WO2016124495A1 - Smart air quality evaluating wearable device - Google Patents

Smart air quality evaluating wearable device Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2016124495A1
WO2016124495A1 PCT/EP2016/051920 EP2016051920W WO2016124495A1 WO 2016124495 A1 WO2016124495 A1 WO 2016124495A1 EP 2016051920 W EP2016051920 W EP 2016051920W WO 2016124495 A1 WO2016124495 A1 WO 2016124495A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
user
air quality
sensor data
device
wearable device
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/EP2016/051920
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
John Cronin
Joseph BODKIN
Original Assignee
Koninklijke Philips N.V.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201562110723P priority Critical
Priority to US62/110,723 priority
Priority to EP15174577 priority
Priority to EP15174577.5 priority
Application filed by Koninklijke Philips N.V. filed Critical Koninklijke Philips N.V.
Publication of WO2016124495A1 publication Critical patent/WO2016124495A1/en

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/0002Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network
    • A61B5/0015Remote monitoring of patients using telemetry, e.g. transmission of vital signals via a communication network characterised by features of the telemetry system
    • A61B5/0022Monitoring a patient using a global network, e.g. telephone networks, internet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/02Detecting, measuring or recording pulse, heart rate, blood pressure or blood flow; Combined pulse/heart-rate/blood pressure determination; Evaluating a cardiovascular condition not otherwise provided for, e.g. using combinations of techniques provided for in this group with electrocardiography or electroauscultation; Heart catheters for measuring blood pressure
    • A61B5/021Measuring pressure in heart or blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/103Detecting, measuring or recording devices for testing the shape, pattern, colour, size or movement of the body or parts thereof, for diagnostic purposes
    • A61B5/11Measuring movement of the entire body or parts thereof, e.g. head or hand tremor, mobility of a limb
    • A61B5/1112Global tracking of patients, e.g. by using GPS
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/30Control or safety arrangements for purposes related to the operation of the system, e.g. for safety or monitoring
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01CMEASURING DISTANCES, LEVELS OR BEARINGS; SURVEYING; NAVIGATION; GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAMMETRY OR VIDEOGRAMMETRY
    • G01C22/00Measuring distance traversed on the ground by vehicles, persons, animals, or other moving solid bodies, e.g. using odometers, using pedometers
    • G01C22/006Pedometers
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H40/00ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/60ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/63ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices for local operation
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H50/00ICT specially adapted for medical diagnosis, medical simulation or medical data mining; ICT specially adapted for detecting, monitoring or modelling epidemics or pandemics
    • G16H50/30ICT specially adapted for medical diagnosis, medical simulation or medical data mining; ICT specially adapted for detecting, monitoring or modelling epidemics or pandemics for calculating health indices; for individual health risk assessment
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B2560/00Constructional details of operational features of apparatus; Accessories for medical measuring apparatus
    • A61B2560/02Operational features
    • A61B2560/0242Operational features adapted to measure environmental factors, e.g. temperature, pollution
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/103Detecting, measuring or recording devices for testing the shape, pattern, colour, size or movement of the body or parts thereof, for diagnostic purposes
    • A61B5/11Measuring movement of the entire body or parts thereof, e.g. head or hand tremor, mobility of a limb
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/68Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient
    • A61B5/6801Arrangements of detecting, measuring or recording means, e.g. sensors, in relation to patient specially adapted to be attached to or worn on the body surface
    • A61B5/6802Sensor mounted on worn items
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F2110/00Control inputs relating to air properties
    • F24F2110/50Air quality properties

Abstract

The present invention includes systems and methods directed towards providing health data for a user based on surrounding air quality. In particular, a smart air wearable device can monitor and measure air quality around the user and record user health parameters. A report of the health condition of the user can be compiled and provided to the user to view to show possible effects of poor air quality. Embodiments of the present invention may also be applied to air handling devices to help users improve air quality based on the report.

Description

SMART AIR QUALITY EVALUATING WEARABLE DEVICE

BACKGROUND

Field of Invention

The present invention generally relates to wearable technology. More specifically, the present invention relates to a smart air quality wearable device.

Description of the Related Art

Wearable electronic devices, or as used herein, wearable technology is a new class of electronic systems that can provide data acquisition through a variety of unobtrusive sensors that may be worn by a user. The sensors gather information, for example, about the environment, the user's activity, or the user's health status. However, there are significant challenges related to the coordination, computation, communication, privacy, security, and presentation of the collected data. Additionally, there are challenges related to power management given the current state of battery technology. Furthermore, analysis of the data is needed to make the data gathered by the sensors useful and relevant to end-users. In some cases, additional sources of information may be used to supplement the data gathered by the sensors. The many challenges that wearable technology presents require new designs in hardware and software.

Wearable technology may include any type of mobile electronic device that can be worn on the body, attached to or embedded in clothes and accessories of an individual and currently existing in the consumer marketplace. Processors and sensors associated with the wearable technology can display, process or gather information. Such wearable technology has been used in a variety of areas, including monitoring health of the user as well as collecting other types of data and statistics. These types of devices may be readily available to the public and may be easily purchased by consumers. Examples of some wearable technology in the health arena include Fit Bit, Nike Fuel Band, and the Apple Watch.

Wearable devices have been used to monitor and measure a variety of different parameters. For example, wearable devices can measure various biometric parameters (e.g., blood pressure) using one or more sensors in conjunction with the body of the user. Wearable devices can also monitor and measure air quality. Air quality can be monitored and measured, for example, by using laser-based optical sensors included in fans.

Health conditions of an individual may be connected to the air quality surrounding the individual. People can implement air circulation devices or use air filtering devices in an attempt to improve air quality around them. These devices may be programmed to turn on/off based upon the monitored/measured air quality in the area.

SUMMARY OF THE CLAIMED INVENTION

Embodiments of the present invention may include systems and methods directed towards providing health data for a user based on surrounding air quality. In particular, a smart air wearable device can monitor and measure air quality around the user and record user health parameters. A report of the health condition of the user can be compiled and provided to the user to view to show possible effects of poor air quality.

Embodiments of the present invention may also be applied to air handling devices to help users improve air quality based on the report. In some embodiments, the wearable technology may be capable of informing the user of possible actions to mitigate the negative impact an environment may pose on the user. In other embodiments, the wearable technology may be capable of initiating solutions (e.g., triggering air handling devices) that can improve air quality for an environment.

A first aspect of the invention includes a method for evaluating surrounding air quality effect on a user health condition using a wearable device, the method comprising obtaining sensor data via one or more sensors of the wearable device, wherein the sensor data pertains to biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality; storing the obtained sensor data in memory; evaluating the stored sensor data with a standards database; providing notification to the user based on the evaluation; and executing an action based on the evaluation.

A second aspect of the invention includes a wearable device for evaluating surrounding air quality effect on a user health condition. The wearable device comprises one or more sensors configured for obtaining sensor data, wherein the sensor data pertains to biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality; memory configured for storing the sensor data; and a processor configured for evaluating the stored sensor data with a standards database, providing notification to the user based on the evaluation, and executing an action based on the evaluation. The current invention is based on the incitation that monitoring and measuring air quality in conjunction with monitoring other user health parameters will result in an improved systems and methods of wearable technology that can determine air quality around the user, record user health parameters, provide a summary of the health of the user based on surrounding air quality, and provide the user with health updates to show the effects of air pollution surrounded with the user, and automatically connect to external device that provide improved and/or cleaner air to the user. Advantageously, the current invention provides the user with health updates to show the effects of air pollution to the health status of the user, and automatically provides improved air to the user to alleviate the air pollution so as to improve the health condition of the user.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGURE 1 illustrates an exemplary system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 illustrates an exemplary standards database that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 3 illustrates exemplary GUI that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 4 illustrates exemplary base software found in a smart wearable device that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 5A illustrates an exemplary method for the measure and save data software that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 5B illustrates an exemplary smart air wearable device database that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an exemplary computing device architecture that may be utilized to implement the various features and processes described herein, according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIGURE 7A illustrates an exemplary method for the quantify health risk software that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 7B illustrates an exemplary method for the smart air quality controller software that may be used in a system for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 8A illustrates an exemplary method for the application base software found in the smart air quality application of the user device, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 8B illustrates an exemplary method for the controller software found in the smart air quality application of the user device, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 9 illustrates exemplary method for monitoring health and surrounding air quality, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention is directed towards systems and methods for monitoring health conditions of the user and a surrounding air quality around the user. In this way, various biometric parameters (e.g., pulse, blood pressure) of the user can be monitored using a wearable device and correlated along with data obtained regarding the surrounding air quality from the same wearable device. The correlation between the biometric parameters and the surrounding air quality can be used to determine if the air quality is negatively impacting the health of the user. The user may be notified of the impact on the health of the user. In other embodiments, the wearable device may also be capable of initiating solutions (e.g., air handling devices) to improve the surrounding air quality.

FIGURE 1 illustrates an exemplary system for monitoring surrounding air quality. The system 100 may include a smart air wearable device 105, a user device 145, a smart air quality network 155, and an air handling device 175. These components of the system 100 may all be communicatively connected to each other through the use of, for example, the cloud or Internet 185. The communication (e.g., wired or wireless) may be facilitated using known technologies, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, 3G, 4G, LTE, near field communication (NFC), etc.

The smart air wearable device 105 may be used to monitor not only the health condition of the user, but also the surrounding air quality. The smart air wearable device 105 may be instructed to obtain sensor data from the various sensors 110 associated with the smart air wearable device 105, so that a connected user device 145 can evaluate the user health condition and surrounding air quality. The smart air wearable device 105 may include a plurality of elements: sensors 110, a fan controller 115, a clock 120, a display 125, memory 130, a communication module 135, and a power supply 140. These elements may all be connected to a single bus.

The smart air wearable device 105 may include multiple distinct sensors used to obtain sensor data about the health condition of the user and about the air quality surrounding the user. As illustrated in the figure, sensors that may be included are a blood pressure sensor and a laser-based optical sensor. The laser-based optical sensor can be used in conjunction with a fan to obtain sensor data about the air quality around the user. In this way, a correlation can be obtained by comparing the sensor data from monitoring the blood pressure of the sensor and data about the surrounding air quality.

It should be noted that other types of sensors may be used to monitor the health of the user. Other sensors may also be usable in obtaining sensor data about surrounding air quality. These other sensors, although not illustrated in FIGURE 1, are within the scope of someone skilled in the art to implement and incorporate into the smart air wearable device 105, as described herein.

The smart air wearable device 105, may also include, for example, sensors for identifying a particular physical location of the user. An exemplary sensor could be the use of a global positioning system (GPS) element. In some embodiments, the GPS data may be beneficial for the user in obtaining already existing air quality data stored, for example, in the smart air quality network 155 (e.g., air quality GPS database 170). In other embodiments, the user may be allowed to upload sensor data and evaluations regarding surrounding air quality and store them in the smart air quality network in connection with the current location of the user (obtained through the GPS). The use of air quality data connected with GPS location can be used to further inform the user, for example, whether it may be unsafe or otherwise inadvisable to enter a particular location due to bad air quality.

The fan controller 115 may be a processor responsible for managing and controlling the use of a fan (e.g., a sensor for air quality) associated with the smart air wearable device 105. As indicated above, the fan may be used in conjunction with a laser based optical sensor 110 to obtain sensor data that can be used to evaluate surrounding air quality. The fan controller 115 may be used, for example, to synchronize operations of the fan with the laser based optical sensor 110 to obtain sensor data. The clock 120 may be included in order to provide time -based data along with the sensor data obtained by the smart air wearable device 105. The time -based data (e.g., date and time) may be used to label and organize the sensor data that is later stored in memory 130. The time-based data may also be beneficial in evaluating a health condition of the user and/or air quality of a surrounding area. For example, data can be evaluated against the time- based data to determine if, for example, a health condition of the user has deteriorated over time.

The display 125 may be used by the smart air wearable device 105 to display various types of information (e.g., sensor data) to the user to view. The display 125 may also allow the user to interact with the smart air wearable device through the use of graphical user interfaces (GUIs). In some embodiments, the display 125 may be a touch screen display that may allow the user to directly interact with the smart air wearable device 105 through physical contact with the display 125.

The memory 130 of the smart air wearable device 105 may be used to store various modules, applications, or software for managing and operating the smart air wearable device 105. The memory 130 may also store sensor data and any other type of data generated by the smart air wearable device 105. As illustrated in the figure, the memory 130 may include various elements: base software, smart air wearable device database, standards database, air quality GPS database and a GUI.

The base software of the smart air wearable device 105 may be responsible for the management and operation of the smart air wearable device 105. In particular, the base software may also execute software and other elements within the smart air wearable device 105 to carry out the functionality of the smart air wearable device 105. In some

embodiments, the base software may poll for sensor data relating to health conditions of the user and/or sensor data relating to the surrounding air quality. The base software may also store the obtained sensor data in the smart air wearable device database. In other

embodiments, the base software may also initiate actions (e.g., initiating the air handling device) to improve the surrounding air quality in the area. Further discussion of the base software can be seen below with respect to FIGURE 4.

The standard database may be used to store information relating to evaluating the health condition of the user with sensor data relating to surrounding air quality. The smart air wearable device 105 may acquire the information, for example, by downloading it from the associated user devicel45 or from a network (e.g., smart air quality network 155). The air quality GPS database may be used to store location-based data related to air quality. As noted above, the smart air quality network 155 may include an air quality GPS database that stores the location-based data related to air quality. For example, such information may be directed at sensor data or reports describing surrounding air quality for a particular location. A user, through the smart air wearable device 105, may be able to download the sensor data and/or reports for a particular location beforehand to evaluate, for example, if the location has a safe level of air quality.

The information may include when the data being downloaded was last updated. The update may correspond to a scenario where sensor data about surrounding air quality was provided by a previous user who went to the same location. In this way, the information in the air quality GPS database in the smart air quality network may be constantly updated by the user as well as any other user who is connected to the smart air quality network.

The GUI may incorporate different icons or visual indicators that a user can interact with to manage and control the smart air wearable device 105. The GUI may also be used to provide information (e.g., sensor data, notification) for the user to view. The smart air wearable device 105 may include elements (e.g., buttons, dials) that a user can use to interact with the GUI. In some embodiments, the display 125 may be a touch screen display, so that the user can directly interact with the GUI through touch gestures.

The communication module 135 may facilitate communication (e.g., wireless communication) between the smart air wearable device 105 with any of the other devices (e.g., user device 145, air handling device 175) or networks (e.g., smart air quality network 155) associated with the system 100, as illustrated in FIGURE 1. The communication module 135 may facilitate communication (e.g. wired or wireless) options, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, 3G, 4G, LTE, near field communication (NFC), etc.

The power supply 140 may be included to provide power for the operation of the smart air wearable device 105. The power supply 140 may be implemented through the use of a capacitor or a battery. The power supply 140 may also be capable of being charged or re-charged using an external power source (e.g., battery charger).

The user device 145 may be communicatively connected to the smart air wearable device 105. The user device 145 may be, for example, a smart device (e.g., mobile phone, laptop, tablet). The user device 145 may be used to provide additional functionality that the smart air wearable device 105 may not be capable of performing. As illustrated in FIGURE 1, the user device 145 includes elements that may also be found in the smart air wearable device: a communication module, a processor, a power supply, a display. The user device, however, may also include a distinct feature: a smart air quality application 150.

The smart air quality application 150 may be one of many different applications stored on the user device 145. The smart air quality application 150 may be downloaded from a network to be used in conjunction with the smart air wearable device 105. The smart air quality application 150 may provide further functionality to the smart air wearable device 105. For example, in some embodiments, the smart air wearable device 105 may not be capable of performing certain evaluations of the sensor data locally. In this case, the sensor data may be provided to the user device 145 where the smart air quality application 150 can perform the evaluation(s) on the sensor data to determine the user health condition and/or surrounding air quality.

As illustrated in FIGURE 1, the smart air quality application 150 may include many similar elements as described above for the smart air wearable device 105. The smart air quality application 150, for example, may include application base software, application database, standards database, and an air quality GPS database. These elements in the smart air quality application 150 may be similar to their counterparts described above in the smart air wearable device 105 but only incorporated for use with the smart air quality application 150. For example, the application base software may similarly be responsible for managing and controlling the various other elements of the user device 145 or executing software to carry out the functionality of the user device 145. It should be noted that the application base software, however, may be downloaded (or updated) from a network. There may be different types of instructions stored in the application base software dependent on the user, the associated smart air wearable device 105, or location. By connecting to the cloud or Internet 185, the user may be able to obtain the necessary version of the application base software for the user device 105.

The smart air quality application 150 may also include controller software and an operating system (OS). The controller software and the OS associated with the smart air quality application 150 may be both included in order to facilitate managing and controlling the user device 145 to carry out the functionalities of the user device.

In the cloud or Internet 185, there may be many networks to which both the smart air wearable device 105 and the user device 145 can connect. An exemplary network, as illustrated in FIGURE 1, may be the smart air quality network 155. The smart air quality network 155 may be a network that includes information that can be used by the smart air wearable device 105 and/or the user device 145 to evaluate a health condition of the user based on data obtained about the surrounding air quality.

The smart air quality network 155 may include information that the user can download such as the application base software 160, a standards database 165, and air quality GPS database 170. The information can be downloaded, for example, to either the smart air wearable device 105 or the user device 145 upon request by the user or at regular intervals to ensure that the information stored in the devices are up-to-date.

The system 100 as illustrated in FIGURE 1 may also include one or more air handling devices 175. Exemplary air handling devices 175 may include fans or ventilation systems. These air handling devices 175 may be programmed to circulate and filter the surrounding air as a way to improve surrounding air quality. For example, stagnant air that is currently within a room may be drawn out through ventilation ducts with fresh air from outside being supplied indoors.

The air handling device may include a communication module and controller that are used to manage and control the operation of a corresponding air handling device. For example, the air handling device 175 may receive instructions from the user (via the user device 145 or the smart air wearable device 105) in response to a determination that air quality for a corresponding area is poor. The air handling device 175 may then automatically initiate a software (e.g., circulate and filter software 180) directed to operating the air handling device 175 in a way to improve surrounding air quality based on the determination. In some embodiments, the user may be able to control the air handling device 175 directly on their smart air wearable device 105 or user device 145 via a GUI.

FIGURE 2 illustrates an exemplary standards database. As illustrated in the figure, the standards database may include a variety of different sensor data parameters and corresponding ranges used to evaluate whether surrounding air quality is good or poor. For example, the standards database may include data such as blood pressure and its correlation with surrounding air quality.

The standard database may also include messages and/or actions alongside the corresponding parameters and respective ranges. These messages and/or actions may be directed at informing the user of their health condition and surrounding air quality.

The first data entry may provide that if the user has a blood pressure within the range of 80/55 through 90/60 with a corresponding smart air quality wearable measurement for the surrounding air quality between zero and forty, the smart air wearable device may determine that the user has normal blood pressure and the surrounding air quality is good. Subsequently, no messages or actions may be performed.

If the blood pressure is higher (e.g., 111/91+) and the air quality is poor (e.g., 80-100), however, the smart air wearable device may determine that the user is experiencing high blood pressure, which could be tied to the surrounding hazardous air quality. With this determination, the standards database may include a message informing the user of the situation (e.g., that the user currently has high blood pressure and that the surrounding air quality is hazardous). The standards database may also have an action that is also provided to the user. For example, the action may include advising the user to leave the immediate area and initiate available air handling device processes as an attempt to improve air quality in the area. The messages and the actions can be provided on the display of the smart air wearable device and/or the user device for the user to view.

FIGURE 3, inclusive of FIGURES 3A, 3B and 3C, illustrates an exemplary GUI. The GUI, which may be incorporated in the smart air wearable device and/or the user device, provides a way for the user to obtain information, as well as interact with the respective device to manage and control the operation of the respective device.

With respect to FIGURE 3A, a main display can be provided that allows the user to access messages, connect the device (e.g., smart air wearable device or user device) with other devices (e.g., air handling devices), access user profile (e.g., to see available devices that may be currently connected) and access raw data obtained from the smart air wearable device that may be stored on the device (e.g., smart air wearable device or user device). The main display as illustrated in FIGURE 3 A may also provide current sensor data for the user to view and any recent messages corresponding to the current sensor data. For example, the main display can provide current blood pressure measurements, air quality measurements and a corresponding message based on the current measurements.

With respect to FIGURE 3B, an exemplary history GUI can be provided so that the user can access messages as well as view a history of messages that the user may have stored on their smart air wearable device. The history GUI may be accessible from the main display through the user accessing the "messages" option in the main display of FIGURE 3A.

With respect to FIGURE 3C, an exemplary set air handling device GUI can be provided so that the user can access connected air handling devices. The set air handling device GUI may be accessible from the main display through the user accessing the

"connected devices" option in the main display of FIGURE 3 A. In this exemplary GUI, the user may view a list of available air handling devices that can be connected to the smart air wearable device. From the list, the user can select any number of air handling devices and instruct the particular air handling device to filter and circulate air if the smart air wearable device determines that the surrounding air quality is poor.

It should be noted that other types of GUI may be provided that can be utilized by the user with the smart air wearable device and/or user device. These GUI may be beneficial in implementing various functionalities of the present invention.

FIGURE 4 illustrates exemplary base software found in the smart air wearable device. As indicated above, the base software may be responsible for the management and operation of the smart air wearable device 105. To carry out the management and operation of the smart air wearable device 105, the base software may include different software that it can execute. As illustrated in the figure, the base software may include a measure and save data software, quantify health risk software and smart air quality controller software. Further details for these features are described below with respect to FIGURE 5 and FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 5 A illustrates an exemplary method for the measure and save data software. The measure and save data software may be used by the base software of the smart air quality wearable device in order to poll the sensors for sensor data. The sensor data can subsequently be stored in the smart air wearable device database.

In step 500, the measure and save data software initiates one or more sensors and polls those sensors for sensor data. The sensor data can be obtained at regular intervals (e.g. 30 seconds). The sensor data may be sensor data to evaluate a health condition of the user and/or to surrounding air quality.

In step 505, the measure and save data software can store the obtained sensor data into the smart air wearable device database. An exemplary smart air wearable device database is provided below (see FIGURE 5B). The sensor data may also be labeled and organized using time-based data provided by the clock. In some embodiments, the information stored in the smart air wearable device database may be provided to the user device.

In step 510, the measure and save data software can then evaluate whether an associated user device is available. When user device is detected, the smart air wearable device can transfer the obtained sensor data stored in the smart air wearable device database to be evaluated by the user device. If no user device is available, the measure and save data software can instruct the sensors to continue polling for sensor data. Data can be obtained and stored within the smart air wearable device database until the user device is detected. If a user device is detected in step 515, however, the measure and save database can connect with the user device and transmit all the data (or at least all the new sensor data since the last transfer with the user device) to the user device. The sensor data can be stored, for example, in the application database of the user device. With the sensor data from the smart air wearable device, the user device may be able to evaluate the surrounding air quality and/or health condition of the user using the smart air quality application.

FIGURE 5B also illustrates an exemplary smart air wearable device database. As noted above, the database may store a plurality of sensor data obtained by the smart air wearable device. The database may include information including the user identification, the time and date from which the sensor data was measured, and the actual sensor data (e.g., blood pressure and air quality).

It should be noted that other types of data may be obtained and stored by the measure and save software into the smart air wearable database aside from the data illustrated in FIGURE 5B. These other types of sensor data may also be used to quantify the user health and/or air quality in the surrounding area. Measurements may also be made at different intervals other than the designated 30 seconds as illustrated in the embodiments of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an exemplary computing device architecture that may be utilized to implement the various features and processes described herein. For example, the computing device architecture 600 could be implemented in a pedometer. Architecture 600 as illustrated in FIGURE 6 includes memory interface 602, processors 604, and peripheral interface 606. Memory interface 602, processors 604 and peripherals interface 606 can be separate components or can be integrated as a part of one or more integrated circuits. The various components can be coupled by one or more communication buses or signal lines.

Processors 604 as illustrated in FIGURE 6 is meant to be inclusive of data processors, image processors, central processing unit, or any variety of multi-core processing devices. Any variety of sensors, external devices, and external subsystems can be coupled to peripherals interface 606 to facilitate any number of functionalities within the architecture 600 of the exemplar mobile device. For example, motion sensor 610, light sensor 612, and proximity sensor 614 can be coupled to peripherals interface 606 to facilitate orientation, lighting, and proximity functions of the mobile device. For example, light sensor 612 could be utilized to facilitate adjusting the brightness of touch surface 646. Motion sensor 610, which could be exemplified in the context of an accelerometer or gyroscope, could be utilized to detect movement and orientation of the mobile device. Display objects or media could then be presented according to a detected orientation (e.g., portrait or landscape).

Other sensors could be coupled to peripherals interface 606, such as a temperature sensor, a biometric sensor, or other sensing device to facilitate corresponding functionalities. Location processor 615 (e.g., a global positioning transceiver) can be coupled to peripherals interface 606 to allow for generation of geo-location data thereby facilitating geo-positioning. An electronic magnetometer 616 such as an integrated circuit chip could in turn be connected to peripherals interface 606 to provide data related to the direction of true magnetic North whereby the mobile device could enjoy compass or directional functionality. Camera subsystem 620 and an optical sensor 622 such as a charged coupled device (CCD) or a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) optical sensor can facilitate camera functions such as recording photographs and video clips.

Communication functionality can be facilitated through one or more communication subsystems 624, which may include one or more wireless communication subsystems. Wireless communication subsystems 624 can include 802.x or Bluetooth transceivers as well as optical transceivers such as infrared. Wired communication system can include a port device such as a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port or some other wired port connection that can be used to establish a wired coupling to other computing devices such as network access devices, personal computers, printers, displays, or other processing devices capable of receiving or transmitting data. The specific design and implementation of communication subsystem 624 may depend on the communication network or medium over which the device is intended to operate. For example, a device may include wireless communication subsystem designed to operate over a global system for mobile

communications (GSM) network, a GPRS network, an enhanced data GSM environment (EDGE) network, 802.x communication networks, code division multiple access (CDMA) networks, or Bluetooth networks. Communication subsystem 624 may include hosting protocols such that the device may be configured as a base station for other wireless devices. Communication subsystems can also allow the device to synchronize with a host device using one or more protocols such as TCP/IP, HTTP, or UDP.

Audio subsystem 626 can be coupled to a speaker 628 and one or more microphones 630 to facilitate voice-enabled functions. These functions might include voice recognition, voice replication, or digital recording. Audio subsystem 626 in conjunction may also encompass traditional telephony functions. I/O subsystem 640 may include touch controller 642 and/or other input controller(s) 644. Touch controller 642 can be coupled to a touch surface 646. Touch surface 646 and touch controller 642 may detect contact and movement or break thereof using any of a number of touch sensitivity technologies, including but not limited to capacitive, resistive, infrared, or surface acoustic wave technologies. Other proximity sensor arrays or elements for determining one or more points of contact with touch surface 646 may likewise be utilized. In one implementation, touch surface 646 can display virtual or soft buttons and a virtual keyboard, which can be used as an input/output device by the user.

Other input controllers 644 can be coupled to other input/control devices 648 such as one or more buttons, rocker switches, thumb- wheels, infrared ports, USB ports, and/or a pointer device such as a stylus. The one or more buttons (not shown) can include an up/down button for volume control of speaker 628 and/or microphone 630. In some implementations, device 600 can include the functionality of an audio and/or video playback or recording device and may include a pin connector for tethering to other devices.

Memory interface 602 can be coupled to memory 650. Memory 650 can include high-speed random access memory or non-volatile memory such as magnetic disk storage devices, optical storage devices, or flash memory. Memory 650 can store operating system 652, such as Darwin, RTXC, LINUX, UNIX, OS X, ANDROID, WINDOWS, or an embedded operating system such as Vx Works. Operating system 652 may include instructions for handling basic system services and for performing hardware dependent tasks. In some implementations, operating system 652 can include a kernel.

Memory 650 may also store communication instructions 654 to facilitate communicating with other mobile computing devices or servers. Communication instructions 654 can also be used to select an operational mode or communication medium for use by the device based on a geographic location, which could be obtained by the GPS/Navigation instructions 668. Memory 650 may include graphical user interface instructions 656 to facilitate graphic user interface processing such as the generation of an interface; sensor processing instructions 658 to facilitate sensor-related processing and functions; phone instructions 660 to facilitate phone-related processes and functions; electronic messaging instructions 662 to facilitate electronic-messaging related processes and functions; web browsing instructions 664 to facilitate web browsing-related processes and functions; media processing instructions 666 to facilitate media processing-related processes and functions; GPS/Navigation instructions 668 to facilitate GPS and navigation-related processes, camera instructions 670 to facilitate camera-related processes and functions; and instructions 672 for any other application that may be operating on or in conjunction with the mobile computing device. Memory 650 may also store other software instructions for facilitating other processes, features and applications, such as applications related to navigation, social networking, location-based services or map displays.

Each of the above identified instructions and applications can correspond to a set of instructions for performing one or more functions described above. These instructions need not be implemented as separate software programs, procedures, or modules. Memory 650 can include additional or fewer instructions. Furthermore, various functions of the mobile device may be implemented in hardware and/or in software, including in one or more signal processing and/or application specific integrated circuits.

Certain features may be implemented in a computer system that includes a back-end component, such as a data server, that includes a middleware component, such as an application server or an Internet server, or that includes a front-end component, such as a client computer having a graphical user interface or an Internet browser, or any combination of the foregoing. The components of the system can be connected by any form or medium of digital data communication such as a communication network. Some examples of communication networks include LAN, WAN and the computers and networks forming the Internet. The computer system can include clients and servers. A client and server are generally remote from each other and typically interact through a network. The relationship of client and server arises by virtue of computer programs running on the respective computers and having a client- server relationship to each other.

One or more features or steps of the disclosed embodiments may be implemented using an API that can define on or more parameters that are passed between a calling application and other software code such as an operating system, library routine, function that provides a service, that provides data, or that performs an operation or a computation. The API can be implemented as one or more calls in program code that send or receive one or more parameters through a parameter list or other structure based on a call convention defined in an API specification document. A parameter can be a constant, a key, a data structure, an object, an object class, a variable, a data type, a pointer, an array, a list, or another call. API calls and parameters can be implemented in any programming language. The programming language can define the vocabulary and calling convention that a programmer will employ to access functions supporting the API. In some implementations, an API call can report to an application the capabilities of a device running the application, such as input capability, output capability, processing capability, power capability, and communications capability.

FIGURE 7A illustrates an exemplary method for the quantify health risk software. The quantify health risk software, included in the base software of the smart air wearable device, may be used to evaluate the obtained sensor data to determine if the health condition of the user has been negatively affected by the surrounding air quality.

In step 700, the quantify health risk software reads the sensor data stored in the smart air wearable device database. As indicated above, the sensor data may include sensor data pertaining to the user health condition (e.g., biometric parameters) as well as sensor data used to evaluate the surrounding air quality. In an embodiment, the quantify health risk software may also utilize data stored in the air quality GPS database alongside the sensor data for the user health condition to evaluate if the surrounding air quality has negatively affected the user.

In step 710, the quantify health risk software can then evaluate the sensor data read in step 700 with the standards database. As discussed above with FIGURE 2, the standards database includes a variety of different ranges used to evaluate, for example, whether air quality is acceptable or poor. The ranges also can be used to indicate whether the health condition of the user is satisfactory or poor. Based on the evaluation with the standards database, a corresponding message and/or action may be provided to the user.

In step 720, the quantify health risk software can check to see if there is a message that can be forwarded to the user. The message may be based on the evaluation performed in step 710. As seen in the exemplary standards database, the message may include information about the user health condition, as well as information about the surrounding air quality. The message may also include suggestions such as advising the user to leave the room or to initiate air handling devices. These messages may be provided on the display of the smart air wearable device.

In step 730, the quantify health risk software can check to see if the standards database has any actions to be provided to the user. The action, for example, may include initiating smart air quality controller software (e.g., in step 740). As discussed below, the smart air quality controller software can be used to connect with one or more air handling devices (e.g., fans, vents) in an attempt to improve air quality. Notification of the action may also be provided to the user on the display of the smart air wearable device.

After the quantify health risk software performs an associated action or in situations where no actions are provided, the quantify health risk software can loop back to step 700 to obtain additional sensor data (e.g., sensor data that is more current). It should be noted that the quantify health risk software may continually loop in order to provide continuous updates about the health condition of the user in view of the surrounding air quality.

FIGURE 7B illustrates an exemplary method for the smart air quality controller software. As indicated above, the smart air quality controller software may be executed to initiate connected air handling devices. By using the air handling devices, the user may be able to improve the surrounding air quality.

In step 750, the smart air quality controller software receives an action (e.g., instructions) from the quantify health risk software. As indicated above in FIGURE 7 A, the action may correspond with a pre-defined action stored in the standards database based on an evaluation performed by the quantify health risk software.

In step 760, the smart air quality controller software can check to see if there is any available connected air handling devices. If none are found, the smart air quality controller software can terminate. In some situations, the smart air quality controller software can continue to poll until an air handling device becomes available. The user can also be notified that no air handling devices are available.

If there is at least one available air handling device, however, the smart air quality controller software proceeds to step 770, where the software attempts to communicate with the connected air handling device. The communication facilitates providing instructions to the air handling device, for example, as dictated by the action stored in the standards database.

In step 780, the instructions for the connected air handling device are executed by the air handling device. The instructions may inform the connected air handling device on how to operate to best improve the surrounding air quality. For example, the instructions may provide settings on how to set conditions for operation of the ventilation system or fan. In some embodiments, the air handling device may only receive instructions to initiate. In this situation, the air handling device may have its own internal software (e.g., circulate and filter software) that can perform its own evaluation on how best to operate.

Once the connected air handling device has been instructed to operate, the smart air quality controller software can terminate until called upon again by the quantify health risk software.

FIGURE 8A illustrates an exemplary method for the application base software found in the smart air quality application of the user device. The application base software can be used to evaluate the health condition of the user and the surrounding air quality based on sensor data obtained by the smart air wearable device. It should be noted that the application base software may perform similar steps as the quantify health risk software described above in FIGURE 7 A. The application base software may be used if the smart air wearable device is not capable of communicating with the controller of the user device. In this way, the user device is capable of performing similar evaluations that the smart air wearable device can perform. In some embodiments, the user device may also be capable of performing additional evaluations and calculations based on the information stored in the application base software that the smart air wearable device may be incapable of performing.

In step 800, the application base software of the user device can request information (e.g., software modules, instructions and/or information for the standards database) in order to determine if the health condition of the user has been negatively affected by the surrounding air quality. In particular, the requested information (e.g., software modules, instructions and/or information for the standards database) may be downloaded from the smart air quality network and/or from the smart air wearable device. The user using the user device may request the information prior to using the user device. In some embodiments, the request for information may be automatically performed. In any case, the requested information (e.g., software modules, instructions and/or information for the standards database) is stored on the user device for later use.

In step 810, the application base software of the user device can receive the information stored in the smart air wearable device database from the smart air wearable device. As indicated above, the smart air wearable device database may include various sensor data pertaining to the user health condition (e.g., biometric parameters), as well as sensor data used to evaluate the surrounding air quality. In some embodiments, the quantify health risk software may also utilize data stored in the air quality GPS database alongside the sensor data for the user health condition to evaluate if the surrounding air quality has negatively affected the user.

In step 820, an evaluation is performed between the sensor data obtained in step 810 from the smart air wearable device and the information stored in the standards database obtained in step 800 (e.g., downloaded from the smart air wearable device and/or smart air quality network. As discussed above with FIGURE 2, the standards database may include a variety of different ranges used to evaluate, for example, whether air quality is acceptable or poor. The ranges also can be used to indicate whether the health condition of the user is satisfactory or poor. Based on the evaluation with the standards database, a corresponding message and/or action may be provided to the user.

In step 830, the application base software for the user device can check to see if there is a message that can be forwarded to the user. The message may be based on the evaluation performed in step 820. As seen in the exemplary standards database, the message may include information about the user health condition, as well as information about the surrounding air quality. The message may also include suggestions such as advising the user to leave the room or to initiate air handling devices. These messages may be provided on the display of the user.

In step 840, the application base software of the user device can check to see if the standards database has any actions to be provided to the user. The action, for example, may include initiating smart air quality controller software. As discussed below, the smart air quality controller software can be used to connect with one or more air handling devices (e.g., fans, vents) in an attempt to improve air quality. Notification of the action may also be provided to the user on the display of the smart air wearable device.

After the application base software of the user device performs an associated action or in situations where no actions are provided, the application base software can subsequently loop back to step 810 to obtain additional sensor data (e.g., sensor data that is more current) from the smart air wearable device. It should be noted that the application base software of the user device may continually loop in order to provide continuous updates about the health condition of the user in view of the surrounding air quality. In some embodiments, the application base software of the user device may also request

additional/updated information from the smart air wearable device and/or smart air quality network at regular intervals (e.g., step 800).

FIGURE 8B illustrates an exemplary method for the controller software found in the smart air quality application of the user device. This controller can be used by the smart air quality application of the user device to control the one or more air handling devices. The controller of the smart air quality application of the user device may perform similar steps as recited above in FIGURE 7B for the smart air quality controller software found in the smart air wearable device. It should be noted, there may be embodiments where the user would prefer that the processes be performed from the user device rather than the smart air wearable device. By using the controller software of the user device, similar functionalities can be performed on the user device without the use of the smart air wearable device. In other embodiments, the user device may be capable of performing additional functionalities that the smart air wearable device may be incapable of performing based on the type of information (e.g., software module, instructions) received, for example, from the smart air quality network and stored in the user device.

In step 860, the controller of the user device receives an action (e.g., instructions) from the application base software (e.g., step 840 of FIGURE 8A). The action may correspond with a pre-defined action stored in the standards database based on an evaluation performed by the application base software of the user device.

In step 870, the controller of the user device can check to see if there is any available connected air handling devices. If none are found, the smart air quality controller software can terminate. In some situations, the controller of the user device can continue to poll until an air handling device becomes available. The user can also be notified that no air handling devices are available.

If there is at least one available air handling device, however, the controller proceeds to step 880, where the controller attempts to communicate with the connected air handling device. The communication facilitates providing instructions to the air handling device, for example, as dictated by the action stored in the standards database.

In step 890, instructions for the connected air handling device are executed by the air handling device. The instructions may inform the connected air handling device on how to operate to best improve the surrounding air quality. For example, the instructions may provide settings on how to set conditions for operation of the ventilation system or fan. In some embodiments, the air handling device may only receive instructions to initiate. In this situation, the air handling device may have its own internal software (e.g., circulate and filter software) that can perform its own evaluation on how best to operate.

Once the connected air handling device has been instructed to operate, the controller of the user device can terminate until called upon again by the smart air quality application of the user device.

FIGURE 9, inclusive of FIGURE 9A and FIGURE 9B illustrates exemplary methods of the present invention for monitoring the health condition of the user and surrounding air quality. The methods depend on whether the smart air wearable device is capable of connecting with air handling devices that can be used to improve air quality. In particular, FIGURE 9A illustrates the method where the smart air wearable device is capable of connecting with air handling devices. In contrast, FIGURE 9B illustrates the method where the smart air wearable device is not capable of connecting with air handling devices. With reference to FIGURE 9A, step 900 corresponds with initiating the base software of the smart air wearable device. As noted above, the base software can be used to instruct the smart air wearable device to obtain sensor data about the user health parameters and surround air quality.

In step 905, the smart air wearable device obtains various sensor data about the user's health (e.g., biometric parameters) and surrounding air quality. The obtained sensor data can then be stored in the smart air wearable device database.

In step 910, the smart air wearable device can evaluate the stored sensor data with data stored in the standards database. As noted above, the data stored in the standards database may include thresholds for identifying, for example, when the health condition of the user has been affected negatively by surrounding air quality. The data stored in the standards database may also include messages that may be provided to the user and/or actions that may be performed when situations corresponding to a negative effect on the health condition of the user have been detected.

In step 915, the smart air wearable device provides notification to the user based on the evaluation performed in step 910. The notification may include, for example, the message stored in the standards database being displayed on the smart air wearable device for the user to view. In other embodiments, the notification may also include providing other types of information (e.g., user biometric parameters, surrounding air quality data) for the user to view.

In step 920, the smart air wearable device may poll for any available air handling devices. In situations where there are no air handling devices available, the user may be provided notification of such. In other embodiments, if there is at least one air handling device available, the smart air wearable device may transmit instructions to the one or more air handling devices (e.g., step 925). The instructions may correspond with instructions stored in the standards database related to the detected effect on the health condition of the user based on the surrounding air quality. The instructions, for example, may include initiating and operating the air handling device (e.g., vent, fan) to improve the surrounding air quality.

With reference to FIGURE 9B, which corresponds to a scenario where the smart air wearable device is not capable of connecting with the air handling devices, the user device may be used to perform the desired functionalities in place of the smart air wearable device. In step 950, the user may download application base software and/or information from the standards database to be used by the user device. As noted above with respect to FIGURE 8A, the user device may download software and/or information from the smart air wearable device and/or the smart air quality network. The downloaded software and/or information can then be stored in the user device for future use.

In step 955, the user device receives stored sensor data from the smart air wearable device (stored in the smart air wearable device database). The sensor data may then be stored in the application database of the user device.

In step 960, the user device evaluates the sensor data from the smart air wearable device with the information stored in the standards database. As discussed above with respect to FIGURE 2, the standards database includes a variety of different ranges used to evaluate, for example, whether air quality is acceptable or poor. The ranges also can be used to indicate whether the health condition of the user is satisfactory or poor. Based on the evaluation with the standards database, a corresponding message and/or action may be provided to the user based on the health condition of the user.

In step 965, notification to the user is provided based on the evaluation performed above in step 960. The notifications may be displayed on the user device for the user to view. The notification may include a message stored in the standards database. The notification may also include information about the user health condition, as well as information about the surrounding air quality. The message may also include suggestions such as advising the user to leave the room or to initiate air handling devices.

In step 970, the user device can poll to see if there is any available connected air handling devices. If none are found, the smart air quality controller software can terminate. In some situations, the controller of the user device can continue to poll until an air handling device becomes available. The user can also be notified that no air handling devices are available.

If there is at least one available air handling device, however, the user device proceeds to step 975, where the user device attempts to communicate with the connected air handling device. The communication facilitates providing instructions to the air handling device, for example, as dictated by the action stored in the standards database. In some embodiments, the instructions may be settings that can be provided to the air handling device (e.g., fan, vent) for operation where the operation of the air handling device improves the surrounding air quality. If there is more than one available air handling device or if there is only one availale air handling device but may have different level of controlling the air quality, the user device may determine which air handling device shall be communicated with, and/or which level of controlling should be set, based on the measured sensor data, namely the sensor data pertains to both biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality.

For instance, if the user has a blood pressure within the range of 80/55 through

90/60 with a corresponding smart air quality wearable measurement for the surrounding air quality between zero and forty, the smart air wearable device may determine that the user has normal blood pressure and the surrounding air quality is good. Subsequently, no

communication is established between the user device and the avaiable air handling device.

If the blood pressure is higher (e.g., 111/91+) and the air quality is poor (e.g.,

80-100), the smart air wearable device may determine that the user is experiencing high blood pressure, which could be tied to the surrounding hazardous air quality. With this determination, the user device may automatically communicate with the air handling device that has the best performance of improving surrounding air quality, and initiate such air handling device processes and set the level of controlling to the highest level, as an attempt to improve air quality in the area.

Alternatively, if the the blood pressure is measured as above average BP (e.g., with the range of 91/61 through 101/71) and the air quality is measured as poor air quality (e.g., within the range of 40-80), the smart air wearable device may determine that the user is experiencing above average blood pressure, which could be tied to the surrounding poor air quality. With this determination, the user device may automatically communicate with the air handling device that has the average performance of improving surrounding air quality and initiate such air handling device processes and set the level of controlling to the middle level, as an attempt to improve air quality in the area.

The foregoing detailed description of the technology herein has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the technology to the precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. The described embodiments were chosen in order to best explain the principles of the technology and its practical application to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the technology in various embodiments and with various

modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the technology be defined by the claim.

Claims

CLAIMS:
1. A computer-implemented method for evaluating surrounding air quality effect on a user health condition using a wearable device, the method comprising:
obtaining sensor data via one or more sensors of the wearable device, wherein the sensor data pertains to both biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality;
storing the obtained sensor data in memory;
evaluating the stored sensor data with a standards database;
providing notification to the user based on the evaluation; and executing an action based on the evaluation,
wherein the executing the action includes automatically initiating an air handling device to improve the surrounding air quality.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the biometric parameters include a blood pressure measurement of the user.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising evaluating the stored sensor data with location-based air quality data.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein executing an action based on the evaluation further comprising selecting an air handling device if there is more than one air handling device based on the sensor data pertains to both biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the air handling device is a fan or ventilation system.
6. A method for evaluating surrounding air quality effect on a user health condition using a user device, the method comprising:
downloading software and standards database from a network to be stored on the user device;
receiving sensor data from a wearable device, the sensor data pertaining to biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality;
storing the received sensor data into memory of the user device; evaluating the stored sensor data with the standards database; providing notification to the user based on the evaluation; and executing an action based on the evaluation,
wherein the executing the action includes automatically initiating an air handling device to improve the surrounding air quality.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the biometric parameters include a blood pressure measurement of the user.
8. The method of claim 6, further comprising evaluating the stored sensor data with location-based air quality data.
9. The method of claim 6, wherein executing an action based on the evaluation further comprising selecting an air handling device if there is more than one air handling device based on the sensor data pertains to both biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality.
10. The method of claim 6, wherein the air handling device is a fan or ventilation system.
11. A wearable device for evaluating surrounding air quality effect on a user health condition, the wearable device comprising:
one or more sensors configured for obtaining sensor data, wherein the sensor data pertains to biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality;
memory configured for storing the sensor data; and
a processor configured for :
evaluating the stored sensor data with a standards database, providing notification to the user based on the evaluation, and
executing an action based on the evaluation,
wherein the executing the action includes automatically initiating an air handling device to improve the surrounding air quality.
12. The wearable device of claim 11, wherein the biometric parameters include a blood pressure measurement of the user.
13. The wearable device of claim 11, wherein the processor is further configured for evaluating the stored sensor data with location-based air quality data.
14. The wearable device of claim 11, wherein executing an action based on the evaluation further comprising selecting an air handling device if there is more than one air handling device based on the sensor data pertains to both biometric parameters for evaluating a health condition of the user and to surrounding air quality.
15. The wearable device of claim 14, wherein the air handling device is a fan or ventilation system.
PCT/EP2016/051920 2015-02-02 2016-01-29 Smart air quality evaluating wearable device WO2016124495A1 (en)

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