WO2017138228A1 - Elevator rope and manufacturing method therefor - Google Patents

Elevator rope and manufacturing method therefor Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2017138228A1
WO2017138228A1 PCT/JP2016/085404 JP2016085404W WO2017138228A1 WO 2017138228 A1 WO2017138228 A1 WO 2017138228A1 JP 2016085404 W JP2016085404 W JP 2016085404W WO 2017138228 A1 WO2017138228 A1 WO 2017138228A1
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Prior art keywords
rope
fiber
load bearing
load
bearing portion
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PCT/JP2016/085404
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French (fr)
Japanese (ja)
Inventor
晋也 内藤
肥田 政彦
道雄 村井
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三菱電機株式会社
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Priority to JP2016023436 priority Critical
Priority to JP2016-023436 priority
Application filed by 三菱電機株式会社 filed Critical 三菱電機株式会社
Publication of WO2017138228A1 publication Critical patent/WO2017138228A1/en

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66BELEVATORS; ESCALATORS OR MOVING WALKWAYS
    • B66B7/00Other common features of elevators
    • B66B7/06Arrangements of ropes or cables
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B1/00Constructional features of ropes or cables
    • D07B1/02Ropes built-up from fibrous or filamentary material, e.g. of vegetable origin, of animal origin, regenerated cellulose, plastics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B1/00Constructional features of ropes or cables
    • D07B1/16Ropes or cables with an enveloping sheathing or inlays of rubber or plastics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B1/00Constructional features of ropes or cables
    • D07B1/06Ropes or cables built-up from metal wires, e.g. of section wires around a hemp core
    • D07B1/0673Ropes or cables built-up from metal wires, e.g. of section wires around a hemp core having a rope configuration
    • D07B1/0686Ropes or cables built-up from metal wires, e.g. of section wires around a hemp core having a rope configuration characterised by the core design
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2201/00Ropes or cables
    • D07B2201/20Rope or cable components
    • D07B2201/2047Cores
    • D07B2201/2052Cores characterised by their structure
    • D07B2201/2055Cores characterised by their structure comprising filaments or fibers
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2201/00Ropes or cables
    • D07B2201/20Rope or cable components
    • D07B2201/2047Cores
    • D07B2201/2052Cores characterised by their structure
    • D07B2201/2065Cores characterised by their structure comprising a coating
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2201/00Ropes or cables
    • D07B2201/20Rope or cable components
    • D07B2201/2047Cores
    • D07B2201/2067Cores characterised by the elongation or tension behaviour
    • D07B2201/2068Cores characterised by the elongation or tension behaviour having a load bearing function
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2205/00Rope or cable materials
    • D07B2205/20Organic high polymers
    • D07B2205/2032Polyacrylics
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2205/00Rope or cable materials
    • D07B2205/20Organic high polymers
    • D07B2205/2046Polyamides, e.g. nylons
    • D07B2205/205Aramides
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2205/00Rope or cable materials
    • D07B2205/20Organic high polymers
    • D07B2205/2096Poly-p-phenylenebenzo-bisoxazole [PBO]
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2205/00Rope or cable materials
    • D07B2205/30Inorganic materials
    • D07B2205/3007Carbon
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D07ROPES; CABLES OTHER THAN ELECTRIC
    • D07BROPES OR CABLES IN GENERAL
    • D07B2501/00Application field
    • D07B2501/20Application field related to ropes or cables
    • D07B2501/2007Elevators

Abstract

This elevator rope comprises: a rope core which has a load-bearing portion that comprises synthetic fibers and a coating portion that covers the outer periphery of the load-bearing portion; and a plurality of steel strands which comprise the stranded wires wound around the outer periphery of the rope core. The interfiber porosity of the synthetic fibers of the load-bearing portion is 17% or less. When a 1% tensile strain is applied to the rope core, a stress of 50 MPa or more is generated.

Description

Elevator rope and manufacturing method thereof

The present invention relates to an elevator rope having a synthetic fiber rope core and a method of manufacturing the same.

In a conventional elevator rope, a core rope is arranged as a rope core at the center of the rope. The core rope is generally configured as a three-pipe rope formed by twisting three core rope strands together. Each core rope strand is composed of a number of yarns. Each yarn is configured by bundling fibers. A plurality of steel strands are twisted around the outer periphery of the core rope.

In the elevator rope having such a configuration, the steel strand plays a role of bearing a load applied in the longitudinal direction of the elevator rope, and the core rope plays a role of maintaining the shape of the elevator rope.

The elevator rope is loaded with the weight of the car, the weight of the counterweight, and the weight of the elevator rope itself. In a high-rise building, the lift distance of the car is long, so the length of the elevator rope used is also long. As the length of the elevator rope becomes longer, the influence of the weight of the elevator rope itself becomes larger, so the maximum lifting distance of the car is limited by the strength of the rope and the weight of the rope. That is, in order to increase the lifting distance of the car, a light and high strength rope having a higher mass specific strength (strength / weight per unit length) is required.

On the other hand, in the conventional hybrid rope, when the braid pitch of the fiber rope constituting the rope center is L and the diameter of the high strength synthetic fiber rope is d, the value of L / d is 6.7 or more. Thus, the strength utilization rate of the fiber is improved. The strength utilization ratio is the ratio of the tensile strength of the synthetic fiber rope to the tensile strength of the synthetic fiber. Such a hybrid rope is lighter and has a tensile strength equal to or higher than that of a rope having an IWRC (IndependentInRope Core) disposed on the rope core (see, for example, Patent Document 1).

Further, in the conventional synthetic fiber rope, a plurality of strands each having a tubular fabric woven with synthetic fiber warps and wefts and a plurality of synthetic fiber cores aligned in the tubular fabric Are twisted together or combined. Thereby, the intensity utilization rate is increased (for example, refer to Patent Document 2).

Japanese Patent No. 5478718 JP 2014-1111851 A

Usually, an elevator rope is used in a load range of approximately 10% of its breaking strength, but the strain in the tensile direction of the entire rope at this time is about 1% or less than 1%. In the hybrid rope as in Patent Document 1, although the strength utilization factor is high, the load when a strain of 1% is generated in the tensile direction is insignificant. For this reason, when used as an elevator rope, that is, when used within a load load range of 10% of the breaking strength, there is almost no effect that the load of the elevator rope is borne by the synthetic fiber rope.

Also, in the synthetic fiber rope of Patent Document 2, for the same reason, the load when a strain of 1% is generated in the tensile direction is low. Therefore, the synthetic fiber rope of Patent Document 2 is used as the rope core of the elevator rope. Even if it is used, the steel strand virtually bears the load, and the effect of bearing the load on the rope core is poor.

The present invention has been made to solve the above-described problems, and can impose a larger load on the rope core to reduce the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand to the rope cross-sectional area. It is possible to obtain an elevator rope capable of reducing the overall weight and improving the mass specific strength, and a method for manufacturing the same.

An elevator rope according to the present invention includes a rope core having a load bearing portion made of synthetic fiber and a covering portion covering the outer periphery of the load bearing portion, and a plurality of steels made of a stranded wire wound around the outer periphery of the rope core. The interfiber porosity of the synthetic fiber in the load bearing portion is 17% or less, and the rope core generates a stress of 50 MPa or more when applied with a tensile strain of 1%.
Moreover, the manufacturing method of the elevator rope which concerns on this invention is a rope core which has a load bearing part which consists of synthetic fibers, and the coating | coated part which covers the outer periphery of a load bearing part, and the several wound wound around the outer periphery of a rope core A method for manufacturing an elevator rope including steel strands, the method including a step of winding a plurality of steel strands around an outer periphery of a rope core having a load bearing portion whose inter-fiber porosity is 17% or less in advance.

The elevator rope and the manufacturing method thereof according to the present invention can reduce the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand to the cross-sectional area of the rope by placing a larger load on the rope core, thereby reducing the overall weight and The mass specific strength can be improved.

It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 1 of this invention. FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line II-II in FIG. It is a graph which compares and shows the relationship between distortion and tensile stress about three types of synthetic fiber ropes. It is explanatory drawing which compares and shows the cross-sectional enlarged photograph of the load-bearing part of the rope core of 22% of the inter-fiber void ratio, and the cross-sectional enlarged photograph of the load-bearing part of the rope core with the inter-fiber space ratio of 11%. It is a graph which shows the relationship between the fiber void ratio of the load bearing part in the rope which bundled the fiber strand which twisted the aramid fiber, and the generated stress in 1% distortion of a rope core. It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 2 of this invention. FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line VII-VII in FIG. 6. It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 3 of this invention. FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along line IX-IX in FIG. 8. It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 4 of this invention. It is sectional drawing which follows the XI-XI line of FIG. It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 5 of this invention. FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view taken along line XIII-XIII in FIG. 12. It is a side view which shows the elevator rope by Embodiment 6 of this invention. FIG. 15 is a sectional view taken along line XV-XV in FIG. 14. It is explanatory drawing which shows the various measured values and calculated values about Examples 1 to 6 and Comparative Examples 1 and 2.

Hereinafter, embodiments for carrying out the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings.
Embodiment 1 FIG.
1 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 1 of the present invention, and FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line II-II in FIG. The elevator rope has a rope core 1 and a plurality (8 in this example) of steel strands 2 made of twisted wires arranged on the outer periphery of the rope core 1 and twisted together.

The rope core 1 has a load bearing part 3 disposed in the center and a synthetic fiber covering part 4 covered on the outer periphery of the load bearing part 3. In FIG. 1, the steel strand 2 is partially removed to show the rope core 1, and the covering portion 4 is partially removed to show the load bearing portion 3.

The load bearing part 3 is composed of a fiber assembly having a tensile strength of 20 cN / dtex or more and a tensile elastic modulus of 500 cN / dtex or more. Further, when 1% tensile strain is applied to the rope core 1, that is, when 1% tensile strain is generated, the stress generated in the rope core 1 is 50 MPa or more.

Here, the strain is a value based on the length when a load of 0.1 kN is applied to the rope core 1. The stress is calculated from the apparent cross-sectional area of the rope core 1 when a load of 0.1 kN is applied to the rope core 1. It is assumed that the outer diameter of the rope core 1 is 10 mm when a load of 0.1 kN is applied to the rope core 1. Mark on the rope in the longitudinal direction at 1000mm intervals, and pull until the distance between the marks is 1010mm. If the load generated at this time is 15 kN, the stress is (15 x 1000) ÷ [(10 ÷ 2) 2 x π] = 191 MPa
It becomes.

Examples of the fiber used for the load bearing part 3 include carbon fiber, polyparaphenylene benzoxazole fiber, aramid fiber, and polyarylate fiber. Although it does not specifically limit as a fiber used for the coating | coated part 4, A fiber with high melting | fusing point is preferable, for example, a carbon fiber, an aramid fiber, a polyarylate fiber, a polyethylene terephthalate fiber, a polybutylene terephthalate fiber, a polyphenylene sulfide fiber, a polyamide Examples thereof include fibers and fluororesin fibers.

The load bearing portion 3 has a role of sharing the load when a tensile load is applied to the elevator rope and reducing the load applied to the outer steel strand 2. The covering portion 4 has a role of preventing the fibers of the load bearing portion 3 from coming into direct contact with the steel strand 2 and preventing the load bearing portion 3 from being damaged by friction.

The inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing part 3 is 17% or less. The rope core 1 in which the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing portion 3 is 17% or less generates a high load only by applying a slight distortion.

The reason why such an effect appears when the inter-fiber porosity is 17% or less is as follows. In a curve showing the relationship between elongation and load when a synthetic fiber rope is pulled, so-called load strain curve, there are two-stage regions. In the initial stage of tension, there is a region called a structural elongation region, that is, a region where only a minute load is generated even when a tensile strain is applied. Further, when a tensile strain is applied, there is a region called a material elongation region, that is, a region where a high load is generated.

The structural elongation region depends on how the synthetic fiber rope is twisted, and the greater the twist angle, the greater the structural elongation. The material elongation region depends on the physical properties of the fiber, and the higher the elastic modulus of the fiber used in the synthetic fiber rope, the higher the load generated per constant strain.

In order to solve the problem of generating a high load with a tensile strain of 1% or less, it is necessary to minimize the structural elongation region. The structural elongation region is a stage where the gaps between the fibers of the synthetic fiber rope which is a fiber assembly are clogged. For this reason, in order to reduce a structural elongation area | region, it turned out that it is necessary to make the twist angle of a fiber small and to reduce the space | gap between fibers.

There are roughly two methods for reducing the gaps between the fibers. One is a method of compressing a synthetic fiber rope, which is a fiber assembly, in the radial direction. The other is a method of pulling the rope, which is a fiber assembly, in the axial direction to align the fibers. Here, the latter method of aligning the fibers is particularly effective in reducing the structural elongation region of the synthetic fiber rope.

In Embodiment 1, by applying a predetermined tensile load to the rope core 1 once or a plurality of times, the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing portion 3 is reduced to 17% or less. The step of applying a predetermined tensile load may be performed after the rope core 1 is formed by the load bearing portion 3 and the covering portion 4 and before the steel strand 2 is wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1. Alternatively, it may be performed on the load bearing part 3 before the outer periphery of the load bearing part 3 is covered with the coating part 4.

The tensile load can be applied once or a plurality of times by a pretensioning device for wire rope, for example.

The lower limit of the inter-fiber porosity is not particularly set, but is preferably 10% or more. If it is less than 10%, the plastic deformation of the cross-sectional shape of the fiber becomes large, which may affect the physical properties of the fiber. From these viewpoints, the inter-fiber porosity is preferably 10 to 17%, more preferably 10 to 15%, and particularly preferably 12 to 13%.

The value of the predetermined tensile load is not particularly limited, but is preferably 5 to 40%, more preferably 15 to 30% of the breaking load of the load bearing portion 3. If it is less than 5%, the fibers are not sufficiently aligned, and the inter-fiber porosity may not be sufficiently reduced. Moreover, when it exceeds 40%, a part of fiber may fracture | rupture and the breaking strength of the rope core 1 may be reduced.

FIG. 3 shows the influence of the twist of the synthetic fiber rope and the void ratio between the fibers on the load strain curve. In FIG. 3, black squares indicate data of a three-strand rope made of aramid fiber. Further, black circles indicate data of a rope in which fiber strands obtained by twisting aramid fibers are bundled and the inter-fiber porosity is 22%. Further, white circles show data on a rope in which a load of 30% of the breaking load is applied in advance to a rope bundled with fiber strands obtained by twisting aramid fibers and the inter-fiber porosity is 11%.

These data show that with a tensile load of 0.1 kN applied to the synthetic fiber rope, marks are added to the synthetic fiber rope at 1000 mm intervals, and the tensile load is increased from there. It was created by recording changes in Note that the distortion (%) on the horizontal axis in FIG.
[(Mark interval at specified load mm) -1000mm] / 1000mm × 100
The amount of distortion calculated by the equation

As shown in FIG. 3, the rope with only the lower twist in which the influence of twisting is reduced generates a load in the low strain region as compared with the three-strike rope. It can also be seen that by reducing the inter-fiber porosity of the rope from 22% to 11%, a load is generated in a lower strain region, and a stress of 88 MPa is generated at 1% strain.

For reference, FIG. 4 compares a cross-sectional enlarged photograph of the load bearing part 3 of the rope core 1 with a 22% inter-fiber porosity and a cross-sectional enlarged photograph of the load bearing part 3 of the rope core 1 with an inter-fiber space ratio of 11%. It is explanatory drawing shown. From FIG. 4, it can be seen that the gap between the fibers can be greatly reduced by applying a load of 30% of the breaking load to the synthetic fiber rope in advance.

FIG. 5 is a graph showing the relationship between the inter-fiber void ratio of the load bearing portion 3 and the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 in a rope bundled with fiber strands obtained by twisting aramid fibers. From the relationship shown in FIG. 5, it can be seen that the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing portion 3 may be reduced to 17% or less in order for the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 to be 50 MPa or more. Moreover, if the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing part 3 is 15% or less, the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 can be stabilized to 50 MPa or more.

The inter-fiber porosity is measured by preparing a sample for cross-sectional observation under a load of 0.1 kN or less, and taking a cross-sectional observation image as shown in FIG. However, it should not be observed after the steel strand 2 is wound around the outer periphery. This is because, when observed after the steel strand 2 is wound around the outer periphery, the inter-fiber porosity may change due to the force from the outer periphery.

As for the inter-fiber porosity, the sum of the fiber cross-sectional areas in the observation image as shown in FIG. 4 is A, and the area of the other part, that is, the area obtained by subtracting the sum of the fiber cross-sectional areas from the entire observation image is B. In this case, [B ÷ (A + B) × 100]. In FIG. 4, a circular and dark portion is a fiber cross section.

The covering portion 4 is formed by winding a fiber around the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 or knitting with the fiber, and the rope core 1 of the first embodiment is completed. The fibers of the covering portion 4 may be impregnated with elevator rope grease as necessary. By impregnating the fiber of the covering portion 4 with the rope grease, the rope grease can be supplied from the covering portion 4 to the steel strand 2 when used as an elevator rope, which is effective in suppressing rust of the steel strand 2. .

Further, the elevator rope of the first embodiment has a structure in which eight steel strands 2 are wound around the rope core 1, for example, 8 × S (19), 8 × W (19) defined in JISG3525. Or 8 × Fi (25) structure.

The elevator rope composed of the rope core 1 having such a configuration and the steel strand 2 has 8 × S (19), 8 × W (19) having a conventional triple-strand synthetic fiber rope as the rope core 1. Or, compared to 8 × Fi (25) rope, the breaking load increases, and the mass specific strength (kN / kg / m) obtained by dividing the breaking strength (kN) by the weight per unit length (kg / m) is 160 kN / kg / m or more, preferably 180 kn / kg / m or more.

The generated load at 1% elongation increases, and the generated stress divided by the cross-sectional area calculated from the nominal rope diameter is 80MPa or more, more preferably 90MPa or more. is there. The nominal rope diameter represents the diameter of the outer circumference of the elevator rope and is also referred to as the nominal rope diameter or the nominal rope diameter. Moreover, the weight reduction of the whole can be achieved by arrange | positioning the lightweight and high intensity | strength rope core 1 as a substitute of a steel wire in the center of steel ropes.

Therefore, a larger load can be borne on the rope core 1, and the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the rope cross-sectional area can be reduced, thereby reducing the overall weight and improving the mass specific strength. be able to.

Embodiment 2. FIG.
6 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 2 of the present invention, and FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line VII-VII in FIG. In the second embodiment, the load bearing portion 3 is impregnated with the flexible resin 5 and cured. As the flexible resin 5, a resin having a low viscosity before curing and having flexibility after curing is preferable. If the viscosity before curing is high, it is difficult to sufficiently impregnate the fibers of the load bearing portion 3. Moreover, if the flexibility after curing is poor, the entire rope core 1 becomes hard and the flexibility of the elevator rope is impaired. Specifically, the hardness of the flexible resin 5 after curing is desirably 50A to 70A.

Also, the flexible resin 5 is preferably a resin that can be cured in a short time by some trigger from the viewpoint of manufacturing. From the above points, examples of the suitable flexible resin 5 include a two-component thermosetting urethane resin.

The process of impregnating the flexible resin 5 between the fibers of the load bearing portion 3 and curing it is performed, for example, as follows. First, in the step of making a fiber assembly of the load bearing portion 3, when bundling smaller units of fiber strands, the fiber strands are impregnated with a thermosetting flexible resin 5 before curing. Thereafter, the fiber strands are bundled while applying a load to the fiber strand, and subsequently heated while applying a tensile load to the fiber assembly to cure the resin. The tensile load to be applied is the same as in the first embodiment.

Thereby, a fiber assembly of the load bearing part 3 cured with a resin can be obtained in a state where the inter-fiber porosity is reduced to 17% or less. Other configurations and manufacturing methods are the same as those in the first embodiment.

In such an elevator rope, in addition to the same effects as those of the first embodiment, the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing portion 3 is also the load burden when bent by winding during production and bending during use. It is possible to prevent an increase from returning to the value before applying the tensile load to the portion 3. That is, even when the elevator rope is bent by aligning the fibers of the load bearing portion 3 and impregnating and hardening the load resin 3 with the flexible resin 5 in a state in which the inter-fiber porosity is reduced. The relative positions of each other can be fixed, and the reduced inter-fiber space ratio can be maintained.

The resin used for the flexible resin 5 is not limited to the two-component thermosetting urethane resin.
The method of impregnating and curing the flexible resin 5 is not limited to the above example.

Embodiment 3 FIG.
8 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 3 of the present invention, and FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line IX-IX in FIG. The rope core 1 of Embodiment 3 has a load bearing portion 3 disposed at the center and a synthetic resin coating portion 6 that is coated on the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 by extrusion molding.

As the synthetic resin used for the covering portion 6, a resin having high flexibility and wear resistance and a low coefficient of friction is preferable. If the flexibility is poor, the coated rope core 1 and the elevator rope using the rope core 1 are difficult to bend, and the covering portion 6 may be damaged by repeated bending. Moreover, when abrasion resistance is low, the coating | coated part 6 may be damaged by contact abrasion with the steel strand 2, and there exists a possibility that the lifetime as an elevator rope may fall. Furthermore, when the friction coefficient is high, the frictional force between the steel strands 2 is increased, and the elevator rope may be difficult to bend.

Furthermore, as the synthetic resin used for the covering portion 6, a resin that can be molded at a temperature lower than the melting point of the fiber used in the load bearing portion 3 is preferable. Taking these into consideration, examples of suitable resins used for the covering portion 6 include polyethylene and polypropylene.

When forming the covering portion 6 on the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3, it can be formed by the same method as a method of covering a linear object such as an electric wire with a resin using an extruder. Other configurations and manufacturing methods are the same as those in the first embodiment.

In such an elevator rope, in addition to the same effects as in the first embodiment, the covering portion 6 can be formed on the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 in a shorter time, and the productivity of the rope core 1 is improved. Can do.

In addition, the resin used for the coating | coated part 6 is not limited to said example.

Embodiment 4 FIG.
Next, FIG. 10 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 4 of the present invention, and FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along line XI-XI in FIG. In Embodiment 4, the load bearing part 3 is impregnated with the flexible resin 5 and cured. Further, the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 is covered with a covering portion 6 by extrusion molding. That is, the fourth embodiment is a combination of the second embodiment and the third embodiment.

Such an elevator rope can obtain the same effects as those of the second and third embodiments.

Embodiment 5 FIG.
12 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 5 of the present invention, and FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along line XIII-XIII in FIG. In the fifth embodiment, 12 steel strands 2 are wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1. The configuration of the rope core 1 is the same as that of the second embodiment in FIG. 12, but may be the same as that of the first, third, or fourth embodiment. Other configurations and manufacturing methods are the same as those in the first to fourth embodiments.

In such an elevator rope, the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the cross-sectional area of the elevator rope is lower than that of the structure in which the eight steel strands 2 shown in the first to fourth embodiments are wound. The elevator rope is lightened. Specifically, when 8 steel strands 2 are used, the above-mentioned cross-sectional area ratio is 46%, and when 12 steel strands 2 are used, the above-mentioned cross-sectional area ratio is 36%. . The sectional area of the elevator rope is calculated from the nominal diameter of the rope.

Thus, the diameter of the rope core 1 can be increased even with an elevator rope having the same diameter as the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 is reduced, and the load applied to the rope core 1 is increased. Can do. As a result, the mass specific strength of the elevator rope can be further improved. As shown in Embodiment 5, the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the cross-sectional area of the entire rope is particularly preferably 40% or less.

In addition, although the example which used the 12 steel strands 2 was shown in Embodiment 5, the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 is further reduced using the 13 or more steel strands 2, and an elevator is used. It is also possible to further reduce the weight of the rope.

Embodiment 6 FIG.
14 is a side view showing an elevator rope according to Embodiment 6 of the present invention, and FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view taken along XV-XV in FIG. In the sixth embodiment, the load bearing part 3 of the rope core 1 has a structure in which a fiber that has been twisted is further twisted. Moreover, the length when the load bearing part 3 is linear is L, and the length when the load twisting part 3 is untwisted to form the straight-twisted fiber constituting the load bearing part 3 When L0 is L0, L0 ÷ L is 1.1 or less.

That is, in the first to fifth embodiments and the sixth embodiment, whether the load bearing portion 3 is a bundle of fibers obtained by twisting fibers and whether L0 ÷ L is twisted at 1.1 or less. It is different in that.

The method of twisting the under-twisted fiber includes three-stroke or eight-beat. In addition, as in the second and fourth embodiments, the load bearing portion 3 may be impregnated and cured with a flexible resin.

The covering portion may be made of synthetic fiber as in the first and second embodiments, or may be made of synthetic resin extruded as in the third and fourth embodiments. Further, eight steel strands may be wound around the rope core 1 as in the first to fourth embodiments, and twelve steel strands may be wound around the rope core 1 as in the fifth embodiment. It may be attached.

In such an elevator rope, the load bearing portion 3 has a structure in which the fiber that has been twisted is further twisted by, for example, three-stroke or eight-beat, so that the fiber may fray during production, When winding up, it does not become extremely flat and the cross-sectional shape does not collapse. Moreover, since L0 / L is 1.1 or less, the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 is increased, and the above manufacturing problems are less likely to occur.

The configurations of Embodiments 1 to 6 can be applied to elevator ropes having any outer diameter.
Moreover, the outer diameter of the rope core 1 is appropriately set with respect to the outer diameter of the elevator rope.
Furthermore, the wire configuration of each steel strand 2 is not particularly limited.
Furthermore, the configuration of the present invention can be applied not only to the main rope that suspends the car and the counterweight but also to the compen- sion rope that is suspended from the car and the counterweight.

Examples and comparative examples will be shown below to explain the effects of the present invention.
Example 1.
Para-aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (manufactured by Toray DuPont) 1670 dtex twisted yarn is twisted and 3 twisted yarns are bundled into 12 strands, and 8 strands are bundled into load bearing portion 3 . Next, the polyester fiber Tetoron 1670T-360-705M (Toray Industries, Inc.) 1670dtex twisted yarn is twisted six times, and the six twisted yarns are wound around the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 to form a covering portion 4 having a diameter of 10 mm. A rope core 1 was produced.

The load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing portion 3 was applied to the rope core 1 over the entire length of the rope core 1. Then, eight steel strands 2 were wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1 after applying a load of 30% of the design breaking load value twice, with a 50 kgf load applied to the rope core 1. 1 Φ14mm 8 × S (19) elevator rope was obtained. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the rope cross-sectional area calculated from the rope nominal diameter of 14 mm was 46%.

Example 2
Para-aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (manufactured by Toray DuPont) 1670 dtex twisted yarn is twisted and 3 twisted yarns are bundled into 12 strands, and 8 strands are bundled into load bearing portion 3 . Next, the load bearing part 3 is impregnated with a two-component mixed polyurethane flexible resin 5, HysolU-10FL (Henkel), and a load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing part 3 is applied. The flexible resin 5 was cured by heating at 150 ° C. for 5 minutes.

Next, the polyester fiber Tetoron 1670T-360-705M (Toray Industries, Inc.) 1670dtex twisted yarn is twisted six times, and the six twisted yarns are wound around the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 to form a covering portion 4 having a diameter of 10 mm. A rope core 1 was produced.

The eight steel strands 2 were wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1 with a load of 50 kgf applied to the rope core 1 to obtain an 8 × S (19) elevator rope having a diameter of 14 mm of Example 2. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the rope cross-sectional area calculated from the rope nominal diameter of 14 mm was 46%.

Example 3 FIG.
High-density polyethylene with a thickness of 0.5 to 1 mm on the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 by extrusion coating of Novatec HE121 (manufactured by Nippon Polyethylene), which is a high-density polyethylene, without using the polyester fiber Tetron Except having provided the coating | cover, it carried out similarly to Example 1, and obtained the Φ14mm 8 * S (19) elevator rope of Example 3.

Example 4
High-density polyethylene with a thickness of 0.5 to 1 mm on the outer periphery of the load bearing portion 3 by extrusion coating of Novatec HE121 (manufactured by Nippon Polyethylene), which is a high-density polyethylene, without using the polyester fiber Tetron Except having provided the coating | cover, it carried out similarly to Example 2, and obtained the 8 * S (19) elevator rope of (PHI) 14mm of Example 3. FIG.

Embodiment 5 FIG.
Para type aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (manufactured by Toray DuPont) 1670dtex, 3 strands are twisted, 16 strands are bundled into 16 strands, 8 strands are bundled into load bearing section 3 . Next, the load bearing part 3 is impregnated with a two-component mixed polyurethane flexible resin 5, HysolU-10FL (Henkel), and a load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing part 3 is applied. The flexible resin 5 was cured by heating at 150 ° C. for 5 minutes.

Next, the polyester fiber Tetron 1670T-360-705M (manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc.) 1670dtex is twisted 6 times, and the 6 twisted yarns are wound around the outer periphery of the load bearing part 3 to form a covering part 4 having a diameter of 12 mm. A rope core 1 was produced.

The 12 steel strands 2 were wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1 with a load of 50 kgf applied to the rope core 1 to obtain a 12 × S (19) elevator rope of Φ14 mm of Example 5. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the rope cross-sectional area calculated from the rope nominal diameter of 14 mm was 36%.

Example 6
Para type aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (manufactured by Toray DuPont) 1670dtex twisted yarn is twisted, 3 twisted yarns are bundled into 16 strands, and 8 strands are twisted in eight and loaded It was set as the burden part 3. Next, the load bearing part 3 is impregnated with a two-component mixed polyurethane flexible resin 5, HysolU-10FL (Henkel), and a load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing part 3 is applied. The flexible resin 5 was cured by heating at 150 ° C. for 5 minutes.

Next, the polyester fiber Tetron 1670T-360-705M (manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc.) 1670dtex is twisted 6 times, and the 6 twisted yarns are wound around the outer periphery of the load bearing part 3 to form a covering part 4 having a diameter of 12 mm. A rope core 1 was produced.

12 pieces of steel strands 2 were wound around the outer periphery of the rope core 1 with a load of 50 kgf applied to the rope core 1 to obtain a 12 × S (19) elevator rope of Φ14 mm of Example 6. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 to the rope cross-sectional area calculated from the rope nominal diameter of 14 mm was 36%.

Comparative Example 1
Comparative Example 1 in the same manner as in Example 1 except that the step of applying a load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing part 3 over the entire length of the rope core 1 to the rope core 1 was omitted. The elevator rope was obtained.

Comparative Example 2
Except that the fiber used for the load bearing part 3 is not the para-aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (Toray DuPont) 1670dtex, but the polyester fiber Tetron 1670T-360-705M (Toray) 1670dtex In the same manner as in Example 1, an elevator rope of Comparative Example 2 was obtained.

For Examples 1 to 6 and Comparative Examples 1 and 2 as described above, the inter-fiber space ratio of the load bearing portion 3 before winding the steel strand 2 was calculated from cross-sectional observation. Moreover, the generated load (kN) and the breaking load (kN) at the time of 1% strain were measured for the completed elevator rope. Further, the mass specific strength (kN / g / m) was calculated by dividing the breaking load (kN) by the unit mass (g / m). The results are shown in FIG.

The physical properties of the fiber materials used in Examples 1 to 6 and Comparative Examples 1 and 2 were as follows. That is,
Para-type aramid fiber Kevlar 129 (Toray DuPont) 1670dtex
Tensile strength: 23.4cN / dtex
Tensile modulus: 670cN / dtex
Polyester fiber Tetoron 1670T-360-705M (Toray Industries, Inc.) 1670dtex
Tensile strength: 8.1cN / dtex
Tensile modulus: 90cN / dtex

From the results shown in FIG. 16, in all of Examples 1 to 6, the inter-fiber porosity is 17% or less, and the stress generated when 1% strain is applied to the rope core exceeds 50 MPa. As a result, it can be seen that in the elevator ropes using them, the generated load at 1% strain, breaking load, and mass specific strength are higher than those of Comparative Examples 1 and 2.

On the other hand, in Comparative Example 1, since the load was not applied to the load bearing part 3 before winding the steel wire, the inter-fiber voidage was not lowered, and as a result, the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 It is thought that it was not possible to increase.

Further, in Comparative Example 2, the inter-fiber void ratio is lowered, but since no high-strength and high-modulus fiber is used, the generated stress at 1% strain of the rope core 1 can be increased. It is thought that it was not possible.

In the comparison between Example 1 and Example 2, or the comparison between Example 3 and Example 4, Example 2 is slightly more than Example 1 or Example 4 is slightly less than Example 3. The reason why the generated stress at 1% strain is high is considered as follows. That is, in the manufacturing process, there is a step of winding around a drum or the like after applying a tensile load of 30% of the breaking load value of the load bearing portion 3. In Example 1 and Example 3, since the load bearing part 3 is not impregnated with the flexible resin 5, the inter-fiber porosity of the load bearing part 3 reduced by applying the tensile load is reduced in the winding process. It is thought that this is because the load bearing portion has been slightly raised due to bending. On the other hand, in Example 2 and Example 4, since the load bearing part 3 was impregnated with the flexible resin 5, it is considered that the inter-fiber void ratio of the load bearing part 3 did not easily increase even after the winding process.

Further, in Example 5, since the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 is lower than in Examples 1 to 4, the generated load and breaking load when the elevator rope is 1% strained are shown in Example 1. Compared to -4, it is lower. However, since the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the steel strand 2 is low, the unit mass of the elevator rope is light, and it can be seen that the mass specific strength is higher than in Examples 1 to 4.

1 rope core, 2 steel strands, 3 load bearing part, 4, 6 covering part, 5 flexible resin.

Claims (11)

  1. A rope core having a load bearing portion made of synthetic fiber and a covering portion covering an outer periphery of the load bearing portion, and a plurality of steel strands made of a stranded wire wound around the outer periphery of the rope core,
    The inter-fiber porosity of the synthetic fiber of the load bearing portion is 17% or less,
    The rope core is an elevator rope that generates a stress of 50 MPa or more when a tensile strain of 1% is applied.
  2. The elevator rope according to claim 1, wherein a stress value obtained by dividing a load when a tensile strain of 1% is applied by a rope cross-sectional area value calculated from a rope nominal diameter is 80 MPa or more.
  3. The elevator rope according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the mass specific strength value obtained by dividing the breaking load by the weight per length of the rope is 160 or more.
  4. The elevator rope according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the synthetic fiber used in the load bearing part is carbon fiber, polyparaphenylene benzoxazole fiber, aramid fiber, or polyarylate fiber.
  5. The magnification between the length when the load bearing portion is linear and the length when the synthetic fiber constituting the load bearing portion is linear is 1.1 times or less. The elevator rope according to any one of the above.
  6. The elevator rope according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the covering portion is made of a synthetic fiber.
  7. The elevator rope according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the covering portion is made of a synthetic resin.
  8. The elevator rope according to any one of claims 1 to 7, wherein the load bearing portion is impregnated and cured with a flexible resin.
  9. The elevator rope according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein a ratio of a total cross-sectional area of the steel strand to a cross-sectional area of the entire rope is 40% or less.
  10. Manufacture of an elevator rope comprising a rope core having a load bearing portion made of synthetic fiber and a covering portion covering the outer periphery of the load bearing portion, and a plurality of steel strands wound around the outer periphery of the rope core A method,
    An elevator rope manufacturing method comprising a step of winding a plurality of steel strands around an outer periphery of a rope core having a load bearing portion whose interfiber porosity is 17% or less in advance.
  11. The method of manufacturing an elevator rope according to claim 10, further comprising: impregnating a flexible resin between the fibers of the load bearing portion and curing the flexible resin in a state where the inter-fiber void ratio is 17% or less.
PCT/JP2016/085404 2016-02-10 2016-11-29 Elevator rope and manufacturing method therefor WO2017138228A1 (en)

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JPH10140490A (en) * 1996-11-13 1998-05-26 Tokyo Seiko Co Ltd Wire rope having fiber core
JP2002060163A (en) * 2000-08-21 2002-02-26 Tesac Corp Fiber rope for elevator
JP2004115985A (en) * 2002-09-30 2004-04-15 Tokyo Seiko Co Ltd Hybrid rope
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WO2019180783A1 (en) * 2018-03-19 2019-09-26 三菱電機株式会社 Elevator rope

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KR20180048820A (en) 2018-05-10

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