WO2022015237A1 - Self-levelling spreader beam - Google Patents

Self-levelling spreader beam Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2022015237A1
WO2022015237A1 PCT/SG2020/050419 SG2020050419W WO2022015237A1 WO 2022015237 A1 WO2022015237 A1 WO 2022015237A1 SG 2020050419 W SG2020050419 W SG 2020050419W WO 2022015237 A1 WO2022015237 A1 WO 2022015237A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
spreader beam
slings
spreader
sling
mode
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/SG2020/050419
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Kok Tiong Roland KAM
Original Assignee
Kam Kok Tiong Roland
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to SG10202006676T priority Critical
Priority to SG10202006676T priority
Application filed by Kam Kok Tiong Roland filed Critical Kam Kok Tiong Roland
Publication of WO2022015237A1 publication Critical patent/WO2022015237A1/en

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C13/00Other constructional features or details
    • B66C13/04Auxiliary devices for controlling movements of suspended loads, or preventing cable slack
    • B66C13/08Auxiliary devices for controlling movements of suspended loads, or preventing cable slack for depositing loads in desired attitudes or positions

Abstract

The self-levelling spreader beam disclosed, consist of a pair of slings (10) coupled to a spreader beam assembly (01, 02). Adopting the mechanical advantage of running the slings (10) through a series of roller sheaves (07, 08, 09) to reduce the capacity of actuators required for the manipulations of the slings (10). Its unique feature is the manipulation of the exposed slings (10) to achieve an ideal effective working length, to indirectly and relatively, position the combined center of gravity of, every component under the hook, influencing it to move below the hook as the load leaves the ground. It uses an angular sensor as a feedback system, sending signals to a logic control system, which in turn, with predetermined logics and events, energize the respective actuators to, commence or stop, manipulating the effective working length of the slings (10) until the entire system comes to a state of equilibrium.

Description

Self-Levelling Spreader Beam
Embodiments of the present disclosure disclose a self-levelling spreader beam assembly together with two slings attached to the ends of the spreader beam.
The present disclosure relates to a lifting equipment use as part of the rigging arrangement to hoist a cargo, equipment or load, from one elevation to another, or over vertical obstacles, either with, an overhead crane within a fabrication facility or a freely mobile crane deployed in construction sites.
Background
Where the current practice in fabrication facilities, or construction sites. Cranes are used to hoist construction material, structures or equipment onto its foundation or destination. The rigging process is a task that requires trained and experience lifting personnel to determine the rigging equipment required to execute and complete the hoisting operation.
Even when the rigging arrangement is designed by an engineer. It does happen that the hoisted equipment is lifted off the ground in a manner not suitable for placing on its foundation.
Where it falls within the lifting supervisor’s experience or capability to safely place the hoisted equipment on its foundation. The lifting supervisor may proceed with the hoisted and tilted equipment but only after assessing that the possible difficulties is within their capacity to place the equipment onto its foundation safely.
In cases where the levelness of the hoisted equipment to be put into place, is subjected to the neighboring installed equipment. It may be required to put the hoisted equipment back on the ground, re-assess a new rigging arrangement based on those used on the first try, modify the rigging arrangement, and finally hook up it again for another try.
With the disclosure of this invention, a self-levelling spreader beam. The problems that may arise from the above scenarios is least likely to surface.
On top of saving time and effort for rework on rigging arrangement, for a desired levelness of the hoisted equipment or load. This spreader beam requires no human intervention to keep the spreader beam and the load levelled to the ground. The inventory required on standby is also reduced to a minimum where it only caters for rigging equipment below the said spreader beam.
The same setup of this spreader beam [01, 02, Fig. 1] and the slings [10, Fig. 1] above it can be re-use for many other equipment or load of similar masses, and center of gravity deviating approximately one-quarter of the spreader beam’s working length within the middle of the spreader beam. So, the same spreader beam can be left on the hook of the crane and only the rigging equipment below the spreader beam needs to change where required.
This invention is designed with the intention to make hoisting of objects, to be performed with exponentially higher probability of success and greater ease of use.
The said spreader beam looks like any other spreader beam except for its size being larger for its capacity, which is unavoidable to cater for the components required to perform what it claimed it is designed do.
This spreader beam consist of a pair of slings [10, Fig. 1] coupled to the spreader beam in a manner that adopts the mechanical advantage of running the slings [10, Fig. 1] through a series of roller sheaves [07, 08, 09, Fig. 1], to smoothly change direction of the slings [10, Fig. 1] and particularly, to reduce the size of the actuators required to manipulate the slings [10, Fig. 1] under tension.
Each of these slings [10, Fig. 1] is terminated inside the spreader beam on a fixed clevis [15, Fig. 3], secured with a pin, runs through a partially exposed roller sheave [07, Fig. 1] on its way out of the spreader beam [02, Fig. 1].
Outside the spreader beam, the sling runs upwards, towards the hook of a crane, over a roller sheave [09, Fig. 1], and back downwards, towards the same end of the spreader beam where it [10, Fig. 1] was first terminated, through a last roller sheave [08, Fig. 1], into the spreader beam [02, Fig. 1] again.
Inside the spreader beam, the sling is terminated and secured with a pin on a movable carriage [16, Fig. 3] parallel to the fixed clevis [15, Fig. 3] where the other end of the sling [10, Fig. 1] was terminated.
On the other end of the spreader beam [02, Fig. 1] , another sling [10, Fig. 1] is connected in the same manner,
The coupling of the middle roller sheave [09, Fig. 1] to the crane hook, is, by means of a set of link plates [11, Fig. 1] on the roller sheave and an endless soft sling or grommet [12, Fig. 1] on the crane hook.
The movable carriage [16, Fig. 3] consists of a removable pin where a sling is terminated and secured, the housing for mechanical stoppers [17, Fig. 3] and electrical actuator [18, Fig. 3], and a clevis [19, Fig. 3] for connecting to the rod of an actuator [20, Fig. 3].
The movable carriage [16, Fig. 3] will slide along a set of stopper catch-plate [25, Fig. 5], which will also act as a guide to restrict the carriage movement within a linear path of travel.
The mechanical stoppers [17, Fig. 3] act as the secondary holding device for a positive hold of the carriage at consistent interval that, in turns, holds the corresponding slings [10, Fig. 1] in place. It also serves as a buffer for a possible controlled leakage of actuator medium wherein, in a hydraulic actuator, the medium would be the hydraulic oil.
Where a leakage occurs, the carriage [16, Fig. 3] will slide slowly and the stoppers [17, Fig. 3], energized by spring-tension, will lock itself into the next slot on the catch-plates [25, Fig. 5].
The main feature of this invention, is the manipulations of the exposed length of the slings [10, Fig. 1] to achieve an ideal effective working length of the exposed slings [10, Fig. 1], to, indirectly and relatively, position the combined center of gravity of every component under the crane hook, inclusive of the load to be hoisted, directly below the crane hook.
The main aim is to ensure that the load to be hoisted, will be hoisted with an acceptable tilt that is closer to perfect levelness than what is possible with current practice, without the tedious process of putting the hoisted load back on the ground for reworking on a new rigging arrangement to hoist the load again, hopefully with a more acceptable degree of levelness.
This spreader beam will exponentially increase the probability of any equipment or load, of mass within the capacity of the spreader beam, with mass center, or center of gravity deviating within, one-quarter of the spreader beam length from within the middle of the spreader beam, to be hoisted and suspended close to perfect levelness, with respect to the horizontal plane.
This spreader beam utilizes a feedback system in the form of a tilt sensor, or angular sensor, transmitting the collected information to a logic control system, which in turn, through a predetermined logic, energize the respective actuators to commence manipulations towards an effective working length of the slings [10, Fig. 1], from within the self-contained spreader beam, until the entire system under the crane hook, comes to a state of equilibrium with the load suspended off the ground, and reasonably levelled with the horizontal plane.
On the spreader beam, there is a master switch to turn on the logic controller inside the spreader beam. This switch turns on the electrical supply from the batteries to the actuator power-units and the logic controller.
Where hydraulic actuators are used, either a power-unit with a hydraulic oil reservoir is installed, or an accumulator fully charged to execute the entire operation will be installed.
There is an emergency-stop button installed next to the master switch on the spreader beam, acting against any unintended activation of any electrically energized component in the spreader beam and also acting as a secondary cut-off switch to the master switch.
There will be two electrical connectors on the spreader beam for connecting a wired external tilt sensor or angular sensor and a wired remote console.
There are two ways of controlling the spreader beam, one of which is with a wired remote console and the other is with a wireless remote console.
The wireless remote console, with the receiver installed in the main module of the spreader beam, facilitates automatic and manual controls of the spreader beam to be executed from a safe distance away from the spreader beam and the load to be hoisted.
Both the wired and wireless remote console has similar functions, switches, and pushbuttons.
The pushbuttons and selector switches on both consoles, will transmit or trigger signals to the logic controller installed in the main module of the spreader beam. These signals will trigger predetermined events that the logic controller was programmed to do.
The vital emergency-stop button, present in both the wired and wireless console, will perform the same function as the emergency-stop button on the spreader beam.
A selector switch on the consoles facilitates switching from automatic control mode and manual control mode.
In automatic control mode, the tilt or angular sensor indirectly determines the actions that the corresponding actuator and carriage stoppers need to take until it has completed its task or, until a stop function is executed by pushing any of the stop pushbutton or, when an emergency-stop button is pressed.
In manual control mode, the operator takes control of both actuator’s movement from the remote console and the logic controller resume the control of the electrical actuator for the release of mechanical stoppers on both carriages.
A selector switch for the selection of one of three modes of operation as mentioned in claim 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14.
Four directional pushbuttons, left, right, up, down, facilitates manual extension or retraction of both the actuators, either one at a time or simultaneously, of which, will serve the purpose in claim 14. The program in the logic controller will determined when these buttons will function and when the buttons will be disabled for safety purpose.
Scenario of typical use of this invention
The numeric values used here in the descriptions of this scenario are random figures selected for easy interpretation purpose only and should not be binding anywhere in this disclosure.
In figure 6. A crane is hooked up with this self-levelling spreader beam [28, Fig. 6] together with the slings [10, Fig. 6], with a working length of 4 meters.
The spreader beam [28, Fig. 6] is set to operate in mode 1 as in claim 11.
Before the start of the hoisting operation, the actuators [32, 33, Fig. 6] in the spreader beam retracts fully, pulling in, the maximum possible length of slings from both ends of the spreader beam.
The exposed sling length [10, Fig. 6] on both sides of the spreader beam are 4 meters.
A set of rigging arrangement [31, Fig. 6] is attached to the lower part of the spreader beam [28, Fig. 6].
A load [27, Fig. 6] of mass 40 tons is attached at the end of the slings [31, Fig. 6] below the spreader beam at the lower lugs [14, Fig. 1].
The mass center, or center of gravity [30, Fig. 6] of the equipment attached, is 2.5 meters from the left end of the spreader beam and 1.5 meters from the right end of the spreader beam.
The mass center, or center of gravity of the equipment [30, Fig. 6], is half a meter from the center [29, Fig. 6] of the spreader beam towards the right side of the spreader beam [28, Fig. 6].
The calculated tension on the left side of the spreader beam is 15 tons and the tension on the right side of the spreader beam is 25 tons.
In figure 7. The crane gradually picks up the load by hoisting.
As more mass or weight is taken by the hoisting crane, the spreader beams begin to tilt upwards on the left side of the spreader beam where there is less tension.
The feedback sensors, or the tilt sensors detects a tilt.
Signals of the tilt is sent to the logic controller.
The tilt sensor on the actuator [32, Fig. 7] mounted on the right side of the spreader beam with its rod extending towards the left, detects a positive tilt.
The tilt sensor on the actuator [33, Fig. 7] mounted on the left side of the spreader beam with its rod extending towards the right, detects a negative tilt.
As the spreader beam is operated on the first mode of operation.
The negative tilt detected on the left actuator is ignored, and no action is required by corresponding actuator [33, Fig. 7].
The logic controller will first energize the corresponding electrical actuator [18, Fig. 3] to disengage the stoppers [17, Fig. 3], releasing them from the catch-plates [25, Fig. 5] on the carriage [16, Fig. 3] that is at the rod-end of the actuator [32, Fig. 7]. The stoppers on the other carriage remain locked onto the corresponding catch-plates as no action is required for the actuator [33, Fig. 7] on the left.
The logic controller sends a signal to energize the actuator [32, Fig. 7] on the right side of the spreader beam [28, Fig. 7] to extend or move the carriage [16, Fig. 3] towards the left, corresponding to the positive tilt of the actuator [32, Fig. 7].
The sling on the left side of the spreader beam, attached to the carriage [16, Fig. 3], will be release towards the exterior of the spreader beam and continue to be released until the corresponding tilt sensor detects a zero tilt.
While the sling is being released, a blue arrow light on the indicator panel [06, Fig. 1] of the spreader beam will light up, giving the crane operator and the lifting supervisor the indication to slew the crane hook towards the right and gradually hoisting, in compliance to the manipulation of the sling on the left which is being lengthen.
When the tilt sensors on the spreader beam reaches a stage where there is a zero tilt and the blue arrow light indicator [06, Fig. 1] goes off. The spreader beam has successfully manipulated the corresponding sling to its effective length. The crane would have already hoisted the load fully off the ground, close to perfect levelness.
In figure 8. With the same signal source, the tilt sensor registering a zero tilt and transmitted to the logic controller. The logic controller will send a signal to trigger the electrical actuator [18, Fig. 3] holding the stoppers, to engage the stoppers, allowing the stoppers [17, Fig. 3] to catch-on to the next coming slot if it ever slide or move again due to a possible, expected and controlled leakage of the actuator.
Depending on which console is used. The spreader beam may be turned off from the console, before commencing further hoisting.
The hoisting operation may proceed as usual when the spreader beam is turned off.
After the spreader beam controller is turned off. There may be a common, controlled leakage of the hydraulic oil internally, from the chamber of the respective actuator under pressure, back to the tank.
This leakage is normal, expected but controlled by slowing it down.
If leakage never occur where the actuator is holding its load with lesser pressure in its chamber. The actuator may continue holding the carriage which in turns, holds the sling [10, Fig. 1].
If leakage does occur. The spring-loaded mechanical stoppers mounted on the carriage, will readily mount itself or catch-on to catch-plates [25, Fig. 5] aligned on both sides of the carriage and the actuator rod, at the next slot.
The mechanical stoppers [17, Fig. 3] will engage itself due to the tensioned or loaded spring action, and disengage is by means of electrical actuator [18, Fig. 3] that will disengage the stoppers [17, Fig. 3] from the catch-plates [25, Fig. 5].
The catch-plates [25, Fig. 5] are designed to catch the stoppers [17, Fig. 3] at a consistent distance interval through the entire stretch of the actuator stroke length.
Based on the numeric values or sample figures used in this scenario. The energized actuator would have extended approximately one meter, while the exposed sling on the left side of the spreader beam would have been lengthen approximately by half a meter and the exposed sling length on the right remaining as 4 meters as there are no activity on the corresponding actuator.
With one end of the sling terminated on a fixed clevis [15, Fig. 3], the lesser change in length on of the exposed sling is due to the sling doubling or running over the top middle roller sheave [09, Fig. 1], where one meter of sling that is terminated on the moving carriage [16, Fig. 3], released from inside the spreader beam is evenly distributed on both sides of the top roller sheave [09, Fig. 1].
Consistent Results despite the lack of precision
Most of the time. Weights or mass of an equipment is calculated. The mass center or center of gravity is also calculated.
Unless the equipment is weighed. The weight can never be verified.
Even when an equipment is weighed, and the weight is verified. The weight will be changed when an item in the equipment is removed. It could be temporary steelwork that served only as a re-enforcement for transportation purpose, to be removed before installation by hoisting.
Where the equipment to be handled is not weighed before a hoisting operation to put the equipment on its foundation. The center of gravity is assumed to be deviating within an acceptable tolerance for the hoisting operation or deemed acceptable.
Regardless of whether the equipment is weighed or not. The final center of gravity is calculated even where it is based on a weighing event by jacking, whereby the pressures and locations of the jacks are used in the calculations of the center of gravity of the equipment. Unless there is a means of tilting the equipment with the jacks, the height of the center of gravity is never determined.
This invention is the final equipment, that will ensure the levelness of the hoisted equipment is closer to perfect levelness by manipulating the length of the exposed slings attached to the spreader beam, to achieved an ideal effective working length which is close to impossible using the current practice of coupling standard slings, shackles and link plates available in the market.
The stretching of the slings under tension does not affect the desired results possible with this invention as the manipulations of the slings is dynamic, wherein the manipulations is done on the slings under tension.
All drawings hereon, are illustrations to aid in the understanding of this invention.
Figure 1 illustrates the externals of the spreader beam with the two slings, items as follows:
Item 01, Main module of the spreader beam
Item 02, End-module of the spreader beam
Item 03 – Indicator Panel
Item 04, Central indicators
Item 05, Left indicators
Item 06, Right indicators
Item 07, Roller sheave
Item 08, Roller sheave
Item 09, Middle Roller sheave
Item 10, Slings
Item 11, Middle Roller sheave link-plates
Item 12, Endless sling, grommets, or D-Ring
Item 13, Hook of a crane
Item 14, Lower Lug for rigging equipment below the spreader beam
Figure 2 illustrates a close-up Spreader Beam showing Indicator Panel with items as follows:
Item 03, Indicator panel.
Item 04, Central indicators.
Item 05, Left indicators.
Item 06, Right indicators.
Figure 3 illustrates the internal Actuators Layout and Slings Terminations with items as follows:
Item 07, Roller sheave
Item 08, Roller sheave
Item 10, Slings
Item 15, Fixed Clevis
Item 16, Carriage
Item 17, Stopper
Item 18, Actuator for disengaging of stoppers
Item 19, Clevis on movable carriage for coupling to actuator rod
Item 20, Main Actuator (with Tilt sensor or angular sensor mounted but not shown)
Figure 4 illustrates the components inside the spreader beam, mounted on the upper half of the beam with items as follows:
Item 21, Power-unit for actuator
Item 22, Batteries
Item 23, Location for Logic controller
Item 24, Solenoid Valve
Figure 5 illustrates the components inside the spreader beam mounted on the lower half of the beam with items as follows:
Item 15, Fixed Clevis
Item 16, Carriage
Item 20, Main Actuator
Item 25, Stopper Catch-plate
Item 26, Actuator for disengaging of stoppers
Figure 6 illustrates a typical scenario of hoisting a Load with Off-set Center of Gravity with items as follows:
Item 10, Sling
Item 27, Equipment to be hoisted
Item 28, Spreader beam assembly consisting of the main module and two end-modules.
Item 29, Middle of the spreader beam
Item 30, Center of Gravity of the equipment to be hoisted
Item 31, Slings arrangement below the spreader beam
Item 32, Right actuator
Item 33, Left actuator
Figure 7 illustrates a typical scenario of hoisting a Load – Before lift-off and manipulations with items as follows:
Item 29, Middle of spreader beam
Item 30, Center of Gravity of load
Item 32, Left actuator
Item 33, Right actuator
Figure 8 illustrates a typical scenario of hoisting a Load – Manipulations by the spreader beam with items as follows:
Item 29, Middle of spreader beam
Item 30, Center of Gravity of load
Item 32, Left actuator
Item 33, Right actuator

Claims (15)

  1. CONSTRUCTION: A spreader beam consisting of the main beam assembly [01, 02, Fig. 1] and two slings [10, Fig. 1], each with both ends terminated on the same side of the main beam [02, Fig. 1], inside the main beam [01, Fig. 1], and with the slings [10, Fig. 1] main body running out of the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1] through the ends of the spreader beam [02, Fig. 1], each going through a series of three roller sheaves [07, 08, 09, Fig. 1], with the middle roller sheave [09, Fig. 1] being attached to the hook [13, Fig. 1] of a hoisting crane, via link plates [11, Fig. 1] on the middle roller sheave [09, Fig. 1] and soft grommets [12, Fig. 1] on the hook [13, Fig. 1] of the crane, rigged in a manner to make use of mechanical advantages of the slings running over the roller sheave [09, Fig. 1].
  2. MODULAR: The spreader beam in claim 1, is modular, wherein the main beam consisting of a main module [01, Fig. 1] and two end modules [02, Fig. 1], a total of three modules bolted together.
  3. EXTENDABLE: The modular design in claim 2, facilitates larger length of load to be hoisted below the spreader beam, wherein, with addition of modules inserted in between the main module [01, Fig. 1] and the end modules [02, Fig. 1], the working length of the spreader beam can be extended.
  4. SELF-CONTAINED: The spreader beam in claim 1, is a self-contained, self-powered lifting equipment, with all control mechanism or component, inclusive of actuators, power units, logic control unit, feedback sensors, batteries, hidden and residing inside the spreader beam body [01, Fig. 1].
  5. AUTOMATIC: The spreader beam in claim 1, with predetermined logics and events programmed to, automatically, manipulates or, alters the exposed length of the attached slings [10, Fig. 1], to achieve an ideal effective working length of the exposed sling [10, Fig. 1] on one end of the spreader beam [02, Fig. 1] or, both slings [10, Fig. 1] at the same instant, with, or without human intervention, thereby drastically reduces the need to put a hoisted load back on the ground to change the rigging equipment for a more acceptable degree of levelness of the load when hoisted again.
  6. MANIPULATION: The manipulations of the slings in claim 5, alters the exposed sling [10, Fig. 1] length by energizing the respective actuator [20, Fig. 3] to pull part of the exposed sling into the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1] or, to release part of the sling [10, Fig. 1] from inside the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1], to achieve, closer to an ideal effective working length of the slings, thereby, relatively positioning the combined center of gravity of every components suspended under the crane hook [13, Fig. 1], directly below it [13, Fig. 1].
  7. LOOKS: The spreader beam in claim 1, looks remarkably close to any ordinary spreader beam, wherein, there are feedback sensors, actuators, control and actuating mechanism, hidden out of sight.
  8. FEEDBACK SYSTEM: The spreader beam in claim 1, adopts a feedback system to the logic control system, to determine the actions required, when to start or stop the operation as described in claim 5.
  9. FEEDBACK DEVICE: The feedback device in claim 8, is a tilt sensor or angular sensor that is installed inside the beam [01, Fig. 1], on each actuator [20, Fig. 3], with the option to include one sensor external to the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1], to be installed on the load to be hoisted.
  10. 3 MODES OF OPERATIONS: The spreader beam in claim 1, operates in one of three modes, to be selected prior to the start of the hoisting operation, wherein each has its own merits, advantages, and disadvantages, depending on operator’s preference and site conditions where it will be used.
  11. MODE 1: The first mode of operation in claim 10, commence operation with maximum length of slings [10, Fig. 1] possible, inside the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1], thereby it can only release part of the sling [10, Fig. 1] towards the exterior of the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1], to lengthen the external exposed sling [10, Fig. 1], which will in turn, lower the end of said spreader beam that is subjected to a lighter tension with respect to the other end.
  12. MODE 2: The second mode of operation in claim 10, commence operation with minimum length of slings [10, Fig. 1] possible inside the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1], thereby it can only pull in part of the exposed sling [10, Fig. 1] into the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1] to shorten the external exposed sling [10, Fig. 1], which will in turn, raise the end of the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1] that is subjected to a higher tension with respect to the other end.
  13. MODE 3: The third mode of operation in claim 10, commence operation with a balanced portion of the slings [10, Fig. 1] pulled into the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1] in a manner, that facilitates equal length of, pulling into the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1] and releasing outside the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1], thereby, permitting a dual-action mode of operation, to pull in the slings [10, Fig. 1] through the heavier end of the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1] and, at the same instant, releasing or exposing more portion of the sling [10, Fig. 1] outside the spreader beam [01,02, Fig. 1] at the lighter end.
  14. MODE 3 EXTENSION: The third mode of operation in claim 13, when switched to manual control mode, will facilitates small increments of lowering or hoisting of the suspended load, just like the crane does, but without the participation of the crane that is hoisting the load, wherein, by releasing part of both slings [10, Fig. 1] through both ends [02, Fig. 1] simultaneously, will lower the suspended load, and by pulling in part of both slings [10, Fig. 1] through both ends [02, Fig. 1] simultaneously, will raise the suspended load.
  15. VISUAL INDICATION: The spreader beam in claim 1, has indicator panels [03, Fig. 1] with lights to provide visual indications for the lifting supervisor, indicating the snail pace movement within the spreader beam [01, Fig. 1], at the same time, allowing the crane operator to anticipate the next instruction from the lifting supervisor.
PCT/SG2020/050419 2020-07-13 2020-07-18 Self-levelling spreader beam WO2022015237A1 (en)

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SG10202006676T 2020-07-13
SG10202006676T 2020-07-13

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Publication Number Publication Date
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Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS50109371U (en) * 1974-02-18 1975-09-06
JPS5160362A (en) * 1974-11-21 1976-05-26 Eagle Clamp Co TENBINTSURIGU
FR2470749A1 (en) * 1979-12-07 1981-06-12 Chainette Atel Self balancing lifting yoke for asymmetric loads - has T=shaped frame and has hydraulic cylinder suspension cables to adjust length
JPS56127588A (en) * 1980-03-12 1981-10-06 Hitachi Ltd Method and device for controlling centre of gravity
JPH09118492A (en) * 1995-10-24 1997-05-06 Babcock Hitachi Kk Automatic aligning hoisting accessory
CN2868965Y (en) * 2005-08-16 2007-02-14 四川长江工程起重机有限责任公司 Automobile crane hoisting device
CN105329766A (en) * 2015-11-17 2016-02-17 无锡市新华起重工具有限公司 Automatic balance type lifting beam
US20190292021A1 (en) * 2018-03-26 2019-09-26 Richardson Capex, LLC Variable Length Tackle Sling

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS50109371U (en) * 1974-02-18 1975-09-06
JPS5160362A (en) * 1974-11-21 1976-05-26 Eagle Clamp Co TENBINTSURIGU
FR2470749A1 (en) * 1979-12-07 1981-06-12 Chainette Atel Self balancing lifting yoke for asymmetric loads - has T=shaped frame and has hydraulic cylinder suspension cables to adjust length
JPS56127588A (en) * 1980-03-12 1981-10-06 Hitachi Ltd Method and device for controlling centre of gravity
JPH09118492A (en) * 1995-10-24 1997-05-06 Babcock Hitachi Kk Automatic aligning hoisting accessory
CN2868965Y (en) * 2005-08-16 2007-02-14 四川长江工程起重机有限责任公司 Automobile crane hoisting device
CN105329766A (en) * 2015-11-17 2016-02-17 无锡市新华起重工具有限公司 Automatic balance type lifting beam
US20190292021A1 (en) * 2018-03-26 2019-09-26 Richardson Capex, LLC Variable Length Tackle Sling

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