WO2015181212A1 - Anterolateral wedge - Google Patents

Anterolateral wedge Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2015181212A1
WO2015181212A1 PCT/EP2015/061664 EP2015061664W WO2015181212A1 WO 2015181212 A1 WO2015181212 A1 WO 2015181212A1 EP 2015061664 W EP2015061664 W EP 2015061664W WO 2015181212 A1 WO2015181212 A1 WO 2015181212A1
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WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
wedge
foot
canting
outside
front
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/EP2015/061664
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Pieter Frans Hendrik MERTENS
Jeroen Marie-Therese Mathijs Hugo DIERCKX
Raymond Vanstraelen
Original Assignee
Bioracer Motion Bvba
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/14Shoes for cyclists
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/143Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form provided with wedged, concave or convex end portions, e.g. for improving roll-off of the foot
    • A43B13/148Wedged end portions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B17/00Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined
    • A43B17/02Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined wedge-like or resilient
    • A43B17/023Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined wedge-like or resilient wedge-like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/145Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the toes, i.e. the phalange
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/24Insertions or cap supports preventing the foot canting to one side, preventing supination or pronation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/14Special medical insertions for shoes for flat-feet, club-feet, or the like
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62MRIDER PROPULSION OF WHEELED VEHICLES OR SLEDGES; POWERED PROPULSION OF SLEDGES OR SINGLE-TRACK CYCLES; TRANSMISSIONS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SUCH VEHICLES
    • B62M3/00Construction of cranks operated by hand or foot
    • B62M3/16Accessories

Abstract

The present invention relates to a method of adjusting the position of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion and to augment stability of the cyclist whilst cycling. It further provides the devices for use in such method as well as bike fitting methods thereto related. The present invention is based on the finding that a foot wedge positioned under the toes, significantly improves stability and symmetry in the cycling movement. Different from the aforementioned varus or valgus wedges, the foot wedges of the present invention ensure that during the pedalling movement an angle is made between the phalanges (toes) and the rest of the foot, wherein the phalanges are more in dorsiflexion. Consequently, the foot wedges of the present invention have a canting angle from the front to the back (elevated toes) as well as from the outside (lateral side) to the inside (medial side).

Description

ANTEROLATERAL WEDGE

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a method of adjusting the support of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion and augment the stability of the cyclist whilst cycling. It further provides the devices for use in such method as well as bike fitting methods thereto related.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

The feet of a cyclist have to follow the perfect circular motion of the pedals while cycling. During this motion the clipless pedal typically limits the freedom of the foot. Consequently, and in case the shoe does not properly support the foot of the cyclists during this movement, this unnatural motion will result in asymmetrical deviations higher up in the movement chain (knee, pelvis, spine, shoulder). Where these asymmetrical movements of the pelvis, trunk and limbs inevitably reduce the efficiency of the pedalling movement, they could also lead to injuries due to an increased strain on the joints and muscles.

There is thus a desire in the field to try and address the foregoing problems by adjusting the position and support of the foot during cycling. In a first attempt to improve the position of the foot, current bicycle shoes are characterized in having a rigid, mostly composite sole. This sole has a certain curvature, elevating the heel and supporting the medial longitudinal arch of the foot. The back of these shoes firmly fits around the heel, preventing any movement between heel and shoe (the so named heel cup). However, this heel arched bicycle shoes do not affect the position of the forefoot through which the bicyclist delivers his power. In another attempt to adjust the position of the foot of the cyclist, various types and shapes of insoles and shoe wedges have been developed. Such insoles and wedges are for example described in US201 1/0023244, and used to compensate for the common biomechanical misalignment of the forefoot relative to the rearfoot, also known as varus or valgus forefoot tilt. (See [0031 ] of US201 1/0023244). In case of a varus forefoot tilt the thicker side of the wedge is placed at the inside and in case of a valgus forefoot tilt the thicker side of the wedge is placed at the outside or lateral side of the foot. Such wedges may be combined with cleat wedges inserted between the sole of the shoe and the pedal in an area proximate to the ball of the foot as presented in US5,860,330. Common for these prior art in-shoe wedges and cleat wedges is that the canting angle is constant in the longitudinal, lengthwise direction of the foot, i.e. running from either the inside (medial side) to the outside (lateral side) or from the lateral to the medial side.. US 2012/0210605 describes a wedge foot support that provides support at the metatarsals head along the medial longitudinal arch, while providing no support to the toes (See [001 1 ] of US2012/0210605). The wedge of US2012/0210605 is characterized in having a maximal height on the medial edge (inside) and tapers as it approaches the lateral edge (outside) and thus in orientation similar to the varus forefoot tilt mentioned above (See [0026] of US2012/0210605). Different from the aforementioned varus forefoot tilt insoles, the wedge foot support of US2012/0210605 also tapers from the wedge body to the distal end (tip) of the forefoot portion, i.e. having a maximal height at the wedge body and tapers as it approaches the forefoot portion. As such, these wedges actually correct for common biomechanical misalignments of the foot as a person walks in a normal heel to toe gait, but fail to address the asymmetrical deviations occurring higher up in the movement chain caused by the unnatural pedalling movement of a cyclist. It has been an object of the present invention to address these asymmetrical movements and to improve stability of the pelvis, trunk and limbs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

With specific reference now to the figures, it is stressed that the particulars shown are by way of example and for purposes of illustrative discussion of the different embodiments of the present invention only. They are presented in the cause of providing what is believed to be the most useful and readily description of the principles and conceptual aspects of the invention. In this regard no attempt is made to show structural details of the invention in more detail than is necessary for a fundamental understanding of the invention. The description taken with the drawings making apparent to those skilled in the art how the several forms of the invention may be embodied in practice. Fig. 1 : Top view of an anterolateral wedge of the present invention, schematically showing positioning of the wedge in relation to the foot.

Fig. 2: Side view of an anterolateral wedge of the present invention, schematically showing positioning of the wedge in relation to the foot.

Fig. 3: Schematic representation for the positioning of the infrared markers on the cyclist and the bike. For each position there is a left and right marker. Position 1 : Wrist - ulna; proc. Styloidem - Position 2: Elbow - lateral epicondyle - Position 3: Shoulder - acromial angle - Position 4: Pelvis - tuberculum of iliac crest - Position 5: Pelvis - spina iliaca anterior superior (SIAS) - Position 6: Femur - trochanter major - Position 7: Knee - Joint between patella and femur - Position 8: Ankle - lateral maleolus of fibula - Position 9: Posterior shoe marker - Position 10: Anterior shoe marker - Positions 1 1 and 12: midline of the bike. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is based on the finding that a foot wedge as further detailed herein, positioned under the toes, significantly improves stability and symmetry in the cycling movement. Different from the aforementioned varus or valgus wedges, the foot wedges of the present invention ensure that during the pedalling movement an angle is made between the phalanges (toes) and the rest of the foot, wherein the phalanges are more in dorsiflexion, meaning that the distal ends of the toes are lifted by the wedge. Consequently, the foot wedges of the present invention have a canting angle from the front (highest end) to the back (lowest end) (thus resulting in elevated toes) as well as from the outside (lateral side) (highest end) to the inside (medial side) (lowest end). In other words, the wedge of the present invention has a maximum at the front lateral edge and tapers both towards the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, and as well as to the medial side of the foot. Thus in a first embodiment the present invention provides a foot wedge for use in positioning the foot of a cyclist, wherein the base of the wedge (A) corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height (h) of the wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and characterized in having a canting angle from the front (distal phalanges) to the back (Metatarsophalangeal joints) as well as from the outside (lateral side of the foot) to the inside (medial side of the foot) of the wedge, wherein the canting angle from the front to the back has a maximum height at the front and tapers to the back; and wherein the canting angle from the outside to the inside has a maximum height at the outside and tapers to the inside. In its coverage, the wedge of the present invention, hereinafter also referred to as the anterolateral wedge, is accordingly limited to the area underneath the toes, i.e. to the area under the distal and proximal phalanges of the toes. It does not extent to the area underneath the metatarsals, this being the area for the typical varus or valgus corrections. It will be evident to the skilled artisan that the anterolateral wedge of the present invention can be combined with any further planar corrections for the user.

Per reference to Figure 1 , and in relation to the foot of the cyclist, the base (A) of the foot wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, and in its longitudinal direction the wedge extends underneath and beyond the proximal, intermediate and distal phalanges of each of the toes. A perpendicular (B) leaving from the point of intersection between the base (A) of the wedge and the longitudinal axis of the foot (C) provides a first orientation for the slope (hereinafter also referred to as the perpendicular slope) running from the front (highest end) of the foot to the base (A) (lowest end) of the wedge. In other words the perpendicular slope has a maximum height at the front of the foot and tapers to the base (A). The baseline of the wedge (A) provides the orientation of the second slope (hereinafter also referred to as the baseline slope) running from the lateral side (highest end) to the medial side (lowest end). Expressed differently, the baseline slope has a maximum height at the lateral side and tapers to the medial side. The slopes of the wedge will be determined by testing each rider personally and are each independently expected to be between 1 and 10 degrees. When applied as in-shoe wedges, the slopes will also depend on the type of bicycle shoe, as it must indeed provide sufficient space to place the wedge under the toes. Due to the combination of the foregoing slopes in a single wedge, an anterolateral canting of the phalanges, i.e. the toes are lifted, is achieved, thus hereinafter also referred to as an anterolateral wedge.

As will be evident to the skilled artisan, the anterolateral wedge of the present invention can be used as an independent in-shoe wedge, as an integrated part of an insole, or even be integrated in the midsole or the sole of the bicycle shoe. All of these possibilities are embodiments within the context of the present invention. Thus in a first aspect, the present invention provides a foot wedge for use in positioning the foot of a cyclist, wherein the base of the wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height of the wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and further characterized in having a canting angle from the front to the back as well as from the outside to the inside of the wedge, wherein the highest ends of the wedge are respectively positioned at the front and the outside of the foot . In one embodiment of the wedge the slope orientation for the canting from the front of the foot (highest end) to the back (lowest end) is in accordance with the perpendicular slope (supra), and the slope orientation for the canting from the outside of the foot (highest end) to the inside (lowest end) is in accordance with the baseline slope (supra). In an even further embodiment the canting of these slopes are each independently between and about 1 to 10 degrees. In another embodiment the present invention provides an insole (including a midsole) for use in positioning the foot of a cyclist, wherein said insole comprises a wedge wherein the base of said wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height of said wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and further characterized in having a canting angle from the front of the foot (highest end) to the back (lowest end) as well as from the outside of the foot (highest end) to the inside (lowest end) of said wedge when in position as an insole. In one embodiment such insole (including a midsole) is further characterized in that the slope orientation of the canting angle from the front to the back is in accordance with the perpendicular slope (supra) and the slope orientation for the canting from the outside to the inside is in accordance with the baseline slope (supra). In another embodiment the present invention provides a sole of a bicycle shoe for use in positioning the foot of a cyclist, wherein said sole comprises a wedge wherein the base of said wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height of said wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and further characterized in having a canting angle from the front (highest end) to the back (lowest end) as well as from the outside (highest end) to the inside (lowest end) of said wedge when in position. In one embodiment such sole is further characterized in that the slope orientation of the canting angle from the front to the back is in accordance with the perpendicular slope (supra) and the slope orientation for the canting from the outside to the inside is in accordance with the baseline slope (supra). When referring to the front, back, outside, and inside of said wedge, it is to be understood that said positions or in accordance with the orientation of the wedge when in position as a sole / insole. When positioned as in in-shoe wedge, as part of an insole (including a midsole) or as integrated part of the sole of the bicycle shoe, the anterolateral wedge is positioned under the toes of the foot, its canting does not extend to the metatarsals of the foot. Thus in a further embodiment the foot wedge of the present invention is characterized in that its canting does not extend underneath the metatarsals of the foot. Being positioned and having a canting (lift) under all of the toes, in-shoe fit of the hallux may be stressed. Consequently, and in order to accommodate the hallux or big toe, the foot wedge of the present invention my further comprise a recess positioned underneath the hallux at the side of the wedge facing the foot.

The foot wedge of the present invention can be made of any art-known insole material, that has a high torsion resistance in order to maintain the canting angles whilst in use. Such as for example made of wood, mdf, metal, carbon fibre material, and the like.

In a further aspect the present invention is directed to a method of adjusting the position of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion of the cyclist whilst cycling. Said method comprising the step of positioning a wedge as defined herein underneath the toes of the foot; wherein in general the base of said wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height of said wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and further characterized in having a canting angle from the front to the back as well as from the outside to the inside of said wedge, wherein the canting angle from the front to the back has a maximum height at the front and tapers to the back; and wherein the canting angle from the outside to the inside has a maximum height at the outside and tapers to the inside.

In one embodiment of the foregoing method, the wedge is position as an in-shoe wedge into the bicycle shoe. In another embodiment, the wedge is positioned as an integrated part of an insole into the bicycle shoe, including midsoles such as for example custom made carbon midsoles for plantar correction. In an even further embodiment the wedge is positioned as an integrated part of the sole of the bicycle shoe under the toes of the foot. The slopes of the foot wedge used in the foregoing methods are in conformity with the different embodiments herein described. Also the materials to be used for the wedge in the foregoing methods are in conformity with the different embodiments herein described.

In a further aspect the present invention provides the use of a wedge (supra) in its different embodiments for adjusting the position of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion of the cyclist whilst cycling.

EXAMPLES

Comparative test of Bikefit Varus/valgus wedge versus the anterolateral wedge according to the invention

1. Measuring hardware

The measurements were done with 6 V120 slim camera's (Natural Point, Corvallis, USA). 3 cameras were placed on the left and 3 on the right side of the cyclist. These cameras registered 20 infrared markers on the body and 2 infrared markers on the midline of the bike as schematically represented in Figure 3. The cameras measure at a frequency of 120 herz and the accuracy is less than 1 mm.

2. Method

The cyclist was asked to ride at a pedaling speed around 90 RPM. The total duration of one measurement was 10 second. The first measurement was done with the bike fit method. The second measurement was done with the anterolateral wedge.

As evident from the following results, for Person 1 there is less lateral movement on both knees during cycling with the anterolateral wedge of the present invention. For this person there is also les lateral movement in the pelvic at the two pelvic marker positions. The knees of this test person move more medial to the bike whilst cycling with the anterolateral wedge of the present invention. For Person 2 there is also less lateral movement in the right knee, but when compared to the bikefit wedge there is more lateral movement in the left knee of this person. Again there is a notable improvement in the lateral movement of the pelvic with the anterolateral wedge. The knees of this second test person move more lateral to the bike. 3. Results

test person Infrared Marker Position 7

lateral movement knee (cm)

Bike fit wedge anterolateral wedge difference

Left right Left right Left (cm) Left (%) right (cm) right (%)

Person 1 1,95 2,53 1,91 2,04 0,04 2,1 0,49 19,4

Person 2 2,11 2,5 2,27 2,3 -0,16 -7,5 0,2 8

Infrared Marker Position 5

lateral movement pelvic 1

Bike fit wedge anterolateral wedge difference

Left right Left right Left (cm) Left (%) right (cm) right (%)

Person 1 1,65 1,44 1,32 1,28 0,33 20 0,16 11,1

Person 2 2,03 1,97 1,84 1,88 0,19 9,4 0,09 4,6

Infrared Marker Position 4

lateral movement pelvic 2

Bike fit wedge anterolateral wedge difference

Left right Left right Left (cm) Left (%) right (cm) right (%)

Person 1 1,21 1,22 0,9 0,92 0,31 25,6 0,3 24,6

Person 2 1,79 1,84 1,58 1,69 0,21 11,7 0,15 8,2 avg. distance knee-bike (cm)

Bike fit wedge anterolateral wedge difference

Left right Left right Left (cm) Left (%) right (cm) right (%)

Person 1 12,34 12,1 12,25 11,95 -0,09 -0,7 -0,15 -1,2

Person 2 13,61 13,7 13,77 13,87 0,16 1,2 0,17 1,2

The reduction in pelvic movement is an evident indication of an improved stability of the cyclist during cycling. In other words, lifting the toes of cyclists using the anterolateral wedge of the present invention, has a clear effect higher up in the movement chain with a stabilizing the upper body of the cyclist. Without the wedge the cyclist has the tendency to shift (move) on0 the saddle with inevitable energy consumption. The wedge accordingly contributes to an

energy efficiency improvement in the unnatural pedalling movement of a cyclist.

Claims

1. A foot wedge for use in positioning the foot of a cyclist, wherein the base of the wedge (A) corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height (h) of the wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and characterized in having a canting angle from the front (distal phalanges) to the back (Metatarsophalangeal joints) as well as from the outside (lateral side of the foot) to the inside (medial side of the foot) of the wedge, wherein the canting angle from the front to the back has a maximum height at the front and tapers to the back; and wherein the canting angle from the outside to the inside has a maximum height at the outside and tapers to the inside.
2. The foot wedge according to claim 1 , wherein the slope orientation for the canting from the outside to the inside of the wedge, corresponds to the orientation of the base (A) of said wedge.
3. The foot wedge according to claim 1 , wherein the slope orientation for canting from the front to the back of the wedge, corresponds to the orientation of the perpendicular (B) leaving from the point of intersection between the base of the wedge and the longitudinal axis (C) of the foot.
4. The foot wedge according to any one of the claims 2 to 3, wherein the canting of these slopes are each independently between and about 3 to 10 degrees.
5. The foot wedge according to any one of the foregoing claims, wherein the foot wedge of the present invention is characterized in that it's canting does not extend underneath the metatarsals of the foot.
6. The foot wedge according to any one of the foregoing claims, wherein the foot wedge comprise a recess positioned underneath the hallux at the side of the wedge facing the foot.
7. The foot wedge according to any one of the foregoing claims, wherein the foot wedge is made of a high torsion resistance material.
8. A method of adjusting the position of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion of the cyclist whilst cycling, said method comprising the step of positioning a wedge as defined in any one of claims 1 to 7, under the toes of the foot.
9. The method according to claim 8, wherein the base (A) of said wedge corresponds to the line formed by the 5 Metatarsophalangeal joints, the height (h) of said wedge extends up to and beyond the distal phalanges of each of the toes, and further characterized in having a canting angle from the front to the back as well as from the outside to the inside of said wedge, wherein the canting angle from the front to the back has a maximum height at the front and tapers to the back; and wherein the canting angle from the outside to the inside has a maximum height at the outside and tapers to the inside.
10. The method according to claims 8 or 9, wherein the wedge is position as an in-shoe wedge into the bicycle shoe.
1 1. The method according to claims 8 or 9, wherein the wedge is positioned as an integrated part of an insole, into the bicycle shoe.
12. The method according to claims 8 or 9, wherein the wedge is positioned as an integrated part of the sole, including a midsole of the bicycle shoe under the toes of the foot.
13. Use of a wedge as defined in any one of claims 1 to 7, for adjusting the position of the foot of a cyclist to reduce misaligned motion of the cyclist whilst cycling.
PCT/EP2015/061664 2014-05-28 2015-05-27 Anterolateral wedge WO2015181212A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
EP14170228.2 2014-05-28
EP14170228 2014-05-28
EP14186827 2014-09-29
EP14186827.3 2014-09-29

Publications (1)

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Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2616190A (en) * 1946-06-14 1952-11-04 Reuben U Darby Walking angle corrective footwear
US6170176B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2001-01-09 James G. Clough Shoe apparatus and method
DE10000416A1 (en) * 2000-01-07 2001-07-26 Armin Wald Orthopedic correction device for cyclists fits between shoe and pedal as rubberized or underside-roughened wedge shape to angle in-shoe foot round pedal axis
WO2010085032A2 (en) * 2009-01-23 2010-07-29 Lee Byung Hun Shoe sole structure
WO2010132364A2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2010-11-18 Georgetown University Orthotic devices
US20110023244A1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2011-02-03 Hogg Stephen J Functional Fitting Of Cyclists In Clipless Pedal Systems
US20110083345A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-04-14 Santopietro Frank J Orthotic devices and methods for manufacturing same
US20120210605A1 (en) * 2011-02-23 2012-08-23 Rylo, Inc. Foot support

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2616190A (en) * 1946-06-14 1952-11-04 Reuben U Darby Walking angle corrective footwear
US6170176B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2001-01-09 James G. Clough Shoe apparatus and method
DE10000416A1 (en) * 2000-01-07 2001-07-26 Armin Wald Orthopedic correction device for cyclists fits between shoe and pedal as rubberized or underside-roughened wedge shape to angle in-shoe foot round pedal axis
WO2010085032A2 (en) * 2009-01-23 2010-07-29 Lee Byung Hun Shoe sole structure
WO2010132364A2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2010-11-18 Georgetown University Orthotic devices
US20110023244A1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2011-02-03 Hogg Stephen J Functional Fitting Of Cyclists In Clipless Pedal Systems
US20110083345A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-04-14 Santopietro Frank J Orthotic devices and methods for manufacturing same
US20120210605A1 (en) * 2011-02-23 2012-08-23 Rylo, Inc. Foot support

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