WO2018063765A1 - Polymerization process - Google Patents

Polymerization process Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2018063765A1
WO2018063765A1 PCT/US2017/050431 US2017050431W WO2018063765A1 WO 2018063765 A1 WO2018063765 A1 WO 2018063765A1 US 2017050431 W US2017050431 W US 2017050431W WO 2018063765 A1 WO2018063765 A1 WO 2018063765A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
process
gt
condensing agent
preceding
propane
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2017/050431
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Richard B. Pannell
Original Assignee
Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201662400261P priority Critical
Priority to US62/400,261 priority
Priority to EP16198127.9 priority
Priority to EP16198127 priority
Application filed by Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. filed Critical Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc.
Priority claimed from CN201780070639.9A external-priority patent/CN110023346A/en
Publication of WO2018063765A1 publication Critical patent/WO2018063765A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08FMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING CARBON-TO-CARBON UNSATURATED BONDS
    • C08F2/00Processes of polymerisation
    • C08F2/01Processes of polymerisation characterised by special features of the polymerisation apparatus used
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08FMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING CARBON-TO-CARBON UNSATURATED BONDS
    • C08F2/00Processes of polymerisation
    • C08F2/34Polymerisation in gaseous state
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08FMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING CARBON-TO-CARBON UNSATURATED BONDS
    • C08F210/00Copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond
    • C08F210/16Copolymers of ethene with alpha-alkenes, e.g. EP rubbers

Abstract

A process including contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent including propane and isobutane under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer is provided.

Description

POLYMERIZATION PROCESS

PRIORITY CLAIM

[0001] This application claims priority to and benefit of USSN 62/400,261, filed September 27, 2016 and EP 16198127.9, filed November 10, 2016, which are incorporated by reference in their entirety.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0002] The present application is related to U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/400,258, filed September 27, 2016, entitled "Polymerization Process" (Arty. Docket No. 2016EM255), and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/400250, filed September 27, 2016, entitled "Polymerization Process" (Arty. Docket No. 2016EM259) both of which are incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The disclosure relates to polymerization processes for the production of poly olefin polymers. In particular, the disclosure relates to gas phase polymerization processes that employ certain condensing agents.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The condensing mode of operation in gas phase polymerization reactors significantly increases the production rate by providing extra heat-removal capacity through the evaporation of condensates in the cycle gas. Additional condensation is often promoted to extend the utility of condensed mode operation by adding an inert condensing agent ("ICA") into the reactor. The most commonly used ICA's in commercial practice are n-pentane, isopentane, n-butane, isohexane, and isobutane. The amount of ICA that can be introduced into the reactor; however, must be kept below the "stickiness limit" beyond which the bed material becomes too sticky to discharge or to maintain a normal fluidization status. Running in excess of this limit will result in different types of fouling or sheeting in various locations in the reactor system. The primary limitation on increasing the reaction rate in a fluidized bed reactor is the rate at which heat can be removed from the polymerization zone. For example, commercial applications raise isopentane concentration to the maximum allowable levels but no higher so as to avoid expanded dome section sheeting or agglomeration of polymer particles in a gas phase reactor.

[0005] An additional limitation arises in commercial applications where the maximum production rate for lower density polymers is sufficiently different from the production rate for higher density polymers, such that downstream extruder turndown limitations require costly or impractical workarounds, e.g., building multiple smaller extruders (less efficient) instead of one large extruder or operating an extruder intermittently.

[0006] Yet another limitation arises in the context of achieving higher production rates in existing facilities that have physical design characteristics, such as maximum operating pressure, that can limit production rate.

[0007] Past endeavors have attempted to improve on this technology by providing higher production rates for longer continuous run times and to bring the production rates for lower density polymers closer to the rates for higher density polymers.

[0008] U.S. Patent No. 5,352,749, is directed to a process for polymerizing alpha- olefin(s) in a gas phase reactor having a fluidized bed and a fluidizing medium wherein the fluidizing medium serves to control the cooling capacity of said reactor. A description of condensable fluids is provided in Col. 6, lines 31-47.

[0009] U.S. Patent No. 6,063,877 is directed to a process for controlling a continuous gas phase exothermic process in a reactor to maintain a constant temperature differential (ΔΤ) between the temperature of reactor inlet and reactor bed or outlet by using a heat exchanger and flow of a condensable fluid to the reactor. Examples of condensable fluids are listed in Col. 2, lines 24-34.

[0010] U.S. Patent No. 7,696,289 is directed to a gas phase polymerization process utilizing a low molecular weight dew point increasing component and a high molecular weight dew point increasing component. ICA's are described, for example, at Col. 15, lines 34-45, and Claim 5.

[0011] U.S. Patent No. 7,858,719 is directed to a gas phase process for polymerizing one or more hydrocarbon monomer(s) in a reactor in the presence of a catalyst system and a fluorinated hydrocarbon. A number of fluorinated hydrocarbons under the section header, "Condensable Fluids," may be found in Col. 19 to Col. 21.

[0012] U.S. Publication No. 2005/0182207 is directed to a continuous gas fluidized bed polymerization process for the production of a polymer from a monomer using at least two inert condensing agents selected from the group consisting of alkanes, cycloalkanes, and mixtures thereof, each of the inert condensing agents having a normal boiling point less than 40°C. Table 1 provides a listing of ICA's.

[0013] PCT Application No. PCT/US2016/031244 is directed to gas phase polymerization processes that employ certain condensing agents, including 2,2- dimethylpropane. [0014] Other background references include WO 94/28021 ; WO 94/28032; WO 2011/147539; and U.S. Patent Nos. 5,453,471 ; 6,262,192; 7,683,140; and 7,531,606.

[0015] Despite these past endeavors, there is a need and desire to increase production rates while maintaining the continuity of the reactor system in a continuous process. Additionally, there is also a desire to broaden the polymer grade operating windows to produce polymers with different properties at higher production rates, for example, decreasing the density or raising the melt index of the polymer, which was not previously possible with current commercial practices due to the limitations of process conditions and readily available ICA's. Further, there is a desire to produce lower density polymer (< 0.912 g/cm3) at production rates closer to higher density polymer (e.g., 0.918 g/cm3) production rates in order to avoid complexity in commercial facilities such as extruder turndown limitations. Finally, there is a desire to achieve these results when existing facility design (such as reactor max operating pressure) limits production rate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0016] The invention relates to a polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising propane and isobutane under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer. It has been discovered that utilizing propane and isobutane allows for increased production rate for a broad range of polymers. The invention also relates to a polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising propane and isobutane under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer; wherein the production rate of the polyolefin polymer is at least 5% greater than the same process polymerizing with a condensing agent consisting essentially of isopentane.

[0017] When expressed on a per unit of reactor volume basis, the production rate is called the "space time yield". In some embodiments, the polyolefin density (ASTM D1505) is < 0.912 g/cm3 and the space time yield is > 14.0 lb/ft /hr (224 kg/m /hr). In some embodiments, the space time yield is > 17.5 lb/ft /hr (280 kg/m /hr).

[0018] Some embodiments are particularly advantageous to avoid extruder turndown problems between grades. In some embodiments, the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having density < 0.912 g/cm3 is > 80% of the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having a density > 0.918 g/cm3.

[0019] It has been further discovered that such rates are achievable at lower reactor operating pressures when the condensing agent comprises propane and isobutane. While capable of operating across a broad range of reactor pressure, a particularly advantageous aspect of the invention relates to achieving increased production rates at reactor pressure from 20 to 24 barg.

[0020] Other embodiments of the invention will be apparent as from the description and claims in the following disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0021] Before the present compounds, components, compositions, and/or methods are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that unless otherwise indicated, this invention is not limited to specific compounds, components, compositions, reactants, reaction conditions, ligands, metallocene structures, or the like, as such may vary, unless otherwise specified. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting.

[0022] It must also be noted that, as used in the specification and the appended claims, the singular forms "a", "an" and "the" include plural referents unless otherwise specified. Thus, for example, reference to "a leaving group" as in a moiety "substituted with a leaving group" includes more than one leaving group, such that the moiety may be substituted with two or more such groups. Similarly, reference to "a halogen atom" as in a moiety "substituted with a halogen atom" includes more than one halogen atom, such that the moiety may be substituted with two or more halogen atoms, reference to "a substituent" includes one or more substituents, reference to "a ligand" includes one or more ligands, and the like.

[0023] The invention is generally directed toward polymerization processes, particularly, gas phase processes, for polymerizing one or more monomer(s) in the presence of at least one catalyst system. The invention also relates in several classes of embodiments to polymerization processes having increased production rates and/or product capabilities.

[0024] The polymerization processes described herein may be a continuous process. As used herein, "a continuous process" is a process that operates (or is intended to operate) without interruption or cessation but of course may be interrupted for customary maintenance or for the occasional disrupting event. For example, a continuous process to produce a polymer would be one in which the reactants are continuously introduced into one or more reactors and polymer product is continually or semi-continually withdrawn.

[0025] In many classes of embodiments of the invention, the invention provides for a gas phase process for polymerizing one or more monomer(s) in the presence of at least one catalyst system and a condensable agent wherein the process is operated in a condensed mode. [0026] For example, in some embodiments, the invention provides for a polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising propane and isobutane under polymerizable conditions to produce a poly olefin polymer. In embodiments, a majority of the condensing agent comprises propane and isobutane. In other embodiments, the condensing agent consists essentially of propane and isobutane. As used herein, "a majority of the condensing agent" shall refer to > 50 mol%, for example, > 60 , > 70 , > 75, > 80, > 85, > 85, or > 90 mol%, based upon the total moles of condensing agent in the reactor. As used herein, a "consisting essentially of propane and isobutane" in the condensing agent shall refer to the sum of isobutane and propane molar concentrations is > 90 mol%, for example, > 92, > 94 , > 95, > 96, > 98 mol%, based upon the total moles of condensing agent in the reactor.

[0027] The condensing agent can comprise from 1 to 99 mol% isobutane and from 99 to 1 mol% propane. The condensing agent can comprise > 10 mol% isobutane, for example, > 20, > 25, > 30, > 40, > 50, > 60, > 70, > 80, > 90 mol% isobutane, and < 90 mol% propane, for example, < 80, < 75, < 70, < 60, < 50, < 40, < 30, < 20, < 10 mol% propane. The condensing agent can comprise > 10 mol% propane, for example, > 20, > 25, > 30, > 40, > 50, > 60, > 70, > 80, > 90 mol% propane, and < 90 mol% isobutane, for example, < 80, < 75, < 70, < 60, < 50, < 40, < 30, < 20, < 10 mol% isobutane.

[0028] In certain preferred embodiments, the condensing agent comprises > 20 mol% isobutane and < 80 mol% propane. In other preferred embodiments, the condensing agent comprises > 50 mol% of isobutane and < 50 mol% propane.

[0029] The molar ratio of isobutane to propane in the condensing agent is from 0.01 to 100, preferably from 0.1 to 10, more preferably from 0.2 to 8. In embodiments, the molar ratio of isobutane to propane in the condensing agent is > 0.1 , for example, > 0.2, > 0.3, > 0.5, > 0.7, > 1.0, > 1.3, > 1.5, > 2.0, > 2.2, > 2.5, > 3.0, > 3.3, > 3.5, > 3.7, > 4.0, > 4.5, or > 5.0.

[0030] Co-pending application US 62/400,250 entitled "Polymerization Process" (Attorney Docket No. 2016EM259), which is incorporated by reference herein, describes benefits of inventions related to condensing agents comprising propane, including condensing agents comprising a majority or even consisting essentially of propane. It has been surprisingly found that utilizing propane as a condensing agent allows increased production rates over conventional condensing agents such as isopentane. Without being bound by any theory, it is believed this is because isopentane depresses the polymer meltpoint more than propane when used as condensing agent. It is believed the reduced meltpoint depression provided by propane allows for higher production rates before "stickiness limits" are encountered.

[0031] However, it has been identified that in certain circumstances when using propane as condensing agent, the increased production rates are achieved at high reactor pressures. Advantageously, it has been discovered that condensing agents comprising propane and isobutane achieve increased production rates over rates achievable using isopentane, and do so at lower reactor pressures. Without being bound by any theory, it is believed that isobutane depresses the polymer meltpoint more than propane when used as condensing agent but not so much as isopentane. It is believed the increased meltpoint depression provided by an isobutane and propane blend (over propane alone) allows for obtaining higher production rates at lower reactor pressures before "stickiness limits" are encountered. In other words, it has been surprisingly discovered that adding isobutane to a propane-based condensing agent mixture lowers the total reactor pressure required to achieve increased production rates.

[0032] In certain embodiments, the process comprises contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising propane and isobutane under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer; wherein the production rate of the polyolefin polymer is at least 5% greater than the same process polymerizing with a condensing agent consisting essentially of isopentane. As used herein, "the same process" shall refer to any gas phase process producing similar polymer products using comparable equipment. However, it shall not exclude the presence of or omission of other variances, steps, elements, equipment, or materials, whether or not, specifically mentioned. As used herein, "production rate" shall refer to a mass of polymer produced per unit of time with units, for example, lb/hr, metric tons/hr (T/hr) or kg/hr. As used herein, a "consisting essentially of isopentane" in the condensing agent shall refer to > 90 mol%, for example, > 92, > 94 , > 95, > 96, > 98 mol%, based upon the total moles of condensing agent in the reactor.

[0033] In some embodiments, the production rate is at least 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, or 70% greater than the same process polymerizing with a condensing agent consisting essentially of isopentane.

[0034] When expressed on a per unit of reactor volume basis, the production rate is called the "space time yield". As used herein, "space time yield" refers to production rate expressed on a per unit of reactor volume basis with units, for example, lb/hr/ft3 (equivalent to units lb/ft3/hr) or kg/hr/m3. In some embodiments, the polyolefin density (ASTM D1505) is < 0.912 g/cm3 and the space time yield is > 14.0 lb/ft /hr (224. kg/m /hr). For example, the density is≤ 0.912 g/cm3 and the space time yield is > 14.5, > 15, > 16, > 17, > 18, > 19, > 20, or > 21 lb/ft /hr (> 232, > 240, > 256, > 272, > 288, > 304, > 320, or > 336 kg/m /hr). As used herein, polyolefin or polymer density is measured by ASTM D1505.

[0035] In some embodiments, the space time yield is > 17.5 lb/ft /hr (280. kg/m /hr). For example, the space time yield is > 18, > 19, > 20, > 21, or > 22 lb/ft /hr (> 288, > 304, > 320, > 336, or > 352 kg/m /hr).

[0036] It has additionally been discovered that using propane and isobutane in condensing agent broaden the operating window allowing lower density polymers to be produced at rates similar to rates when producing higher density polymers. Similarly, using propane and isobutane as condensing agent allows higher melt index (MI) polymers to be produced at rates similar to rates when producing lower MI polymers. Notwithstanding this advantageous result, it has been observed that adding isobutane to a propane-based condensing agent results in some narrowing of the operating window over propane-only condensing agent. Nevertheless, such relatively equivalent production rates (i.e., such broad operating window) were not previously achievable with conventional condensing agents such as isopentane. Additionally, these equivalent rates (i.e., broader than isopentane but slightly narrower than propane-only operating window) are achievable at lower total reactor pressures than with propane-only condensing agent.

[0037] In some embodiments, the process using propane and isobutane condensing agents can have a production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having density < 0.912 g/cm3 that is > 80% of the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having a density > 0.918 g/cm3, density measured by ASTM D1505. For example, the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having density < 0.912 g/cm3 can be > 85, > 90%, > 92%, > 94% of the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having a density > 0.918 g/cm3.

Catalyst Components and Catalyst Systems

[0038] All polymerization catalysts including conventional-type transition metal catalysts are suitable for use in the polymerization processes of the invention. The following is a non- limiting discussion of the various polymerization catalysts useful in the process of the invention. All numbers and references to the Periodic Table of Elements are based on the new notation as set out in Chemical and Engineering News, 63(5), 27 (1985), unless otherwise specified.

[0039] In the description herein, the transition metal compound may be described as a catalyst precursor, a transition metal catalyst, a polymerization catalyst, or a catalyst compound, and these terms are used interchangeably. The term activator is used interchangeably with the term co-catalyst. As used herein, "at least one catalyst system" refers to a combination comprising a catalyst compound and an activator capable of polymerizing monomers.

Conventional Catalysts

[0040] Conventional catalysts generally known in the art refer to Ziegler Natta catalysts or Phillips-type chromium catalysts. Examples of conventional-type transition metal catalysts are discussed in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,115,639; 4,077,904; 4,482,687; 4,564,605; 4,721,763; 4,879,359; and 4,960,741. The conventional catalyst compounds that may be used in the present invention include transition metal compounds from Groups 3 to 10, preferably 4 to 6 of the Periodic Table of Elements.

[0041] These conventional-type transition metal catalysts may be represented by the formula:

Figure imgf000009_0001

where M is a metal from Groups 3 to 10, preferably Group 4, more preferably titanium; R is a halogen or a hydrocarbyloxy group; and x is the valence of the metal M, preferably x is 1, 2, 3 or 4, more preferably x is 4. Non-limiting examples of R include alkoxy, phenoxy, bromide, chloride and fluoride. Non-limiting examples of conventional-type transition metal catalysts where M is titanium include TiCh, TiCh, TiBn, Ti(OC2H5)3Cl, Ti(OC2H5)Cl3, Ti(OC4H9)3Cl, Ti(OC3H7)2Cl2, Ti(OC2H5)2Br2, TiCh. ½AlCh and Ti(OCi2H25)Cl3.

[0042] Conventional chrome catalysts, often referred to as Phillips-type catalysts, may include Cr03, chromocene, silyl chromate, chromyl chloride (CrC Ck), chromium-2-ethyl- hexanoate, chromium acetylacetonate (Cr(AcAc)3). Non-limiting examples are disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 2,285,721 ; 3,242,099; and 3,231,550.

[0043] For optimization, many conventional catalysts require at least one cocatalyst. A detailed discussion of cocatalysts may be found in U.S. Patent No. 7,858,719, Col. 6, line 46, bridging Col. 7, line 45.

Metallocene Catalysts

[0044] Polymerization catalysts useful in embodiments of the invention include one or more metallocene compounds (also referred to herein as metallocenes or metallocene catalysts). Metallocene catalysts are generally described as containing one or more ligand(s) and one or more leaving group(s) bonded to at least one metal atom, optionally with at least one bridging group. The ligands are generally represented by one or more open, acyclic, or fused ring(s) or ring system(s) or a combination thereof. These ligands, preferably the ring(s) or ring system(s) are typically composed of one or more atoms selected from Groups 13 to 16 atoms of the Periodic Table of Elements; preferably, the atoms are selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, phosphorous, germanium, boron and aluminum or a combination thereof. Most preferably, the ring(s) or ring system(s) are composed of carbon atoms such as, but not limited to, those cyclopentadienyl ligands or cyclopentadienyl-type ligand structures or other similar functioning ligand structures such as a pentadiene, a cyclooctatetraendiyl, or an imide ligand. The metal atom is preferably selected from Groups 3 through 15 and the lanthanide or actinide series of the Periodic Table of Elements. Preferably, the metal is a transition metal from Groups 4 through 12, more preferably Groups 4, 5 and 6, and most preferably the transition metal is from Group 4.

[0045] Exemplary metallocene catalysts and catalyst systems are described in for example, U.S. Patent Nos. 4,530,914; 4,871,705; 4,937,299; 5,017,714; 5,055,438; 5,096,867; 5,120,867; 5,124,418; 5,198,401; 5,210,352; 5,229,478; 5,264,405; 5,278,264; 5,278,119; 5,304,614; 5,324,800; 5,347,025; 5,350,723; 5,384,299; 5,391,790; 5,391,789; 5,399,636; 5,408,017; 5,491,207; 5,455,366; 5,534,473; 5,539,124; 5,554,775; 5,621,126; 5,684,098; 5,693,730; 5,698,634; 5,710,297; 5,712,354; 5,714,427; 5,714,555; 5,728,641 ; 5,728,839; 5,753,577; 5,767,209; 5,770,753; 5,770,664; EP-A-0 591 756; EP-A-0 520-732; EP-A-0 420 436; EP-B1 0 485 822; EP-B1 0 485 823; EP-A2-0 743 324; EP-B1 0 518 092; WO 91/04257; WO 92/00333; WO 93/08221; WO 93/08199; WO 94/01471; WO 96/20233; WO 97/15582; WO 97/19959; WO 97/46567; WO 98/01455; WO 98/06759; and WO 98/011144.

Mixed Catalysts

[0046] In a class of embodiments of the invention, the at least one catalyst system may comprise a mixed catalyst, i.e., two or more of the same or different types of catalysts, such as the ones described above. For example, a metallocene catalyst may be combined with one or more of a conventional catalysts or advanced catalysts known in the art. An example of such catalyst is PRODIGY™ Bimodal Catalyst available from Univation Technologies, LLC, Houston, TX.

Activator and Activation Methods

[0047] The above described polymerization catalysts, particularly, metallocene catalysts, are typically activated in various ways to yield polymerization catalysts having a vacant coordination site that will coordinate, insert, and polymerize olefin(s).

[0048] As used herein, the term "activator" refers to any compound that can activate any one of the polymerization catalyst compounds described herein by converting the neutral polymerization catalyst compound to a catalytically active catalyst cation compound. Non- limiting activators, for example, include alumoxanes, aluminum alkyls, ionizing activators, which may be neutral or ionic, and conventional-type cocatalysts. A detailed discussion of activators and activation methods may be found in U.S. Patent No. 7,858,719, Col. 14, line 21, bridging Col. 17, line 30.

Method for Supporting

[0049] The above described catalysts and catalyst systems may be combined with one or more support materials or carriers using one of the support methods well known in the art. In several classes of embodiments of the invention, the at least one catalyst system is in a supported form.

[0050] As used herein, the terms "support" or "carrier" are used interchangeably and are any porous or non-porous support material, preferably, a porous support material, for example, talc, inorganic oxides and inorganic chlorides, for example silica or alumina. Other carriers include resinous support materials such as polystyrene, a functionalized or crosslinked organic supports, such as polystyrene divinyl benzene poly olefins or polymeric compounds, or any other organic or inorganic support material and the like, or mixtures thereof.

[0051] The preferred carriers are inorganic oxides that include those Group 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, or 14 metal oxides. The preferred supports include silica, alumina, silica-alumina, magnesium chloride, and mixtures thereof. Other useful supports include magnesia, titania, zirconia, montmorillonite and the like. Also, combinations of these support materials may be used, for example, silica-chromium and silica-titania.

[0052] Examples of supported metallocene catalyst systems are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,701,432; 4,808,561; 4,912,075; 4,925,821; 4,937,217; 5,008,228; 5,238,892; 5,240,894; 5,332,706; 5,346,925; 5,422,325; 5,466,649; 5,466,766; 5,468,702; 5,529,965: 5,554,704; 5,629,253; 5,639,835; 5,625,015; 5,643,847; 5,648,310; 5,665,665; 5,698,487; 5,714,424; 5,723,400; 5,723,402; 5,731,261; 5,743,202; 5,759,940; 5,767,032; 5,688,880; 5,770,755; and 5,770,664; WO 95/32995; WO 95/14044; WO 96/06187; WO 96/11960; and WO 96/00243.

[0053] Examples of supported conventional catalyst systems are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,894,424; 4,376,062; 4,395,359; 4,379,759; 4,405,495; 4,540,758; and 5,096,869. Polymerization Process

[0054] Embodiments of the at least one catalyst system described above are suitable for use in any gas phase polymerization process, including fluidized bed or stirred bed processes. Particularly preferred is a gas phase polymerization process in which one or more condensable agent as described below is utilized.

[0055] Typically in a gas phase polymerization process, a continuous cycle is employed where in one part of the cycle of a reactor system, a cycling gas stream, otherwise known as a recycle stream or fluidizing medium, is heated in the reactor by the heat of polymerization. This heat is removed from the recycle composition in another part of the cycle by a cooling system external to the reactor. Generally, in a gas fluidized bed process for producing polymers, a gaseous stream containing one or more monomers is continuously cycled through a fluidized bed in the presence of at least one catalyst system under polymerizable conditions. As used herein, "polymerizable conditions" refers to any and all process conditions and any and all equipment necessary and suitable to polymerize olefins into polyolefins. In a preferred class of embodiments of the invention, a condensable agent as described below, is introduced to the process for purposes of increasing the cooling capacity of the recycle stream. The purposeful introduction of a condensable agent with the recycle stream temperature below the recycle stream dew point into a gas phase process is referred to as a "condensed mode process" discussed in greater detail below. The gaseous stream is withdrawn from the fluidized bed and recycled back into the reactor. Simultaneously, polymer product is withdrawn from the reactor and fresh reactants including monomers are added to the reactor. See, for example, U.S. Patent Nos. 4,543,399; 4,588,790; 5,028,670; 5,317,036; 5,352,749; 5,405,922; 5,436,304; 5,453,471; 5,462,999; 5,616,661 ; and 5,668,228, and also the Background section of this Application.

Condensing Agent(s)

[0056] Condensing agents or fluids generally include hydrocarbons having little to no solvent power regarding the polymer product(s). Suitable condensing agents include C3-C8 hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof, preferably C3-C6 hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof, including linear, branched, cyclic, substituted hydrocarbons, as well as their respective isomers. In all embodiments of the invention, the condensing agent comprises propane.

[0057] In a class of embodiments of the invention, propane may be used with other condensing agents, for example, other C4-C8 condensing agents or mixtures thereof as described above. In particular, the condensing agent may comprise a mixture of propane and at least another C4-C8 condensing agent of the chemical formula CnH2n+2, where n is 4 to 8, e.g., n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpropane, n-hexane, isohexane, n-heptane, n-octane, or mixtures of two or more thereof. In an embodiment of the invention, the condensing agents comprise or consist essentially of propane and isobutane. In other embodiments, the condensing agent comprises propane and butane in combination with at least one other condensing agent.

Condensed Mode Process

[0058] The condensing agent may be used in a gas phase polymerization process or simply a gas phase process. The gas phase process is operated in a condensed mode where a condensing agent as described above is introduced to the process at a temperature below the dew point of the gas to increase the cooling capacity of the recycle stream. The gas phase process is particularly well-suited for polymerizing one or more olefin(s), preferably at least one of which is ethylene or propylene, in a fluidized bed reactor, the process operating in a condensed mode in which a liquid and a gas are introduced to the fluidized bed reactor having a fluidizing medium or a stirred bed reactor having a medium, wherein the level of condensable fluid, is greater than 5 weight percent, preferably, greater than 10 weight percent, or greater than 15 weight percent or greater than 20 weight percent, more preferably greater than 25 weight percent, based on the total weight of the liquid and gas entering the reactor. For further details of a condensed mode process see, for example, U.S. Patent No. 5,436,304.

[0059] In one preferred embodiment of the invention, the invention is directed to a process, preferably a continuous process, for polymerizing monomer(s) in a reactor, said process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a recycle stream into the reactor, the recycle stream comprising one or more monomer(s); (b) introducing a polymerization catalyst and a condensable fluid into the reactor; (c) withdrawing the recycle stream from the reactor; (d) cooling the recycle stream to form a gas phase and a liquid phase; (e) reintroducing the gas phase and the liquid phase into the reactor; (f) introducing into the reactor additional monomer(s) to replace the monomer(s) polymerized; and (g) withdrawing a polymer product from the reactor. In an embodiment, the condensable fluid is introduced in amounts greater than 10 weight percent or greater than 15 weight percent or greater than 20 weight percent, preferably greater than 25 weight percent, based on the total weight of fluidizing medium being reintroduced into the reactor.

Reactor Conditions

[0060] The reactor pressure in any of the gas phase processes described in the above embodiments vary from about 100 psig (0.69 barg) to about 500 psig (34.5 barg), preferably, in the range of from about 290 psig (20 barg) to about 420 psig (29 barg), more preferably, from about 290 psig (20 barg) to about 377 psig (26 barg). In preferred embodiments, the reactor pressure is in the range from about 290 psig (20 barg) to about 362 psig (25 barg). In most preferred embodiments, the reactor pressure is in the range from about 333 psig (23 barg) to about 362 psig (25 barg).

[0061] The reactor temperature in any of the gas phase processes described in the above embodiments vary from about 30°C to about 120°C, preferably from about 60°C to about 115°C, more preferably in the range of from about 70°C to 110°C, and most preferably in the range of from about 70°C to about 100°C. In another embodiment, the polymerization temperature is above ambient temperature (23°C), preferably above 30°C, preferably above 50°C, preferably above 70°C.

[0062] In several classes of embodiments of the invention, the process produces greater than 500 lbs of polymer per hour (227 kg/hr) to about 200,000 lbs/hr (90,900 kg/hr) or higher of polymer, preferably greater than 1000 lbs/hr (455 kg/hr), more preferably greater than 10,000 lbs/hr (4540 kg/hr), even more preferably greater than 25,000 lbs/hr (11,300 kg/hr), still more preferably greater than 35,000 lbs/hr (15,900 kg/hr), still even more preferably greater than 100,000 lbs/hr (45,500 kg/hr), and most preferably greater than 65,000 lbs/hr (29,000 kg/hr) to greater than 200,000 lbs/hr (90,700 kg/hr).

Monomers and Polymers

[0063] Polymers produced are olefin polymers or "polyolefins". As used herein, "olefin polymers" or "polyolefin" refers to at least 75 mol% of the polymer is derived from hydrocarbon monomers, preferably at least 80 mol%, preferably at least 85 mol%, preferably at least 90 mol%, preferably at least 95 mol%, and preferably at least 99 mol%. Hydrocarbon monomers are monomers made up of only carbon and hydrogen. For example, the monomers to be polymerized are aliphatic or alicyclic hydrocarbons, (as defined under "Hydrocarbon" in Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 13th edition, R. J. Lewis ed., John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1997). In another embodiment of the invention, the monomers to be polymerized are linear or branched alpha-olefins, preferably d to C40 linear or branched alpha-olefins, preferably C2 to C20 linear or branched alpha-olefins, e.g., ethylene, propylene, butene, pentene, hexene, heptene, octene, nonene, decene, undecene, dodecene, or mixtures thereof. Well-suited monomers include two or more olefin monomers of ethylene, propylene, butene- 1, pentene- 1, 4-methyl-pentene-l, hexene- 1, heptene- 1, octene- 1, decene- 1, and mixtures thereof.

[0064] Other monomers useful in the process of the invention include ethylenically unsaturated monomers, diolefins having 4 to 18 carbon atoms, conjugated or nonconjugated dienes, polyenes, vinyl monomers and cyclic olefins. Non-limiting monomers useful in the invention include butadiene, norbornene, norbornadiene, isobutylene, vinylbenzocyclobutane, ethylidene norbornene, isoprene, dicyclopentadiene and cyclopentene.

[0065] In another embodiment of the invention, ethylene or propylene is polymerized with at least two different comonomers, optionally, one of which may be a diene, to form a terpolymer.

[0066] The polymers produced by the process of the invention are useful in making a wide variety of products and useful in many end-use applications. The polymers produced by the process of the invention include low density polyethylenes, linear low density polyethylenes, medium density polyethylene, and high density polyethylenes.

[0067] The polymers produced, typically polyethylene polymers, may have a ASTM D1505 density in the range of from 0.860 g/cc to 0.970 g/cc, preferably in the range of from 0.880 g/cc to 0.965 g/cc, more preferably in the range of from 0.905 g/cc to 0.940 g/cc, even more preferably in the range of from 0.905 g/cc to 0.920 g/cc, yet even more preferably in the range from 0.910 g/cc to 0.918 g/cc, and most preferably greater than 0.905 g/cc.

[0068] In one embodiment, the polymers produced by the process of the invention typically have a molecular weight distribution, a weight average molecular weight to number average molecular weight (Mw/Mn) of about 1.5 to about 30, particularly about 2 to about 15, more preferably about 2 to about 10, even more preferably about 2.2 to less than about 8, and most preferably from about 2.5 to about 8. The ratio of Mw/Mn is measured by gel permeation chromatography techniques well known in the art.

[0069] In several classes of embodiments of the invention, the polyethylene polymers typically have a narrow or broad composition distribution as measured by Composition Distribution Breadth Index (CDBI). Further details of determining the CDBI of a copolymer are known to those skilled in the art. See, for example, WO 93/03093. CDBI's may be generally in the range of greater than 50% to 99%, preferably in the range of 55% to 85%, and more preferably 60% to 80%, even more preferably greater than 60%, still even more preferably greater than 65%. Alternatively, CDBI's may be generally less than 50%, more preferably less than 40%, and most preferably less than 30%.

[0070] Polyethylene polymers may have a melt index (MI) or (I2.i6) as measured by ASTM-D-1238-E in the range from 0.01 dg/min to 1000 dg/min, more preferably from about 0.01 dg/min to about 100 dg/min, even more preferably from about 0.1 dg/min to about 50 dg/min, and most preferably from about 0.1 dg/min to about 10 dg/min. The polyethylene polymers may have a melt index ratio (I21.6/I2.16 or for a shorthand "I21/I2") (measured by ASTM-D-1238-F) of from 10 to less than 25, more preferably from about 15 to less than 25. Further, in another embodiment, the polymers have a melt index ratio (I21/I2) of from preferably greater than 25, more preferably greater than 30, even more preferably greater than 40, still even more preferably greater than 50, and most preferably greater than 65. Alternatively, the polyethylene polymers may have a melt index ratio (I21/I2) in the range of from 15 to 40, preferably in the range of from about 20 to about 35, more preferably in the range of from about 22 to about 30, and most preferably in the range of from 24 to 27.

[0071] In yet other embodiments of the invention, propylene based polymers may be produced. These polymers include without limitation atactic polypropylene, isotactic polypropylene, and syndiotactic polypropylene. Other propylene polymers include propylene random, block or impact copolymers.

[0072] Polymers produced by the processes of the invention are useful in forming a variety of articles. Such articles include without limitation films, sheets, and fibers. The articles may be produced by extrusion and co-extrusion as well as blow molding, injection molding, and rotational molding. Films include blown or cast films formed by coextrusion or by lamination, shrink film, cling film, stretch film, sealing films, and oriented films. The films are useful in packaging, heavy duty bags, grocery sacks, food packaging, medical packaging, industrial liners, geo-membranes, etc. Fibers include melt spinning, solution spinning and melt blown fiber operations for use in woven or non-woven form to make filters, diaper fabrics, medical garments, geotextiles, etc. Extruded articles include medical tubing, wire and cable coatings, geomembranes, and pond liners. Molded articles include single and multi-layered constructions in the form of bottles, tanks, large hollow articles, rigid food containers, playground equipment, toys, etc.

Examples

[0073] It is to be understood that while the invention has been described in conjunction with the specific embodiments thereof, the foregoing description is intended to illustrate and not limit the scope of the invention. Other aspects, advantages and modifications will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains.

[0074] Therefore, the following examples are put forth so as to provide those skilled in the art with a complete disclosure and description and are not intended to limit the scope of that which the inventors regard as their invention.

[0075] These examples model reactor operation that will use a variety of ICAs. Comparative examples CI and C2 utilize conventional isopentane as a condensing agent whereas examples 1-7 and 8-14 utilize propane and isobutane blends. Modelling was done using methods shown in U. S. Patent No. 7,683,140, Col. 62, row 48 bridging Col. 69, row 51. These examples use the same physical property sources as the aforementioned patent. These examples also employ the same exemplary calculation as used in U.S. Patent No. 7,683,140 (see Table 3 in Col. 69). The examples demonstrate the ΔΜΙΤ. Table 1 shows the full set of solubility parameters used in these examples (Chemical Properties Handbook, 1999).

TABLE 1 : Solubility Parameters ((cal/cm3)1/2)

Figure imgf000017_0001

[0076] Table 2 defines the reactor conditions for all examples.

TABLE 2: Reactor Conditions

Figure imgf000017_0002

[0077] Once cycle gas concentrations are fixed, often based on reaching a target value for ΔΜΙΤ, the heat removal capacity of the cycle gas loop is calculated. For illustrative purposes, the reactor temperature remains fixed at 80 or 85°C and the cycle gas temperature entering the reactor is fixed at a constant value of 40°C. These are typical values for a commercial plant, which uses cooling water to remove heat of polymerization. Calculations are based upon Soave-Redlich-Kwong thermodynamic properties. Example calculations are done based on fixed volumetric flowrate at reactor temperature, because commercial reactors are operated with this method to control particle carryover. Results of these calculations are illustrated in Tables 3(a) and 3(b). TABLE 3(a)

Example CI 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

MI (g/10 min) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Density (g/crrf) 0.918 0.918 0.918 0.918 0.918 0.918 0.918 0.918

Nitrogen (mol%) 14.36 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Hydrogen (mol%) 0.0186 0.0155 0.0155 0.0155 0.0155 0.0155 0.0155 0.0155

Ethylene (mol%) 67.25 56.04 56.04 56.04 56.04 56.04 56.04 56.04

1-Hexene (mol%) 1.350 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.125

Isopentane (mol%) 15

n-Hexane (mol%) 2.014 1.675 1.675 1.675 1.675 1.675 1.675 1.675

Isobutane (moP/o) 10 12 14 16 18 20 22

Propane (mol%) 21.14 19.14 17.14 15.14 13.14 11.14 9.14

Condensed (wt%) 24.01 8.70 9.95 11.30 12.75 14.29 15.92 17.61

Dew Point T (°C) 77.06 61.38 62.38 63.36 64.34 65.30 66.25 67.19

ADew Point T (°C) 7.94 23.62 22.62 21.64 20.66 19.70 18.75 17.81

Rate (T/hr) 50.90 43.51 45.81 48.30 50.97 53.81 56.83 59.99

STY (kg/m3/hr) 236.6 202.3 213.0 224.5 236.9 250.2 264.2 278.9

ΔΜΙΤ (°C) 6.11 3.89 4.10 4.32 4.53 4.74 4.95 5.15

TABLE 3(b)

Example C2 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

MI (g/10 min) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Density (g/crrf ) 0.912 0.912 0.912 0.912 0.912 0.912 0.912 0.912

Nitrogen (mol%) 22.96 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Hydrogen (mol%) 0.0195 0.0129 0.0129 0.0129 0.0129 0.0129 0.0129 0.0129

Ethylene (mol%) 60.74 46.70 46.70 46.70 46.70 46.70 46.70 46.70

1-Hexene (mol%) 1.659 0.937 0.937 0.937 0.937 0.937 0.937 0.937

Isopentane (mol%) 12.13

n-Hexane (mol%) 2.499 2.083 2.083 2.083 2.083 2.083 2.083 2.083

Isobutane (moP/o) 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

Propane (mol%) 27.26 25.26 23.26 21.26 19.26 17.26 15.26

Condensed (wt%) 20.68 9.97 11.24 12.62 14.09 15.64 17.28 18.97

Dew Point T (°C) 76.20 63.36 64.31 65.26 66.20 67.12 68.04 68.95

ADew Point T (°C) 3.80 16.64 15.69 14.74 13.80 12.88 11.96 11.05

Rate (T/hr) 41.76 41.94 44.33 46.90 49.65 52.58 55.67 58.91

STY (kg/ni3/hr) 194.1 195.0 206.1 218.0 230.8 244.5 258.8 273.9

ΔΜΙΤ (°C) 6.65 5.19 5.40 5.62 5.83 6.04 6.24 6.45

[0078] The production rate increased with use of propane and isobutane as condensing agents in examples 4-7 compared to use of isopentane in corresponding comparative example CI. Likewise, the production rate increased in inventive examples 8-14 over isopentane condensing agent used in corresponding comparative example C2. Advantageously, the production rate for density 0.918 in example 7 was 18% higher than the production rate for density 0.918 in example CI and the production rate for density 0.912 in example 14 was 42% higher than the production rate for density 0.912 in example 3, both examples 7 and 14 using propane and isobutane as condensing agents. Also advantageously, the ΔΜΙΤ for example 7 and 14 were lower when compared to use of isopentane in corresponding examples C I and C2. Particularly advantageous, the reactor pressure for these increased production rate examples was relatively low at 20 barg.

[0079] The phrases, unless otherwise specified, "consists essentially of and "consisting essentially of do not exclude the presence of other steps, elements, or materials, whether or not, specifically mentioned in this specification, so long as such steps, elements, or materials, do not affect the basic and novel characteristics of the invention, additionally, they do not exclude impurities and variances normally associated with the elements and materials used.

[0080] For the sake of brevity, only certain ranges are explicitly disclosed herein. However, ranges from any lower limit may be combined with any upper limit to recite a range not explicitly recited, as well as, ranges from any lower limit may be combined with any other lower limit to recite a range not explicitly recited, in the same way, ranges from any upper limit may be combined with any other upper limit to recite a range not explicitly recited. Additionally, within a range includes every point or individual value between its end points, even though not explicitly recited. Thus, every point or individual value may serve as its own lower or upper limit combined with any other point or individual value or any other lower or upper limit, to recite a range not explicitly recited.

[0081] All priority documents are herein fully incorporated by reference for all jurisdictions in which such incorporation is permitted and to the extent such disclosure is consistent with the description of the present invention. Further, all documents and references cited herein, including testing procedures, publications, patents, journal articles, etc., are herein fully incorporated by reference for all jurisdictions in which such incorporation is permitted and to the extent such disclosure is consistent with the description of the present invention.

[0082] While the invention has been described with respect to a number of embodiments and examples, those skilled in the art, having benefit of this disclosure, will appreciate that other embodiments can be devised which do not depart from the scope and spirit of the invention as disclosed herein.

Claims

CLAIMS What is claimed is:
1. A polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent, wherein a majority of the condensing agent comprises propane and isobutane, under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer.
2. A polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising from 1 to 99 mol% isobutane and from 99 to 1 mol% propane, under polymerizable conditions to produce a polyolefin polymer.
3. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the production rate of the polyolefin polymer is at least 5% greater than the same process polymerizing with a condensing agent consisting essentially of isopentane.
4. The process of any one of preceding claims, wherein the polyolefin density (ASTM D1505) is≤ 0.912 g/cm3 and the space time yield is > 14.0 lb/ft /hr (224. kg/m /hr).
5. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the space time yield is > 17.5 lb/ft /hr (280. kg/m /hr).
6. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having density < 0.912 g/cm3 is > 80% of the production rate when producing a polyolefin polymer having a density > 0.918 g/cm3, density measured by ASTM D1505.
7. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the reactor pressure is from 20 to 29 barg.
8. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the reactor pressure is from 20 to 26 barg.
9. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the reactor pressure is from 20 to 25 barg.
10. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the molar ratio of isobutane to propane in the condensing agent is from 0.1 to 10.
11. The process of any one of claims 1-9, wherein the condensing agent comprises > 10 mol% isobutane and < 90 mol% propane.
12. The process of any one of claims 1-9, wherein the condensing agent comprises > 10 mol% propane and < 90 mol% isobutane.
13. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the condensing agent further comprises at least one additional C4-C8 condensing agent.
14. The process of claim 12, wherein the at least one additional C4-C8 condensing agent comprises n-butane, n-pentane, isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpropane, n-hexane, isohexane, n- heptane, n-octane, or mixtures thereof.
15. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the condensing agent consists essentially of propane and butane.
16. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polyolefin polymer is a copolymer of ethylene and C3-C12 alpha-olefin.
17. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polyolefin polymer is a copolymer of ethylene and C4-C8 alpha-olefin.
18. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polyolefin polymer has a density from 0.905 g/cm3 to 0.940 g/cm3.
19. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polyolefin polymer has a melt index (h.ie) (ASTM D1238-E) from 0.25 dg/min to 50 dg/min.
20. The process of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the at least one catalyst system comprises a Ziegler-Natta, chromium, chromium oxide, AlCh, cobalt, iron, palladium, vanadium, metallocene catalyst, group IV organometallic complex catalyst, or mixtures thereof.
21. A gas phase polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent, wherein a majority of the condensing agent comprises propane and isobutane, under gas phase polymerizable conditions to produce a poly olefin polymer.
22. A gas phase polymerization process, the process comprising contacting one or more monomers, at least one catalyst system, and a condensing agent comprising from 1 to 99 mol% isobutane and from 99 to 1 mol% propane, under gas phase polymerizable conditions to produce a poly olefin polymer.
PCT/US2017/050431 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 Polymerization process WO2018063765A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201662400261P true 2016-09-27 2016-09-27
US62/400,261 2016-09-27
EP16198127.9 2016-11-10
EP16198127 2016-11-10

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CN201780070639.9A CN110023346A (en) 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 Polymerization
US16/336,992 US20190218319A1 (en) 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 Polymerization Process
EP17767974.3A EP3519446A1 (en) 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 Polymerization process
BR112019005988A BR112019005988A2 (en) 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 polymerization process

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2018063765A1 true WO2018063765A1 (en) 2018-04-05

Family

ID=57286308

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2017/050431 WO2018063765A1 (en) 2016-09-27 2017-09-07 Polymerization process

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2018063765A1 (en)

Citations (135)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2285721A (en) 1941-04-10 1942-06-09 Karp Morris Vegetable grater
US3231550A (en) 1964-06-04 1966-01-25 Union Carbide Corp Olefin polymerization
US3242099A (en) 1964-03-27 1966-03-22 Union Carbide Corp Olefin polymerization catalysts
US4077904A (en) 1976-06-29 1978-03-07 Union Carbide Corporation Olefin polymerization process and catalyst therefor
US4115639A (en) 1971-06-24 1978-09-19 Union Carbide Corporation Ethylene polymerization with ether modified catalyst
US4376062A (en) 1979-11-28 1983-03-08 Union Carbide Corporation Spheroidal polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene polymerization
US4379759A (en) 1979-02-16 1983-04-12 Union Carbide Corporation Impregnated polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene copolymerization
US4395359A (en) 1979-02-27 1983-07-26 Union Carbide Corporation Polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene homopolymerization
US4405495A (en) 1980-06-30 1983-09-20 Union Carbide Corporation Catalyst impregnated on fine silica, process for preparing, and use for ethylene polymerization
US4482687A (en) 1979-10-26 1984-11-13 Union Carbide Corporation Preparation of low-density ethylene copolymers in fluid bed reactor
US4530914A (en) 1983-06-06 1985-07-23 Exxon Research & Engineering Co. Process and catalyst for producing polyethylene having a broad molecular weight distribution
US4540758A (en) 1973-08-03 1985-09-10 Union Carbide Corporation Polymerization of ethylene with supported π allyl chromium complexes
US4543399A (en) 1982-03-24 1985-09-24 Union Carbide Corporation Fluidized bed reaction systems
US4564605A (en) 1983-11-23 1986-01-14 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst and process for polymerizing olefins
US4588790A (en) 1982-03-24 1986-05-13 Union Carbide Corporation Method for fluidized bed polymerization
US4701432A (en) 1985-11-15 1987-10-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
US4721763A (en) 1982-06-24 1988-01-26 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for the polymerization and copolymerization of alpha-olefins in fluidized bed
US4808561A (en) 1985-06-21 1989-02-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
US4871705A (en) 1988-06-16 1989-10-03 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for production of a high molecular weight ethylene a-olefin elastomer with a metallocene alumoxane catalyst
US4879359A (en) 1986-12-29 1989-11-07 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for polymerising ethylene using a chromium oxide catalyst
US4894424A (en) 1985-10-11 1990-01-16 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation of olefins using modified ziegler-natta catalyst
US4912075A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-03-27 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for preparing a supported metallocene-alumoxane catalyst for gas phase polymerization
US4925821A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-05-15 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for utilizing triethyaluminum to prepare an alumoxane support for an active metallocene catalyst
US4937217A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-06-26 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for utilizing triethylaluminum to prepare an alumoxane support for an active metallocene catalyst
US4937299A (en) 1983-06-06 1990-06-26 Exxon Research & Engineering Company Process and catalyst for producing reactor blend polyolefins
US4960741A (en) 1988-03-03 1990-10-02 Bp Chemicals Limited Ziegler-Natta catalyst
EP0420436A1 (en) 1989-09-13 1991-04-03 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Olefin polymerization catalysts
US5008228A (en) 1988-03-29 1991-04-16 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for preparing a silica gel supported metallocene-alumoxane catalyst
US5017714A (en) 1988-03-21 1991-05-21 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Silicon-bridged transition metal compounds
US5028670A (en) 1988-07-15 1991-07-02 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for the gas-phase polymerization of olefins in a fluidized-bed reactor
WO1992000333A2 (en) 1990-06-22 1992-01-09 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Aluminum-free monocyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts for olefin polymerization
US5096869A (en) 1990-12-21 1992-03-17 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation High activity vanadium-based catalyst
US5096867A (en) 1990-06-04 1992-03-17 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts
US5120867A (en) 1988-03-21 1992-06-09 Welborn Jr Howard C Silicon-bridged transition metal compounds
US5124418A (en) 1985-11-15 1992-06-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
EP0520732A1 (en) 1991-06-24 1992-12-30 The Dow Chemical Company Homogeneous olefin polymerization catalyst by ligand abstraction with lewis acids
WO1993003093A1 (en) 1991-07-18 1993-02-18 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Heat sealed article
US5198401A (en) 1987-01-30 1993-03-30 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Ionic metallocene catalyst compositions
WO1993008199A1 (en) 1991-10-15 1993-04-29 The Dow Chemical Company Preparation of metal coordination complex
WO1993008221A2 (en) 1991-10-15 1993-04-29 The Dow Chemical Company Elastic substantially linear olefin polymers
US5210352A (en) 1991-05-09 1993-05-11 Phillips Petroleum Company Fluorene compounds
US5229478A (en) 1988-06-16 1993-07-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for production of high molecular weight EPDM elastomers using a metallocene-alumoxane catalyst system
US5238892A (en) 1992-06-15 1993-08-24 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported catalyst for 1-olefin(s) (co)polymerization
US5240894A (en) 1992-05-18 1993-08-31 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making and using a supported metallocene catalyst system
US5264405A (en) 1989-09-13 1993-11-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl titanium metal compounds for ethylene-α-olefin-copolymer production catalysts
US5278119A (en) 1987-01-30 1994-01-11 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Catalysts, method of preparing these catalysts, and polymerization processes wherein these catalysts are used
US5278264A (en) 1991-08-26 1994-01-11 Hoechst Ag Process for the preparation of an olefin polymer
WO1994001471A1 (en) 1992-07-01 1994-01-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts
EP0591756A2 (en) 1992-09-22 1994-04-13 Idemitsu Kosan Company Limited Polymerization catalysts and process for producing polymers
US5304614A (en) 1991-10-15 1994-04-19 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for the preparation of an olefin polymer using metallocenes having specifically substituted indenyl ligands
US5317036A (en) 1992-10-16 1994-05-31 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Gas phase polymerization reactions utilizing soluble unsupported catalysts
US5324800A (en) 1983-06-06 1994-06-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process and catalyst for polyolefin density and molecular weight control
US5332706A (en) 1992-12-28 1994-07-26 Mobil Oil Corporation Process and a catalyst for preventing reactor fouling
US5347025A (en) 1992-09-09 1994-09-13 Tosoh Corporation Catalyst for polymerization of vinyl compound
US5346925A (en) 1992-11-10 1994-09-13 Mitsubishi Petrochemical Company Limited Method for producing α-olefin polymers
US5350723A (en) 1992-05-15 1994-09-27 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparation of monocyclopentadienyl metal complex compounds and method of use
US5352749A (en) 1992-03-19 1994-10-04 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
WO1994028032A1 (en) 1993-05-20 1994-12-08 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation process
WO1994028021A1 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-12-08 Medical University Of South Carolina Endometrial proteins, antigenic compositions and methods for detecting endometriosis
US5384299A (en) 1987-01-30 1995-01-24 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Ionic metallocene catalyst compositions
US5391789A (en) 1991-08-08 1995-02-21 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Bridged, chiral metallocenes, processes for their preparation and their use as catalysts
US5391790A (en) 1992-06-13 1995-02-21 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for the preparation of bridged, chiral metallocene catalysts of the bisindenyl type
EP0485823B1 (en) 1990-11-12 1995-03-08 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft 2-Substituted bisindenyl-metallocenes, process for their preparation and their use as catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
US5399636A (en) 1993-06-11 1995-03-21 Phillips Petroleum Company Metallocenes and processes therefor and therewith
US5405922A (en) 1993-04-26 1995-04-11 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5408017A (en) 1987-01-30 1995-04-18 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. High temperature polymerization process using ionic catalysts to produce polyolefins
WO1995014044A1 (en) 1993-11-19 1995-05-26 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5422325A (en) 1993-09-17 1995-06-06 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalysts, their production and use
US5436304A (en) 1992-03-19 1995-07-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5453471A (en) 1994-08-02 1995-09-26 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Gas phase polymerization process
US5455366A (en) 1991-11-30 1995-10-03 Hoechst Ag Metallocenes having benzo-fused indenyl derivatives as ligands, processes for their preparation and their use as catalysts
US5462999A (en) 1993-04-26 1995-10-31 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5466649A (en) 1993-10-15 1995-11-14 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5466766A (en) 1991-05-09 1995-11-14 Phillips Petroleum Company Metallocenes and processes therefor and therewith
US5468702A (en) 1994-07-07 1995-11-21 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making a catalyst system
WO1995032995A1 (en) 1994-05-26 1995-12-07 Montell Technology Company Bv Components and catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
WO1996000243A1 (en) 1994-06-24 1996-01-04 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5491207A (en) 1993-12-14 1996-02-13 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process of producing high molecular weight ethylene-α-olefin elastomers with an indenyl metallocene catalyst system
WO1996006187A1 (en) 1994-08-25 1996-02-29 The Solicitor For The Affairs Of Her Majesty's Treasury In Her Britannic Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern Ireland Nucleotide sequencing method
WO1996011960A1 (en) 1994-10-13 1996-04-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5529965A (en) 1994-10-28 1996-06-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
EP0485822B1 (en) 1990-11-12 1996-07-03 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for preparing high molecular weight polyolefines
WO1996020233A1 (en) 1994-12-23 1996-07-04 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparation of epoxy compounds
US5534473A (en) 1991-07-23 1996-07-09 Phillips Petroleum Company Catalyst systems for producing broad molecular weight polyolefin
US5539124A (en) 1994-12-19 1996-07-23 Occidental Chemical Corporation Polymerization catalysts based on transition metal complexes with ligands containing pyrrolyl ring
US5554775A (en) 1995-01-17 1996-09-10 Occidental Chemical Corporation Borabenzene based olefin polymerization catalysts
EP0743324A2 (en) 1995-05-16 1996-11-20 UNION CARBIDE CHEMICALS &amp; PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION Production of polyethylene using stereoisomeric metallocenes
US5616661A (en) 1995-03-31 1997-04-01 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Process for controlling particle growth during production of sticky polymers
US5621126A (en) 1987-01-30 1997-04-15 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl metal compounds for ethylene-α-olefin-copolymer production catalysts
US5625015A (en) 1994-11-23 1997-04-29 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making supported catalyst systems and catalyst systems therefrom
WO1997015582A1 (en) 1995-10-27 1997-05-01 The Dow Chemical Company Supportable biscyclopentadienyl metal complexes
US5629253A (en) 1994-04-26 1997-05-13 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
WO1997019959A1 (en) 1995-11-27 1997-06-05 The Dow Chemical Company Supported catalyst containing tethered cation forming activator
US5639835A (en) 1994-02-14 1997-06-17 Jejelowo; Moses Olukayode Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5643847A (en) 1994-08-03 1997-07-01 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported ionic catalyst composition
US5648310A (en) 1993-12-23 1997-07-15 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Spray dried, filled metallocene catalyst composition for use in polyolefin manufacture
US5684098A (en) 1995-06-07 1997-11-04 Industrial Technology Research Institute Process for the polymerization or copolymerization of ethylene using mao- or borate-free single site catalysts
US5688880A (en) 1995-12-11 1997-11-18 The Dow Chemical Company Readily supportable metal complexes
US5693730A (en) 1993-11-24 1997-12-02 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metallocenes, process for their preparation and their use as catalysts
WO1997046567A1 (en) 1996-06-06 1997-12-11 Bp Chemicals Limited Novel group iv metal complexes
US5698634A (en) 1993-07-16 1997-12-16 Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc. Process for preparing block copolymer of monoolefin
WO1998001455A1 (en) 1996-07-05 1998-01-15 Bayer Aktiengesellschaft Metallocene compounds
US5710297A (en) 1993-12-21 1998-01-20 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metallocenes, and their use as catalysts
US5712354A (en) 1996-07-10 1998-01-27 Mobil Oil Corporation Bridged metallocene compounds
US5714555A (en) 1992-09-04 1998-02-03 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst compositions and process for preparing polyolefins
US5714427A (en) 1991-05-27 1998-02-03 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Catalyst system comprising two zirconocenes and aluminoxane
US5714424A (en) 1995-01-09 1998-02-03 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Multi-component polyolefin catalysts
WO1998006759A1 (en) 1996-08-09 1998-02-19 California Institute Of Technology Group iv zwitterion ansa metallocene (zam) catalysts for alpha-olefin polymerization
US5723400A (en) 1995-02-21 1998-03-03 Montell North America Inc. Process for the preparation of a solid catalyst component suitable for the polymerization of olefins which includes at least two additions of an electron donor
US5723402A (en) 1996-05-30 1998-03-03 Pq Corporation Silicas with specific contents of cations as supports for olefin polymerization catalysts
EP0518092B1 (en) 1991-06-12 1998-03-11 BASF Aktiengesellschaft Catalyst system on carrier which may be isolated, for polymerisation of C2- to C10 1-alcenes
US5728839A (en) 1994-12-29 1998-03-17 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metal complexes with heterocycles carbenes
US5728641A (en) 1993-10-27 1998-03-17 Nippon Oil Company, Limited Catalyst component for the polymerization of olefins
WO1998011144A1 (en) 1996-09-12 1998-03-19 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation catalyst
US5731261A (en) 1995-06-01 1998-03-24 Enichem S.P.A. Process for the preparation of mixed porous silica-alumina oxides in a spherical form
US5743202A (en) 1993-10-04 1998-04-28 Atlanta Attachment Company Elastic waistband attachment system
US5753577A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-05-19 Tosoh Corporation Olefin polymerization catalyst based on organometallic complexes and process for production of polyolefins using the catalyst
US5759940A (en) 1994-03-29 1998-06-02 Montell Technology Company Bv Components and catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
US5767032A (en) 1993-12-03 1998-06-16 Borealis A/S Catalyst for olefin polymerization and a method for the manufacture thereof
US5767209A (en) 1993-01-19 1998-06-16 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst compositions and process for preparing polyolefins
US5770753A (en) 1992-06-27 1998-06-23 Targor Gmbh Metallocenes containing aryl-substituted indenyl derivatives as ligands, process for their preparation, and their use as catalysts
US5770755A (en) 1994-11-15 1998-06-23 Phillips Petroleum Company Process to prepare polymeric metallocenes
US5770664A (en) 1994-10-13 1998-06-23 Japan Polyolefins Co., Ltd. Catalyst component for producing polyolefin, catalyst for producing polyolefin comprising the catalyst component, and process for producing polyolefin in the presence of the catalyst
US6063877A (en) 1997-07-31 2000-05-16 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Control of gas phase polymerization reactions
WO2001049750A1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2001-07-12 Opp Química S.A. Process for the gas phase polymerization and copolymerization of olefin monomers
US6262192B1 (en) 1999-08-30 2001-07-17 China Petrochemical Corporation Introducing a condensing agent into a fluidized bed polymerization reactor operated in the condensing mode
US6391985B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2002-05-21 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation High condensing mode polyolefin production under turbulent conditions in a fluidized bed
US6759489B1 (en) * 2003-05-20 2004-07-06 Eastern Petrochemical Co. Fluidized bed methods for making polymers
US20050137364A1 (en) * 2003-12-23 2005-06-23 Univation Technologies, Llc Condensing mode operation of gas-phase polymerization reactor
US20050182207A1 (en) 2003-12-23 2005-08-18 Diwaker Singh Gas-phase process
US20050267268A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2005-12-01 Hendrickson Gregory G Method for operating a gas phase polymerization reactor
US20050267269A1 (en) * 2004-05-20 2005-12-01 Hagerty Robert O Polymerization process
US7683140B2 (en) 2004-05-20 2010-03-23 Univation Technologies, Llc Method for determining temperature value indicative of resin stickiness from data generated by polymerization reaction monitoring
US7696289B2 (en) 2006-05-12 2010-04-13 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Low molecular weight induced condensing agents
WO2011147539A1 (en) 2010-05-27 2011-12-01 Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (Sabic) Olefin gas phase polymerisation

Patent Citations (144)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2285721A (en) 1941-04-10 1942-06-09 Karp Morris Vegetable grater
US3242099A (en) 1964-03-27 1966-03-22 Union Carbide Corp Olefin polymerization catalysts
US3231550A (en) 1964-06-04 1966-01-25 Union Carbide Corp Olefin polymerization
US4115639A (en) 1971-06-24 1978-09-19 Union Carbide Corporation Ethylene polymerization with ether modified catalyst
US4540758A (en) 1973-08-03 1985-09-10 Union Carbide Corporation Polymerization of ethylene with supported π allyl chromium complexes
US4077904A (en) 1976-06-29 1978-03-07 Union Carbide Corporation Olefin polymerization process and catalyst therefor
US4379759A (en) 1979-02-16 1983-04-12 Union Carbide Corporation Impregnated polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene copolymerization
US4395359A (en) 1979-02-27 1983-07-26 Union Carbide Corporation Polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene homopolymerization
US4482687A (en) 1979-10-26 1984-11-13 Union Carbide Corporation Preparation of low-density ethylene copolymers in fluid bed reactor
US4376062A (en) 1979-11-28 1983-03-08 Union Carbide Corporation Spheroidal polymerization catalyst, process for preparing, and use for ethylene polymerization
US4405495A (en) 1980-06-30 1983-09-20 Union Carbide Corporation Catalyst impregnated on fine silica, process for preparing, and use for ethylene polymerization
US4588790A (en) 1982-03-24 1986-05-13 Union Carbide Corporation Method for fluidized bed polymerization
US4543399A (en) 1982-03-24 1985-09-24 Union Carbide Corporation Fluidized bed reaction systems
US4721763A (en) 1982-06-24 1988-01-26 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for the polymerization and copolymerization of alpha-olefins in fluidized bed
US5324800A (en) 1983-06-06 1994-06-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process and catalyst for polyolefin density and molecular weight control
US4937299A (en) 1983-06-06 1990-06-26 Exxon Research & Engineering Company Process and catalyst for producing reactor blend polyolefins
US4530914A (en) 1983-06-06 1985-07-23 Exxon Research & Engineering Co. Process and catalyst for producing polyethylene having a broad molecular weight distribution
US4564605A (en) 1983-11-23 1986-01-14 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst and process for polymerizing olefins
US4808561A (en) 1985-06-21 1989-02-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
US4894424A (en) 1985-10-11 1990-01-16 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation of olefins using modified ziegler-natta catalyst
US5124418A (en) 1985-11-15 1992-06-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
US4701432A (en) 1985-11-15 1987-10-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalyst
US4879359A (en) 1986-12-29 1989-11-07 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for polymerising ethylene using a chromium oxide catalyst
US5408017A (en) 1987-01-30 1995-04-18 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. High temperature polymerization process using ionic catalysts to produce polyolefins
US5384299A (en) 1987-01-30 1995-01-24 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Ionic metallocene catalyst compositions
US5198401A (en) 1987-01-30 1993-03-30 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Ionic metallocene catalyst compositions
US5278119A (en) 1987-01-30 1994-01-11 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Catalysts, method of preparing these catalysts, and polymerization processes wherein these catalysts are used
US5621126A (en) 1987-01-30 1997-04-15 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl metal compounds for ethylene-α-olefin-copolymer production catalysts
US4937217A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-06-26 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for utilizing triethylaluminum to prepare an alumoxane support for an active metallocene catalyst
US4925821A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-05-15 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for utilizing triethyaluminum to prepare an alumoxane support for an active metallocene catalyst
US4912075A (en) 1987-12-17 1990-03-27 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for preparing a supported metallocene-alumoxane catalyst for gas phase polymerization
US4960741A (en) 1988-03-03 1990-10-02 Bp Chemicals Limited Ziegler-Natta catalyst
US5017714A (en) 1988-03-21 1991-05-21 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Silicon-bridged transition metal compounds
US5120867A (en) 1988-03-21 1992-06-09 Welborn Jr Howard C Silicon-bridged transition metal compounds
US5008228A (en) 1988-03-29 1991-04-16 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for preparing a silica gel supported metallocene-alumoxane catalyst
US4871705A (en) 1988-06-16 1989-10-03 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for production of a high molecular weight ethylene a-olefin elastomer with a metallocene alumoxane catalyst
US5229478A (en) 1988-06-16 1993-07-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for production of high molecular weight EPDM elastomers using a metallocene-alumoxane catalyst system
US5028670A (en) 1988-07-15 1991-07-02 Bp Chemicals Limited Process for the gas-phase polymerization of olefins in a fluidized-bed reactor
WO1991004257A1 (en) 1989-09-13 1991-04-04 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts
EP0420436A1 (en) 1989-09-13 1991-04-03 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Olefin polymerization catalysts
US5055438A (en) 1989-09-13 1991-10-08 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Olefin polymerization catalysts
US5264405A (en) 1989-09-13 1993-11-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl titanium metal compounds for ethylene-α-olefin-copolymer production catalysts
US5096867A (en) 1990-06-04 1992-03-17 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Monocyclopentadienyl transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts
WO1992000333A2 (en) 1990-06-22 1992-01-09 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Aluminum-free monocyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts for olefin polymerization
EP0485822B1 (en) 1990-11-12 1996-07-03 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for preparing high molecular weight polyolefines
EP0485823B1 (en) 1990-11-12 1995-03-08 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft 2-Substituted bisindenyl-metallocenes, process for their preparation and their use as catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
US5096869A (en) 1990-12-21 1992-03-17 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation High activity vanadium-based catalyst
US5466766A (en) 1991-05-09 1995-11-14 Phillips Petroleum Company Metallocenes and processes therefor and therewith
US5210352A (en) 1991-05-09 1993-05-11 Phillips Petroleum Company Fluorene compounds
US5714427A (en) 1991-05-27 1998-02-03 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Catalyst system comprising two zirconocenes and aluminoxane
EP0518092B1 (en) 1991-06-12 1998-03-11 BASF Aktiengesellschaft Catalyst system on carrier which may be isolated, for polymerisation of C2- to C10 1-alcenes
EP0520732A1 (en) 1991-06-24 1992-12-30 The Dow Chemical Company Homogeneous olefin polymerization catalyst by ligand abstraction with lewis acids
WO1993003093A1 (en) 1991-07-18 1993-02-18 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Heat sealed article
US5534473A (en) 1991-07-23 1996-07-09 Phillips Petroleum Company Catalyst systems for producing broad molecular weight polyolefin
US5391789A (en) 1991-08-08 1995-02-21 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Bridged, chiral metallocenes, processes for their preparation and their use as catalysts
US5278264A (en) 1991-08-26 1994-01-11 Hoechst Ag Process for the preparation of an olefin polymer
WO1993008199A1 (en) 1991-10-15 1993-04-29 The Dow Chemical Company Preparation of metal coordination complex
WO1993008221A2 (en) 1991-10-15 1993-04-29 The Dow Chemical Company Elastic substantially linear olefin polymers
US5304614A (en) 1991-10-15 1994-04-19 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for the preparation of an olefin polymer using metallocenes having specifically substituted indenyl ligands
US5455366A (en) 1991-11-30 1995-10-03 Hoechst Ag Metallocenes having benzo-fused indenyl derivatives as ligands, processes for their preparation and their use as catalysts
US5436304A (en) 1992-03-19 1995-07-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5352749A (en) 1992-03-19 1994-10-04 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5350723A (en) 1992-05-15 1994-09-27 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparation of monocyclopentadienyl metal complex compounds and method of use
US5554704A (en) 1992-05-18 1996-09-10 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Controlled particle size polyolefins from silica supported prepolymerized matallocene catalyst
US5240894A (en) 1992-05-18 1993-08-31 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making and using a supported metallocene catalyst system
US5391790A (en) 1992-06-13 1995-02-21 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Process for the preparation of bridged, chiral metallocene catalysts of the bisindenyl type
US5238892A (en) 1992-06-15 1993-08-24 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported catalyst for 1-olefin(s) (co)polymerization
US5770753A (en) 1992-06-27 1998-06-23 Targor Gmbh Metallocenes containing aryl-substituted indenyl derivatives as ligands, process for their preparation, and their use as catalysts
WO1994001471A1 (en) 1992-07-01 1994-01-20 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Transition metal olefin polymerization catalysts
US5714555A (en) 1992-09-04 1998-02-03 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst compositions and process for preparing polyolefins
US5347025A (en) 1992-09-09 1994-09-13 Tosoh Corporation Catalyst for polymerization of vinyl compound
EP0591756A2 (en) 1992-09-22 1994-04-13 Idemitsu Kosan Company Limited Polymerization catalysts and process for producing polymers
US5317036A (en) 1992-10-16 1994-05-31 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Gas phase polymerization reactions utilizing soluble unsupported catalysts
US5346925A (en) 1992-11-10 1994-09-13 Mitsubishi Petrochemical Company Limited Method for producing α-olefin polymers
US5332706A (en) 1992-12-28 1994-07-26 Mobil Oil Corporation Process and a catalyst for preventing reactor fouling
US5767209A (en) 1993-01-19 1998-06-16 Bp Chemicals Limited Catalyst compositions and process for preparing polyolefins
US5462999A (en) 1993-04-26 1995-10-31 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5405922A (en) 1993-04-26 1995-04-11 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process for polymerizing monomers in fluidized beds
US5668228A (en) 1993-05-20 1997-09-16 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerization process
WO1994028032A1 (en) 1993-05-20 1994-12-08 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation process
WO1994028021A1 (en) 1993-05-28 1994-12-08 Medical University Of South Carolina Endometrial proteins, antigenic compositions and methods for detecting endometriosis
US5399636A (en) 1993-06-11 1995-03-21 Phillips Petroleum Company Metallocenes and processes therefor and therewith
US5698634A (en) 1993-07-16 1997-12-16 Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc. Process for preparing block copolymer of monoolefin
US5422325A (en) 1993-09-17 1995-06-06 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported polymerization catalysts, their production and use
US5743202A (en) 1993-10-04 1998-04-28 Atlanta Attachment Company Elastic waistband attachment system
US5466649A (en) 1993-10-15 1995-11-14 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5728641A (en) 1993-10-27 1998-03-17 Nippon Oil Company, Limited Catalyst component for the polymerization of olefins
WO1995014044A1 (en) 1993-11-19 1995-05-26 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5693730A (en) 1993-11-24 1997-12-02 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metallocenes, process for their preparation and their use as catalysts
US5767032A (en) 1993-12-03 1998-06-16 Borealis A/S Catalyst for olefin polymerization and a method for the manufacture thereof
US5491207A (en) 1993-12-14 1996-02-13 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Process of producing high molecular weight ethylene-α-olefin elastomers with an indenyl metallocene catalyst system
US5710297A (en) 1993-12-21 1998-01-20 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metallocenes, and their use as catalysts
US5648310A (en) 1993-12-23 1997-07-15 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Spray dried, filled metallocene catalyst composition for use in polyolefin manufacture
US5639835A (en) 1994-02-14 1997-06-17 Jejelowo; Moses Olukayode Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5759940A (en) 1994-03-29 1998-06-02 Montell Technology Company Bv Components and catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
US5629253A (en) 1994-04-26 1997-05-13 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5698487A (en) 1994-05-26 1997-12-16 Montell Technology Company Bv Components and catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
WO1995032995A1 (en) 1994-05-26 1995-12-07 Montell Technology Company Bv Components and catalysts for the polymerization of olefins
WO1996000243A1 (en) 1994-06-24 1996-01-04 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5468702A (en) 1994-07-07 1995-11-21 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making a catalyst system
US5453471A (en) 1994-08-02 1995-09-26 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Gas phase polymerization process
US5453471B1 (en) 1994-08-02 1999-02-09 Carbide Chemicals & Plastics T Gas phase polymerization process
US5643847A (en) 1994-08-03 1997-07-01 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Supported ionic catalyst composition
WO1996006187A1 (en) 1994-08-25 1996-02-29 The Solicitor For The Affairs Of Her Majesty's Treasury In Her Britannic Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern Ireland Nucleotide sequencing method
US5770664A (en) 1994-10-13 1998-06-23 Japan Polyolefins Co., Ltd. Catalyst component for producing polyolefin, catalyst for producing polyolefin comprising the catalyst component, and process for producing polyolefin in the presence of the catalyst
WO1996011960A1 (en) 1994-10-13 1996-04-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5529965A (en) 1994-10-28 1996-06-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization catalyst systems, their production and use
US5770755A (en) 1994-11-15 1998-06-23 Phillips Petroleum Company Process to prepare polymeric metallocenes
US5665665A (en) 1994-11-23 1997-09-09 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Method for making supported catalyst systems and catalyst systems therefrom
US5625015A (en) 1994-11-23 1997-04-29 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method for making supported catalyst systems and catalyst systems therefrom
US5539124A (en) 1994-12-19 1996-07-23 Occidental Chemical Corporation Polymerization catalysts based on transition metal complexes with ligands containing pyrrolyl ring
WO1996020233A1 (en) 1994-12-23 1996-07-04 The Dow Chemical Company Process for preparation of epoxy compounds
US5728839A (en) 1994-12-29 1998-03-17 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Metal complexes with heterocycles carbenes
US5714424A (en) 1995-01-09 1998-02-03 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Multi-component polyolefin catalysts
US5554775A (en) 1995-01-17 1996-09-10 Occidental Chemical Corporation Borabenzene based olefin polymerization catalysts
US5723400A (en) 1995-02-21 1998-03-03 Montell North America Inc. Process for the preparation of a solid catalyst component suitable for the polymerization of olefins which includes at least two additions of an electron donor
US5616661A (en) 1995-03-31 1997-04-01 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Process for controlling particle growth during production of sticky polymers
EP0743324A2 (en) 1995-05-16 1996-11-20 UNION CARBIDE CHEMICALS &amp; PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION Production of polyethylene using stereoisomeric metallocenes
US5731261A (en) 1995-06-01 1998-03-24 Enichem S.P.A. Process for the preparation of mixed porous silica-alumina oxides in a spherical form
US5684098A (en) 1995-06-07 1997-11-04 Industrial Technology Research Institute Process for the polymerization or copolymerization of ethylene using mao- or borate-free single site catalysts
WO1997015582A1 (en) 1995-10-27 1997-05-01 The Dow Chemical Company Supportable biscyclopentadienyl metal complexes
WO1997019959A1 (en) 1995-11-27 1997-06-05 The Dow Chemical Company Supported catalyst containing tethered cation forming activator
US5688880A (en) 1995-12-11 1997-11-18 The Dow Chemical Company Readily supportable metal complexes
US5753577A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-05-19 Tosoh Corporation Olefin polymerization catalyst based on organometallic complexes and process for production of polyolefins using the catalyst
US5723402A (en) 1996-05-30 1998-03-03 Pq Corporation Silicas with specific contents of cations as supports for olefin polymerization catalysts
WO1997046567A1 (en) 1996-06-06 1997-12-11 Bp Chemicals Limited Novel group iv metal complexes
WO1998001455A1 (en) 1996-07-05 1998-01-15 Bayer Aktiengesellschaft Metallocene compounds
US5712354A (en) 1996-07-10 1998-01-27 Mobil Oil Corporation Bridged metallocene compounds
WO1998006759A1 (en) 1996-08-09 1998-02-19 California Institute Of Technology Group iv zwitterion ansa metallocene (zam) catalysts for alpha-olefin polymerization
WO1998011144A1 (en) 1996-09-12 1998-03-19 Bp Chemicals Limited Polymerisation catalyst
US6063877A (en) 1997-07-31 2000-05-16 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation Control of gas phase polymerization reactions
US6262192B1 (en) 1999-08-30 2001-07-17 China Petrochemical Corporation Introducing a condensing agent into a fluidized bed polymerization reactor operated in the condensing mode
US6391985B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2002-05-21 Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Technology Corporation High condensing mode polyolefin production under turbulent conditions in a fluidized bed
WO2001049750A1 (en) * 1999-12-30 2001-07-12 Opp Química S.A. Process for the gas phase polymerization and copolymerization of olefin monomers
US6759489B1 (en) * 2003-05-20 2004-07-06 Eastern Petrochemical Co. Fluidized bed methods for making polymers
US20050137364A1 (en) * 2003-12-23 2005-06-23 Univation Technologies, Llc Condensing mode operation of gas-phase polymerization reactor
US20050182207A1 (en) 2003-12-23 2005-08-18 Diwaker Singh Gas-phase process
US20050267269A1 (en) * 2004-05-20 2005-12-01 Hagerty Robert O Polymerization process
US7683140B2 (en) 2004-05-20 2010-03-23 Univation Technologies, Llc Method for determining temperature value indicative of resin stickiness from data generated by polymerization reaction monitoring
US7858719B2 (en) 2004-05-20 2010-12-28 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Polymerization process
US7531606B2 (en) 2004-05-26 2009-05-12 Chevron Phillips Chemical Company Lp Method for operating a gas phase polymerization reactor
US20050267268A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2005-12-01 Hendrickson Gregory G Method for operating a gas phase polymerization reactor
US7696289B2 (en) 2006-05-12 2010-04-13 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Low molecular weight induced condensing agents
WO2011147539A1 (en) 2010-05-27 2011-12-01 Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (Sabic) Olefin gas phase polymerisation

Non-Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"Chemical Properties Handbook", 1999
CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING NEWS, vol. 63, no. 5, 1985, pages 27
R. J. LEWIS: "Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 13th ed.", 1997, JOHN WILEY AND SONS, article "Hydrocarbon"

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6346575B1 (en) Production of multimodal polythylene
CA2210496C (en) Borabenzene based olefin polymerization catalysts
CA2347410C (en) Solution polymerization process catalyzed by a phosphinimine catalyst
US7365136B2 (en) High melt strength polypropylene
JP5279188B2 (en) Polyolefins for catalyst compositions and extrusion coating applications
EP0619325B1 (en) Process for preparing polyolefin catalysts
KR101299375B1 (en) Ethylene-alpha olefin copolymers and polymerization processes for making the same
KR100414776B1 (en) Polymerization catalyst system and its preparation method
RU2446179C2 (en) Improved polymerisation methods using metallocene catalysts, polymer products and use thereof
AU741875B2 (en) Process for producing a homogeneous polyethylene material in the presence of a catalyst
CA2294384C (en) Olefin polymerization process
RU2349611C2 (en) Polyethylene films
RU2184743C2 (en) Polyethylene production process
AU760137B2 (en) Polymer composition, a process for the production thereof and films prepared thereof
EP2864369B1 (en) Ethylene copolymers, film and polymerization process
US9175111B2 (en) Ethylene-based polymer compositions, methods of making the same, and articles prepared from the same
EP0794200A2 (en) Staged reactor polymerisation process
US6730751B2 (en) Polymerization of polyethylene having high molecular weight
CN103007867A (en) Loop type reactor for polymerization
US6218472B1 (en) Production of multimodal polyethylene
EP2032615B1 (en) Polymers made with metallocene catalysts, for use in rotomolding and injection molding products
US20080090974A1 (en) Polymer Production at Supersolution Conditions
EP1950241A1 (en) Multimodal medium density polyethylene polymer composition
FR2519007A1 (en) Modified copolymers of ethylene and at least one a-olefin and process for their preparation
CN104781319A (en) Low density polyolefin resins ad films made therefrom

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 17767974

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: BR

Ref legal event code: B01A

Ref document number: 112019005988

Country of ref document: BR

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 2017767974

Country of ref document: EP

Effective date: 20190429

ENP Entry into the national phase in:

Ref document number: 112019005988

Country of ref document: BR

Kind code of ref document: A2

Effective date: 20190326