WO2018208241A1 - Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate - Google Patents

Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2018208241A1
WO2018208241A1 PCT/TR2017/050178 TR2017050178W WO2018208241A1 WO 2018208241 A1 WO2018208241 A1 WO 2018208241A1 TR 2017050178 W TR2017050178 W TR 2017050178W WO 2018208241 A1 WO2018208241 A1 WO 2018208241A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
controlled release
morphine
matrix
release
tablet
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/TR2017/050178
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Hatice Öncel
Yilmaz Çapan
Onur PINARBAŞLI
Aslihan Arslan
Nagehan SARRAÇOĞLU
Original Assignee
İlko Ilaç Sanayi Ve Ticaret Anonim Şirketi
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by İlko Ilaç Sanayi Ve Ticaret Anonim Şirketi filed Critical İlko Ilaç Sanayi Ve Ticaret Anonim Şirketi
Priority to PCT/TR2017/050178 priority Critical patent/WO2018208241A1/en
Publication of WO2018208241A1 publication Critical patent/WO2018208241A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K9/00Medicinal preparations characterised by special physical form
    • A61K9/20Pills, tablets, discs, rods
    • A61K9/2004Excipients; Inactive ingredients
    • A61K9/2013Organic compounds, e.g. phospholipids, fats
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K31/00Medicinal preparations containing organic active ingredients
    • A61K31/33Heterocyclic compounds
    • A61K31/395Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins
    • A61K31/435Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins having six-membered rings with one nitrogen as the only ring hetero atom
    • A61K31/47Quinolines; Isoquinolines
    • A61K31/485Morphinan derivatives, e.g. morphine, codeine
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K9/00Medicinal preparations characterised by special physical form
    • A61K9/20Pills, tablets, discs, rods
    • A61K9/2004Excipients; Inactive ingredients
    • A61K9/2022Organic macromolecular compounds
    • A61K9/205Polysaccharides, e.g. alginate, gums; Cyclodextrin
    • A61K9/2054Cellulose; Cellulose derivatives, e.g. hydroxypropyl methylcellulose

Abstract

A stable solid controlled release formulation having a prolonged release of the active agent comprising morphine and/or one or several pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof. The controlled release tablet is formulated with a controlled release matrix, wherein the matrix comprises a dual-action polymer mix consisting of a hydrophilic 0 polymer and a hydrophobic polymer.

Description

FORMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF CONTROLLED RELEASE

TABLETS OF MORPHINE SULPHATE

DESCRIPTION

Technical field:

Morphine, the most important alkaloid of opium, is classified pharmacologically as a narcotic analgesic. The present invention allows the preparation of a controlled release tablet composition having a prolonged release of the active agent comprising morphine and/or one or several pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof with a controlled release matrix, wherein the matrix comprises a dual-action polymer mix consisting of a hydrophilic polymer and a hydrophobic polymer. Also, the invention relatesto processes for its preparation and to its medical use.

Prior Art:

Morphine is a pain medication of the opiate type which is found naturally in a number of plants and animals.lt acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease the feeling of pain. It can be taken for both acute pain and chronic pain.

Morphine is typically used in therapy in the form of morphine sulfate or a hydrate thereof. Morphine sulfate is an opioid compound with specific affinity for the receptors μ, δ and K. The principal actions of therapeutic value are analgesia and sedation. The precise mechanism of the analgesic action is unknown. Specific opioid receptors have been located in the brain and the spinal cord and are likely to play a role in the expression of analgesic effects. Morphine sulfate is designated chemically as 7,8-Didehydro-4,5a- epoxy-17-methylmorphinan-3,6a-diol sulfate (2:1 )(salt)pentahydrate with a white crystalline powder, soluble in water. Its empirical formula is (Ο^Η^ΝΟ^-Η^βΟγδΗ^Ο and its structural formula is given below (Formula I):

Figure imgf000002_0001

Formula (I) l Morphine was first isolated between 1803 and 1805 by Friedrich Serturner. Merck began marketing it commercially in 1827. The primary source of morphine is isolation from poppy straw of the opium poppy.

Pharmaceutical-grade morphine exists as a salt, typically in the form of morphine hydrochloride, morphine acetate, or morphine sulfate. In this present invention, morphine sulphate is used.

Morphine is a Schedule II drug in the United States, Class A in the United Kingdom, and Schedule I in Canada.lt is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.

Morphine is subject to presystemic elimination (metabolism in the gut wall and liver) and therefore only 40% of the administered dose reaches systemic circulation. Virtually all morphine is converted to glucuronide metabolites; morphine-3-glucuronide (present in highest concentrations but inactive) and morphine-6-glucuronide. A large body of evidence from animal experiments shows that morphine-6-glucuronide is a potent μ-opioid agonist, with the potential to contribute to morphine's analgesic response.

Morphine is regarded as the opioid drug of choice in the treatment of cancer pain, for example. Side effects of morphine treatment include, for example, nausea and vomiting, constipation, sedation, confusion and loss of appetite. It has been suggested that the use of modified release morphineformulations, apart from their convenience and their ability to provide continuous analgesia, may result in a lower incidence and severity of morphine- related side effects and also improve patient compliance.

Morphine has a short elimination half-life of only 1 .5-2.5 h, leading to difficulties in clinical pain management. There was a study that supported that sustained-release morphine tablets administered every 12 h can replace an immediate-release morphine solution administered every 4 h. Yue et al. demonstrated that oral treatment with sustained-release morphine hydrochloride in patients with cancer pain is effective,safe and convenient; and also can improve the quality of life.

Extended release oral morphine sulphate preparations are considered to be clinically significant as they impart equivalent to superior analgesia with respect to immediate release forms in addition to reducing the likelihood of morphine associated side effects. Morphine sulphate is currently available as twice a day dosage form as MSContin®T ablets available as 10 mg, 30 mg, 60 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg active per unit dose. Once daily morphine products currently available are those sold under the Trade Marks MST Continus Long and Kapanol. Various slow/sustained release morphine formulations have been developed and are described in the literature. Sustained-release morphine dosage forms are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,202,128 and 5,378,474.

WO 1994/003161 discloses pH independent and zero order controlled release tablets of morphine for a period of at least 8 hours, preferably at least 12 hours that are coated with a water-insoluble diffusion membrane.

WO 1999/039698 discloses a sustained release tablet dosage form comprising a mixture of a three component release rate controlling matrix composition: a water insoluble polymer; a pH dependent gelling polymer; and a pH-independent gelling polymer.

WO 1999/020255 discloses an oral morphine multiparticulate formulation for once-daily administration to a patient, comprising sustained release particles each having a core containing water soluble morphine and an osmotic agent, the core being coated with a rate-controlling polymer coat comprised of ammonia methacrylate copolymers in an amount sufficient to achieve therapeutically effective plasma levels of morphine over at least 24 hours in the patient.

US2016/0361269 discloses a composition for controlled release of an opioid pharmaceutical composition which exhibits a zero order release profile, the method comprises controlling the release of at least one opioid into an aqueous medium by erosion of at least one surface of a pharmaceutical composition comprising a matrix composition comprising a) polymer or a mixture of polymers, b) an opioid and, optionally, c) one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipients, and a coating.

Many controlled release products on the market suffers from the lack of a true controlled release. To obtain therapeutic plasma concentrations with less frequent dosing, effective controlled release analgesics are under continuous development. Also, the composition should be storage stable with respect to chemical and physical stability.

The new developed product provides a storage stable formulation for oral pharmaceutically morphine sulphatecontrolled release tablet.

The aims of the present study were thus to develop a morphine sulfate controlled-release tablet formulation and to evaluate its bioequivalence compared with the commercial brand, MSContin® Controlled Release Tablet. Description of the Invention:

In the first aspect, the present invention relates to formulate stable controlled release tablet composition comprising a therapeutically effective amount of morphine or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

The objective of present invention is to develop a controlled release matrix tablets of morphine sulphate by using two type of ethylcellulose as hydrophilic/ hydrophobic matrix polymers and to study the effect of polymers on release pattern.

The controlled-release process is regulated by the interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers to fine-tune the diffusion of the drug and, thus, its release rate. The controlled release preparation according to the invention preferably contains from 1 to 20% (by weight), preferably from 2 to 10% (by weight) of one or more alkylcelluloses and from 10 to 40% (by weight), preferably from 15 to 30% (by weight) of aliphatic alcohol.

Present invention relates to pharmaceutical controlled release tablet composition of morphine sulphate which is bioequivalent to reference drug of morphine sulphatecontrolled release tablets (MS Contin®) respectively under fasted and fed condition.

The morphine sulphate produced as an intermediate product by Turkish Grain Board (TMO) and it has been proved with the methods that are usable in the quality of the pharmaceutical active substance. In drug product analysis, morphine sulfate active substance has been validated with stability-based methods to be usable according to the standards found in American and European pharmacopoeias, and to be produced in a manner suitable for pharmaceutical production.

The term "controlled-release" is defined for purposes of the present invention as the release of the drug at such a rate that blood concentrations are maintained within the therapeutic range but below toxic concentrations over a period of time of about 12 hours or longer.

MSContin® (Purdue Pharma, Stamford, CT) was the first of the controlled-release tablet forms of morphine sulfate developed. The morphine sulfate in MSContin® is contained in a dual-action polymer mix consisting of a hydrophilic polymer and a hydrophobic polymer. The used excipients are hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, cetostearyl alcohol, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, talc and titanium dioxide. The rate of drug release from this formulation depends on the rate of diffusion of the dissolved morphine through produced gel layer at the surface of the tablet. The depth of the gel layer increases over time as the gastric fluid gains access to the deeper regions of the tablet. The release rate can be controlled by varying the hydrophilic polymer, the type of hydrophobic matrix, or their ratio.

The active ingredient in the preparation according to the invention may suitably be incorporated in a matrix. This may be any matrix that affords in-vitro dissolution rates and in vivo absorption rates of morphine sulphate within the ranges. Preferably the matrix is a controlled release matrix. Alternatively, normal release matrices having a coating which provides for controlled release of the active ingredient may be used.

Suitable materials for inclusion in a controlled release matrix include;

(a) Hydrophillic or hydrophobic polymers, such as gums, cellulose ethers, acrylic resins and protein derived materials. Of these polymers, the cellulose ethers, especially alkylcelluloses are preferred. The preparation may conveniently contain between 1 % and 80% (by weight) of one or more hydrophillic or hydrophobic polymers.

(b) Digestible, long chain (C8— C50, especially C12— C40), substituted or unsubstituted hydrocarbons, such as fatty acids, fatty alcohols, glyceryl esters of fatty acids, mineral and vegetable oils and waxes. Hydrocarbons having a melting point of between 25 and 90°C are preferred. Of these long chain hydrocarbon materials, fatty (aliphatic) alcohols are preferred. The preparation may conveniently contain up to 60% (by weight) of at least one digestible, long chain hydrocarbon.

Non-limiting lists of suitable controlled-release materials which may be included in a controlled-release matrix according to the invention include hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic materials. Preferred controlled release polymers include alkylcelluloses such as ethylcellulose, acrylic and methacrylic acid polymers and copolymers, and cellulose ethers.

Ethylcellulose, dissolved in an organic solvent or solvent mixture, can be used on its own to produce water-insoluble films. Higher-viscosity ethylcellulose grade stend to produce stronger and more durable films. Also, it is the non-ionic, pH insensitive cellulose ether and insoluble in water but soluble in many polar organic solvents. It is used as; - A non- swellable, insoluble component in matrix or coating systems. - However, hydroxyethylcellulose is also non-ionic water-soluble cellulose ether, easily dispersed in cold or hot water to give solutions of varying viscosities and desired properties, yet it is insoluble in organic solvents. One particularly suitable controlled release matrix comprises one or more alkylcelluloses and one or more C12— C36 aliphatic alcohols. The controlled-release process is regulated by the interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers to fine-tune the diffusion of the drug and, thus, its release rate. The alkylcellulose is preferably C1— C6 alkyl cellulose, especially hydroxyethyl cellulose. The controlled release preparation according to the invention preferably contains from 1 to 20% (by weight), especially from 2 to 10% (by weight) of one or more alkylcelluloses. Surprisingly, it was observed that the type of the cellulose esters as hydrophilic controlled-release polymer plays a major role in the release characteristic of the formulation.

The hydrophobic content is used to slow the diffusion of drug into the aqueous phase, which limits diffusion into the gastrointestinal tract and absorption into the body.Once the tablet comes in contact with the gastrointestinal liquid, a swelling of the hydrophilic matrix occurs, giving a viscous gel. The kinetics of the drug release is directly linked to the swelling of the hydrophilic polymer matrix, which is controlled by the rate of fluid penetration through the hydrophobic part. Consequently, the general rate of drug release is regulated by variation of the ratio between the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic polymers. The controlled release preparation suitable contains from 10 to 40% (by weight), especially from 15 to 30% (by weight) of aliphatic alcohol.The aliphatic alcohol may conveniently be lauryl alcohol, myristyl alcohol or stearyl alcohol but is preferably cetyl alcohol or more preferably cetostearyl alcohol.

Optionally the controlled release matrix may also contain other pharmaceutically acceptable ingredients which are conventional in the pharmaceutical art such as diluents, lubricants, binders, granulating aids, colourants, favourants, surfactants, pH adjusters, anti-adherents and glidants, e.g. dibutylsebacate, ammonium hydroxide, oleic acid and colloidal silica.

The controlled release preparation according to the invention may conveniently be film coated using any film coating material conventional in the pharmaceutical art. Preferably an aqueous film coating is used.

The tablet was prepared by wet granulationprocess.

In a further aspect the present invention provides a process for preparing a controlled release composition comprising incorporating morphine or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof in a controlled release matrix, for example by; (a) granulating a mixture comprising morphine or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof and one or more alkylcelluloses, preferably hydroxyethyl cellulose

(b) heating the alkylcellulose containing granules and melting 012-36 aliphatic alcohols, preferably cetostearyl alcohol

(c) mixing the heated alkylcellulose containing granules with molten one or more

C1 2-36 aliphatic alcohols

(d) mixing purified talc and magnesium stearate with the granules

(e) compressing the granules into tablets and film coating

The critical point is the mixing of containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic matrix agents. In order to have homogeneous granules, the heating step of alkylcellulose containing granules and melting step of C12-36 aliphatic alcohols are important.

In order that the invention may be well understood the following examples are given by way of illustration only.

Example 1.

MORPHINE SULPHATE

% amount in unit

100 MG CONTROLLED

dose (%w/w)

RELEASE TABLETS

Morphine sulphate 50-80

Ethyl cellulose 2-10

Cetostearyl alcohol 15-30

Talc 1 -5

Magnesium Stearate 0.1 -2.0

Film coating

Morphine sulphate and ethyl cellulose were mixed and granulated with water in a high sheer mixer. The granules were then dried at fluid bed drier and passed througha 1 .2 mm screen. The granules were heated and cetostearyl alcohol was melted in a heated water bath. To the heated morphine containing granules was added molten cetostearyl alcohol and the whole was mixed at high speed while heating thoroughly. The granules were allowed to cool and sieved through a 1 .2 mm screen. Purified talc and magnesium stearate were added and mixed with the granules. The granules were then compressed into tablets and finally the tablets were coated with a film.

Example 2. In order to examine the effect of the type of cellulose esters, same production method of Example 1 is performed with hydroxyethyl cellulose.

MORPHINE SULPHATE

% amount in unit

100 MG CONTROLLED

dose (%w/w)

RELEASE TABLETS

Morphine sulphate 50-80

Hydroxyethyl cellulose 2-10

Cetostearyl alcohol 15-30

Talc 1 -5

Magnesium Stearate 0.1 -2

Film coating q.s.

Morphine sulphate and hydroxyethyl cellulose were mixed and granulated with water in a high sheer mixer. The granules were then dried at fluid bed drier and passed through a 1 .2 mm screen. The granules were heated and cetostearyl alcohol was melted in a heated water bath. To the heated morphine containing granules was added molten cetostearyl alcohol and the whole was mixed at high speed while heating thoroughly. The granules were allowed to cool and sieved through a 1 .2 mm screen. Purified talc and magnesium stearate were added and mixed with the granules. The granules were then compressed into tablets and finally the tablets were coated with a film.

Dissolution studies

For all examples, the tablets were tested for dissolution of morphine at USP Type I (Basket) apparatus. Dissolution medium is given as water (deaerated) which was maintained at 37±0.5°C, 50 rpm, 900 mL and 12 hours (FDA). The dissolution profiles of the products produced with example 1 formulation is compared to the dissolution profile of the references product MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets in specified dissolution conditions. Dissolution profile is given at Figure 1 .

The dissolution profile shows that using ethyl cellulose as alkylcellulose in the formulation did not achieve similar in-vitro profiles with reference product.

The dissolution profile of the products produced with example 2 formulation is compared to the dissolution profile of the references product MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets in specified dissolution conditions. Dissolution profile is given at Figure 2.

The dissolution profile shows that the example 2 formulation of the present invention achieve a dissolution profile substantially similar to that of the reference product marketed under the trade name MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets.

Although, the ratio of alkylcellulose per unit dose is used same in example 1 and example 2, there is an extreme difference in drug release of morphine sulphate. This difference is related to differences at water solubility properties of these two ether structures. In Example 1 , produced with ethyl cellulose, dissolution rate of morphine sulphate is very low and consequently it has a dissolution profile that is not similar to the reference product. On the other hand, the dissolution profile obtained with water-soluble polymer of hydroxyethyl cellulose (Example 2) is very similar to the reference product.

In order to show pH independency of the developed product, drug release of test product (Example 2) and reference products were also determined at other dissolution mediums (pH 1 .2, pH 4.5 and pH 6.8) at 37±0.5°C, 50 rpm, 900 mL and 12 hours.The dissolution profiles obtained are disclosed in Figure 3-5.

Stability Studies

The stability of a drug substance is an important factor in the manufacture of safe and effective pharmaceutical products. Stability studies are required to be submitted by any applicant seeking approval for a new pharmaceutical product. Stability study requirements are covered, for example in the United States Pharmacopea, in the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) as well as in FDA and ICH Guidelines. It is known that many drugs exhibit poor or modest shelf stability. The presence of degradation products of these drugs can give rise to efficacy or toxicity issues, but even if they do not, the diminution of the concentration of a drag as a result of its degradation is inherently undesirable, as it make therapy with the drug less certain. Stability issues can be caused by environmental factors such as humidity, temperature and the like.

In the development of morphine sulphate controlled release tablet formulation, stability was assessed under three different isothermal conditions (25°C ± 2°C/60 ± 5% RH, 30°C ± 2°C/65 ± 5% RH and 40 ± 2°C/75 ± 5% RH) in temperature-programmable control cabinets. A temperature of 25°C ± 2°C/60 ± 5% RH represents ambient temperature, 30°C ± 2°C/65 ± 5% RH represents intermediate temperature and 40 ± 2°C/75 ± 5% RH is a temperature that can be reached under extreme conditions in homes without air conditioning in the summer. The extreme condition, temperature of 40°C ± 2°C and 75 % ± 5 % RH (Relative Humidity), accelerated stability studies are carried out on morphine sulphate controlled release tablet up to 6 months.

Thestability of a pharmaceuticaldosage form is relatedtomaintainingitsphysical, chemical, microbiological, therapeutic, and toxicological properties when stored, i.e., in a particular container and environment.

Morphine sulphate controlled release tablet of the invention is stable at three different conditions, in conventional packaging, e.g. sealed Alu/Alu blister. The results of 6 months' accelerated stability testing at 40°C ± 2°C/ 75 % ± 5 % RH showed that the formulation withcontaining from 1 to 20% (by weight), preferably from 2 to 10% (by weight) of one or more alkylcelluloses of hydroxyethyl cellulose and from 10 to 40% (by weight), preferably from 15 to 30% (by weight) of aliphatic alcoholof cetostearyl alcohol proved to have good stability in controlled release tablet form.

Bioequivalence study

As per USFDA guideline titled "Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Studies for Orally Administered Drug Products— General Considerations" Bioequivalence is defined as: "the absence of a significant difference in the rate and extent to which the active ingredient or active moiety in pharmaceutical equivalents or pharmaceutical alternatives becomes available at the site of drug action when administered at the same molar dose under similar conditions in an appropriately designed study." "Reference drug" means a morphine sulphate product as described in U.S. Federal Food and Drug Administration's New Drug Application No. 021368 approved on Nov 21 , 2003 as provided in the U.S. Federal Food and Drug Administration's Orange Book, Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by non-compartmental methods using actual elapsed time from dosing:

Cmax (ng/mL) : Maximum observed plasma concentration, obtained directly from the observed concentration versus time data.

Tmax (h) : Time to maximum plasma concentration, obtained directly from the observed concentration versus time data.

AUCo (ng /ml_*h) : Area under the curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity, calculated by linear up/log down trapezoidal summation and extrapolated to infinity by addition of the last quantifiable concentration divided by the elimination rate constant

AUC0-Tiast (ng/mL*h) : Area under the curve from time zero to time of last measurable concentration, calculated by linear up/log down trapezoidal summation.

The in-vivo studies were conducted in 44 healthy volunteers to assess the bioequivalence of the morphine sulphatel 00 mgcontrolled release tablet composition of present invention (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet; Batch No: 1406229001 ) against MSContin® 100 mg Controlled Release Tablets (Batch No: WJM31 ) as using an open-label, single dose, 4-period crossover, randomized design under fasting and fed conditions.

Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profiles and the relative bioavailability of morphine was performed from the test preparation (Morphine Sulphate 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) in comparison with the reference preparation (MSContin® 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet, Purdue Pharma, Stamford, CT) so that to demonstrate the bioequivalence of the test product with the reference product under fasting and fed conditions.

Pharmacokinetic parameters AUC0-tiast, AUC0-inf and Cmax of morphine were tested with respect to fasting and fed conditions for statistically significant differences by means of the ANOVA test procedure following In-transformation of data and 90 % confidence intervals (two one-sided t-tests) were calculated. Differences in the parameter tmax were statistically tested by nonparametric analysis (90 % confidence intervals; two one-sided Wilcoxon tests). Potential food interactions were evaluated from parametric point estimates (ratio of geometric means) and 90 % confidence intervals (two one-sided t- tests) of fed vs fasting comparisons separately for test and reference preparation.

The results are given at the following tables (Table 2, 3 and 4):

Table 2.Pharmacokinetic parameters of Morphine for composition of Test product (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) against Reference product (MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets).

Pharmacokinetic Results of Morphine (Fasting Condition)

AUCo-tlast AUCo-inf Cmax tmax

[ng/ml*h] [ng/ml*h] [ng/ml] [h] ~N 44

Test (T) 377.50±88.44 408.14±100.22 33.99±9.27 2.02±1 .25

Reference (R) 370.93±89.03 393.81 i94.14 34.56±10.73 2.60±1 .59

Pharmacokinetic Results of Morphine (Fed Condition)

AUCo-tiast AUCo-inf Cmax tmax

[ng/ml*h] [ng/ml*h] [ng/ml] [h]

~N 44

Test (T) 503.901161 .71 530.85±165.66 57.66±19.18 2.50±1 .39

Reference (R) 517.28±135.68 539.81 ±142.93 64.15±19.51 2.67±1 .31

Table 3.Statistical Resultsof morphineat fasting condition for composition of Test product (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) against Reference product (MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets).

Statistical Results of Morphine (Test vs reference); n=44, fasting condition

Primary pharmacokinetic parameters:

90% confidence interval of

AUC 0-tlast

ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 97.73 % - 106.32 %

point estimator (ratio): 101 .93 %

90% confidence interval of

ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 92.85 % - 105.74 %

point estimator (ratio): 99.08 %

Secondary pharmacokinetic parameters:

90% confidence interval of

ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 99.27 % - 108.12 %

point estimator (ratio): 103.60 %

90% confidence interval of

Non-parametric analysis: 0.00 h

Median (difference reference-test): 0.50 h

Table 4.Statistical Results of morphine at fed condition for composition of Test product (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) against Reference product (MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets).

Statistical Results of Morphine (Test vs reference); n=44, fed condition

Primary pharmacokinetic parameters:

90% confidence interval of

AUCo-tiast ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 88.90 % - 102.16 %

point estimator (ratio): 95.30 %

90% confidence interval of

Cmax ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 82.96 % - 95.34 %

point estimator (ratio): 88.93 %

Secondary pharmacokinetic parameters:

90% confidence interval of

AUC0-∞ ANOVA (two one-sided t-tests): 90.41 % - 103.1 1 %

point estimator (ratio): 96.55 %

90% confidence interval of

tmax Non-parametric analysis: -0.25 h - 0.50 h

Median (difference reference-test): 0.00 h

Table 5. Investigation of a food effect for Test product (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) andReference product (MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets) (fed vs fasting)

Geometric

AUCn -tlast AUCn-∞ tn

Mean Ratio

N 44 T2/T1 129.64% 127.02% 166.48% 123.49%

R2/R1 138.55% 136.12% 185.40% 1 1 1 .54% Based on the results of the present study, both the extent (AUC0-tiast) and rate (Cmax) of bioavailability of the test preparation (Example 2 - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet) and the reference preparation (MS Contin® 100 mg Controlled Release Tablets) are comparable under fasting and fed conditions. The 90 % confidence intervals of the In-transformed AUC0-tiast and Cmax meet the bioequivalence criteria of 80 % - 125 %.

Explanations of Figures:

Figure 1. Comparative dissolution profiles of MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets vs Test Product Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet (Example 1 ) (n=6, USP Type I (Basket) apparatus, dissolution medium: water (deaerated))

Figure 2.Comparative dissolution profiles of MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets vs Test Product Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet (Example 2) (n=6, USP Type I (Basket) apparatus, dissolution medium: water (deaerated))

Figure 3.Comparative dissolution profiles of MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets vs Test Product - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet (Example 2) (n=6, USP Type I (Basket) apparatus, dissolution medium: pH1 .2)

Figure 4.Comparative dissolution profiles of MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets vs Test Product - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet (Example 2) (n=6, USP Type I (Basket) apparatus, dissolution medium: pH4.5)

Figure S.Comparative dissolution profiles of MSContin® 100 mg controlled release tablets vs Test Product - Morphine 100 mg Controlled Release Tablet (Example 2) (n=6, USP Type I (Basket) apparatus, dissolution medium: pH6.8)

Claims

1. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation comprising morphine or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof in a controlled release matrix such that said dosage form comprises at least one alkylcellulose and at least one aliphatic alcohol wherein said controlled release matrix a hydrophilic matrix consisting of alkylcellulose present from 1 % to 20% (w/w) by weight based on the total weight of the tablet.
2. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation according to claim 1 , wherein said controlled release matrix is a hydrophobic matrix consisting of aliphatic alcohol is present from 10 to 40% (w/w), preferably 15 to 30% w/w by weight based on the total weight of the tablet.
3. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation according to claim 2, wherein alkylcelluloses is present from 2 to 10% w/w by weight based on the total weight of the tablet.
4. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation according to claim 1 , wherein said alkylcellulose is hydroxyethyl cellulose.
5. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation according to claim 1 , wherein said aliphatic alcohol is cetostearyl alcohol.
6. An oral controlled release pharmaceutical tablet preparation according to claim 1 , wherein from 10 to about 200 mg of morphine (calculated as morphine sulphate) is incorporated in the dosage form.
PCT/TR2017/050178 2017-05-10 2017-05-10 Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate WO2018208241A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/TR2017/050178 WO2018208241A1 (en) 2017-05-10 2017-05-10 Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/TR2017/050178 WO2018208241A1 (en) 2017-05-10 2017-05-10 Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2018208241A1 true WO2018208241A1 (en) 2018-11-15

Family

ID=59930732

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/TR2017/050178 WO2018208241A1 (en) 2017-05-10 2017-05-10 Formulation and optimization of controlled release tablets of morphine sulphate

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2018208241A1 (en)

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0205282A2 (en) * 1985-06-11 1986-12-17 Euroceltique S.A. Oral pharmaceutical composition
US5202128A (en) 1989-01-06 1993-04-13 F. H. Faulding & Co. Limited Sustained release pharmaceutical composition
WO1994003161A1 (en) 1992-07-29 1994-02-17 Gacell Laboratories Ab Controlled release morphine preparation
WO1998000143A1 (en) * 1996-06-28 1998-01-08 Knoll Pharmaceutical Company Slow release pharmaceutical compositions and methods of making same
WO1999020255A1 (en) 1997-10-17 1999-04-29 Elan Corporation, Plc Oral morphine multiparticulate formulation
WO1999039698A1 (en) 1998-02-04 1999-08-12 Duramed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Sustained release formulation
WO2001058447A1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2001-08-16 Euro-Celtique, S.A. Controlled-release compositions containing opioid agonist and antagonist
US20140271840A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2014-09-18 Benjamin Oshlack Controlled release hydrocodone formulations
US20160361269A1 (en) 2003-03-26 2016-12-15 Egalet Ltd. Morphine controlled release system

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0205282A2 (en) * 1985-06-11 1986-12-17 Euroceltique S.A. Oral pharmaceutical composition
US5202128A (en) 1989-01-06 1993-04-13 F. H. Faulding & Co. Limited Sustained release pharmaceutical composition
US5378474A (en) 1989-01-06 1995-01-03 F. H. Faulding & Co. Limited Sustained release pharmaceutical composition
WO1994003161A1 (en) 1992-07-29 1994-02-17 Gacell Laboratories Ab Controlled release morphine preparation
WO1998000143A1 (en) * 1996-06-28 1998-01-08 Knoll Pharmaceutical Company Slow release pharmaceutical compositions and methods of making same
WO1999020255A1 (en) 1997-10-17 1999-04-29 Elan Corporation, Plc Oral morphine multiparticulate formulation
WO1999039698A1 (en) 1998-02-04 1999-08-12 Duramed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Sustained release formulation
US20140271840A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2014-09-18 Benjamin Oshlack Controlled release hydrocodone formulations
WO2001058447A1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2001-08-16 Euro-Celtique, S.A. Controlled-release compositions containing opioid agonist and antagonist
US20160361269A1 (en) 2003-03-26 2016-12-15 Egalet Ltd. Morphine controlled release system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7514100B2 (en) Controlled release hydrocodone formulations
EP1810679B1 (en) Controlled release oxycodone compositions
EP1492506B1 (en) Matrix for sustained, invariant and independent release of active compounds
AU2006269225B2 (en) Sustained release pharmaceutical compositions for highly water soluble drugs
EP2301526B1 (en) Morphine controlled release system
CA2474904C (en) Once-a-day oxycodone formulations
KR101476574B1 (en) Controlled release hydrocodone formulations
AU2007220456B2 (en) Crush-resistant oxycodone tablets intended for preventing accidental misuse and unlawful diversion
JP4505059B2 (en) Controlled release formulations coated with ethylcellulose aqueous dispersion
JP4440635B2 (en) Oxymorphone controlled release formulation
US6159501A (en) Modified release multiple-units dosage composition for release of opioid compounds
ES2336913T3 (en) Modified-release tablet of bupropion hydrochloride.
JP3280810B2 (en) Sustained release oral opioid formulation
US20130344143A1 (en) Formulations of nonopioid and confined opioid analgesics
JP3015105B2 (en) Powder coating the oral dosage form
US20050181046A1 (en) Tamper-resistant oral opioid agonist formulations
US20070098795A1 (en) Pharmaceutical formulation
AU2009200460B2 (en) Stable extended release oral dosage composition
US6171618B1 (en) Combination dosage form comprising cetirizine and pseudoephedrine
JP3645589B2 (en) Opioid formulation with extended release inhibitory
RU2433817C2 (en) Medical form and method for delivery of habit-forming medical substances
US20030190358A1 (en) Sustained release hydromorphone formulations exhibiting bimodal characteristics
CA2592173C (en) Controlled release complex formulation for oral administration of medicine for diabetes and method for the preparation thereof
CN1189165C (en) Fast-acting analgesic
CN100500130C (en) Sustained-release preparations and method for producing the same

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 17771888

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1