WO2017160778A1 - Infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage - Google Patents

Infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2017160778A1
WO2017160778A1 PCT/US2017/022194 US2017022194W WO2017160778A1 WO 2017160778 A1 WO2017160778 A1 WO 2017160778A1 US 2017022194 W US2017022194 W US 2017022194W WO 2017160778 A1 WO2017160778 A1 WO 2017160778A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
infusion
container
enclosure
beverage
coffee
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2017/022194
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Joseph APUZZO, III
Original Assignee
Apuzzo Joseph Iii
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201662307946P priority Critical
Priority to US62/307,946 priority
Application filed by Apuzzo Joseph Iii filed Critical Apuzzo Joseph Iii
Publication of WO2017160778A1 publication Critical patent/WO2017160778A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J31/00Apparatus for making beverages
    • A47J31/06Filters or strainers for coffee or tea makers ; Holders therefor
    • A47J31/0615Filters or strainers for coffee or tea makers ; Holders therefor with special arrangements for making tea or the like, e.g. where the infusion liquid is kept a certain time in the filter before flowing out

Abstract

An infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage including a container (54) including at least one wall (52) having an interior surface and forming an enclosure for retaining a beverage infusion product (30), wherein the at least one wall is liquid-permeable; and at least one cross-member extending within the enclosure from the interior surface of the at least one wall and configured to interface with and enhance extraction of flavor from the beverage infusion product.

Description

INFUSION APPARATUS FOR PREPARING A BEVERAGE
Cross Reference to Related Application
[001] This application claims priority to U.S. provisional application no. 62/307,946, filed on March 14, 2016, the content of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.
Field of the Invention
[002] The present invention relates to containers for preparing a beverage, and more specifically to an infusion container through which useful qualities of a material are infused in a liquid, for example, in the steeping of coffee or tea.
Background of the Invention
[003] The coffee world is driven by a combination of quality, affordability and convenience. Brewing coffee is a delicate process that hinges on the level of extraction of the coffee grounds. Coffee that is under extracted is weak and lacking body, while coffee that is over extracted can be bitter and just as undesirable. The best cup of coffee is a result of the proper extraction, which is achieved by a combination of the appropriate grind, brewing method and brewing time. Another important variable for brewing coffee is the 'intensity' of the extraction. Some factors that influence intensity are the time that the water is in contact with the coffee grounds, the heat of the water and the 'cleanliness' of the liquid extracting the flavor. In most brewing methods the water is constantly flowing through the coffee grounds and being replaced by 'clean,' hot water. The cleaner the water is, the more effective and efficient the extraction is, however; clean, hot water results in a very aggressive extraction of the coffee grounds that tears through the desired flavors and can result in the bitter, undesirable flavors of over extracted coffee. By allowing the coffee grounds to be steeped, like a French ress brew, the coffee grounds are being extracted by coffee rather than fresh water. This allows the brewing process to be slowed down resulting in a richer cup of coffee and a lower risk of over extraction.
[004] Buying coffee by the cup is convenient and usually provides a good quality cup, but can be very expensive. Brewing a pot of coffee at home achieves an affordable, good tasting cup,but is often not convenient as many people don't want to take the time to brew it or simply don't want a full pot of coffee.
[005] The K-Cup has,to some extent, successfully struck a balance between these variables considering it is less expensive than purchasing coffee by the cup, more convenient than brewing a full pot, and produces a reasonably good cup of coffee. With respect to each of these variables though, the K-Cup has some shortcomings, for example,many consumersthink diatthe price of the typical K-Cup isrelativelyexpensive to other ways of getting coffee, a special machine is required to brew it thereby adding expense and a level of inconvenience, and some consider K- Cup coffee to be lacking in quality. The K-Cup has also introduced a sustainability issue due to the immense amount of waste that it has created. Despite each of these potential setbacks, the K- Cup has successfully opened up the world of coffee drinkers to the single serve format and the industry as a whole has accepted it.
Summary of the Invention
[006] The disadvantages of the prior art are overcome bya beverage infusion apparatus whichcontains, for example, coffee grinds that can be brewed by being steeped in a cup of hot waterto produce a full-bodied, rich cup of coffee. Advantageously, the beverage infusion apparatus allows consumers to brew a strong, single cup of coffee for a reasonable price without the use of a bulky machine. The beverage infusion apparatus allows consumers to have more control over their coffee by providing flexibility in the brewing time and the ability to brew different types of coffeeto satisfy the unique preferences of different coffee drinkers. Moreover, the beverage infusion apparatus enables the strength and richness of the coffee to be altered to match the specific desires of each consumer as a result of the beverage infusion apparatus being steeped by a person, as opposed to coffee being brewed by a machine. Yet another advantage of the present invention is the reduction in the waste produced by the coffee industry. For beverage infusion apparatus embodiments that are non-disposable, i.e., reusable units they are preferably fabricated from metal, and the only waste items that need be disposed of are the finished coffee grinds/beverage material and occasionally the packaging container that the beverage materialwas purchased/stored in. Disposable models of the beverage infusion apparatus can be fabricated from recyclable, biodegradable or compostable materials, which will significantly cut back on the waste produced by the single-serve coffee industry. [007] In one embodiment, an infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage comprises a container including at least one wall having an interior surface and forming an enclosure for retaining a beverage infusion product; and at least one cross-member extending within the enclosure from the interior surface of the at least one wall; wherein the at least one cross-member is a movable plate extending horizontally across the at least one wall and divides the enclosure into an upper section and a lower section, at least a portion of the lower section being liquid-permeable, the beverage infusion product being provided in the enclosure and the at least one cross-member being configured to interface with and enhance extraction of flavor from the beverage infusion product, the at least one wall having a first orifice formed through the upper section and configured to slidably receive an elongated handle having a first end attached to the plate within the enclosure and an opposing second end extending externally from the enclosure. In one aspect, movement of the handle through the first orifice moves the plate within the enclosure and forces liquid infused by the beverage infusion product out through the enclosure of the container. In another aspect, the container includes an upper support member coupled over the container, the upper support member having a second orifice aligned with the first orifice and configured to slidably receive and guide the second end of the elongated handle. In yet another aspect, a second portion of the at least one wall forming the lower section of the enclosure is fabricated from a non-porous material. In still another aspect, the lower section includes an opening into the enclosure and a removable panel positioned below the movable plate to selectively open and close the enclosure. In another aspect, the at least one wall includes six walls formed by a top wall, bottom wall and four side walls extending therebetween to form a hexahedron-shaped container.
[008] In another aspect, the bottom wall is fabricated from a non-porous material. In still another aspect, the at least one wall includes five walls formed by a top wall and four side walls to form a polyhedron container having a bottom opening, each of the four side walls including at least one mesh structure. In yet another aspect, the infusion apparatus further comprises a movable panel positioned below the movable plate to selectively open and close the bottom opening into the enclosure. In another aspect, the moveable plate is formed of a liquid- impermeable material. In yet another aspect, the moveable plate includes spaced-apart openings therethrough. In one aspect, the handle and moveable plate define a plunger, the plunger cooperating with a spring to automatically move the moveable plate in a direction opposite to a direction of movement by a user. In yet another aspect, the infusion apparatus further comprises a stand having a base and upper support member for supporting the infusion apparatus in an inverted orientation. In yet another aspect, the infusion apparatus further comprises a pan disposed within the stand for catching drippings from the infusion apparatus.
[009] In another embodiment, an infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage comprises:a container including at least one wallhaving an interior surface and forming an enclosure for retaining a beverage infusion product, wherein the at least one wall is liquid-permeable; andat least one cross-member extending within the enclosure from the interior surface of the at least one wall and configured to interface with and enhance extraction of flavor from the beverage infusion product. In one aspect, the infusion apparatus further comprisesa handle extending from the least one wall. In another aspect, the handle is a generally rigid, elongated handle having a longitudinal axis, with a first end attached to the container and an opposing distal second end extending therefrom. In still another aspect, the at least one cross-member extends transversely at an acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the handle. In yet another aspect, the at least one cross-member extends within the enclosure from the at least one wall in a direction towards an opposing wall. In one aspect, the at least one wall of the container comprises a plurality of walls forming a polyhedron. In another aspect, the at least one wall of the container is fabricated from a mesh structure. In still another aspect, the at least one wall of the container is fabricated from a woven fabric.
JBrief Description of the Drawings
[0010] FIG. 1 is a top, front perspective view of an embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a cross-member and a handle which is suitable for preparing a beverage such as coffee or tea in a liquid;
[0011] FIG. 2 is a top, front perspective view of another embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a plurality of cross-members and a handle;
[0012] FIG. 3 is a front, top perspective view of yet another embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a plurality of cross-members and a handle;
[0013] FIG. 4 is a front, top perspective view of still another embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a plurality of cross-members and a handle; [0014] FIGS. 5A-5D collectively depicts a schematic block diagram illustrating a method for fabricating the infusion container of the present invention;
[0015] FIG. 6 is a top, front perspective view of an embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container and a handle partially filled with a beverage material;
[0016] FIG. 7 is a top, front perspective view of an embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a plurality of cross-members and a handle which is suitable for preparing a beverage in a cup or container;
[0017] FIG. 8 is a rear perspective view of a portion of an interior wall of a container of the infusion apparatus having a plurality of spaced-apart, rearward extending cross-members;
[0018] FIG. 9 is a top, front perspective view of another embodiment of a single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a moveable plunger for extracting a beverage material into a liquid;
[0019] FIG. 10 is a top, front perspective view of yet another embodiment of the single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a moveable plunger for extracting a beverage material into a liquid;
[0020] FIG. 11 is a top, front right-side perspective view of still another embodiment of the single-serve infusion apparatus with a container having a moveable plunger for extracting a beverage material into a liquid;
[0021] FIG. 12 is an exploded cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a mesh sidewall of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ;
[0022] FIG. 13 is an exploded top, front right-side perspective view of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ;
[0023] FIG. 14 is a top, front right-side perspective view of a frame structure of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ;
[0024JFIG. 15 is a front elevated view of the frame structure of FIG. 13;
[0025] FIG. 16 is a rear elevated view of an elongated handle assembly of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ;
[0026] FIG. 17 is a top, front right-side perspective view of an agitator press plate of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ;
[0027] FIG. 18 is a top, front right-side perspective view of a lower slidable panel of the infusion apparatus of FIG. 1 1 ; [0028] FIG. 19 is a bottom elevated view of the lower slidable panel of FIG. 18;
[0029] FIG. 20 is a top, rear righl-side perspective view of another embodiment of the single- serve infusion apparatus with a container having a moveable plunger for extracting a beverage material into a liquid;
[0030] FIG. 21 is a top, front left-side perspective view of a stand structure for supporting the single-serve infusion apparatus of FIGS. 9-11 and 19; and
[0031] FIG. 22 is a top, front left-side perspective view of a removable pan or tray usedwith the stand structure of FIG. 21 for catching any waste drippings from the beverage infusion structure placed thereon.
[0032] In the following description of the embodiments, identical reference numerals have been used, when appropriate, to designate the same or similar elements that are common to the figures. Further, unless specifically stated otherwise, the features shown in the figures are not drawn to scale, but are shown for illustrative purposes only.
Detailed Description of the Embodiments
[0033] The infusion apparatus of the present invention is a liquid-permeable container forming an enclosure that retains a beverage material such as,for example, ground coffee, tea leaves, fruit, spices, and other flavoringsfor making a beverage drink, for example, a single-serve cup of hot coffee or tea. The container and its contents are immersed in a vessel of water or other liquid, to enable the flavors of the beverage materialto seep into the surrounding liquid environment, e.g., a cup of hot or cold water. Preferably, the infusion container is not completely filled with the beverage material so that the beverage material, e.g., coffee grinds,tea leaves, and the
likecanmove freely and be fully engulfed in the extracting liquid. The structural integrity of the container can be achieved in various ways including providing a skeletal structure having overlying liquid-permeable walls that form a "skin" around the skeletal structure, or the walls themselves can be formed of a generally rigid liquid-permeable material which retains the desired shape of the container. One or more cross-members extend within the confines of the enclosure and can further provide structural integrity for the infusion container to help it maintain its shape during use.Preferably, a generally rigid handle or dipper extends from the infusion container to allow the user to dunk and move the container with its contents in the liquid environment. A user can hold the container by its handle and move the container with its beverage contentstherein up and down to help facilitate movement of the liquid and beverage material withinthe container. Alternatively, a cross-member can be selectively lowered and/or raised within the interior of the beverage container via the handle to accelerate the brewing process. During such up and down movements, the cross-member(s) assist in both the breakup of any clumped beverage material (e.g., coffee grinds or tea leaves) and in promoting the flow of liquid in and out of the container unit, thereby resulting in a more uniform and better overall extractionof the beverage infusion material.
[0034] Referring now to FIG. 1, a beverage infusion apparatus for preparing a single-serve beverage, such as a cup of coffee or tea is illustratively shown. The infusion apparatus 10 includes a container 12 formed by at least one wall 14 defining an enclosure 16 suitable for retaining a beverage material 30 such as ground coffee or tea leaves, and at least one cross- member 18 extending within the enclosure or interior chamber 16. A dipper or handle assembly 20 has a first end 22 secured at the container 12 and a second end 24for grasping the infusion apparatus while preparing the beverage. The second end 24 of the handle 20 can optionally include a tab 26, a curved end, a cross-member, protrusion or other shaped member to assist the user with the grasping and/or holding of the handle 20. The container 12, cross-member(s) 18 and handle 20 are all fabricated from one or more biodegradable materials such as bioplastic, Polyamide 11 & PLA plastics, and the like, as discussed below in further detail.
[0035] Preferably, the container is partially filled with a beverage material 30 such as coffee grinds. The amount of beverage material 30 placed in the container is dependent on the type and strength of the beverage material in terms of desired flavors and tastes. For example, the container can be filled to approximately one-half of its volume with coffee grinds to ensure a strong and rich brew, although the amounts of beverage material and its ratio to the volume of the container 12 is not considered limiting. In particular, a person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that smaller amounts may lead to weak brews, while overfilling can cause an undesirably strong cup of coffee. It is noted that filling the container beyond a certain volume may also result in a weak brew because the packed coffee grinds will restrict the flow of water through the container and limit the extraction of the flavor from beverage material(e.g., the coffee grounds).
[0036] In one embodiment, the at least one wall 14 is fabricated as a mesh sheet or fabric32 having openings or perforation34 sized to prevent the beverage material 30, e.g., the coffee grinds or tea leaves from undesirably flowing out of the enclosure 16. In an alternative embodiment, the container 12 includes a liquid permeable fabric wrapped around each of the mesh walls 14. Many different types of mesh and fabrics can be used for fabricating the walls 14 of the container 12. One illustrativebiodegradable and compostable material can be a bioplastic material that can be manufactured into a woven mesh or a non-woven fabricA person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the material composition of the infusion apparatus components is not limited to biodegradable or compostable materials, as other water-permeable materials can be utilized.For example, stainless steel or other non-corrosive metal materials that can be manufactured into woven sheets and then cut or otherwise reduced to a desired size to form the metal mesh walls 14. Both the mesh 32 and the fabric 33 are used to form the walls 14 because the mesh 32, due to its superior rigidity is what will create the structural integrity of the walls 14 needed to sustain the container shape when the infusion apparatus lOcomes in contact with hot water. The fabric 33 is less porous than the mesh 32 which, for an application like steeping coffee, is needed in order to restrict the undesired coffee particles from getting into the cup. Alternatively, the infusion apparatus 10 can be formed by injection molding and/or mold- over techniques.
[0037] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the container 12 is illustratively a polyhedron having six walls that form a cube, although the shape of the container 12 is not limiting. A single cross- member 18 extends in the interior enclosure of the cube. In a preferred embodiment, the cross- member 18 extends between diagonally opposing comers of the cubed container 12. Agenerally rigid handle 20 illustratively extends linearly from an end of the cross-member 18, such that the handle 20 is aligned along the longitudinal axis of the cross-member 18. The arrangement of the handle 20 and the cross-member 18 with respect to the container 12 result in one of the cube's corners 15Lforming a lowest portion of the cubed container 12 where the coffee grinds will normally rest. When the user holds the handle 20and dunks the container 12 in a hot cup of water,the grinds will rise upward within the container. Conversely, when the cube is pulled back up, the grinds will fall back towards the bottom of the container.Because the handle 20 is generally rigid, the user can rapidly move the container up and down and side-to-side to distribute the coffee grinds within the enclosure 16. As the user moves the container 12, the cross-member 18 will assist in breaking up any clumps of coffee grinds to better expose more surface area of the coffee grinds to the water,and thereby further enhance and quicken the extraction processes in the water.
[0038] The linear shape of the handle 20 is not considered limiting as other configurations and arrangements with the container 12 are contemplated. For example, a curvilinear shaped handle is illustratively shown in FIG. 2. Further, multiple handle members can be attached to the container 12 and joined together, e.g., at the second end to form the handle assembly, as illustratively shown in FIG. 4.Alternatively, the handle 20 can be replaced with a length of string which has its first end connected to the container 12 and the opposing end connected to the tab 26, such as a well-known paper tag and the like. The string enables the user to dip the container in the water environment for a slow brewing process in a similar manner as dipping a well- known tea bag in a cup of hot water.
[0039] In yet another embodiment, the at least one wall is semi-rigid or flexible such that the shape of the container 12 is generally maintained by the cross-members 14. Further, no handle is attached to the container 12. During use, when the container 12 is submersed in the liquid, a user can press down on the container with a spoon or other utensil to cause the wall(s) to flex and the cross-members 18 to move somewhat to break apart clumped coffee grinds. Further, the cross- members 18 can also be semi-rigid or somewhat flexible and/or stretchable to facilitate expansion and contraction movements when pressing down on the container 12 with a utensil.
[0040] Referring now to FIG. 2, another embodiment of the cubed shaped container 12 is illustratively shown. The mesh and fabric sidewalls are not shown on the walls 14 of the container 12 to facilitate better understanding of the interior structure of the enclosure 16. The container 12 includes a plurality of cross-members 18i through 18„, where "n" is an integer greater than one and collectively referred to as cross-members 18. In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 2, there are four cross-members 18i to 18„~4 extending from the four pairs of diagonally opposite comers 15 of the cubed container 12. For example, cross-member 18| extends from diagonally opposing comers 15i and 15 ;, cross-member 182 extends from diagonally opposing comers 154 and 156, cross-member I 83 extends from diagonally opposing comers 153 and 15s, and cross-member I 84 extends from diagonally opposing comers 152 and 158-In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the orientation of comer 15< is such that it forms the bottom comer of the container 12, as discussed above with respect to FIG. I . Increasing the number of cross-members further assists in the breakup of clumped coffee grinds to thereby further enhance and quicken the extraction processes in the water.
[0041] Referring to FIG. 3, yet another embodiment of the cubed shaped container 12 is illustratively shown. Again, the mesh and fabric sidewalls are not shown forming the walls 14 of the container 12 to facilitate better understanding of the interior structure of the enclosure 16. The container 12 includes the plurality of cross-members 18i to 18n-4 extending from the four pairs of diagonally opposite corners 15 of the cubed container 12. Similar to the cubed container 12 of FIG. 2, cross-member 18i extends from diagonally opposing corners 15i and 157, cross- member I 82 extends from diagonally comers 154 and 156, cross-member 183 extends from diagonally corners 153 and 15s, and cross-member I 84 extends from diagonally corners 152 and 15g. As noted above, increasing the number of cross-members further assists in the breakup of clumped coffee grinds.In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the first end 22 of the handle assembly 20 is connected within the enclosure at a central point 38 where the cross-members 181 through 184 intersect. Preferably, the handle 18 extends upwardly such that cubed container 12 has a lower wall 14uand an upper wall 144 that are orientated generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis "L" of the handle 20. Accordingly, the coffee grinds are distributedmore evenly over a greater surface area of the bottom lower wall 14u as compared to the cubed container 12 which is orientated diagonally as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. This generally horizontal orientation limits the containers ability to pierce through and displace the water while being dunked, as compared to the orientation of the container 12 as shown in FIG. 1. The result is the water having a greater tendency to flow through the container 12, thereby enhancing extraction of the flavor(s) from the beverage material.
[0042] Referring to FIG. 4, the cubed container of FIG. 3 is illustratively shown with a handle assembly 20 that is connected to the four corners of the upper wall 14*. In this configuration, the cubed container 12 has its lower wall 14L and upper wall H4 orientated generally perpendicular 10 a central vertical axis "C" of the handle 20, which intersects the four cross-members 18 at a central point 38 in a similar manner to the longitudinal axis "L" of the handle 20 of FIG. 3. The handle assembly 20 comprises four elongated members or rods 211 through 2l4(collectively elongated members 21) having equal lengths with each having a first end connected to one of the upper corners 15 of the upper wall H4 and a second end 24 that joins together with the other second ends 24. A tab 26 can be attached to the second ends 24 of the handle to facilitate bettergrasping, transporting arid dipping of the infusion apparatus 10. A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the number and locations of attachment of elongated members or rods 21 extending from the container 16 are not considered limiting.
[0043] Referring now to FIGS. 5A-5D, a method of forming the cubed container is illustratively shown. FIG. 5 A shows the mesh/liquid-permeable fabricwhich form the walls 14 in a rectangular shape. The rectangular or square shape is achieved by wrapping the mesh/fabric around a rectangular or square mold, i.e., tube. For example, awell-known form, fill and seal machine generally has a circular tube, but in order to begin the structure of the cubed container 12, the circular tube is replaced with asquare tube.
[0044] FIG. 5B shows the mesh/filter paper being sealed at the bottom of the tube. The seal is made along the middle of two opposite sides (left and right when looking at the figure) and across the center of the bottom of the rectangle. This results in two points on either side of the seal, which can be seen in the figure. FIG. 5C shows the bottom of the shape being flattened resulting in the formation of the bottom of the cube and two triangular shapes on either side. When these two triangles are cut along the lines shown in the diagram, the bottom of the cubed container is formed. The same process is used for the formation of the upper wall of the cubed container 12. FIG. 5D shows the finished cubed container with the seams in the middle of the top and bottom of the cube. The seams can then be welded to close the container 54. A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the container 12 or the entire infusion apparatus 10 can alternatively be formed by injection molding or mold-over techniques.
[0045] Referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, a beverage infusion apparatus 10 having a tetrahedral-shaped container 12 is illustratively shown. As compared to the well-known rectangular coffee/tea bags, the tetrahedral shape of the container 12 allows for a larger amount of coffee and greater volume within the container in a similar manner as the cubed container of FIGS. 1 -4. Referring now to FIG. 6, the container has a triangular base 14eand three triangular shaped walls 14) through 143(only walls 14] and 142 shown) forming an apex 15A. An elongated rigid or semi-rigid handle 20 having a first end 22 is attached at the apex 15Aof the container 12, and a second free end 24 can include a tab 26 for facilitating greater ease for grasping the beverage infusion apparatus 10. The handle 20 and walls 14 of the tetrahedral container can be fabricated from the same biodegradable and compostable material discussed above with respect to the cubed container of FIGS. 1-3. FIG. 6 illustrates the coffee grinds occupying about 75 percent of the volume of the container enclosure 16.
[0046] Referring now to FIG. 7, in one embodiment, the walls 14 are formed from a
flexible.liquid-permeable fabric material without any underlying mesh structure. The structural integrity of the container 12 is provided by the internal cross-members 18 which collectively form a skeletal structure 39 thatprevents the fabric walls 14 from collapsing on the coffee grinds when the container is submerged inwater. In the illustrative embodiment shown, three elongated cross-members 18i through 183each have first ends connected together to form a skeletal apex 38 and the opposing second endswhich radiate downwardly to form a triangular shape structure of the container 12. A fourth elongated cross-member I84 has a first end connected to the skeletal apex 38 and its opposing second end extending vertically upward such mat the second ends of the four cross-members 181 through I84 define the triangular tetrahedral shape. A water- permeable fabric 14 is formed over the triangular-shaped skeletal structure 39to form the container 12. Preferably, the skeletal apex 38 is positioned centrally within the enclosure 16. In FIG. 7, aflexible handle 20 illustratively formed from a string and tag 26 arrangement can be attached at the apex 15A of the container 12 to facilitate dunking of the container 12 in the liquid by the user. Alternatively, a rigid or semi-rigid handle as shown in FIG. 6 can be attached at the apex 15A of the container 12 to enable a user to dunk the container 12 in the liquid at a faster rate than when the handle is a string or other flexible material.ln either handle embodiment, the cross-members 1 Sassists in breaking apart clumps of coffee that form when the water contacts the grounds. In particular, the clumpsare broken up as the container 12 is pulled up through the water so that the internal cross-members 18slice through the grounds as theymove to the bottom of the container 12.
[0047] Referring now to FIG. 8, a fabric material 40 having a plurality of spaced-apart, rearward, i.e., inwardly extending cross-members 42 is shown. In this embodiment, the perforated walls and thecross-members are formed from the biodegradable materials discussed above, in one embodiment, the fabric material 40 can cover the skeletal structure 39 of the container 12 to form the walls 14 and the enclosure 16. Alternatively, the rigidness of the fabric material 40 is sufficient to maintain the shape of the container 12 and its enclosure 16 so that the skeletal structure 39 formed by the support members 18 can be eliminated. The cross members 42 extend inwardly within the enclosure 56 from at least the sidewall of the container 54. Preferably, the cross-members 42 have a length that extendsat least to or beyondthe middle of and into the enclosure 16 of the container 12, although such length is not considered limiting. The distribution, i.e., quantity/orand spacing of the rearward or inwardly extending cross- members 42 can be determined based on the size of the enclosure formed by the fabric material 40, as well as a desired rate in which the extraction process would occur. By utilizing a fabric 40 having the integral cross-members 42, the need for including a mesh fabric 32 underneath the fabric 40 or the cross-members 18 of FIG. 8 iseliminated. The fabric 40 with its substantially normal extending cross-members 42 is suitable for use on any shaped container 12 such as a cubed, curvilinear or other shaped container, with or without the skeletal structure 39,to thereby assist in breaking apart any clumped coffee grounds in the enclosure 16. The fabric material 40 can also include small perforation 44 to enhance the liquid-permeability of the container walls 14.
[0048] In order to facilitate a sufficient flow through the cubed, tetrahedron or other shaped infusion apparatus 10 of FIGS. 1-8, the perforated or otherwise water-permeable walls must be porous enough to allow water to move in and out of the container 12. The porosity of thewalls mayallow some of the fine coffee particles to flow out of the container 12 and into the surrounding cup. To many coffee drinkers, this may not be an issue and may even be desirable because of the additional flavor that these particles carry with them. Conversely, a portion of the coffee market often desires a very pure coffee beverage with minimal grounds flowing into the cup of coffee. To address this situation and to promote a more sufficient extraction, various infusion press devices are illustratively shown and described with respect to FIGS. 9 and 19.
[0049] Referring to FIG. 9, in one embodiment acubed-shaped infusion press 50 is illustratively shown. The cubed press 50 is similar to the polyhedral cubed infusion apparatus illustratively shown in FIGS. 1-4 except that the cube press 50 contains a moveable cross-member (i.e., plunger) that allows the user to press down and pull up on the contents in the container to both encourage the movement of the liquid from the container into the cup and increase the agitation of the grinds, thereby extracting even more flavor.
[0050] The infusion press50 comprises at least one side wall, e.g., six side walls 521 through 52$ that collectively form a container 54 with an enclosure 56, and a plunger 60 that slidably moves within the enclosure 56. Preferably the top wall 52sand bottom wall 526are made from a solid material (e.g., recyclable or bioplastic material), while the remaining four side walls 52·, through 524 are made of a very fine mesh material. The top wall 52s includes an opening or bore58 tbrmedin its center which is sized to receive a handle 62 of the plunger 60 that can be moved freelyup and down by the user, i.e., in through and out of the container 54. The coffee grinds are provided in the container 54 below the plunger 70.
[0051] In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 9, extending from the top of the container 54 is a support structure 66 illustratively formed by fourelongated support members 68 having opposing ends, and a ring 67 having an opening 69. A first end of the support members 68 is attached to a respective top corner of the container 54. The opposing second end of each support member 68 is attached to the ring 69. The ring 67 and opening 69 is spaced distally (e.g., two inches) over the top wall 52¾ of the container 54 and is axially aligned with the opening or bore 58 of the container 54. The ring opening 69 is also sized to receive the handle 62 of the plunger 60 to enable the handle 62 to move freely up and down by the user over the container 54.A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the number and locations of attachment of elongated support members or rods 68 extending from the container 54 are not considered limiting.
Additionally, a person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the first orifice 58 is sufficiently sized to allow the elongated handle 62 to slidably move down and up, while also minimizing the escape of any beverage material from the enclosure 56 therethrough.
[0052] The plunger 60 includes the elongated handle 62 with a first end for facilitating gripping by the user. Preferably, the first end of the handle 62 has a tab or gripping portion 63. A second lower end of the handle 62 is connected to a cross-member, i.e., an agitator structure 70 within the enclosure 56. In one embodiment, the agitator structure 70 can be formed by a central hub having a bore or orifice dimensioned to receive and be secured to the lower portion of the elongated handle, e.g., via press or snap fitting, crimping, a threaded interface or a fastener. A horizontally orientated rectilinear member having a rectilinear opening circumscribes the central hub and is connected thereto by a plurality of spaced-apart cross-members extending radially outward from the central hub and connecting to the circumscribing rectilinear member to form a web-like structure. In another embodiment, the horizontally orientated agitator structure 70 is fabricated from a rigid or substantially rigid bioplastic material having perforations or holes that are sized, for example, in a range including but not limited to 300 to 750 microns, and preferably 500 microns to allow some of the liquid coffee and ground particles to flow up through the horizontal plunger 70, and also create a downward pressure below the plunger to force the liquid and particles out of the infusion press therebelow.The agitator structure 70 is oriented parallel to and between the top and bottom walls 52s and 526 and extends wall-to-wall across the enclosure 56 such that the ends of the peripheral edges of the press slidably engage the interior surface of the sidewalls 52 \ through 524 of the container 54.0ptionally, the bottom wall 52& and/or the top wall 52s can be fabricated from a non-porous material so that the beverage infused liquid therein will only flow out through the sidewalls 52j through 524 of the container 54.
[0053] In yet another aspect, a pair of cross-members 65, e.g.,two one-half inch members extend outward horizontally from the upper support mcmber67substantially in parallel with the of the top wall 52s of the container 54 to allow the user to hold the container 54 up when pushing down on the tab 63. During operation, the user can operate the infusion press 50 with one hand by using the pointer and middle finger to hold the container up and the thumb to push the down on the handle 62 of the infusion press 50.
[0054] In another embodiment, the support structure 66 with its elongated members and upper support member are omitted, as illustratively shown in FIG. 10. In this embodiment, when the bottom wall 52eof the beverage infusion apparatus 50 is resting on the bottom surface in the coffee cup, the user can press down on the plunger 60 to thereby force the extracted coffee through the vertical sidewalls 52) through 524 of the container 54.
[0055] In both of the illustrative press embodiments of FIGS. 9 and 10, the result will be an increased flow of highly concentrated coffee liquid from the inside of the container 54 to the surrounding liquid in the cup. A user can repeatedly lower and raise the plunger 60 to hasten the agitation of the beverage material 30 to help hasten and strengthen the brew.
[0056JFIGS. 1 l-19illustrate yet another embodiment of the infusion press apparatus50 by which the user can manually introduce and thereby control the amounts of the beverage material 30 (e.g., coffee grinds) that is placed in the infusion apparatus 50. Referring now to FIGS. 11, 14 and 15, the infusion apparatus 50 includes at least one side wall, e.g., five side walls 52] through 525(collectively sidewalls 52) that form a container 54 having an enclosure 56 with a bottom opening 84, and a plunger assembly 60 that slidably moves within the enclosure 56. Preferably the top wall 52sisformedas a solid non-poroussurface area, while the remaining four side walls 52i through 524 areillustratively formed by a plurality of frame members 80) through 807 (collectively frame support members 80) that secureone or more mesh materials 82 to help form in part the sidewalls 52, as discussed below in further detail with respect to FIG. 12. The top wall 52$ includes the firstorifice 58 formed in its center which is sized to receive an elongated handle 62 of the plunger 60. As shown in FIG. 11 , the coffee grinds 30 are also provided in the container 54 below the plunger 60 in a similar manner to the press embodiments of FIGS. 9 and 10.
[0057] In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1 1, extending from the top of the container 54 is a support structure 66 illustratively formed by fourelongated support members or rods 68 having opposing ends, and an upper support member 67 having the secondorifice 69. The support structure 66 is similar to the support structure illustratively shown and described above with respect to FIG. 9. A first end of the support members 68 is attached to a respective top corner of the container 54. The opposing second end of each support member 68 is attached to the upper support member 67. The upper support member 67 is spaced distally (e.g., two inches) over the top wall 52s of the container 54 and is axially aligned with the first orifice 58 of the container 54. The second orifice 69 of the upper support member67 is also sized to receive the elongated handle 62 of the plunger 60 to enable the handle 62 to move freely up and down by the user over the container 54. A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the number and locations of attachment of elongated support members 68 extending from the container 54 are not considered limiting.
[0058] Referring to FIGS. 11 and 12, in one embodiment a plurality of mesh sidewalls or sheets, e.g., 82] and 823 (collectively mesh sidewalls 82), are attached to the frame support structures 80 and top wall 52s by a mold over process. The mesh sheets 82 are not shown on all of the sidewalls 52 of the container 54 to facilitate better understanding of the interior structure of the enclosure 56.Referring to FIG. 12, the cross-sectional view illustrates that the top wall 52s and bottom frame support member 80? are respectively molded over the upper, lower and side peripheral edges of the mesh sheet(s) 82. The technique of attaching the mesh sheets 82 to the frame support structures 80 is not considered limiting as the separate mesh sheets can be crimped between, or otherwise fastened to the frame support structures 80, or a single sheet can be wrapped around externally or internally the container 54 and fastened to the frame support structures 80. The mesh sheets 82 can be formed by one or more adjacent mesh sheets fabricated from a liquid permeable, corrosion resistive mesh material such as stainless steel, a bioplastic or recyclable material, a ceramic material and the like. Referring again to FIG. 12, the mesh sheets 82 are illustrativelyformed by three adjacent sheets of mesh material in which a fine sheet of mesh material 89 (e.g., a mesh 500 linear squares per inch) is sandwiched adjacently between two coarser sheets of mesh material 88 (e.g., 18 linear squares per inch). A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the number of mesh sheets forming each side wall, the sheet fabrication materials, themesh size ( i.e., linear squares per inch), and the manner of attaching the mesh sheets to the frame support members are not considered limiting.
[0059] Referring to FIG. 11, the bottom portion of the container 54 has an opening 84 for receiving a slidable panel 90 to close and open the container 54, as well as enabling the insertion and removal of an agitator press plate 70 as discussed below in further detail. The slidable panel 90 enables user access into the enclosure 56 for loading the beverage material 30 (e.g., coffee grinds), emptying and cleaningthe interior portions/enclosure 56, as well as assembling and disassembling the infusion press 50.
[0060] Referring to FIGS. 14 and 15, the lower frame support members 8Ο5 and 80? forming the lower opposing side portions of the container 54 each include a side channel 86 or groove extending along the length of its interior surface which facetowards the center of the enclosure 56. Similarly, the lower frame support member SOf, forming the lower rear portion of the container 54 includes a rear channel or groove 85 extending along the length of its interior surface and thereby faces towards the center of the enclosure 56. The channels 85 and 86 collectively fonn a slot 87 and are dimensioned to receive and slidably engage the peripheral edges of the panel 90.
[0061] Referring now to FIGS. 18 and 19, the panel 90 is rectangular in shape and dimensioned to be slidably inserted and retracted through the slot 87, i.e., through channels 85 and 86 to enable access into the enclosure 56. The panel 92 includes an upper surface 91 (FIG. 18), a lower surface 92 (FIG. 19), opposing side flanges 93 and a rear flange 94. The upper surface 91 is preferably non-textured and supports the beverage material 30 when the panel 90 is inserted into the slot 87 to close the opening 84. The lower surface 92 can include a textured portion 97 e.g., ridges and/or grooves to better facilitate removal of the panel 90 from the slot 87 by the user. The side and rear flanges 93, 94 are dimensioned to slidably interface with the side channels 86 and rear channel 85 of the container 54. In one embodiment, one or more tabs or protuberances 95 extend laterally from the side flanges 93 to provide greater frictional forces with protrusions 96 inside of the side channels 86, located at the four corners of the rectangular shaped (three-sided) slide panel slot 87 to help retain the panel 90 in the slot 87 in a closed position, as well as prevent the panel 90 from falling out of the slot 87 when in an open position. The protrusions 96form stops which make it difficult to move but not prevent the panel 90 beyond or from the slot 87. A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the slide panel 90 is not to be considered limiting as a hinged panel or other retractable gateway can be implemented.
[0062] Referring now to FIGS. 11, 13, 16 and 17, the plunger assembly 60 includes the elongated handle 62 with an upper end 76 for facilitating gripping by the user. Preferably, the upper end of the handle 62 has a tab or gripping portion 63. A lower end 78 of the handle 62 is connected to the agitator structure 70 which is positioned within the enclosure 56. In one embodiment, the agitator structure 70 is formed by a solid non-porous plate having central bore 72 which receives and interfaces with the lower end 78 of the elongated handle 62. Preferably, the bore 72 and the lower end 78 of the handle 62 are threaded to permit screwing the agitator 70 on and off the handle 62. In another aspect, a fastener (not shown) is provided to enable attachment and removal of the agitator 70 with the handle 62. Alternatively, the lower end 78 of the handle 62 and agitator 70 can be permanently connected via press or snap fitting, welding, riveting and the like. In one embodiment, a collar 71 can be provided to circumscribe the bore 72 to provide additional support and threading for attachment to the lower end 78 of the handle 62, as illustratively shown in FIG. 11. The plunger assembly 60 is preferably fabricated from stainless steel,an aluminum alloy, ceramic and/or bioplastic material or other rigid material that is liquid impermeable and corrosion resistant.
[0063] Referring to FIGS. 11 and 17, the agitator structure 70 is a plate dimensioned to extend wall-to-wall within the interior chamber/enclosure 56 such that the agitator plate's sidewalls 81 can slidably engage with the interior surfaces of the mesh sheets 82 and frame support members 80 to minimize movement of the beverage material 30 above the agitator plate 70. Preferably, the upper and lower peripheral edges 83 of the agitator plate 70 are beveled along the sidewalls 81 to facilitate downward and upward movement of the plunger assembly 60 during use.
[0064] The elongated handle 62 is inserted through the second orifice 69 in the upper support member 67 and through the central bore 58 formed in the upper sidewall 52s, and extends downward into the enclosure 65 with its lower end 78 attached to the agitator plate 70 as described above. In an embodiment where the agitator plate 70 and lower end 78 of the handle 62 are both threaded 75, the upper end 76 of the elongated handle 62 can be rotated from above the container 54 and support structure 66 to screw the lower threaded end 75 into and out of the bore 72 while the agitator plate 70 is positioned horizontally within the enclosure 56. In particular, the agitator plate 70 is inserted into the enclosure 56 via the bottom opening 84, and then the lower end 78 of the handle 62 can be threadinglyattached thereto.
[0065] Referring to FIGS. 14 and 16, in one aspect, the first and second orifices58 and 69 and the elongated handle 62 are keyed to prevent twisting or rotation of the elongated handle 62. For example, in FIG. 14, the first and second orifices 58 and 69 each include a male protuberance 61 and 64 extending inwardly and sized to conform to and interface with an elongated channel 79 extending a length along the upper portion 76 and lower portion 78 of the handle 62, as shown in FIG. 16. Where the lower end of the handle 62 is threaded 75 with the bore 72 of the agitator plate 70, the length of the handle 62 is sized such that the lower end 78 can be extended through the opening 84 and is positioned below the container 54 to thereby allow the user to attach the agitator plate 70 onto the lower end 78 of the handle 62 from beneath the container 54.
[0066] In one embodiment, a coil spring 73 can be provided between the lower surface of the upper support member 67 and the upper surface of the top sidewall 52s. The spring 73 is provided to automatically retract (raise) the handle 62 and drive the agitator plate 70 upward within the enclosure 54 after the user presses the handle 62 in a downward direction. Preferably the coil spring 73 is cone shaped, although such shape is not limiting, as a well-known linear- shaped coil spring can be implemented. The upper portion 76 of the handle 62 has a diameter that is greater than the diameter of the lower portion 79 such that a shoulder 77 is formed between the upper and lower portions of the handle 62. The shoulder 77 has a diameter greater than the diameter of the upper portion of the coil spring 73 and the lower portion 78 of the handle 62 extends through the center of the coil spring 73.
[0067] Referring now to FIG. 11 , when the user pushes downward on the handle 62, the shoulder 77 forces the spring 73 to compress and move downward. When the user releases the handle, 62, the spring 73 automatically returns to its normal uncompressed state and thereby lifts the handle 62 and agitator plate 70 in an upward vertical direction. In one aspect, a recess or annular groove 74 can be formed in the upper surface of the top sidewall 52sand sized to provide a seat for and thereby prevent lateral slippage of the lower end of the coil spring 73. As the user moves the handle 62 of the plunger 60 down and back up again relative to the container 54, the agitator 70 will assist in breaking up any clumps of coffee grinds therein to better expose more surface area of the coffee grinds to the water. Moreover,the down and up movement of the plunger 60 will promote movement of the surrounding liquid (in the cup) into and out of the container 54 via the mesh sidewalls 82tothereby further enhance and quicken the extraction processes in the water.
[0068] Although the spring 73 is illustratively depicted as being positioned between the upper support member 67 and upper sidewall 52s, such location is not considered limiting as other embodiments can be implemented such as, for example, the spring can be positioned to circumscribe the lower handle portion 78 of the handle 62 between the bottom interior surface of the upper sidewall 525 and the top surface of the agitator plate 70 to automatically raise the plunger 60 after being pressed downwards. Alternatively, the spring can be a one or more of springs attached to and radiating downwardly from the upper handle portion 76 of the handle 62 to the top of the upper sidewall 525 and which are compressed when the user pushes the handle 62 downwardly and automatically raise the plunger when released. In yet another embodiment, the spring 73 can be positioned about the upper handle portion 76 between the shoulder 77 and the bottom surface of the upper support member 67. As well, the spring 73 can be one or more springs which are configured and biased such that it will automatically push the plunger 60 downwards, instead of upwards when the user releases the handle 62.
[0069] Although the infusion press apparatus SO has been described and illustrated as being rectangular in shape, such shape is not limiting as a person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the shape of the infusion press 50 can be cylindrical, oval or any other three- dimensional shape suitable to retain and permit the beverage material to seep therefrom into the surrounding cup or container of water. Additionally, although the infusion press apparatus 50 is described having open sidewalls in which the mesh sheets 82 are positioned, in another embodiment, the sidewalls 52 are fabricated from a poured metal (e.g., stainless steel, aluminum or other non-corrosive metal) with a predetermined number and size of perforations formed in the sidewalls 52. For example, the perforations could be provided only through the four sidewalls 52 of the cube structure. A fine or very fine mesh sheet 89 can be provided within the enclosure 56 positioned adjacent to the four sidewalls to provide greater filtering of the beverage material.
[0070] During operation, a user pushes on the textured lower surface 92 of the panel 90 to slidably remove it from the slot 87 and thereby exposing the bottom opening 84 in the container 54. The agitator plate 70 is retracted and a predetermined amount of the beverage material 30 (e.g., coffee grinds) is inserted in the enclosure 56. The panel 90 is then inserted back into the opposing side channels 86 and slid back to the rear channel 85 until the bottom opening 84 is completely closed by the panel 90. The user is then ready to insert the beverage infusion apparatus 50 into a cup or mug of hot water to begin the brewing process. Once the infusion press apparatus 50 is resting on the bottom of the cup or mug, the coffee grinds will float within the enclosure and the extraction process will naturally begin. The user can press down on the plunger 60 to cause the agitator plate 70 to also move downward and drive the brewed/extracted coffee flavors from the grinds out of the container 54 via the mesh material 82 and into the surrounding cup of water. The user can repeatedly push the plunger down and up to accelerate the brewing process. The process is repeated until the desired strength and richness of the beverage material (e.g., coffee) is obtained. Following the completion of the brew, the panel 90can be retracted (and removed, if desired) and the agitator plate 70 can be used to push the spent grounds out of the apparatus 50 through the bottom opening 84. The plunger 60 can be pushed down so that it extends below the bottom of the container 51 in order to facilitate efficient cleaning of the apparatus 50 so that it is ready to be used again.
[0071] Referring now to FIG. 20 a disposable embodiment of the beverage infusion apparatus 120 of FIG. 11 is illustratively shown. The mesh sheets 82 are not shown on the sidewalls 52 of the container 54 to facilitate better understanding of the interior structure of the enclosure 56.The infusion apparatus 120 of FIG. 20 is the same as that shown with respect to FIG. 11 , except that the disposable apparatus 120 does not have a removable panel 90 to selectively open and close the bottom of the container 54. Rather, the infusion apparatus 120 is fabricated with the bottom wall omitted so that the plunger 60 can be inserted into the enclosure 56 such that the handle extends through the orifices 58 and 69 in a similar manner as in the embodiment of FIG. 1 1. The handle 62 and agitator plate 70 can be integrally fabricated by injection molding such that they are not separable. The tag 63 can be eliminated or optionally welded, snap fit or otherwise attached to the upper handle portion 76 after the plunger 60 is properly inserted in the enclosure 56. A predetermined amount of beverage material 30 (e.g., coffee) is prefilled within the enclosure 56 through the bottom opening 84. Thereafter, the bottom sidewall 52(, is placed over the bottom opening 84 and permanently sealed (e.g., welded) to thereby close the enclosure 56 and retain the beverage material. [0072] In one embodiment, the support members 68 are resilient such that the coil spring 73 of FIG. 11 can be eliminated. Further, the shoulder 77 of the elongated handle 62 is positioned above the upper support member 67. During operation, user presses the elongated handle 62 downward to drive the agitator plate 70 down within the enclosure. As the user presses down, the shoulder 77 contacts upper support member 67 which in turn bends the resilient support members 68 as the plunger 60 is pressed down into the enclosure 56. When the user releases the plunger 60, the support members 68 automatically return to their normal unbiased linear shape and raise the agitator plate 70 from the interior bottom surface 526 of the container 54. This action is repeated until the desired flavoring and richness is achieved. In another embodiment, the sidewalls 52 of the container 54 are formed by an enlarged upper solid portion as shown in FIG. 20. The mesh material 32 is provided beneath the enlarged solid portion in a similar manner as described above with respect to FIGS. 11 and 12. Where the volume of the beverage material 30 is higher than the height of the mesh sheets 32, the extended height of the solid portion and the reduced height of the mesh material 32 along the sidewalls 52 of the embodiment of FIG. 20 will direct a greater flow concentration of the extracted brew at the bottom portion of the beverage fusion apparatus 120 as compared to the embodiment of FIG. 11. A person of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the enlarged solid portion of the sidewalls 52 and the sealed bottom wall shown and discussed with respect to FIG. 20 can also be implemented in the embodiment of FIG. 11.
[0073] Referring now to FIGS. 21 and 22, a rack or stand 100 and dripping catch pan or tray 1 15 are illustratively shown for the reusable beverage infusion apparatus 50 of FIG. 11. The stand 100 and pan 115 can be used to hold the beverage infusion apparatus 50 in an upside down, i.e., inverted orientation to allow a user to easily open and close the panel 90 to insert die beverage material 30 into the enclosure 56 or to subsequently clean the contents from the container 54 after use. The stand 100 can bemade from stainless steel, aluminum, ceramic materials, plastic and biodegradable materials, and can be fabricated by injection molding, cast molding, welding,amongother well-known manufacturing techniques.
[0074] The stand 100 comprises a lower base 102, a first beverage apparatus support structure 106 at the upmost portion of the stand, a second beverage apparatus support structure 108 below the first beverage support structure 106, a drip pan support structure 110 raised above the lower base 102, and a plurality of vertical support rods interconnecting the base 102, apparatus support structures 106, 108 and drip pan support structure 110 together. The base 102 is illustratively formed from one or more elongated rods or base support members 102m, where "m" is an integer greater than zero. The first beverage apparatus support structure 106 is illustratively formed from a one or more elongated rods or support members 106n, where "n" is an integer greater than zero. The second beverage apparatus support structure 108 is illustratively formed from a one or more elongated rods or support members 108s, where "r" is an integer greater than zero.
Similarly, the catch pan support structure 106 is illustratively formed from a one or more elongated rods or base support members 106p, where "p" is an integer greater than zero. The base 102, first and second support structures 106, 108 and catch pan support structure 110 are illustratively rectangular in shape, although such shape is not considered as being limiting.
Moreover, the number of support members or rods for the base 102, first and second support structures 106, 108 and catch pan support structure 110 are not required to have equal values, where m≠ n≠ p≠ r. For example, the base 102 can be formed from a single oval shaped support member (e.g., m=l), the first and second beverage apparatus support structure 106, 108 are circular (e.g., n:i::l), and the pan support structure 110 is shaped as a square (e.g., p=4).
[0075]The base 102 has a perimeter or diameter that is greater than that of the first apparatus support structure 106 to provide greater stability. The base 102 and first support structure 106 are interconnected by afirst plurality of extending rods 104, e.g., four vertically extending rods 1041 through 104s(where "s" is an integer greater than zero) that slope inwardly and illustratively interconnected at their respective corners to define the overall pyramidal shape of the stand 100. The rectangular shape of the first apparatus support structure 106 forms an upper opening that is sized to receive the beverage infusion apparatus support structure 66 when inverted one-hundred and eighty degrees from its normal upright position. That is, the first apparatus support structure 106 supports the support members 68 of the beverage infusion apparatus 50 to support it in an inverted position. The first apparatus support structure 106 is positioned so that when the beverage infusion apparatus 50 is positioned on the stand 100, the bottom portion of the infusion apparatus 50 is above the stand 100 so that the panel 90 easily accessible from above and can be operated (opened and closed) as intended.
[0076] The second apparatus support structure 108 is positioned below the first apparatus support structure 106 and forms a second opening 107 that is sized to support the top surface of the upper support structure 67 of the beverage infusion apparatus 50. That is, the upper support structure 67 of the beverage infusion apparatus 50 isseated on the second apparatus support structure 108 when in its inverted position and the second opening 107 allows the elongated handle 82 to extend downwards therethrough towards the surface beneath the base 102. The second apparatus support structure 108 is connected to the four first vertically extending rods 104 illustratively by a second plurality of extending rods 112 (e.g., four vertical rods 112j through 112u), as illustratively shown in FIG. 21. Similarly, the pan support structure 110 is positioned below the second apparatus support structure 108 and above the base 102 by a third plurality ofextending rods 114 (e.g., four vertical rods 114] through 114t). The pan support structure 110 is spaced apart beneath the second apparatus support structure 108 a distance sufficient to allow the handle 62 of the plunger 60 to fully extend in a downward direction.
[0077] In another embodiment, the opening 107 of the second apparatus support structure 108 is sized to accommodate and receive the support members 68 and the opening 105 of the first apparatus support structure 106 is sized to receive and guide the sidewalls 52 of the infusion apparatus 50. The second apparatus support structure 108 is spaced beneath the first apparatus support structure 106 a predetermined height such that the upper support structure 67 and handle 62 extends through and is positioned below the second apparatus support structure 108, while the first apparatus support structure 106 circumscribes and prevents lateral movement of the infusion apparatus 50. In still another embodiment, the first and second apparatus support structures 106, 108 are spaced apart to enable the user to return the infusion apparatus to its normal upright orientation and place the bottom surface (e.g., panel 90) on the second apparatus support structure 108 of the stand and the first apparatus support structure 106 circumscribes the sidewalls 52 to prevent lateral movement. In any orientation, the pan 1 15 therebelow will catch and retain any undesired drippings from the infusion apparatus 50.
[0078] The pan support structure 110 has a perimeter or diameter less than that of the base 102 and illustratively has a pan opening 109 that is sized to receive the pan or tray 1 15 such as the pan 115 illustratively shown in FIG. 22. The pan or tray 115 includes a bottom portion 116 and at least one sidewall 117 to catch any liquid and beverage material drippings from the infusion beverage container 50 while being supported on the stand 10, e.g., in its inverted position.
Preferably, the bottom 1 16 of the pan 115 is supported about one-half to one inch above the height of the base 102 to facilitate ease of removal for purposes of emptying and cleaning.
Although the stand 100 is illustratively shown as being generally pyramidal in shape, those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that such shape is not limiting. For example, the number of vertical rods 104$, 112u and 114t, do not have to be equal such that s≠ t≠ u. Moreover, the third opening 109 formed by the rods 110 can be a solid shelf-like structure that supports the bottom surface of the pan 115.
[0079] During use, the stand 100 is positioned on a level surface such as a table top and the tray 115 is placed on and supported by the tray supports 110. The beverage infusion apparatus 50 is inverted to an up-side-down orientation with the handle 62 aligned over and pointing downward over the first and second openings 105 and 107. The infusion apparatus 50 is lowered such that the handle 62 passes through the stand openings 105 and 107 and comes to rest when the support members 68 of the beverage infusion apparatus 50 contact the second apparatus support structure 108 and the first support structure 106 circumscribes and guides the sidewalls 82 of the infusion apparatus 50. Advantageously, the first apparatus support members 106 prevent lateral movement of the infusion apparatus 50 Once the beverage infusion apparatus 50 is seated on the stand 100, die user can safely open (e.g., slide open) the removable panel 90 at the bottom portion of the beverage infusion apparatus 50 to expose the opening 84 and load a predetermined amount of beverage material (e.g., coffee grinds, tea leaves, fruit, spices, etc.) into the enclosure 56 and then replace the panel 90 to close the opening 84 and lock in the beverage material. The same procedure is repeated after the beverage infusion apparatus 50 has been used to make a beverage drink to open the enclosure 56 to clean out the used contents. Any overflow spillage during the loading of the beverage material or drippings after use of the apparatus 50 during the cleaning process will be caught by the drip pan 115 positioned below the beverage infusion apparatus 50. Accordingly, the stand 100 and tray 115 combination is especially desirable in, for example, a restaurant setting or other similar settings where patrons can enjoy the benefits of a fresh brewed cup of coffee or other beverage in a manner specific to their own taste
[0080] in the embodiments of FIGS. 1-8, the infusion apparatus 10 provides a way to make coffee in the single serve format that is superior to the existing commercially available single- serve methods and devices. The beverage infusion apparatus offers a unique alternative to similar products that already exist for various reasons. Compared to most competing products, the cubed or tetrahedral shaped container holds a significantly greater amount of coffee than a standard tea bag, which will improve taste and quality. The containeris purposely not completely filled in order to allow the grounds to be fully engulfed in the extracting liquid, which willpromote a more even extraction. Furthermore, the shape of the cube and structural integrity of the material will allow it to maintain its form, which facilitates better movement of the liquid through the container, thereby resulting in a betteroverall extraction.ln particular, when coffee grounds become wet, they tend to clump together, which can make it more difficult to maintain an even extraction. As the container is dunked into the cup and pulled back up, the cross- members running through the enclosure of the container will slice through and help break apart the clumps and allow for a more even extraction of each individual coffee ground.
[0081] With respect to the agitator-press embodiments 50 and 120 of FIGS. 11 through 20, as the plunger 60 is moved down and up, the movement causes the press plate to oscillate inside of the unit 50, 120 so that the surrounding liquid in the cup will be forced in and out of the container 54. As the liquid is being drawn into and forced out of the container 54, the beverage material will experience extremely turbulent conditions causing the beverage material 30 to quickly move and/or swirl, thereby promoting an efficient extraction.
[0082] The beverage infusion apparatus of the present invention can be a disposable unit made from a, recyclableor biodegradablematerial or can be a reusable unit illustratively made from stainless steel or other metal or ceramic material so that the only item that would need to be disposed of after each use is the beverage material itself. Given the level of public
dissatisfaction with the waste produced by most of the current single-serve coffee products, the biodegradability of the material can provide adistinct advantage over other coffee and tea infusion products in the current market.
[0083] The present beverage infusion apparatus has numerous advantages over other types of coffee brewing devices and techniques in the market place that will allow it to appeal to many different types of consumers in all different circumstances including, but not limited to:
[0084] No brewing machine is required - The infusion apparatus of the present invention require only soaking in the cup or container of liquid in which the infusion process will take place and wait a predetermined time for the extraction process to take place. The extraction process can be enhanced, i.e., accelerated and increased by providing a dunking motion and/or implementing a plunger to agitate and expose a greater surface area of the beverage material to the surrounding liquid (e.g., water) and thereby increase the extraction flow process.
[0085] Morning Rush - For those coffee drinkers that do not want to spend much time or money on their morning coffee, the present beverage infusion apparatus is a good solution and aless expensive, better quality alternativeto the K-Cup. Consumers will only need to boil water at home, fill their travel mug with the hot water, and place the beverage infusion apparatus in the travel mug so that they can brew on the go.
[0086] The Coffee Aficionado- As coffee has grown in popularity, many coffee consumers donot want to simply be considered coffee drinkers; rather, they want to be considered coffeeconnoisseurs. The coffee connoisseurs are coffee drinkers who know their favorite beans, ideal grinds and specific way they like their coffee prepared. For suchindividuals, a product that offers them complete control over the brewing of their coffee is particularly attractive. The user will have control over factors like brewing time and degree of agitation, which heavily impact the flavor of the beverage.
[0087] The InstantCoffee Drinker - There is a portion of the instant coffee market that drinks instant coffee not because it is cheap or because it has a good flavor, but because it is convenient. These coffee drinkers most likely donot want to operate and then clean a coffee machine. They don't have one, don't want to buy one, or maybe it just isn't practical for them to use a coffee maker or K-Cup machine in the environment that they want to brewtheir coffee. As a result, the instant coffee drinkers are willing to accept what many would consider an inferior cup of coffee. The present beverage infusion apparatuses able to satisfy the constraints that this segment of the coffee drinking market has without sacrificing the quality of the coffee. Additionally, instant coffee drinkers already have access to hot water, which makes these people very strong potential consumers of this product.
[0088] Restaurants - The single serve format of the present infusion apparatus, e.g., the cube, allows restaurants to offer coffee similar to the way that tea is offered now. Patronswill be able to selecttheir infusion apparatus filled with a desired beverage, e.g., coffee and brew it themselves at the table. The restaurant simply needs to provide hot water. This has the ability to enhance the entire dessert experience as it will allow the restaurant to offer coffee from different origins and different flavors of coffee without having to brew multiple pots. Additionally, this format allows the customer to be assured that they are getting what they order. This may be an especially attractive benefit for the customers ordering decaf coffee, for example, after dinner and want to be sure that they are not drinking regular coffee late at night. Additionally, customers can be assured that the coffee is not brewed hours or even minutes before it is being serve because it is being brewed at die table. [0089] Office or Workplace - Coffee provided at the office or workplaceis typically brewed in bulk (e.g., a commercially available 12-20 cup drip coffee maker) or provided in the single-serve format ("K" cup). When brewed in bulk, the taste, quality, strength etc. is the same for every person having coffee. The current single-serve methods, typically lack in quality. With the present invention, users can bring their disposable or reusable beverage infusion apparatuswith them to the office, fill their cups or mugs with hot water (e.g., from the red tap on a water cooler), and brew a fresh cup of coffee at their desk precisely to their liking.
[0090] Portability - With the recent improvements in battery technology, products are being developed to keep beverages warm. These same products may eventuallybe used to heat water to a temperature that is capable of extracting the coffee flavor from the grinds. For example, a heating element that is plugged into a vehicle cigarette lighter could be used to heat water in a travel mug. Under these circumstances, coffee brewing could occur entirely on the go. For those that are overly concerned with time, ease, and convenience, the combination of the present beverage infusion apparatus with a portable water heating device canbe a very attractive system.
[0091] Parties - Any person hosting an event where there are many people with differing coffee preferences would be a strong potential customer for a product like this. The K-Cup has done a good job of satisfying many differing coffee preferences by allowing each person to pick their desired coffee and brew it individually. If the event has a large number of people though, the time that each K-Cup takes to brew could become an issue. Advantageously, the present beverage infusion apparatus, because it only needs hot water, would enable the host to provide guests with hot water and a variety of beveragecubes or other shaped beverage infusion containers. The entire party could then brew their coffeescontemporaneously.
[0092] Competition - Several beverage infusion products exist made by companies such as, for example,Maxwell House and Folgers, which offer consumers the ability to brew coffee by dunking what is essentially a conventional rectangular shaped tea-bag, filled with coffee into very hot water. As previously noted, there are two significantflaws with the products that currently exist to brew coffee in bags. First, a typical tea bag is not large enough to hold the volume of coffee that is needed for a good cup. Due to the limitations of these containers, the primary players in this sector of the single-serve market are using less than 5 grams of coffee in their product, which is significantly less than the amount used in K-Cups or the amount needed to make a good, flavorful cup of coffee. The second major flaw is the design of the brewing bags. These bags are in a flat rectangular shape, which restricts the movement of the coffee grounds, inhibiting the extraction process and presses the coffee together, limiting the flow of the liquid through the grounds. By using the beverage infusion apparatus, such as a cube or other three-dimensional container shaped design described herein, the volume inside the container is increased to allow for much more coffee to be used. For example, a cube-shaped infusion with a 1.5 inch side length apparatus canretain up to 14 grams of coffee and still have empty space left inside. This empty space can be beneficialto achieve an efficient extraction. In particular, the coffee grounds need to have enough space to move freely in the cube in order to become fully engulfed in the liquidand be evenly extracted. A fairly large amount of space is needed due to the tendency that coffee has to swell when it is mixed with hot water. The size and design of the present beverage infusion apparatus allows a more appropriate amount of coffee to fit in the container (e.g., cube) and promote a more effective extraction than the existing products, which results in a much greater quality cup of coffee.
[0093] The flow of liquidis important to ensure that all surfaces of each coffee grind or other beverage material is fully engulfed in the extracting liquid. The agitator-press design promotes an even greater extraction environment as it will force water to flow around the beverage material without having to implement a well-known brewing machine, to a more gentle brewing process.
[0094] Brewing Research - When coffee is steeped, the grounds are in contact with the water for much longer period of time. In order to avoid the undesirable flavors of over extracted coffee, a coarser grind may be more beneficial. Additionally, when the coffee grinds first come in contact with hot water, carbon dioxide is released, which if trapped in the cup, can negatively affect the taste of the coffee. While it is very difficult to circumvent this potential problem when using a coffee maker or K-Cup machine, the present beverage infusion apparatus can be dunked and removed for about thirty seconds to allow for the release of carbon dioxide to occur outside of the cup and limit the negative flavors that could ruin a good cup of coffee.
[0095] A typical coffee machine uses the drip method, which similar to a Keurig, continually introduces new, fresh, hot water to the coffee grounds until the process is complete. Compared with water that is already infused with coffee, this fresh, pure water causes a quicker extraction. The down side of this is that the time that it takes to extract the desired flavors from the grounds decreases and the undesirable flavors come out much more quickly. The present beverage infusion apparatushasa similar steeping method to the French pressin thatthe pressure or energy that is driving the extraction process decreases over time as the coffee is brewed. This is because the liquid that is extracting the flavor from the grounds is becoming less pure. For this reason, and the ability to agitate the beverage material while brewing, the brew from the infusion apparatus is more well-rounded and gradual, which produces a superior cup of coffee to those of the K-cup, drip tnachinecoffee, and the like.
[0096] Although the present apparatus is described in one embodiment as being provided with a flexible handle 20, such as a string (as typically used with tea bags), it is preferable to provide a non-flexible handle 20 attached to the container 12, which enables the user to dunk the infusion apparatus 10 at a faster rate than with a string attached to the container and it is further desirable that the apparatus is equipped with the agitator-press feature to further promote extraction.
When coffee is brewed, a separation between the grounds and some of the oils in the grounds takes place. When these oils are removed from the grounds; the buoyancy of the grounds changes allowing them to sink. Until this change occurs, the grounds have a tendency to rise to the surface, winch may inhibit ideal conditions for extraction. In the case that the buoyancy of the grounds cause the container to also rise to the surface, the generally rigid handle attached to the infusion apparatus can be used to press the containerback down into the liquid and submerge the grounds entirely. The structural integrity of the handle 20 that is attached to the container 12 is what will enable the user to force the cube into the water rather than simply dunking and removing it. By forcing the container down into the water and pulling it back up, the user will be able to effectively agitate the grounds and produce a good level of extraction.
[0097] While preferred embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described herein, it will be obvious that such embodiments are provided by way of example only.
Numerous variations, changes and substitutions will occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the invention herein. Accordingly, it is intended that the invention be limited only by the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Claims

I claim:
1. An infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage comprising:
a container including at least one wallhaving an interior surface and forming an enclosure for retaining a beverage infusion product; and
at least one cross-member extending within the enclosure from the interior surface of the at least one wall; wherein the at least one cross-member is a movable plate extending horizontally across the at least one wall and divides the enclosure into anuppersection and a lower section, at least a portion of the lower section being liquid-permeable, the beverage infusion product being provided in the enclosure and the at least one cross-member being configured to interface with and enhance extraction of flavor from the beverage infusion product, the at least one wall having a first orifice formed through the uppersection and configured to slidably receive an elongated handle having a first end attached to the plate within the enclosure and an opposing second end extending externally from the enclosure.
2. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein movement of the handle through the first orifice moves the plate within the enclosure and forces liquid infused by the beverage infusion product out through the enclosure of the container.
3. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the container includes an upper support member coupled over the container, the upper support member having a secondorificealigned with the first orifice and configured to slidably receive and guide tine second end of the elongated handle.
4. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein a second portion of the at least one wall forming the lowersection of the enclosure is fabricated from a non-porous material.
5. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the lowersection includes an opening into the enclosure and a removable panel positioned below the movable plate to selectively open and close the enclosure.
6. The infusion apparatus of claim 1, wherein the at least one wall includes six walls formed by a top wall, bottom wall and four side walls extending therebetween to form a hexahedron- shaped container.
7. The infusion apparatus of claim 6, wherein the bottom wall is fabricated from a non- porous material.
8. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the at least one wall includes five walls formed by a top wall and four side walls to form a polyhedron container having a bottom opening, each of the four side walls including at least one mesh structure.
9. The infusion apparatus of claim 8 further comprising a movable panel positioned below the movable plate to selectively open and close the bottom opening into the enclosure.
10. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , wherein moveable plate is formed of a liquid- impermeable material.
11. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 , whereinthe moveable plate includes spaced-apart openings therethrough.
12. The infusion apparatus of claim 3, wherein the handle and moveable plate define a plunger, said plunger cooperating with a spring to automatically move the moveable plate in a direction opposite to a direction of movement by a user.
13. The infusion apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a stand having a base and upper support member for supporting the infusion apparatus in an inverted orientation.
14. The infusion apparatus of claim 13 further comprising a pan disposed within the stand for catching drippings from the infusion apparatus.
15. An infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage comprising:
a container including at least one wallhaving an interior surface and forming an enclosure for retaining a beverage infusion product, wherein the at least one wall is liquid-permeable; and at least one cross-member extending within the enclosure from the interior surface of the at least one walland configured to interface with and enhance extraction of flavor from the beverage infusion product.
16. The infusion apparatus of claim 13 further comprising a handle extending from theleast one wall.
17. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the handle is a generally rigid, elongated handle having a longitudinal axis, with a first end attached to the container and an opposing distal second end extending therefrom.
18. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the at least one cross-member extends transversely at an acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the handle.
19. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the at least one cross-member extends within the enclosure from the at least one wall in a direction towards an opposing wall.
20. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the at least one wall of the container comprises a plurality of walls forming a polyhedron.
21. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the at least one wall of the container is fabricated from a mesh structure.
22. The infusion apparatus of claim 13, wherein the at least one wall of the container is fabricated from a woven fabric.
PCT/US2017/022194 2016-03-14 2017-03-13 Infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage WO2017160778A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201662307946P true 2016-03-14 2016-03-14
US62/307,946 2016-03-14

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2017160778A1 true WO2017160778A1 (en) 2017-09-21

Family

ID=58428378

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2017/022194 WO2017160778A1 (en) 2016-03-14 2017-03-13 Infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage

Country Status (1)

Country Link
WO (1) WO2017160778A1 (en)

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US561921A (en) * 1896-06-09 Tea-infuser
US1018684A (en) * 1911-06-03 1912-02-27 Arthur A Smith Coffee-pot.
CH505598A (en) * 1969-08-06 1971-04-15 Jacobs Joh & Co Containers for making beverages
US20050199129A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Glucksman Dov Z. Infusion beverage brewing system
WO2006051322A1 (en) * 2004-11-13 2006-05-18 Martin John Almond Infusing device
WO2007080461A1 (en) * 2006-01-10 2007-07-19 Hendrik Willem Kruger Beverage extraction

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US561921A (en) * 1896-06-09 Tea-infuser
US1018684A (en) * 1911-06-03 1912-02-27 Arthur A Smith Coffee-pot.
CH505598A (en) * 1969-08-06 1971-04-15 Jacobs Joh & Co Containers for making beverages
US20050199129A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Glucksman Dov Z. Infusion beverage brewing system
WO2006051322A1 (en) * 2004-11-13 2006-05-18 Martin John Almond Infusing device
WO2007080461A1 (en) * 2006-01-10 2007-07-19 Hendrik Willem Kruger Beverage extraction

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
None

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6007853A (en) Disposable beverage infuser
US5952028A (en) Disposable beverage insufer and method of making a beverage using the infuser
US5635233A (en) Methods for preparing a coffee, tea and milk beverage
US9290317B2 (en) Method for brewing beverage and cartridge containing infusible material
US5424083A (en) Self contained disposable coffee brewing device
US7258884B2 (en) Method employing a disposable brew basket for an electric coffee maker
US7856922B2 (en) Instant extraction cup
US10004353B2 (en) Method, device and capsule for brewing a beverage
US7152520B2 (en) Method and apparatus for collecting liquid and extracting tea essence from a tea bag
WO2015075020A1 (en) Device and method for brewing a beverage
US9723942B2 (en) Brewing and filtering device for coffee and tea
GB2300562A (en) A plunger filter infusion device
US8734874B1 (en) Beverage brewing lid and system and method incorporating such a lid
US20160007795A1 (en) 3 in 1 mini coffee tube as a container, a filter, and a stirring tool
US5799566A (en) Self-propelled moving-filter beverage maker
US3357340A (en) Coffee brewing apparatus
WO2017160778A1 (en) Infusion apparatus for preparing a beverage
EP2498652B1 (en) Accessory for beverage preparation
KR101651519B1 (en) Portable drip coffee extracting device
WO2008147308A1 (en) A disposable beverage infusion device and use of such device
JP3166151B2 (en) Drip bag
AU2015201017B2 (en) Method for brewing beverage and cartridge containing infusible material
WO2019106356A1 (en) Beverage making assembly
WO2005060799A1 (en) Method and apparatus for collecting liquid and extracting tea essence from a tea bag
IES86109Y1 (en) A beverage system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: DE

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application

Ref document number: 17714081

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1

122 Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase

Ref document number: 17714081

Country of ref document: EP

Kind code of ref document: A1