WO2017058234A1 - Wearable accessory - Google Patents

Wearable accessory Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2017058234A1
WO2017058234A1 PCT/US2015/053556 US2015053556W WO2017058234A1 WO 2017058234 A1 WO2017058234 A1 WO 2017058234A1 US 2015053556 W US2015053556 W US 2015053556W WO 2017058234 A1 WO2017058234 A1 WO 2017058234A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
wearable accessory
leds
signal
number
capacitors
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2015/053556
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Paul Michael CARSON
Ian Christopher SHATTO
Jonathan NEUNEKER
Original Assignee
Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. filed Critical Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Priority to PCT/US2015/053556 priority Critical patent/WO2017058234A1/en
Publication of WO2017058234A1 publication Critical patent/WO2017058234A1/en

Links

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B1/00Details of transmission systems, not covered by a single one of groups H04B3/00 - H04B13/00; Details of transmission systems not characterised by the medium used for transmission
    • H04B1/38Transceivers, i.e. devices in which transmitter and receiver form a structural unit and in which at least one part is used for functions of transmitting and receiving
    • H04B1/3827Portable transceivers
    • H04B1/385Transceivers carried on the body, e.g. in helmets
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/16Constructional details or arrangements
    • G06F1/1613Constructional details or arrangements for portable computers
    • G06F1/163Wearable computers, e.g. on a belt
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A44HABERDASHERY; JEWELLERY
    • A44CJEWELLERY; BRACELETS; OTHER PERSONAL ADORNMENTS; COINS
    • A44C9/00Finger-rings
    • A44C9/0053Finger-rings having special functions
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B1/00Details of transmission systems, not covered by a single one of groups H04B3/00 - H04B13/00; Details of transmission systems not characterised by the medium used for transmission
    • H04B1/38Transceivers, i.e. devices in which transmitter and receiver form a structural unit and in which at least one part is used for functions of transmitting and receiving
    • H04B1/3827Portable transceivers
    • H04B1/385Transceivers carried on the body, e.g. in helmets
    • H04B2001/3861Transceivers carried on the body, e.g. in helmets carried in a hand or on fingers

Abstract

A wearable accessory may include an antenna to receive a signal from a wireless local area network, a converter to convert the signal into an electric charge, a number of capacitors to store the electric charge, and a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) driven according to discharge cycles of the number of capacitors. A method of illuminating a wearable accessory, may include receiving, at an antenna coupled to the wearable accessory, a Wi-Fi signal, converting the Wi-Fi signal into an electric charge, charging a number of capacitors coupled to the wearable accessory with the electric charge, and illuminating a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) coupled to the wearable accessory with a discharging from the number of capacitors of the electric charge to indicate the presence of the wireless network signal.

Description

WEARABLE ACCESSORY

BACKGROUND

[0001] With the advent of wireless technologies, communication between separate computing devices has been increased. In order to provide for this wireless networking between these computing devices a routing device capable of broadcasting and receiving an electromagnetic signal is used. This signal is an electromagnetic signal that can be converted into an electric charge.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0002] The accompanying drawings illustrate various examples of the principles described herein and are a part of the specification. The illustrated examples are given merely for illustration, and do not limit the scope of the claims.

[0003] Fig. 1 A is a side view diagram of a wearable accessory for, in one example, indicating the presence of a wireless signal according to one example of the principles described herein.

[0004] Fig. 1 B is a perspective view diagram of a wearable accessory for, in one example, indicating the presence of a wireless signal according to one example of the principles described herein.

[0005] Fig. 2 is diagram of a system for illuminating a wearable accessory according to one example of the principles described herein.

[0006] Fig. 3 is an electrical circuit diagram of an electrical circuit embedded in the wearable accessory according to one example of the principles described herein. [0007] Fig. 4 is a flowchart showing a method of illuminating a wearable accessory according to one example of the principles described herein.

[0008] Fig. 5 is a side view diagram of a wearable accessory for, in one example, indicating the presence of a wireless signal according to one example of the principles described herein.

[0009] Throughout the drawings, identical reference numbers designate similar, but not necessarily identical, elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0010] As described above, wireless computing networks implement a wireless broadcasting device such as a router for exchanging information.

These wireless signals are electromagnetic signals in the range of, for example, 2.4 GHz such as those used by Wi-Fi Alliance™ supported devices. The Wi-Fi Alliance™ is a non-profit organization that promotes Wi-Fi technology and certifies Wi-Fi products if they conform to certain standards of interoperability. Other ranges used by a wireless broadcasting device may include microwaves and radio waves among others.

[0011] These signals may be converted into an electrical charge using an electric circuit as described below. Once the electromagnetic signal has been converted into an electrical charge, that charge may be stored. In one example of the present specification, the charge may be stored in a number of capacitors. When the capacitors are charged, a number of light emitting diodes (LEDs) may be activated indicating the presence of an electromagnetic signal such as a Wi-Fi signal.

[0012] The present specification describes a wearable accessory may include an antenna to receive a signal from a wireless local area network, a converter to convert the signal into an electric charge, a number of capacitors to store the electric charge, and a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) driven according to discharge cycles of the number of capacitors.. [0013] The present specification also describes a method of illuminating a wearable accessory, the method may include receiving, at an antenna coupled to the wearable accessory, a Wi-Fi signal, converting the Wi-Fi signal into an electric charge, charging a number of capacitors coupled to the wearable accessory with the electric charge, and illuminating a number of light- emitting diodes (LEDs) coupled to the wearable accessory with a discharging from the number of capacitors of the electric charge to indicate the presence of the wireless network signal.

[0014] Additionally, the present specification describes a system for illuminating a wearable accessory, including an illumination circuit integrated into the wearable accessory; the illumination circuit including a wireless network signal antenna coupled to the wearable accessory to receive a wireless network signal, a converter to convert the wireless signal received at the wireless network signal antenna into an electrical charge, a number of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to receive the electrical charge and be illuminated indicating that the wearable accessory is in the presence of a wireless signal, and an illumination controller to control the illumination of the LEDs. In one example, the wearable accessory does not comprise a battery.

[0015] As used in the present specification and in the appended claims, the term "metamaterial" is meant to be understood broadly as any composite material that provides material properties that are not otherwise attainable with materials found in nature. In one example, the metamaterial may be formed into an antenna as described below. In this example, a metamaterial is formed of microscopic composite materials.

[0016] Additionally, as used in the present specification and in the appended claims, the term "a number of" or similar language is meant to be understood broadly as any positive number comprising 1 to infinity.

[0017] In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough

understanding of the present systems and methods. It will be apparent, however, to one skilled in the art that the present apparatus, systems and methods may be practiced without these specific details. Reference in the specification to "an example" or similar language means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with that example is included as described, but may not be included in other examples.

[0018] Turning now to the figures, Figs. 1A and 1 B show a side view and perspective view, respectively, diagram of a wearable accessory (100) for, in one example, indicating the presence of a wireless signal according to one example of the principles described herein. The wearable accessory (100) may be any type of accessory capable of being worn by a user of the wearable accessory (100). In the example shown in Fig. 1 the wearable accessory (100) is in the shape of a ring to be worn on a finger of the user. Although, Fig. 1 shows the wearable accessory (100) as a ring, the wearable accessory (100) may be, for example, earrings, necklaces, bracelets, among others. In one example, the wearable accessory (100) may be made of any material that is rigid and may retain a specified shape in order to have a number of devices embedded or coupled therein to remain embedded or coupled to the wearable accessory (100). These materials may include metals, ceramics, glasses, and plastics, among others. In another example, the wearable accessory (100) may be made of any material capable of retaining the devices such as an antenna, a converter, a number of capacitors, a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and a processor or ASIC as descried in more detail below. In this example, a pliable material may be used to hold these devices in place.

[0019] The wearable accessory (100) may have a number of devices embedded into it in order to allow a number of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate as will be described below. In one example, the wearable accessory (100) may include an antenna (105), a converter (1 10), a number of capacitors (1 15), and a number of light emitting diodes (LEDs) (120). Each of these will now be described in more detail.

[0020] The antenna (105) may be embedded into the body of the wearable accessory (100) and may be situated to receive any number of wireless signals. The antenna (105) may of any size or shape to receive a wireless signal. In one example, the antenna (105) may be a Wi-Fi antenna capable of receiving a Wi-Fi signal from, for example, a router that is broadcasting such a signal. In this example, the length of the antenna (105) is approximately 12 ½ cm so that a 2.5 GHz Wi-Fi signal can be captured.

Alternatively, a 12 ½ cm antenna (105) may be cut into quarter sections for examples, approximately 30mm, to reduce the overall length and still be able to receive a 2.5 GHz Wi-Fi signal. Other lengths of the antenna (105) may be incorporated in the wearable accessory and the present specification contemplate the use of these different antennas (105) in order to receive other wireless signals such as 5 GHz Wi-Fi signals and radio signals, among other electromagnetic signals. In the example of the wearable accessory (100) is a ring, the antenna (105) may encompass the entire circumference of the ring. Thus, although Fig. 1 shows the antenna (105) encompassing a portion of the ring, the antenna (105) may be of any shape or form sufficient to accurately and reliably receive the wireless signal. In one example, the antenna (105) may be made of a metamaterial that can relatively more effectively receive and absorb the wireless signal.

[0021] The wearable accessory (100) may further include a converter (1 10). The converter (1 10) may be embedded into the wearable accessory (100) and may be electromagnetically coupled to the antenna (105). The converter (1 10) may convert the wireless signal received at the antenna (105) into an electrical charge. In one example, the circuit is a rectifying circuit capable of converting the electromagnetic signal into, for example, direct current (DC). Other examples may implement a number of other devices formed into a number of circuits that include vacuum tube diodes, mercury-arc valves, copper and selenium oxide rectifiers, semiconductor diodes, silicon- controlled rectifiers and other silicon-based semiconductor switches.

[0022] The wearable accessory (100) may further include a number of capacitors (1 15) to receive the electrical charge from the converter (1 10) and store the electrical charge. These capacitors (1 15) may be embedded into the wearable accessory (100) and may be electrically coupled to the converter (1 10). During operation, the converter (1 10) may charge these capacitors (1 15) sufficiently to drive a number of devices in the wearable accessory (100) including a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (120). As will be described in more detail below, the LEDs (120) may turn on and off or activated based on the discharge cycles of the capacitors (1 15). The discharge cycles of the capacitors (1 15) may be dependent on the ability of the converter (1 10) to convert the received electromagnetic signal from the antenna (105) into the electrical charge. In one example, the wearable accessory (100) comprises no battery and instead relies solely on the capacitors (1 15) to store and deliver electrical charge to the LEDs (120).

[0023] Fig. 2 is diagram of a system for illuminating a wearable accessory according to one example of the principles described herein. The system (200) may include the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) and a wireless signal source (205). Upon activation of the wireless signal source (205), wireless signals (210) may be broadcast to the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100). As described above, the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105) of wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) may receive the wireless signals (210) and the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) may convert those wireless signals (210) into an electric charge. The electric charge may be stored in a number of capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15). The capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) may charge up sufficiently to discharge the electrical charge into a number LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120).

[0024] The LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) may be of any color or size to indicate to a user of the wearable accessory (100) that a wireless signal (210) is available. In one example, the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) may light up based on the strength of the signal received from the wireless signal source (205). In this example, the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105) may receive a signal and, based on the strength of the signal, cause the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) to blink relatively slowly as compared to when the wireless signals (210) from the wireless signal source (205) is stronger. This may occur because with relatively less signal strength, the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) fails to convert the electromagnetic signal from the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105) quickly thereby failing to quickly charge the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15). Where the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) are charged fully by the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) less frequently, the discharge of electrical charge from the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) occurs less frequently causing the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) to turn on less frequently. The opposite is also true. Where the wireless signals (210) from the wireless signal source (205) are relatively stronger, the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) is provided more electromagnetic signals from the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105). Because the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) can convert the electromagnetic signal into electrical charge more frequently, the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) may charge the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) relatively more frequently.

Once the charge rate of the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) is increased, the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) can discharge their full charge relatively more frequently. This results in the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) turning off and on relatively more frequently indicating to the user that the signal strength of the wireless signal source (205) is relatively stronger. This may allow a user to, for example, determine which locations would be best to connect a computing device to the wireless signal source (205) and use that wireless signal source (205) to, for example, access the Internet.

[0025] In one example, an illumination controller may be built into the electric circuit and embedded into the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) to control the activation of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120). In one example, the illumination controller may control the timing of the activation of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120), the discharge of the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15), and the brightness of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) to indicate a number of situations. In this example, the illumination controller may indicate the presence of a relatively weak wireless signal (210) from a wireless signal source (205) by turning off and on the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) relatively slowly. Additionally, the illumination controller may indicate the presence of the relatively strong wireless signal (210) by turning off and on the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) relatively quickly.

[0026] In one example, the illumination circuit may control the dimness of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120). In this example a dimming circuit such as a bleeder circuit, a charge pump, a simple PWM supply, or a complex PWM supply may receive the discharged electrical charge from the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) and indicate the relative signal strength of the wireless signals (210) from the wireless signal source (205). For example, a set of dim LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) made dim by the bleeder circuit, charge pump, simple PWM supply, or complex PWM supply may indicate the presence of a relatively weak wireless signal (210) whereas a bright set of LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) may indicate the presence of a relatively strong wireless signal (210).

[0027] In one example, the illumination controller may also control a number of different colors of LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) to indicate the relative signal strength of the wireless signals (210) from the wireless signal source (205). In one example, the illumination controller may cause a specific color of LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) such as red to blink when the signal strength is relatively weak. In this example, another color of LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) such as blue may be directed by the illumination controller to blink when the signal strength is relatively strong.

[0028] Fig. 3 is an electrical circuit diagram of an electrical circuit (300) embedded in the wearable accessory (100) according to one example of the principles described herein. Although the electrical circuit (300) shown in Fig. 3 depicts a number of electrical components, the electrical circuit is merely an example, and the present specification contemplates the use of any other electrical circuit designs to accomplish the effects described herein. The electrical circuit (300) may comprise an antenna (305) to receive an

electromagnetic signal from a wireless signal source (Fig. 2, 205).

[0029] The antenna (305) may direct the electromagnetic signal to a convertor (305) which converts the electromagnetic signal into an electric charge. A number of diodes (310) may conduct the electrical charge in a single direction to a number of capacitors (315). The capacitors (315) may be charged sufficiently to, when discharging stored electrical charge, illuminate a number of LEDs (320). In one example, a Zener diode (325) may be added to the circuit to allow for reverse as well as forward flow of current. This may be done to protect any other semiconductor based devices from momentary voltage pulses. Additionally or alternatively, the inclusion of the Zener diode (325) in this circuit, the Zener diode may avalanche when enough voltage is built up in the capacitors (315). As a consequence, this allows current to flow in an opposite direction thereby allowing the current to flow to the LEDs (320).

[0030] Fig. 4 is a flowchart showing a method (400) of illuminating a wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) according to one example of the principles described herein. The method (400) may begin with receiving (405), at an antenna (Fig. 1 , 105) coupled to the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100), a wireless signal (Fig. 2, 210). As described above, the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105) may be made of, for example, a metamaterial.

[0031] Once a wireless signal has been received (405), a converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) may convert (410) the wireless network signal into an electric charge. As described above, the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) may include any number of electrical circuits that may convert an electromagnetic signal into an electrical charge. In one example, the circuit is a rectifying circuit capable of converting the electromagnetic signal into, for example, direct current (DC).

[0032] The electrical charge from the converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10) may be used to charge (415) a number of capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) coupled to the wearable accessory. The capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) may be of any size and capacitance. In one example, once the capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15) are fully charged, the electrical charge stored therein may be used to illuminate (420) a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (Fig. 1 , 120) coupled to the wearable accessory. The illumination (420) of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) may indicate the presence of the wireless network signal. A described above, an illumination controller may be used to direct the illumination of the LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) to indicate the relative strength of the wireless signal (Fig. 2, 210) emitted from a wireless signal source (Fig. 2, 205).

[0033] In one example, the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) may be formed by injection molding. In this example, the antenna (Fig. 1 , 105), converter (Fig. 1 , 1 10), capacitors (Fig. 1 , 1 15), and LEDs (Fig. 1 , 120) along with their electrical interconnects may all be arranged in a form. The material forming the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) may then be injected into the mold causing the above elements to be embedded at least partially into the material. Other examples of forming the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100) are

contemplated by the present specification and may be altered based on, for example, the type of material used to form the wearable accessory (Fig. 1 , 100). [0034] Fig. 5 is a side view diagram of a wearable accessory (500) for, in one example, indicating the presence of a wireless signal according to one example of the principles described herein. The wearable accessory (500) may comprise those elements similar to that described in connection with Fig. 1A. In this example, the wearable accessory (500) may comprise an antenna (105), a converter (1 10), a number of capacitors (1 15), and a number of LEDs (120) as descried in connection with Fig. 1 above. In addition, the wearable accessory (500) may further comprise an illumination controller (505) that receives the electrical charge from the number of capacitors (1 15) and illuminates the number of LEDs (120) according to a certain pattern. The illumination controller (505), in one example, may be a processor or an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that is powered by the capacitors (1 15). In this example, the illumination controller (505) may direct the electrical charge to any of a number of LEDs (120) in order to cause the LEDs (120) to light up in a certain pattern or characteristic. The illumination of the LEDs (120) may be varied by timing the activation of each of the individual LEDs (120) and/or controlling the brightness/dimness of the LEDs (120). As described above, the timing may be altered based on the strength of the wireless signals (210) received at the antenna (105) and the resulting electrical charge received. In this example, however, the control of the illumination of the LEDs (120) may not be based on the discharge rate of the capacitors (1 15) but instead on the instructions used in the illumination controller (505).

[0035] Aspects of the present system and method are described herein with reference to flowchart illustrations and/or block diagrams of methods, apparatus (systems) and computer program products according to examples of the principles described herein. Each block of the flowchart illustrations and block diagrams, and combinations of blocks in the flowchart illustrations and block diagrams, may be implemented by computer usable program code.

[0036] The specification and figures describe a wearable accessory. This wearable accessory may allow a user to determine when he or she is in the presence of a wireless signal such as a Wi-Fi signal broadcasted by a Wi-Fi router. The use of LEDs in the present examples allow for the user to determine this even in relatively high and low-light situations. Still further, the electronic devices that make up the electrical circuits may be incorporated into any type of wearable accessory such as rings, earrings, necklaces, bracelets, anklets, among others. The LEDs may also be illuminated in a way to grab the attention of the user by, for example, twinkling in using any pattern of illumination or dimness as described above.

[0037] The preceding description has been presented to illustrate and describe examples of the principles described. This description is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit these principles to any precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching.

Claims

CLAIMS WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:
1. A wearable accessory comprising:
an antenna to receive a signal from a wireless local area network;
a converter to convert the signal into an electric charge;
a number of capacitors to store the electric charge; and
a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) driven according to discharge cycles of the number of capacitors.
2. The wearable accessory of claim 1 , wherein the wearable accessory further comprises an illumination controller to control the illumination of the LEDs.
3. The wearable accessory of claim 2, wherein the illumination controller illuminates the LEDs when the wearable accessory is within range to receive the signal.
4. The wearable accessory of claim 1 , further comprising a dimming circuit to control the dimness of the LEDs.
5. The wearable accessory of claim 1 , wherein the illumination controller illuminates the LEDs to indicate a signal strength of the wireless local area network available.
6. The wearable accessory of claim 1 , wherein the antenna, converter, capacitors, and LEDs are embedded into the body of the wearable accessory.
7. The wearable accessory of claim 1 , wherein the wearable accessory is a ring.
8. A method of illuminating a wearable accessory, comprising:
receiving, at an antenna coupled to the wearable accessory, a Wi-Fi signal;
converting the Wi-Fi signal into an electric charge;
charging a number of capacitors coupled to the wearable accessory with the electric charge; and
illuminating a number of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) coupled to the wearable accessory with a discharging from the number of capacitors of the electric charge to indicate the presence of the wireless network signal.
9. The method of claim 8, further comprising, with a processor coupled to the wearable accessory, illuminating the LEDs to indicate:
whether the wearable accessory is within range to receive the Wi-Fi signal;
the strength of the Wi-Fi signal received from the wireless network; or combinations thereof.
10. The method of claim 9, where the LEDs blink at a relatively faster rate when the Wi-Fi signal strength is stronger than when the Wi-Fi signal strength is weaker.
1 1 . The method of claim 8, wherein illuminating the LEDs occurs when sufficient electric charge has been stored in the capacitors to drive the LEDs.
12. A system for illuminating a wearable accessory, comprising:
an illumination circuit integrated into the wearable accessory; the illumination circuit comprising:
a wireless network signal antenna coupled to the wearable accessory to receive a wireless network signal;
a converter to convert the wireless signal received at the wireless network signal antenna into an electrical charge; a number of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to receive the electrical charge and be illuminated indicating that the wearable accessory is in the presence of a wireless signal; and
an illumination controller to control the illumination of the LEDs.
13. The system of claim 12, further comprising a number of capacitors to receive the electric charge from the converter and store an amount of electrical charge.
14. The system of claim 13, wherein the LEDs are illuminated when the capacitors has stored sufficient electrical charge to drive the LEDs.
15. The system of claim 12, wherein the illumination controller is a processor that directs the illumination of the LEDs to indicate the strength of the wireless signal by determining the amount of electrical charge being stored in the capacitors over a given period of time and causes the LEDs to blink at a different rate based on the detected strength of the wireless signal.
PCT/US2015/053556 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 Wearable accessory WO2017058234A1 (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/US2015/053556 WO2017058234A1 (en) 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 Wearable accessory

Publications (1)

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Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2004096898A (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-25 Yu:Kk Electromagnetic wave utilization system
US20120098432A1 (en) * 2006-03-28 2012-04-26 Wireless Environment, Llc. Wireless Power Inverter for Lighting
KR101216854B1 (en) * 2012-05-11 2012-12-28 백용승 Light emitting case by light guide plate for nfc
US20140128107A1 (en) * 2012-11-08 2014-05-08 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for outputting location of wireless charging device in portable terminal
KR20150093034A (en) * 2014-02-06 2015-08-17 동서대학교산학협력단 Self-protection ring and dangerous situation management system by self-protection ring

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2004096898A (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-25 Yu:Kk Electromagnetic wave utilization system
US20120098432A1 (en) * 2006-03-28 2012-04-26 Wireless Environment, Llc. Wireless Power Inverter for Lighting
KR101216854B1 (en) * 2012-05-11 2012-12-28 백용승 Light emitting case by light guide plate for nfc
US20140128107A1 (en) * 2012-11-08 2014-05-08 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for outputting location of wireless charging device in portable terminal
KR20150093034A (en) * 2014-02-06 2015-08-17 동서대학교산학협력단 Self-protection ring and dangerous situation management system by self-protection ring

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