barrier to detect barrier movement. Alternatively, a magnetic switch may be incorporated to detect movement of the barrier. 25 The alert device 142 may include sensory components and time-delay features that will calculate how long the barrier 140 has been moved or opened. Upon reaching a predetermined time period, in other words, as the barrier 140 has been moved or opened for a certain duration, the alert device 142 will send a signal, such as the above-mentioned signals, to alert the store personnel, security and/or the consumer that the barrier 140 has 30 been opened or moved for a long period of time, thereby indicating a potential theft situation. In an exemplary embodiment, upon the passing of the predetermined time H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 34 period, the alert device 142 may send an audio alert signal, including a signal different from a previous audio alert signal, that would draw attention to the vicinity. The alert device 142 can therefore be designed to provide its alert for a fixed period of time before becoming silent. 5 In another embodiment of the alert device 142, the audio alert signal is adjustable to provide a variety of alert tones of varying frequencies, or to announce that the barrier 140 has been opened or moved for too long and that the consumer needs to close the barrier 140, or to send a silent alarm to the store and/or security personnel. Different signals or 10 frequencies can be used as the length of time in which the barrier has been opened or moved increases. Numerous combinations of alert signals are possible with the alert device 142 depending on the desired level of security. The alert signal is adjustable and numerous combinations of signals may be used to provide the desired signal level and thus security level, yet avoid turning away legitimate consumers from selecting and purchasing the 15 product. That is, for example, the alert device 142 can be programmed to provide an alert signal that will draw the attention of surrounding shoppers or store/security personnel, yet short enough to limit aggravation of the legitimate consumers or stock person. Also, in another embodiment, a two-tiered response could be implemented. For example, 20 if the barrier 140 is moved, a signal could be transmitted directly to the security camera, or via the store computer or both. In addition, an inaudible notification could be provided directly to security personnel. If the barrier 140 remains open or moved for a set period of time, more clearly indicating a potential theft, an additional audible alarm and flashing lights could also be activated, or any other alarm. Thus, the response could be configured 25 to more carefully match the situation. Referring to Figure 15, in an exemplary embodiment, a security video camera 260 may be placed in the vicinity of product that are high risk theft items, or other product of concern. As shown in Figure 16, a monitor 262 also may be placed in the vicinity of the high risk 30 product. The monitor 262 may be used to show the security camera image to consumers and any potential thief. Thus, a consumer or potential thief that removes product from the H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 35 shelf 104 of the display system 100 may realize that their actions are being watched by a camera and potentially recorded. As can be appreciated, the position of the potential theft relative to the security camera 260 5 would be beneficial to provide an instruction to the security camera to focus on a particular position. This positional information could be generated by a number of methods, including providing a store computer with the security camera coordinate system for the security camera. The location of the alert device 142 relative to the security camera could be determined during setup and during a potential theft situation; the location of the alert 10 device 142 could be used to direct the focus of the security camera. Alternatively, the security camera could be configured to focus in several positions, such as three points along an aisle, and the store computer could indicate which position was the most appropriate for the particular situation. One skilled in the art will appreciate that the described methods are illustrative because of the numerous methods of controlling the 15 security camera that exist. In addition to the value of such system in loss prevention, the monitor can show video in the form of advertising or consumer information. As illustrated by Figure 17, the monitor 262 can switch between the advertising or consumer information and the camera image 20 through the use of a video switch 264. This switching activity can occur on a periodic basis, such as every 30 seconds, or can occur when predetermined conditions are met, such as the lifting of the barrier 140, the removal of product, the movement of a pusher, or input from a proximity sensor that a consumer has entered or approaches the area. By playing the video segment, the device not only reduces loss, but becomes a source of revenue when 25 advertisers are charged to place their message on the system. A secondary video source for the monitor on which advertising, consumer information or other content is shown can be a video player 266 such as a video cassette recorder, compact disk-video player, solid state digital video player, direct video, audio feed or other 30 video sources. With respect to the switch 264, the switching action between the camera image and advertising or other content can be effected by a hardware timer or a small H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 36 microcontroller. In one embodiment, the secondary video source can contain a multitude of short video segments which are randomly or non-randomly selected by the timer or microcontroller. The camera 260 may be a small, stand-alone type, not connected to any part of an existing security system, or it may be any typical store security camera existing 5 in the store's security network. The monitor 262 may be a small flat, color, LCD type monitor and can be placed at numerous locations on or near the shelf 104. For instance, the monitor may be placed in overhead signage above the merchandised product or it can be attached to the shelf 104 edge. In some applications, a larger monitor, such as a CRT type, plasma, LCD or projection monitor can be used. A preferred solid-state digital video 10 player may comprise the secondary video source. The source may be housed in the same enclosure as the monitor or may be located remotely from the monitor. Referring back to Figures 4 and 5, in another exemplary embodiment, the shelf 104 on which the product rests may be a "pull-out" shelf The "pull-out" shelf allows store 15 associates or personnel access to the product to restock the shelf but prevents a thief from obtaining such access. The pull-out shelf allows easy access to all products on the shelf This function, however, requires that the shelf not be movable by the consumer or thief and therefore the pull-out function must be protected by a key-lock, special tool, or other locking mechanism. In this embodiment, the product dividers 110 may be designed to be 20 at least equal to the height of the tallest product package on the shelf. As the shelf 104 is pulled out, the product lane or dividers may cause the barrier 140 to rise. If the height of the dividers 110 is lower than the tallest product package, pushing the shelf back in may cause the barrier 140 to catch on the product packages and make it more difficult to return to its closed position. Additionally, pulling out the shelf 104 will raise the barrier 140 25 which may activate an annunciator or signal generator, as explained above. Referring to Figure 9, in an exemplary embodiment, a barrier placed on a top-most shelf 104 may include a lock-box 108 that may be used for storage of overstock product or additional display system 100 components. In an embodiment in which the top-most shelf 30 104 is a pull-out type, the shelf 104 will pull out while the horizontal barrier above it remains in place, allowing product to be easily accessed. As indicated above, the lock-box H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 37 108 may also be mounted to the vertical uprights 102, through known mounting techniques, and may be mounted at any location on the display system 100. The lock-box 108 may use any known locking mechanism that permits key or key-less entry to the lock box 108. One skilled in the art will appreciate that other security components may be 5 mounted to the lock-box 108 including the security camera, monitor, and alert device 142, to name a few. In an embodiment, a stationary shroud 180 may placed toward the top of the product display system 100. The shroud 180 provides security and graphic placement, and product 10 may be stored within it. The shroud 180 provides security in that it functions as a top wall or barrier preventing access to the product from a point above the product. The shroud 180 may mount on or to an existing shelf. The shroud 180 may be fixed or adjustable. With an adjustable shroud, the shroud can be positioned at numerous locations on the product display system. In addition, the shroud 180 can be a pull-out shroud functioning in manner 15 similar to the exemplary pull-out shelf 104 described above. Moreover, the shroud 180 can also serve as a shelf to hold product. In other words, the product display system 100 could include multiple shrouds 180 that function as shelves to hold or display product. Also, the shroud can be configured to mount the barriers 130, 140, through numerous known mounting techniques. In an exemplary embodiment, the lock box 108 having a 20 lockable door 109, as shown in Figure 9, may be placed on the shroud 180 for additional product storage and graphic placement. The product display system 100 of the invention offers various levels of securement and theft protection. Each level described herein can be used separately and various or all 25 levels can be used in conjunction with each other. Each level can also be added to or adapted with existing shelf systems or be provided as a stand alone system. The divider or retaining walls 110 provide securement. The front retaining wall 116 or "fence" provides securement, with or without the retaining tabs 120. The barriers and access doors 130, 140 over the top of the retaining wall 116 provides securement. The close positioning of the 30 shelf 104 over the product located on the shelf below provides securement. The audible or other signal that is generated by the alert device 142 when the barrier 140 has been open H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 38 for a set period of time provides securement. The security camera and video and display devices provide securement. Each of these separable aspects of an embodiment of the invention can be used on its own in a retail setting, or can be used in conjunction with other aspects of the embodiment. Each separable aspect can be added to existing shelving 5 or display systems to effectively retrofit and add one or more levels of security to such existing systems. One embodiment of the invention features various levels of theft deterrent. One level assists in preventing sweeping of products. Pushers 126, dividers 110, and retaining walls 10 116 are coupled with a shelf 104 or barrier 130, or both, above the product to provide securement to the product. The pushers, dividers, retaining walls, shelf, and barrier allow approximately one, two or three packages to be removed through an opening at one time from a facing of the display system. Second retaining walls or tabs 122 may be used to provide individual securement for specific rows of product. The front wall 116 and tabs 15 122 may also include holes or openings that extend therethrough that would require the consumer to push on the product through the holes or openings in order to remove the product from the shelf. A second level of securement incorporates all of the features of first level with the addition 20 of a barrier 140 or access door. To access the product, the consumer must utilize two hands, one to lift or slide the barrier 140 and the other to remove the product, thus adding a second layer of deterrent to the system. A third level of securement builds upon the features of the first and second levels with the 25 addition of a theft-warning notification device, such as an alert device 142, or other signal transmission device. The alert notification or signal transmission is activated if the barrier 140 or access door is open a predetermined amount of time. This delay can be adjusted to any duration or eliminated. The notification provides an audible, inaudible, infrared, radio-frequency, electronic, or cellular signal that notifies consumers and/or store and 30 security personnel that the barrier 140 has been open for a particular period of time. The signal transmission can send a signal to a store computer, store personnel or a security H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 39 camera or monitor. The signal can alert the store computer or personnel that the barrier 140 or access door has been opened for a particular period of time and can activate the security camera and monitor to show the thief an image of himself or herself in front of the product. This image can be recorded. Additional alert notifications or signal transmissions 5 can be activated as the amount of time the barrier or access door is open increases. An additional level of deterrence of theft by consumers or store personnel is the use of a locking mechanism on the shelf 104 to limit unauthorized personnel from pulling out the shelf. The system can require the use of a key or an uncommonly or commonly shaped 10 instrument to be inserted into a concealed access slot in the front or underside of the shelf This method is designed to require someone with specific knowledge of the shelf operation to disengage the lock. In an embodiment, the barrier 140 or access door on the shelf 104 can be automatically raised for restocking purposes when the shelf is pulled out, then re engaged once the shelf has been returned to the closed position. In this application, an 15 audio alert may be incorporated that indicates that the shelf is being restocked with product. In addition, in an embodiment, a stationary shroud 180 may be placed toward the top of the product display and management system. The shroud provides security by inhibiting 20 access to the product from above the product. Also, a lock box can be placed anywhere on the system to store additional product that will be secured by a key lock or some other locking mechanism. In one embodiment of the present invention, various aspects of the invention are added to 25 portions of existing shelves. In some environments, there are only one, two or a few potential high-theft products among a display of many products. Aspects of the present invention can be added solely to the portion of a shelf management and display system with respect to those high-theft products. For example, a barrier 140 could be placed solely over those products. In addition, side walls could be placed to cover one or more of 30 the sides of the products to further deter sweeping or other theft. A front barrier, a locking mechanism or other aspects of the invention described herein could be used solely with the H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 40 high-theft products or other highly relevant products in a display and not used with other products in the same display. In one embodiment, a particular set of relevant products can be effectively segregated from the other products within the same display. This particular set of relevant products can be subject to additional security aspects described herein that 5 are not used with the remaining products in the display. Referring to Figures 28-29, there is depicted an adjustable power bar 400 that may be selectively mounted to the back wall 106. The power bar 400 will provide electrical power to various components mounted to the shelves, including any video monitors, security 10 cameras, lighting, illuminated signage, overhead header lights, radios, stereos, or any other components that may be mounted to a shelf or the product display and require electrical power. As illustrated by the Figures, the power bar 400 is selectively adjustable between several positions to accommodate shelf height changes or adjustments without causing obstruction with the mounting or adjustment of the shelf 15 Conventionally, power outlets were mounted to the shelf and were not easily movable. In fact, significant force was required to unlock the power outlets from the track on which they were mounted to then move the power outlets. In other known applications, the power outlets were mounted to conductive tracks, similar to track-lighting tracks which 20 included embedded power tracks. With those track-type systems, the power outlets needed to be placed at correct locations and snap-fit into position. Once installed, the power outlets were not slidable. The power bar 400 of the invention solves these problems and other known problems by 25 providing a power source for a product display that is easily mountable to the display, such as the back wall 106, and is easily adjustable to accommodate changes made to the positions of the shelves. The power bar 400 includes an elongated body 402 that may be attached to the back wall 106 of the display. As illustrated, the power bar 400 may be mounted in a vertical manner and the elongated body 402 may extend the entire height of 30 the product display or alternatively less than the entire height of the product display. The power bar 400 may be slidably moved (as indicated by direction arrow 401) a sufficient H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 41 distance to avoid interference with the product shelf that may be placed at approximately the same vertical height, or with the repositioning of the mounted product shelf. The power bar 400 includes one or more power outlets 404 that may be configured at numerous positions on the power bar 400. Once in the desired position, a fastener, not shown, may 5 be positioned through an adjustment slot 406 to secure the power bar 400 to the back wall 106 at the desired height. The adjustment slot 406 is elongated to permit further adjustment of the power bar 400. The elongated body 402 defines an elongated hollow cavity 408 through which may pass 10 conducting wires 410 that are used to supply the power to the power bar outlets 404. The elongated body 402 may also include a recessed channel 412 formed in the body 402 and along each side of the body 402. The channel 412 may be used as a receptor for receiving and aligning the power bar 400 onto the body 402. The power bar 400 may fit on or within the channel 412 in a tongue-and-groove manner, or any other suitable mounting connection 15 that permits slidable movement of one component relative to another. Once installed, the power bar 400 will slide relative to the body 402 in or on the channel 412. Figures 34-59 illustrate an embodiment of a box-shelf that may be secured directly to an upright. Thus, as depicted, the box-shelf may be provided as a complete unit that provides 20 theft-prevention benefits as discussed above while allowing for more straightforward installation in a retail location. As can be appreciated, in an embodiment the box-shelf may be configured to be self-contained so as to eliminate the need for a support shelf. Looking first at Figures 34-36, a box-shelf 3405 includes a top 3420 and two sides 3422 25 that can be connected together to form part of a housing 3408. A recessed portion 3421 is provided so that in the event that the box-shelf 3405 is mounted under a shelf, the recessed portion 3421 will aid in ensuring there is no interference with the brackets that support the shelf or other structure that may extend downward (not shown). One or more shelf supports 3430 are mounted to the box shelf 3405 so as to enable the box shelf 3405 to be 30 mounted to a vertical support (not shown) in a traditional manner.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 42 A slidable shelf 3410 is mounted to one or more tracks 3416, which can be supported at least in part by the sides 3422. As depicted, the slidable shelf 3410 can include a support surface 3412 that supports a divider 3418 (which may be a pusher or a simple divider) and includes a rail 3445 mounted to the front of the shelf 3410. The rail in turn supports a 5 retainer 3414. As depicted, a door 3424 with one or more handles 3426 can be mounted to the top 3420 via hinge system 4010 and is coupled to a control unit 3515 that may be configured to produce an audible tone (immediately or after some predetermined delay) when the door is 10 opened and may further be configured to provide a signal to a remote device so as to trigger video capture or security personal. Slidable shelf 3410 translates via a track 3416 when locking feature 3525 is actuated. As can be appreciated, to translate the slidable shelf 3410, the door 3424 needs to be opened 15 and in an embodiment, as depicted, the door may open up to 90 degrees. As can be appreciated, the rail 3445 can also be mounted on the top 3420 of the box shelf 3405. It should be noted that details such as discussed above with respect to Figures 1-33 may also be incorporated into the embodiment depicted in Figures 34-59, where appropriate. 20 Thus, where desirable and/or convenient, the above details may be incorporated. Figures 37a-37b show the locking feature 3525 in a locked or blocking position and an opening and non-blocking position. In an embodiment, an opening in the lip 3547 allows a key to be inserted so as to translate the locking feature 3525 from the locked to the open 25 position. Thus, as can now be appreciated, the locking feature 3525 is shown in both the blocked and open position in a number of the Figures. As depicted in Figure 38, one or more box shelves 34-5 may be mounted on top of each other. In such a configuration, a path 3810 can allow the insertion of a key (not shown) to 30 actuate the locking feature 3525.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 43 As can be appreciated from Figure 39, the door 3424 can be pivotally mounted to support 3925. Furthermore, a hat channel 3915 can be provided for additional strength and rigidity of the box shelf 3405. The hat channel 3915 may also be used to support the locking feature 3525 and / or one or more tracks 3416. As depicted, two shelf supports 3430 5 (sometimes referred to as brackets) are mounted to a rear panel 3940 and include slots so as to allow the box shelf to be mounted to vertical supports in an adjustable manner even if the position of the vertical supports include some degree of tolerance stack-up. The shelf supports 3430 can be connected to one or more vertical rails (not shown) of a shelving structure. 10 Figures 40-47 illustrate additional details of the depicted embodiment of the box shelf. It should be noted that the box-shelf may be constructed out of known materials, such as powder coated 18 gauge steel or some other appropriate material. Figure 48 illustrates an embodiment of the support surface 3412 and includes reference to cross-sections J-J and P 15 P. As can be appreciated from Figures 49-51, the lip 3547 can include a blocking lip 4910 in the center of the shelf (or in some other location aligned with the locking feature 3525) but the blocking lip may not be required in other locations, thus allowing (but not requiring) a reduction in the amount of material used to make the support surface 3412. 20 Figures 52-54 illustrate details one embodiment of the locking feature 3525. Figure 52 shows the hinge plate 5215 both in a partially exploded view and in an installed position. As depicted, the hinge plate 5215 is mounted to hinge base plate 5225 by a fastener 5230 that couples to a nut 5240. A biasing element 5235 directs the hinge plate 5215 toward a first or locked position. Thus, hinge plate 5215a is a locked position and hinge plate 5215b 25 is an open position. As can be appreciated, however, numerous other methods of mounting the hinge plate 5215 to the hinge base plate 5235 are possible. Figures 54-59 illustrate additional details regarding embodiments of the locking feature 3525, shelf support 3430 and other potential elements of the box shelf 3405. In addition, 30 Figure 59 depicts section H-H, from which Figure 46 is taken. It should be noted that any dimensional references are merely exemplary and are not intended to reflect any H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 44 limitations to the present invention unless otherwise noted. Figures 60-73 illustrate another aspect of the invention, namely a low profile shelf system that improves the merchandising of product. The low profile shelf system improves 5 product merchandising by creating more spacing between shelves to accommodate larger product. In some stores, there are large product sections wherein product management systems, such as those described above, are not the most ideal systems to use because there is not sufficient height (i.e., spacing) between shelves to add such a system. In these instances, the product is merchandised so tightly between shelves that adding a product 10 management system, such as those described above, raises the product such that it may interfere with the shelf above. Occasionally, retailers are not willing to adjust the shelves to incorporate a product management system because such shelf adjustments typically must be done in fixed increments (e.g., one inch increments), and moving shelves by such increments can sometimes lead to the undesirable eliminating of a shelf, such as the top 15 shelf. As depicted in Figures 60-73, the invention solves this problem by using low-profile shelf supports 600. Each low-profile shelf support 600 may define a back portion 602 and a front portion 604. The back portion 602 may include a fastening plate 606 attached thereto 20 (Figure 72), each fastening plate 606 having at least one hook formation 610 that can be inserted into a slotted upright (not shown). The fastening plate 606 may be fastened to the shelf support through the use of fasteners 623. Alternatively, the back portion 602 may form the at least one hook formation 610 (Figure 60). As shown in Figure 60, the back portion 602 of the shelf support 600 may have a thickness that is substantially greater than 25 the thickness of the front portion, resulting in the front portion 604 having a significantly lower profile than the back portion of the shelf support 600. This reduced profile of the front portion results in greater clearance between product shelves to accommodate larger product and/or the installation of the product management systems described herein. In one embodiment, the thickness of the back portion 602 may be 75% greater than the 30 thickness of the front portion 604. Other thicknesses of the front and back portions are possible to create the desired low profile shelf support configuration.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 45 Referring to Figures 61 and 73, the shelf supports 600 may be positioned beneath and secured to a shelf 614. A pusher system 616 may be mounted to the shelf 614. The pusher system may include a pusher track 618 and a pusher 620. Any of the pusher 5 systems described herein may be used with the low profile shelf supports 600. Additionally, a product divider 625 may be mounted to the shelf 614 or made part of the pusher system 616, as described herein. Referring to Figures 60, 63 and 64, a pivotable barrier 640 and a front product retaining 10 wall 642 may be mounted to a front rail 644, which may be mounted to the front of the shelf 614. The front rail 644 may include one or more channels 645 for receiving one or more retaining walls 642 or signage identifying the products being merchandised. The front rail 644 may also be configured to receive the pusher system 610 in either a slidable or non-slidable manner. The barrier 640 may be configured similar to the barriers 15 described herein. Similarly, the retaining wall 642 may be configured similar to the retaining walls also described herein. Referring to Figures 62-65, an alert device 650 may be mounted to the shelf 614 at or near the back portion 602. Similar to alert device 142, the alert device 650 may be used to 20 detect when the pivotable barrier 640 is moved or opened and send an appropriate alert signal, as illustrated above. With this embodiment, the alert device 650 may include a switch 652 that is activated by a linkage 654 that operatively contacts the pivotable barrier 640 (Figure 64). The linkage 654 may be a metal or plastic rod or flat stock of a suitable material. With this embodiment, the barrier 640 may include a cam-shaped end 641 25 mountable to the front rail 644, as shown in Figure 64, the cam-shaped end 641 configured to contact and cause movement of the linkage 654 when the barrier 640 pivots. The linkage 654 in turn may contact the switch 652 of the alert device 650 (as shown in Figure 65) to activate the alert device 650, which will send or emit the desired alert signal. A linkage cover 662 may be mounted over the linkage 654 to cover and protect the linkage 30 654.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 46 Referring to Figures 66-69, a security box-shelf 670 may be secured to the low-profile shelf support 600 (or to the vertical uprights) and over the pusher system 610. The box shelf 670 may be provided as a complete unit that provides theft-prevention benefits as discussed above and may be configured to be self-contained so as to eliminate the need for 5 a support shelf. The box-shelf 670 may include a top 672 that may be made of clear material to permit products to be seen in the box-shelf 670. The box-shelf 670 may also include two sides 674 and a back wall 676 that may be joined together to form the box shelf 670. A front security rail 678 may be mounted to the top 672 (as shown in Figure 69). The security rail 678 may also be configured to receive a pivotable barrier 640. The 10 barrier 640 may be similar to the barriers described above and may be opened to permit access to the products merchandised within the box-shelf 670. An alert device may also be operatively coupled to the barrier 640. Referring to Figures 70-71, optional signage 690 may be mounted to the shelf 614 that is 15 supported by the low profile shelf supports 600. One or more signage supports 692 may be used to support the signage 690. The supports may be mounted to one or more horizontal mounting brackets 694 for added stability of the signage 690. Referring to Figures 72-73, it should be understood that multiple low profile shelf supports 20 600 may be positioned underneath the shelf 614, depending on the size and configuration of the shelf. It should further be understood that multiple pusher systems 616 and dividers 625 may be positioned on the shelf 614 to merchandise multiple rows of product on the shelf. 25 Figures 79-91 illustrate another aspect of the invention, namely a merchandise system 810. Similar to the other embodiments, the merchandise system 810 improves product merchandising by limiting the number and the frequency with which product can be removed from, for example, a merchandising shelf by using various methods such as slowing the rate at which product can be pushed towards the front edge of a merchandising 30 shelf.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -47 Referring to Figures 79-84, in an exemplary embodiment, merchandise system 810 includes a base 812. The base 812 defines a generally flat planar surface that may be configured to engage with or mount onto any known shelf used in a store, as well as any other merchandise system 810, and in any known mounting configuration and orientation. 5 The base 812 defines a front edge 826, a back edge 828, a first side edge 820, a second side edge 822, and one or more tracks 814. As is further illustrated, a housing 850 can be mounted to the base 812 in any known mounting configuration and orientation. The housing 850 defines a top wall 852, a first side wall 854, a second side wall 856, and a front retaining wall 876. First and second side walls 854 and 856, respectively, can be 10 used such that when more than one merchandise system 810 is placed adjacent to another like merchandise system 810 on a shelf or stacked on top of another like merchandise system 810, product resting on the base 812 of each respective merchandise system 810 remains separated or divided. In an embodiment, one merchandise system 810 can be stacked on top of another merchandise system 810 without need of a separate shelf 15 between the two merchandise systems. In an exemplary embodiment, front retaining wall 876 is mounted at an angle, (for example, approximately a 450 angle) relative to the base 812 and extends from the second side edge 822 to first side edge 820 towards the front edge 826. Angles other than 20 approximately 450 are possible, including angles of approximately 150, 300, 600 and 750, to name a few. Front retaining wall 876 can define a channel 888 located proximate the base 812. Channel 888 further can define a detent 886. Front retaining wall 876 and first side wall 854 define an opening 878 through which, as will be explained below, product can be removed by a customer or employee. In an embodiment, front retaining wall 876 25 does not fully extend from the second side edge 822 to first side edge 820. A lever 880 can be operatively coupled to the merchandise system 810 for ejecting product through the opening 878. In an exemplary embodiment, lever 880 is slidably mounted within the channel 888. The lever 880 can include a lever biasing element 882 and a lever hook 884 adapted to move product. As illustrated, lever biasing element 882 can be a coil spring 30 positioned between lever hook 884 and detent 886. The one or more tracks 814 extend along the base 812 from the back edge 828 to the front retaining wall 876. As shown, a H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 48 track 814 can be used with a pusher 816. It should be understood that more or less than two tracks could be used with the invention, depending on the particular application. The base 812 further defines a rack aperture 988 for use with a rack 986 as will be discussed below. 5 Referring to Figures 88 and 89, in an exemplary embodiment, the one or more tracks 814 extend longitudinally along the length of the base 812 and define at least one rail 830 and an elongated aperture or channel 832 in the base 812. The aperture 832 and rail 830 are sized and shaped to receive and mount a mating element of the pusher 816. The pusher 10 816 is slidably mounted to the base 812 such that the pusher 816 does not lift out of the track 814. The present invention contemplates the use of other shapes of rails and apertures to mount the pusher 816 to the base 812. Other pusher mounting techniques are possible with the invention. 15 The pusher 816 also contains at least one pusher urging element 860 used to urge the pusher 816 toward the front of the shelf. The pusher urging element 860 may be any biasing element including, without limitation, a flat coil spring. The present invention may use one or more pusher urging elements 860 to urge the pusher 816 depending on the desired application. The pusher urging element 860 may be mounted to the pusher 816 20 and the base 812 using any known mounting technique. In the exemplary embodiment, one end of the pusher urging element 860 is secured to the base 812 near the front edge 826 of the base 812, and the opposing end of the pusher urging element 860 is positioned behind the pusher 816 to urge the pusher 816 toward the front of the shelf Further, pusher 816 includes an angled pusher face 892. In an exemplary embodiment, angled pusher face 25 892 is positioned such that its angle relative to the base 812 corresponds to the angle of front retaining wall 876. It should be understood, however, that angled pusher face 892 can be positioned at other angles and can have various dimensions and shapes. Referring to an embodiment of the invention in Figures 85 and 86, pusher 816 will urge the 30 product toward the front retaining wall 876. When product is positioned between the front retaining wall 876 and pusher 816, only a single product can be accessed by customers or H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 49 employees because the opening 878 is equal in dimension to less than the width of two products. In an embodiment, the opening 878 is no more than approximately 50% wider that the width of a single product. In another embodiment the opening 878 is roughly the width of a single product yet wide enough to allow a single product to pass through the 5 opening 878. The positioning and dimensions of opening 878, in combination with the positive pressure the pusher 816 places on product against the front retaining wall 876, hampers a customer or employee's ability to remove products using solely digits (i.e., fingers) or digital force. To facilitate the removal of a single product, when product is positioned between the front retaining wall 876 and pusher 816, a force can be applied to 10 lever 880 such that lever 880 can be slidably translated. As lever 880 is slidably translated, lever hook 884 engages the most forward positioned product. When the customer or employee slidably translates lever 880 to a fully extended position, the single product is partially ejected from the housing 850 and can be easily removed by the customer or employee. Further, when lever 880 is in a fully extended position, lever biasing element 15 882 is compressed between lever hook 884 and detent 886. Accordingly, when a customer or employee stops applying force to the lever 880, lever biasing element 882 biases lever 880 back into its original position. In the embodiment described below, when customers or employees reach and pull out the 20 product available to them, the pusher 816 is slowly urged toward the front retaining wall 876 by pusher urging element 860 and, after a pre-determined period of time, a single product once again is positively pressured between the pusher 816 and the front retaining wall 876 such that the product is adjacent opening 878. An attempt by a customer or employee to remove or urge the next product forward after a first product is removed is 25 hampered because the product is positioned at an angle corresponding to angled pusher face 892 and thus, if a customer or employee attempts to tip the product forward, the product will be biased in a standing position by the second side wall 856. The speed at which the pusher moves can be controlled by various devices including, without limitation, a dampened gear assembly discussed below. By providing a merchandise system that 30 urges product forward at a slow rate of speed, a customer or employee can be inhibited from removing more than one product at a time and is assisted in removing product only H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 50 once every pre-determined amount of time. In an embodiment of the invention, to provide the desired slow rate of speed for the pusher 816, an exemplary dampened gear assembly 980 may be mounted to the pusher 816. The 5 dampened gear assembly 980 may include a gear 982 and a gear housing 984 that can be filled with any dampening fluid known in the art. A portion of gear 982 is housed within gear housing 984. A rack 986 can be mounted to rack aperture 988. The rack 986 defines a plurality of teeth 990. Gear 982 of gear assembly 980 is adapted to engage the plurality of teeth 990 of rack 986. In operation, when product is removed from the base 812, and 10 pusher 816 is urged forward by pusher urging element 860, gear assembly 980 acts to slow the rate at which pusher 816 is urged forward. This can be accomplished because rotation of gear 982 is regulated by the dampening fluid located in gear housing 984 which acts to resist movement of the gear 982 within gear housing 984. Again, other dampening techniques may be used with the present invention to affect the desired slow rate of 15 movement of the pusher toward the front of the shelf. In an embodiment, front retaining wall 876 is made of a clear or transparent material that allows for the product to be viewed through front retaining wall 876. In an embodiment, front retaining wall 876 enables advertisements or marketing materials to be placed on 20 front retaining wall 876. Base 812 also can include a display area 999 (see Figure 79) for advertising or marketing material as well as product information such as product pricing information. Because display area 999 can include product information, merchandise system 810 can be, as was discussed above, stacked on top of another like merchandise system 810 without the use of shelves. 25 In an embodiment, a locking device (not shown) can be used to prevent the removal of product. Such locking device may include a rotatable barrier, a door, or a locking clip. The locking device, for instance, could prevent product from fitting through opening 878 such that when the merchandise system 810 is not in use, neither employees nor customers 30 can access the product.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 -51 It should be understood that the merchandise system 810 can be altered such that first side wall 854 and second side wall 856 are reversed and thus, opening 878 is on the opposite side. As can be understood by one in the art, in this embodiment, the angled pusher face 892, front retaining wall 876, and the lever 880, among other things, are also reversed. 5 Referring to Figures 90 and 91, in another embodiment, a housing 950 defines a top wall 952, a first side wall 954, and an opposing second side wall. A front edge of the base 812 is configured to mount to or on a rail 924 in any known manner. As discussed above, the base 812 may include a rack and rack aperture wherein the rack defines a plurality of teeth 10 990 (as shown in Figures 90 and 91) such that a gear of a gear assembly can be adapted to engage the plurality of teeth 990. The rail 924 includes a front retaining wall 976 to retain product that is pushed toward the rail. Front retaining wall 976 and housing 950 define an opening 978 that is roughly equal to the width of a single product. The pusher 916 will urge the product toward the rail 924. When one merchandise system 810 is be placed 15 adjacent to another like merchandise system 810 on a shelf, product can only be removed through the top portion 979 of the opening 978. Accordingly, when product is positioned between the front retaining wall 976 and pusher 916, only a single product can be accessed by customers or employees. It will be further understood that a device, such as a lever trigger (not shown), may be used to facilitate a customer or employee to partially or fully 20 eject product through the top portion 979 of the opening 978. Figures 92A-101C illustrate another aspect of the invention, namely a merchandise system 1010. Similar to the other embodiments, the merchandise system 1010 improves product merchandising by limiting the number and the frequency with which product can be 25 removed from, for example, a merchandising shelf by using various methods such as an electronic lock-out mechanism which locks the merchandising shelf and multiple shelves when too many products are removed at one time. The merchandise system 1010 may generally include a base 1012 and housing 1050, a door assembly or door 1020, a locking assembly, and an electronic control unit 1080. 30 Referring to Figure 92A, in an exemplary embodiment, merchandise system 1010 includes H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 52 a base 1012. The base 1012 defines a generally flat planar surface that may be configured to engage with or mount onto any known shelf used in a store, as well as any other merchandise system 1010, and in any known mounting configuration and orientation. The base 1012 defines a front edge 1016, a back edge 1017, a first side edge 1018, a second 5 side edge 1019, and one or more tracks 1014. Additionally, the base 1012 may include a ratchet shaft slot 1015. The ratchet shaft slot 1015 may be configured to accept the ratchet shaft 1066 as will be described below. The ratchet shaft slot 1015 may extend longitudinally along the length of the base 1012. The ratchet shaft slot 1015 is sized and shaped to receive and mount the ratchet shaft 1066. 10 As is further illustrated in Figure 92A, a housing 1050 can be mounted to the base 1012 in any known mounting configuration and orientation. The housing 1050 defines a top wall 1052, a first side wall 1054, and a second side wall 1056. The housing 1050 may also include a rear retaining wall (not shown in the figures). The first and second side walls 15 1054 and 1056, respectively, can be used such that when more than one merchandise system 1010 is placed adjacent to another like merchandise system 1010 on a shelf or stacked on top of another like merchandise system 1010, product resting on the base 1012 of each respective merchandise system 1010 remains separated or divided. In an embodiment, one merchandise system 1010 can be stacked on top of another merchandise 20 system 1010 without need of a separate shelf between the two merchandise systems. As shown in Figure 92A, the one or more tracks 1014 may extend along the base 1012 from the back edge 1028 to the door 1020. As shown, a track 1014 can be used with a pusher 1040. It should be understood that more or less than two tracks could be used with 25 the invention, depending on the particular application. As illustrated in Figure 92A, the one or more tracks 1014 extend longitudinally along the length of the base 1012 and may define at least one rail and/or an elongated aperture or channel in the base 1012. The track is sized and shaped to receive and mount a mating 30 element of the pusher 1040. The pusher 1040 may be slidably mounted to the base 1012 such that the pusher 1040 does not lift out of the track 1014. The present invention H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 53 contemplates the use of other tracks to mount the pusher 1040 to the base 1012. Other pusher mounting techniques are possible with the invention. The pusher 1040 also contains at least one pusher urging element 1044 used to urge the 5 pusher 1040 toward the front of the shelf The pusher urging element 1044 may be any biasing element including, without limitation, a flat coil spring or a spiral torsion spring. The present invention may use one or more pusher urging elements 1044 to urge the pusher 1040 depending on the desired application. The pusher urging element 1044 may be mounted to the pusher 1040 and the base 1012 using any known mounting technique. 10 In the exemplary embodiment, one end of the pusher urging element 1044 is secured to the base 1012 near the front edge 1016 of the base 1012, and the opposing end of the pusher urging element 1044 is positioned behind the pusher 1040 to urge the pusher 1040 toward the front of the door 1020. 15 In an exemplary embodiment, the merchandise system 1010 also includes a product door assembly. The door assembly may include a door 1020, a door pin 1030, a door spring 1032, a door stiffener 1034, and a door spacer 1036. The door 1020 may be designed to rotate outward while holding only one product and allow the consumer to remove only one product from the merchandise system 1010. The door 1020 may be in a closed position or 20 an open position. The operation of the door 1020 will be explained in more detail below. The door 1020, as illustrated in Figure 92A may include a handle 1022. The handle 1022 as shown in Figure 92A is located on the upper section of the door 1020, such that the door 1020 can be opened from the top of the door 1020. The handle 1022 can be other 25 configurations that allow a consumer to pull open the door 1020 from the upper section of the door 1020. The door 1020, as illustrated in Figure 92A may also include a first roller 1024 and a second roller 1026. The first roller 1024 may be engaged with an upper slot 1055 located 30 on the first side wall 1054 of the housing 1050. The second roller 1026 may be engaged with a lower slot 1057 located on the first side wall 1054 of the housing 1050. Without H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 54 departing from this invention, the slots 1055 1057 and rollers 1024 1026 may be located on either side of the housing 1050 and the door 1020 respectively. Additionally, without departing from this invention, there may be a pair of upper slots 1055, with one slot located on the first side wall 1054 and a second slot located on the second side wall 1056; 5 a pair of lower slots 1057, with one slot located on the first side wall 1054 and a second slot located on the second slide wall 1056; and a pair of first rollers 1024 and a pair of second rollers 1026 that may engage the corresponding slots on each of the first and second side walls 1054 1056. The rollers 1024 and 1026 are configured to slide from one end of its corresponding slot 1055 1057 to the other end of the corresponding slot 1055 10 1057 during the operation of the door 1020. The specific operation of the door 1020 will be described more below. The door 1020 may also include an opening 1028. The opening 1028 may be located on the consumer side of the door 1020 and may allow the consumer or user to press or touch 15 the product without opening the door 1020. As will be described further below, the opening 1028 can be used during the restocking process. The door assembly may also include a door pin 1030 and a door spring 1032, as illustrated in Figures 92A and 93. The door pin 1030 may be cylindrical in shape and may be any 20 suitable material, such as plastic or metal. The door spring 1032, as shown in Figure 92A, is a spiral torsion spring or a flat coil spring that includes a first end or free end and a second end. The door spring 1032 may be other suitable spring types without departing from this invention. The door pin 1030 and the door spring 1032 engage both the door 1020 and the base 1012 to attach the door 1020 to the base 1012. The door pin 1030 may 25 be located at the base or bottom of the door 1020. The first end or free end of the door spring 1032 may engage the door pin 1030 at the base or bottom of the door 1020. The second end of the door spring 1032 may engage a portion of the locking mechanism of the merchandising system 1010, such as a locking gear 1062 as will be described below. As the door 1020 is opened by providing downward and outward pressure on the handle 1022, 30 the door spring 1032 is pulled away from the locking gear 1062, thereby uncoiling the door spring 1032 and providing a closing bias to the door 1020. When pressure is released from H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 55 the handle 1022, the bias from the door spring 1032 causes the door 1020 to return to the closed position. The operation of the door 1020 with the door spring 1032 will be described more below. 5 Additionally, the door assembly may include a door stiffener 1034 as shown in Figure 92A. The door stiffener 1034 may be located at the bottom of the door 1020. The door stiffener 1034 may provide additional support, especially to the bottom of the door 1020 as the door 1020 is rotated from the closed position to the open position. 10 Additionally, as illustrated in Figures 92A and 93, the door assembly may include a door spacer 1036. The door spacer 1036 may be installed against the back side of the door 1020 to create a slot for the product when the door 1020 is opened. The door spacer 1036 may be required so that the door 1020 and merchandise system 1010 can accommodate different size packages of product. For example, a wide door spacer 1036 may be installed 15 to the door 1020 for smaller or thinner packages and a thin or even no door spacer 1036 may be installed to the door 1020 for larger or thicker packages. Depending on the size and shape of the package, the door spacer 1036 may take on various different shapes to accommodate the different sizes and shapes of the packages. 20 In an embodiment, the door 1020, and specifically the front of the door 1020, is made of a clear or transparent material that allows for the product to be viewed through the door 1020. Additionally, the door 1020 may enable advertisements or marketing materials to be placed on the front of the door 1020. Additionally, the base 1012 can include a display area for advertising or marketing material as well as product information such as product 25 pricing information. Because the display area can include product information, merchandise system 1010 can be, as discussed above, stacked on top of another merchandise system 1010 without the use of shelves. Additionally, instead of using a door 1020 as described above, the merchandising system may include a button-release system that includes a button to help access or dispense product. For example, when the button is 30 pressed, the product may be released by the use of a pusher or a slow-moving pusher to discharge the product at a bottom opening for the customer to recover.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 56 The merchandise system 1010 as illustrated in Figures 92A, 98A, and 98B may also include a locking assembly. The locking assembly may generally include a locking bar 1060, a locking gear 1062, a locking latch 1064, a ratchet shaft 1066, and a pusher lock 5 1068. As illustrated in Figures 92A, 98A, and 98B, the locking bar 1060 is an elongated bar that extends approximately the lateral length of the base 1012. The locking bar 1060 may be located along the bottom or underneath the base 1012. As illustrated in Figure 92A, the 10 base 1012 includes an opening 1018A located along the first side 1018 and a second opening located along the second side 1019 (not shown). The locking bar 1060 may fit within this opening 1018A. Additionally, the locking bar 1060 may include a locking member 1061 located on the side of the locking bar 1060 as illustrated in Figure 92A. The locking member 1061 may be configured to engage the locking latch 1064 during locking 15 operations as will be described further below. Additionally, the locking bar may include a slot 1063. The slot 1063 may be configured to engage a locking end 1067 of the ratchet shaft 1066 during locking operations as will be described further below. The locking bar 1060 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. Additionally, the locking bar 1060 may be configured to attached to an adjacent locking bar 1060 when 20 multiple merchandise systems 1010 are configured together adjacently. As illustrated in Figures 92A, 98A, and 98B, the locking mechanism also includes the locking gear 1062. The locking gear 1062 may include a set of gear teeth on one end and a rounded surface on the other end. The gear teeth of the locking gear 1062 may be 25 configured to engage with the locking latch 1064 during locking operations as will be described further below. Additionally, the door spring 1032 may be located on the rounded surface end to provide the bias for the door to open and close. The door opening operation will be described further below. The locking gear 1062 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. 30 As illustrated in Figures 92A, 98A, and 98B, the locking mechanism also includes the H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 57 locking latch 1064. The locking latch 1064 may be configured to engage with the locking bar 1060, and specifically the slot 1063 on the locking bar 1060. The locking latch 1064 may also be configured to simultaneously engage with the locking gear 1062. The locking latch 1064 may engage both the locking bar 1060 and the locking gear 1062 during locking 5 operations as will be described further below. The locking latch 1064 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. As illustrated in Figure 92A, the locking mechanism also includes the ratchet shaft 1066. The ratchet shaft 1066 is sized and shaped to fit within the ratchet shaft slot 1015 in the 10 base 1012. The ratchet shaft 1066 includes one side with a plurality of teeth 1069. The other sides of the ratchet shaft 1066 may be smooth. The ratchet shaft 1066 may also include a locking end 1067. The locking end 1067 may be located at the approximately location of the locking bar 1060, such that the locking end 1067 engages the locking bar 1060 and specifically the locking slot 1063 on the locking bar 1060 during locking 15 operations as will be described below. Additionally, the plurality of teeth 1069 are configured to engage the end of the pusher lock 1068 during locking operations as will be described below. The ratchet shaft 1066 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. 20 As illustrated in Figure 92A, the locking mechanism also includes the pusher lock 1068. The pusher lock 1068 may be connected to or engaged with the pusher 1040. The pusher lock 1068 may have a pointed end opposite the side that is engaged with the pusher 1040. The pointed end of the pusher lock 1068 may be configured to engage the plurality of teeth 1069 on the ratchet shaft 1066 during locking operations as will be described below. The 25 pusher lock 1068 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal or plastic. The operation of the merchandise system 1010 includes both locking and door opening and these operations can be done simultaneously. As illustrated in Figure 93, the merchandise system 1010 is shown in an unlocked condition with the door 1020 closed. In this 30 configuration, the door 1020 is closed and the door spring 1032 is not extended or uncoiled. The locking bar 1060 is not extended. The locking latch 1064 is not engaged H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 58 with the locking gear 1062. The ratchet shaft 1066 is rotated such that one of the smooth sides faces upward toward the pusher lock 1068. As annotated as reference letter "A" in Figure 93, when the ratchet shaft 1066 is in the position as shown, the pointed end of the pusher lock 1068 rests on the smooth side of the ratchet shaft 1066. This allows the pusher 5 1040 to move freely both forward and backward. As further annotated as reference letter "B" in Figure 93, when the locking latch 1064 is in the position shown, the locking gear 1062 can rotate freely, thereby allowing the door spring 1032 to uncoil and the door 1020 to swing open when pressure is applied to the door handle 1022. Figure 94 illustrates a similar configuration that includes product with the merchandise system 1010 in an 10 unlocked condition with the door 1020 closed. Figure 95 illustrates a configuration with the merchandise system 1010 in an unlocked condition with the door 1020 open. In this configuration, the door 1020 is open with the door spring 1032 extended and uncoiled. The locking bar 1060 is not extended. The 15 locking latch 1064 is not engaged with the locking gear 1062. The ratchet shaft 1066 is rotated such that one of the smooth sides faces upward toward the pusher lock 1068. As annotated as reference letter "B" in Figure 93, when the locking latch 1064 is in the position shown, the locking gear 1062 can rotate freely, thereby allowing the door spring 1032 to uncoil and the door 1020 to swing open when pressure is applied to the door 20 handle 1022. Figure 96 illustrates a configuration with the merchandise system 1010 in a locked condition with the door 1020 closed. In this configuration, the door is closed with the door spring 1032 not extended and not uncoiled. The locking bar 1060 is extended. When the 25 locking bar 1066 shift positions, the locking bar 1066 forces the locking latch 1064 to engage the locking gear 1062 and the locking bar 1066 rotates the ratchet shaft 1066. The locking latch 1064 is engaged with the locking gear 1062. The ratchet shaft 1066 is rotated such that the side with the plurality of teeth 1069 faces upward towards the pusher lock 1068, thereby engaging the pusher lock 1068 with one of the plurality of teeth 1069 on the 30 ratchet shaft 1066. As annotated as reference letter "A" in Figure 96, when the ratchet shaft 1066 rotates into the position shown, the pointed end of the pusher lock 1068 falls H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 59 into one of the plurality of teeth 1069 on the ratchet shaft 1066, thereby locking the pusher paddle 1040 at the current position. Additionally, as annotated as reference letter "B" in Figure 96, when the locking latch 1064 is in the position shown, the locking latch 1064 engages the gear teeth on the locking gear 1062. The locking gear 1062 cannot rotate 5 clockwise and thus the door spring 1032 cannot uncoil. This locks the door 1020 from swinging open. Figure 97 illustrates a configuration with the merchandise system 1010 in a locked condition with the door 1020 open. In this configuration, the door is open with the door 10 spring 1032 extended and uncoiled. As was previously described above for Figure 96, when the locking bar 1066 shift positions, the locking bar 1066 forces the locking latch 1064 to engage the locking gear 1062 and the locking bar 1066 rotates the ratchet shaft 1066. The locking latch 1064 is engaged with the locking gear 1062. The ratchet shaft 1066 is rotated such that the side with the plurality of teeth 1069 faces upward towards the 15 pusher lock 1068, thereby engaging the pusher lock 1068 with one of the plurality of teeth 1069 on the ratchet shaft 1066. As annotated as reference letter "B" in Figure 97, when the locking latch 1064 is in the position shown, the locking latch 1064 engages the gear teeth on the locking gear 1062. The locking gear 1062 cannot rotate clockwise and thus the door spring 1032 cannot uncoil. This locks the door 1020 from swinging open. However, the 20 locking gear 1062 can ramp over the locking latch 1064 in a counter clockwise motion, thus allowing the door spring 1032 to recoil and the door 1020 to close. Figure 98A illustrates a bottom view of the merchandise system 1010 in an unlocked condition. As is illustrated in Figure 98A, similar to the description above for Figure 93, 25 the locking bar 1060 is not extended. Because the locking bar 1060 is not extended, the slot 1063 on the locking bar 1060 presses against the locking end 1067 of the ratchet shaft 1066 and keeps the ratchet shaft 1066 in the position with the pusher lock 1068 resting on the smooth side of the ratchet shaft 1066. Additionally, because the locking bar 1060 is not extended, the locking member 1061 is not engaged with the locking latch 1064, 30 thereby allowing the locking gear 1062 to rotate freely and allow the door spring 1032 to uncoil and the door 1020 to swing open.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -60 Figure 98B illustrates a bottom view of the merchandise system 1010 in a locked condition. As is illustrated in Figure 98B, similar to the description above for Figure 96, the locking bar 1060 is extended. When the locking bar 1060 extends, the slot 1063 on the 5 locking bar 1060 presses against the locking end 1067 of the ratchet shaft 1066, thereby rotating the ratchet shaft 1066 such that the side with the plurality of teeth 1069 faces upward and engages the pusher lock 1068. Additionally, when the locking bar 1060 extends, the locking member 1061 engages the locking latch 1064, thereby moving the locking latch 1064 to engage with the locking gear 1062 and the gear teeth. The locking 10 gear 1062 cannot rotate clockwise, and thus the door spring 1032 cannot uncoil. This locks the door 1020 from swinging open. Figure 99 illustrates another feature of the merchandise system 1010, namely the operation of the door 1020. As is illustrated in Figure 99, the door includes a first roller 1024 and a 15 second roller 1026. The first roller 1024 may slidably engage with an upper slot 1055 in the housing 1050. The second roller 1026 may slidably engage with a lower slot 1057 in the housing 1050. During the door operation, through the design of the first roller 1024, the second roller 1026, the upper slot 1055, and the lower slot 1057, the back end and the floor of the door 1020 keeps the next product behind the door from sliding forward. The 20 door 1020 continually contacts the product along the same vertical plane throughout the door's motion. As is shown in Figure 99, through reference letters "A" through "E", the door operation is represented from the closed position to the open position, with "A" representing the closed position and "E" representing the open position. As illustrated by "A", the first roller 1024 is positioned in the lower portion of the slot 1055, the second 25 roller is positioned in the lower portion of the slot 1057 and the door handle 1022 is closed. As the door 1020 moves to position "B", as can been seen in Figure 99, the first roller 1024 moves a longer distance along the upper slot 1055 than does the second roller 1026 along the lower slot 1057. As the door 1020 moves to position "C", the first roller 1024 has almost moved to the end of the upper slot 1055, while the second roller 1026 has not 30 moved much along the lower slot 1057. As the door 1020 moves to position "D", the second roller moves a longer distance along the lower slot 1057, while the first roller 1024 H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 61 moves a smaller distance along the upper slot 1055. As the door 1020 moves to position "E", the second roller 1026 again moves a longer distance along the lower slot 1057 to the final upper position in the lower slot 1057 and the first roller 1024 moves a small amount into the final upper position in the upper slot 1055. The design and shape of the upper slot 5 1055 and the lower slot 1057 combined together with the geometry of the door 1020 allow the door to contact the product on the same vertical plane throughout the motion of the door 1020, thereby keeping the next product behind the door from sliding forward. Once the product is removed from the door 1020 by the consumer, the pusher 1040 and pusher spring 1044 will push the next product into the door 1020 when the door 1020 returns to 10 the closed position, thereby reloading the door 1020 with product. As was described above, more than one merchandise system 1010 may be placed adjacent to other like merchandise systems 1010 on a shelf. Additionally, the merchandise system 1010 may include an electronic control unit 1080 to control the locking operations of all 15 merchandise systems linked together. As shown in Figure 100, multiple merchandise systems 1010 may be linked together. Additionally, an electronic control unit 1080 may be located at the end of the linked merchandise systems 1010. The electronic control unit 1080 may be used to improve product merchandising by limiting the number and the frequency with which product can be removed from the merchandise systems 1010 by 20 locking and/or alarming the merchandise systems 1010 when too many products are removed at one time. For the present embodiment described above in Figures 92A through 99, the electronic control unit may include a mechanical member (not shown) linked to the locking bars 1060 25 of the adjacent merchandise systems 1010. This mechanical member may be activated to move based on the parameters set in the electronic control unit 1080, thereby extending or moving the linked locking bars 1060 of the merchandise systems 1010. When the linked locking bars 1060 extend or move, the locking bars 1060 lock the doors 1020 and the pushers 1040 on the merchandise systems 1010 as described above. 30 A number of parameters may be included or loaded into the electronic control unit 1080 to H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -62 control the flow of product by alarming and/or locking the merchandise systems 1010 without departing from this invention. One such parameter may be the electronic control unit 1080 locking the merchandise systems after a certain number of consecutive door openings, such as three door openings. For example, if a consumer attempts to open any 5 three doors consecutively on the merchandise system 1010, the electronic control unit 1080 may then alarm and send a signal to the mechanical member, thereby extending and moving the locking bars 1060 and locking the doors 1020. This parameter may be changed based on the needs of the store or consumers and products, such as after two times, four times, five times, or more. Additionally, the definition of "consecutive" may 10 also be varied within the electronic control unit 1080. For example, "consecutive" may mean three door openings within a 10-minute time period, or within a 5-minute time period. Additionally, "consecutive" could mean that time between individual or multiple door openings must be greater than two minutes, or greater than one minute, or greater than some other time variable. Multiple variations of number of openings and time 15 variables may be used for the electronic control unit 1080 without departing from this invention. Additionally, when the electronic control unit 1080 is triggered to lock or alarm, the electronic control unit 1080 may also be configured to send a signal to an alarm system or 20 messaging system. For example, when the electronic control unit 1080 is triggered to lock or alarm, the electronic control unit 1080 may send a signal to an intercom system in a store the signals the store personnel to come to the merchandise system 1010 to either reset the system or to deal with a possible theft situation. Additionally, without departing from the invention, the electronic control unit 1080 can send an electronic signal to many other 25 devices or systems, including, but not limited to, office phones, cell phones, cash registers, office computers, emails, etc. In addition to sending an electronic signal, the electronic control unit 1080 may light an alarm light 1082, as illustrated in Figure 100. The electronic control unit 1080 may also include a key system 1081 as illustrated in 30 Figure 100. The key system 1081 may be utilized to reset an alarm or locked situation. Additionally, the key system 1081 may be utilized to override the locking system if a key H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 -63 is left in the key system 1081. This override capability may be advantageous to store personnel when stocking or restocking the merchandise system 1010. The key system 1081 may be utilized for various other functions without departing from this invention. 5 In an alternate embodiment the door assembly may also include a door spacer bar 1090 as illustrated in Figs. lOlA, 101B, and 1OiC. The door spacer bar 1090 may be used as an alternative to the door spacer 1036 illustrated in Figures 92A and 93. The door spacer bar 1090 may include an attached end 1092 and a locking end 1094. The attached end 1092 may be attached, pinned, or connected to the door 1020 near the front of the door 1020 10 such that the locking end 1094 of the door spacer bar 1090 can rotate away from the front of the door 1020. The locking end 1094 may rotate away from the front of the door 1020. The locking end 1094 may move and be locked into place in one of a plurality of door spacer bar teeth 1096. The door spacer bar teeth may be configured to lock the locking end 1094 of the door spacer bar 1090 at the depth of the package. Additionally, the door 15 spacer bar 1090 may include a door spacer bar locking tab 1098 located to lock in the top of the rotational door spacer bar as illustrated in Figs. lOlA, 101B, and 1OiC. The door spacer bar locking tab 1098 may slide from an unlocked position to a locked position, wherein the locking tab 1098 locks the attached end of the door spacer bar 1090. 20 The door spacer bar 1090, like the door spacer 1036, may allow the user to adjust the door for different depths of packages in the display. Figure 10 1A illustrates the door spacer bar 1090 not adjusted for depth of packages. As illustrated in Figure lOlA, the door spacer bar 1090 is flush against the front of the door 1020 and the locking tab 1098 is in the locked position, thereby locking the door spacer bar 1090 in place. Figure 101B illustrates 25 the door spacer bar 1090 being adjusted for a thinner depth of package. As illustrated in Figure 101B, the locking tab 1098 may slide to the unlocked position and the door spacer bar 1090 is rotated away from the front of the door 1020. Figure 1OIC illustrates the door spacer bar 1090 in the adjusted position and locked for a thinner depth of a package. As illustrated in 1OIC, the locking tab 1098 is positioned back in the locked position and the 30 locking end 1094 of the door spacer bar 1090 is seated in one of the plurality of door spacer bar teeth 1096.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 64 Figures 102 through 106E illustrate another embodiment of the present invention. Figures 102 through 106E illustrate a merchandise system 2000 that improves product merchandising by limiting the number and the frequency with which product can be 5 removed from, for example, a merchandising shelf by using various methods. The merchandise system 2000 may generally include a base 2030 and housing 2050, and a window or door 2010. Figure 102 illustrates a merchandise system 2000 that holds a number of products, such as 10 cans (for example, baby formula cans) in the merchandise system that would be accessible to the customer one at a time out of the front of the merchandise system 2000. Referring to Figure 102, in an exemplary embodiment, merchandise system 2000 includes a base 2030. The base 2030 defines a generally flat planar surface that may be configured to engage with or mount onto any known shelf used in a store, as well as any other merchandise 15 system 2000, and in any known mounting configuration and orientation. The base 2030 defines a front edge 2032, a back edge 2034, a first side edge 2036, a second side edge 2038, and one or more tracks 2033. As is further illustrated in Figure 102, a housing 2050 can be mounted to the base 2030 in 20 any known mounting configuration and orientation. The housing 2050 defines a top wall 2052 and a pair of side walls 2054. The housing 2050 may also include a rear retaining wall (not shown in the figures). As shown in Figure 102 and Figures 103A-103D, the one or more tracks 2033 may extend 25 along the base 2030 from the back edge 2034 to the front edge 2032. Figure 103A is a front view of the merchandise system 2000. Figure 103B is another isometric view of the merchandise system 2000. Figures 103C and 103D are isometric views of the base 2030 and track 2033 of the of the merchandise system 2000. As shown, a track 2033 can be used with a pusher 2040. It should be understood that more or less than two tracks could 30 be used with the invention, depending on the particular application.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1.docx-3/05/2016 - 65 As illustrated in Figure 102 and Figures 103A-D, the one or more tracks 2033 extend longitudinally along the length of the base 2030 and may define at least one rail and/or an elongated aperture or channel in the base 2030. The track 2033 is sized and shaped to receive and mount a mating element of the pusher 2040. The pusher 2040 may be slidably 5 mounted to the base 2030 such that the pusher 2040 does not lift out of the track 2033. The present invention contemplates the use of other tracks to mount the pusher 2040 to the base 2030. Other pusher mounting techniques are possible with the invention. The pusher 2040 also contains at least one pusher urging element used to urge the pusher 10 2040 toward the front of the shelf The pusher urging element may be any biasing element including, without limitation, a flat coil spring or a spiral torsion spring. The present invention may use one or more pusher urging elements to urge the pusher 2040 depending on the desired application. The pusher urging element may be mounted to the pusher 2040 and the base 2030 using any known mounting technique. In the exemplary embodiment, 15 one end of the pusher urging element is secured to the base 2030 near the front edge 2032 of the base 2030, and the opposing end of the pusher urging element positioned behind the pusher 2040 to urge the pusher 2040 toward the front of the window 2010. Additionally, each merchandise system 2000 may also have a slow moving pusher 2040 with a damper attached to the pusher 2040 to slow the movement of the product from the back to the front 20 of the merchandise system 2000. As illustrated in Figures 103A and 103B, the merchandise system 2000 uses a track 2033 and a slow pusher 2040 so that after a product is removed, a slow moving pusher 2040 moves product forward. Additionally, as illustrated in Figures 103C and 103D, the merchandise systems 2000 may be mounted to a surface using fasteners through the floor of the merchandise system 2000. 25 The front of each merchandise system 2000 may include its own individual security window or door 2010 attached to the merchandise system 2000. The window may be rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the housing, such that the window 2010 is rotatable in an upward or vertical 30 direction. The window 2010 may be made of a clear or transparent material that allows for the product to be viewed through the window 2010. The merchandise system 2000 may H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 66 also include a geometric aperture 2035 on the sidewalls 2034 towards the front of the merchandise system 2000. The geometric aperture 2035 may make it difficult (even with the security window 2010 open) for a consumer to get their fingers around enough of the next can or product moving forward to pull it out of the merchandise system 2000 until the 5 product has advanced forward as designed. Figures 104A and 104B illustrate top-down isometric views of the merchandise system 2000. As illustrated in Figures 104A and 104B, the merchandise system 2000 may include an audio box 2016 included with the merchandise system 2000. The audio box 2016 may 10 be located on the top wall 2052 of the housing 2050. The merchandise system 2000 with the audio box 2016 may be triggered in a similar fashion to the other merchandise systems 2000 as described above. Additionally, there may be another different type of merchandise system 2000 wherein the audio box is not included on the top wall 2052 of the housing 2050. 15 Both types of merchandise systems 2000 may include a trigger axle 2012 located just behind the hinge point of the window 2010. The trigger axle 2012 may also include a cantilever 2014. As illustrated in Figures 104A and 104B, when the window 2010 is rotated, it rotates the trigger axle 2012 and the cantilever 2014 attached to the trigger axle 20 2012. The cantilever 2014 may rotate up against a switch trigger on the audio box 2016 to sound the audio box 2016 on the merchandise system 2000. Figures 105A through 105E illustrate isometric views of the merchandise system 2000 in operation with a first product 2002. Figure 105A illustrates the merchandise system 2000 25 with the window 2010 closed and the first product 2002 located inside the housing 2050. Figure 105B illustrates the merchandise system 2000 with the window 2010 rotated and lifted up and the first product 2002 being removed from the housing 2050. Figure 105C illustrates the merchandise system 2000 with the window 2010 still rotated open and the first product 2002 removed from the housing 2050. A second product 2003 is seen located 30 in the housing 2050 at this stage. Figure 105D illustrates the merchandise system 2000 with the window 2010 still rotated open with the second product 2003 starting to slowly H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 67 slide forward with the pusher 2040. Figure 105E illustrates the merchandise system 2000 with the window 2010 closed again and the second product 2003 located inside the housing 2050. 5 Figures 106A through 106E illustrate an example merchandise system 2000 that includes multiple housings 2050. The trigger axle 2012 may include both a male connection point 2020 on one side and a female connection point 2022 on the opposite side. The circle illustrated in Figure 106D shows the male connection point 2020 and the female connection point 2022 of the trigger axle 2012. As was discussed above, the merchandise 10 system 2000 may include a housing 2050 with an audio box 2016 or a housing 2050 without an audio box. The trigger axels 2012 of additional (non-audio and audio) merchandise systems 2000 can be mated together so that a single audio merchandise system 2000 can be activated by numerous non-audio merchandise systems 2000. Figure 106E illustrates a first merchandise system 2000A that includes an audio box 2016 15 attached to a second merchandise system 2000B that is a non-audio system. Both merchandise systems 2000A, 2000B include the trigger axles 2012A, 2012B and the cantilevers 2014A, 2014B attached together in order to switch the trigger to sound the audio box 2016 on the merchandise system 2000A. 20 The trigger axle 2012 may allow a number of non-audio merchandise systems 2000 to be connected in-line with each other and ultimately to one of the merchandise systems 2000 that includes an audio box. Once the merchandise systems 2000 are connected together (with non-audio box and audio box systems), any of the windows on the connected, non audio merchandise systems 2000 can trigger the single audio box housed in the audio 25 merchandise system 2000. This allows a mechanical approach to connecting multiple, less-expensive, non-audio merchandise systems 2000 to a single audio merchandise system 2000, which makes the average cost of the audio per facing significantly lower. This may also decrease the battery replacement for store employees to one audio box per linear run rather than multiple audio boxes in the same run. 30 Additionally, the merchandise system 2000 may include a "guillotine" type device that H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 68 could be activated by the opening of the security window. When the door 2010 is lifted upwards, the guillotine portion may extend downwards into the two "pockets" formed on either side of the tangent point (from a top view) between a product or can in front and a product or can immediately behind it. This guillotine portion would effectively block the 5 removal of the next product or can until the slow pusher moved the product or can forward enough to allow the guillotine to fall behind that product or can when the window is opened. Additionally, the merchandise system 2000 may include a mechanical lock-out device for 10 all windows of the attached merchandise systems 2000. This may be similar in design to a mechanical version of the electronic lock-out module as described above and illustrated in Figures 92A through 101C. This mechanical lock-out module may include incorporating a fluid-filled damper element attached to the trigger axle 2012. The use of a fluid-filled damper element may allow the merchandise system 2000 to have a set number of door 15 openings before triggering a mechanical lock-out of all of the attached security windows. Once the fluid-filled damper relaxes, the damper would allow the windows to be opened once again. Variations and modifications of the foregoing are within the scope of the present invention. 20 It should be understood that the invention disclosed and defined herein extends to the individual features and all alternative combinations of two or more of the individual features mentioned or evident from the text and/or drawings. All of these different combinations constitute various alternative aspects of the present invention. The embodiments described herein explain the best modes known for practicing the invention 25 and will enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention. Throughout this specification and the claims which follow, unless the context requires otherwise, the word "comprise", and variations such as "comprises" and "comprising", will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated integer or step or group of integers or 30 steps but not the exclusion of any other integer or step or group of integers or steps.

H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_l.docx-3/05/2016 - 69 The reference in this specification to any prior publication (or information derived from it), or to any matter which is known, is not, and should not be taken as an acknowledgment or admission or any form of suggestion that that prior publication (or information derived from it) or known matter forms part of the common general knowledge in the field of 5 endeavour to which this specification relates.

Claims (20)

1. A merchandising system, comprising: a base configured to support product; 5 a housing configured to engage with the base, comprising a top wall, a first side wall, and a second side wall; a pusher movably mounted on the base; a window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the housing; and 10 a trigger axle located adjacent to the hinge point of the window, wherein when the window is rotated, the trigger axle is rotated.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the trigger axle includes a cantilever that is attached to the trigger axle. 15
3. The system of claim 2, wherein when the window is rotated, the cantilever is rotated.
4. The system of claim 1 further including an audio box configured to sound an alarm. 20
5. The system of claim 4, wherein when the window is rotated, the trigger axle rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
6. The system of claim 1 further including an audio box configured to sound an alarm, 25 wherein the trigger axle includes a cantilever that is attached to the trigger axle, wherein when the window is rotated, the cantilever rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
7. The system of claim 1, further including a mechanical lock-out module that allows 30 the window to have a set number of window openings before triggering a mechanical lock out of the opening of window. H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 71
8. The system of claim 7, wherein the mechanical lock-out module includes a fluid filled damper element attached to the trigger axle.
9. The system of claim 1, further including a geometric aperture located on the first 5 side wall and the second side wall towards the front of the housing, wherein the geometric aperture makes it difficult for a consumer to get their fingers around enough of a product moving forward to remove it from the housing until the product has advanced forward.
10. The system of claim 1, wherein the base further comprises a track. 10
11. The system of claim 10, wherein the pusher is adapted to engage the track.
12. The system of claim 1, wherein the window is made of a clear or transparent material that allows for the product to be viewed through the window. 15
13. A merchandising system, comprising: a first merchandise system that includes: a first base configured to support product, a first housing configured to engage the first base, 20 a first pusher movably mounted on the first base, a first window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the first housing, and a first trigger axle that includes a first male connector on one end and a first female connector on an opposite end to the first male connector, wherein when the 25 first window is rotated, the first trigger axle is rotated; and a second merchandise system that includes: a second base configured to support product, a second housing configured to engage the second base, a second pusher movably mounted on the second base, 30 a second window rotatable from a closed position to an open position about a hinge point adjacent to the top wall of the second housing, and H: \tId\lnterwoven\NRPortbl\DCC\TLD\10087483_1docx-3/05/2016 - 72 a second trigger axle that includes a second male connector on one end and a second female connector on an opposite end to the second male connector, wherein when the second window is rotated, the second trigger axle is rotated, wherein the first male connector engages the second female connector and further 5 wherein when the first trigger axle rotates, the second trigger axle is rotated.
14. The system of claim 13, wherein the first trigger axle includes a first cantilever that is attached to the first trigger axle. 10
15. The system of claim 14, wherein when the first window is rotated, the first cantilever is rotated.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein the first merchandise system further includes an audio box configured to sound an alarm. 15
17. The system of claim 16, wherein when the first window is rotated, the first trigger axle rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
18. The system of claim 16, wherein when the second window is rotated, the second 20 trigger axle rotates, thereby rotating the first trigger axle to rotate against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
19. The system of claim 13 wherein the first merchandise system further includes an audio box configured to sound an alarm, wherein the first trigger axle includes a first 25 cantilever that is attached to the first trigger axle, wherein when the first window is rotated, the first cantilever rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
20. The system of claim 19 wherein when the second window is rotated, the second 30 trigger axle rotates, thereby rotating the first trigger axle and the first cantilever rotates against a switch trigger located on the audio box to sound the audio box.
AU2013327132A 2004-02-03 2013-10-02 Product securement and management system Active AU2013327132B2 (en)

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US201261708967P true 2012-10-02 2012-10-02
US61/708,967 2012-10-02
US13/858,574 2013-04-08
US13/858,574 US9526351B2 (en) 2004-02-03 2013-04-08 Product securement and management system
PCT/US2013/063093 WO2014055664A1 (en) 2012-10-02 2013-10-02 Product securement and management system

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CN104994767A (en) 2015-10-21
WO2014055664A1 (en) 2014-04-10
KR101761120B1 (en) 2017-07-25
AU2013327132A1 (en) 2015-04-30
CN104994767B (en) 2018-09-14
KR20150064188A (en) 2015-06-10
EP2903482B1 (en) 2016-12-28
EP2903482A1 (en) 2015-08-12
BR112015007471A2 (en) 2017-12-12

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