WO2015117186A1 - A solar lighting system - Google Patents

A solar lighting system Download PDF

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Publication number
WO2015117186A1
WO2015117186A1 PCT/AU2015/000057 AU2015000057W WO2015117186A1 WO 2015117186 A1 WO2015117186 A1 WO 2015117186A1 AU 2015000057 W AU2015000057 W AU 2015000057W WO 2015117186 A1 WO2015117186 A1 WO 2015117186A1
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WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
lighting
solar lighting
solar
module
reflector
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/AU2015/000057
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Robert AZZOPARDI
Original Assignee
Ellumination Pty Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to AU2014900334 priority Critical
Priority to AU2014900334A priority patent/AU2014900334A0/en
Application filed by Ellumination Pty Ltd filed Critical Ellumination Pty Ltd
Publication of WO2015117186A1 publication Critical patent/WO2015117186A1/en

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Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21SNON-PORTABLE LIGHTING DEVICES; SYSTEMS THEREOF; VEHICLE LIGHTING DEVICES SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLE EXTERIORS
    • F21S9/00Lighting devices with a built-in power supply; Systems employing lighting devices with a built-in power supply
    • F21S9/02Lighting devices with a built-in power supply; Systems employing lighting devices with a built-in power supply the power supply being a battery or accumulator
    • F21S9/03Lighting devices with a built-in power supply; Systems employing lighting devices with a built-in power supply the power supply being a battery or accumulator rechargeable by exposure to light
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05FSYSTEMS FOR REGULATING ELECTRIC OR MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G05F1/00Automatic systems in which deviations of an electric quantity from one or more predetermined values are detected at the output of the system and fed back to a device within the system to restore the detected quantity to its predetermined value or values, i.e. retroactive systems
    • G05F1/66Regulating electric power
    • G05F1/67Regulating electric power to the maximum power available from a generator, e.g. from solar cell
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/052Cooling means directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. integrated Peltier elements for active cooling or heat sinks directly associated with the PV cells
    • H01L31/0521Cooling means directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. integrated Peltier elements for active cooling or heat sinks directly associated with the PV cells using a gaseous or a liquid coolant, e.g. air flow ventilation, water circulation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/054Optical elements directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. light-reflecting means or light-concentrating means
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/054Optical elements directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. light-reflecting means or light-concentrating means
    • H01L31/0543Optical elements directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. light-reflecting means or light-concentrating means comprising light concentrating means of the refractive type, e.g. lenses
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and specially adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/054Optical elements directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. light-reflecting means or light-concentrating means
    • H01L31/0547Optical elements directly associated or integrated with the PV cell, e.g. light-reflecting means or light-concentrating means comprising light concentrating means of the reflecting type, e.g. parabolic mirrors, concentrators using total internal reflection
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, e.g. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S20/00Supporting structures for PV modules
    • H02S20/30Supporting structures being movable or adjustable, e.g. for angle adjustment
    • H02S20/32Supporting structures being movable or adjustable, e.g. for angle adjustment specially adapted for solar tracking
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, e.g. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S40/00Components or accessories in combination with PV modules, not provided for in groups H02S10/00 - H02S30/00
    • H02S40/30Electrical components
    • H02S40/38Energy storage means, e.g. batteries, structurally associated with PV modules
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21SNON-PORTABLE LIGHTING DEVICES; SYSTEMS THEREOF; VEHICLE LIGHTING DEVICES SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLE EXTERIORS
    • F21S8/00Lighting devices intended for fixed installation
    • F21S8/08Lighting devices intended for fixed installation with a standard
    • F21S8/085Lighting devices intended for fixed installation with a standard of high-built type, e.g. street light
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V23/00Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices
    • F21V23/04Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being switches
    • F21V23/0442Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being switches activated by means of a sensor, e.g. motion or photodetectors
    • F21V23/0471Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being switches activated by means of a sensor, e.g. motion or photodetectors the sensor detecting the proximity, the presence or the movement of an object or a person
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/74Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21WINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO USES OR APPLICATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • F21W2107/00Use or application of lighting devices on or in particular types of vehicles
    • F21W2107/10Use or application of lighting devices on or in particular types of vehicles for land vehicles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21WINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO USES OR APPLICATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS
    • F21W2131/00Use or application of lighting devices or systems not provided for in codes F21W2102/00-F21W2121/00
    • F21W2131/10Outdoor lighting
    • F21W2131/103Outdoor lighting of streets or roads
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies, e.g. halogen lamps or gas discharge lamps
    • Y02B20/72Energy efficient lighting technologies, e.g. halogen lamps or gas discharge lamps in street lighting
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/50Photovoltaic [PV] energy
    • Y02E10/52PV systems with concentrators
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E70/00Other energy conversion or management systems reducing GHG emissions
    • Y02E70/30Systems combining energy storage with energy generation of non-fossil origin

Abstract

A solar lighting system for street lighting, the solar lighting system comprising: a concentrated photovoltaic module; and a lighting module.

Description

A SOLAR LIGHTING SYSTEM
Field of the Invention
[0001] The present invention relates to a solar lighting system and in particular to a solar lighting system have a concentrated photovoltaic module and a lighting module.
[0002] The invention has been developed primarily for use in/with street lighting and will be described hereinafter with reference to this application. However, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to this particular field of use.
Background
[0003] Existing streetlights typically draw power from conventional electrical reticulation networks. However, increasing electricity prices render such street lighting system is unfeasible with councils and municipalities having to foot extra ordinary monthly power consumption bills.
[0004] Furthermore, such conventional street lighting systems require power reticulation, usually at the top of street poles, be expensive, unsightly, and requiring maintenance.
[0005] As such, attempt to be made to address the above problems by utilising "off grid" power and especially solar power. In this regard, these solar lighting systems deploy solar panels adjacent streetlights for the purposes of generating power for the street lighting.
[0006] However, these off grid systems suffer from several disadvantages. Specifically, the solar panels and lights are inefficient, space consuming, and are prone to operational degradation from debris such as bird droppings and the like. Further disadvantages include inability to detect faults, non-standards compliant light dispersion and the inability to track the sun.
[0007] As such, the present invention seeks to provide a solar lighting system, which will overcome or substantially ameliorate at least some of the deficiencies of the prior art, or to at least provide an alternative.
[0008] It is to be understood that, if any prior art information is referred to herein, such reference does not constitute an admission that the information forms part of the common general knowledge in the art, in Australia or any other country. Summary of the Invention
[0009] According to one aspect, there is provided a solar lighting system for street lighting, the solar lighting system comprising a concentrated photovoltaic module and a lighting module.
[0010] The concentrated photovoltaic module is preferably a high concentration photovoltaic module such as a high concentration photovoltaic module adapted to concentrate sunlight by greater than substantially XI 000, XI 500 or even X2000.
[001 1] The concentrated photovoltaic module may comprise a primary reflector having a diameter of substantially about 300, about 400, about 500 or about 600 mm. The concentrated photovoltaic module may further comprise a secondary reflector adapted to receive reflected light from the primary reflector. Then, the concentrated photovoltaic module comprises a solar cell adapted to receive reflected light from the secondary reflector.
[0012] The concentrated photovoltaic module may comprise a waveguide between the secondary reflector and the solar cell such as a waveguide comprising a prism. Such a prism may have a first cross-section facing the secondary reflector and a second cross-section facing the solar cell and wherein the first cross-section is greater than the second cross- section. The second cross-section may be sized in accordance with a size of the solar cell.
[0013] The waveguide may alternatively comprises optic fibre.
[0014] Preferably, the solar lighting system further comprises a sun tracking module. The sun tracking module may be operably coupled to the primary reflector and/or the secondary reflector.
[0015] The lighting module comprises at least one LED or a plurality of LEDs 150. Each LED 150 may have a lens adapted to output a desired lighting pattern. The desired lighting pattern may be substantially rectangular.
[0016] The solar lighting system further comprises a heatsink. The heatsink is preferably a passive or can be active by way of wind turbine heatsink operably coupled to the lighting module and/or the concentrated photovoltaic module.
[0017] The heatsink may comprise LED heatsink portions adapted for being operably coupled to an LED 150 of the lighting module and solar cell heatsink portions adapted for being operably coupled to a solar cell of the concentrated photovoltaic module.
[0018] The heatsink is adapted to dissipate greater than substantially 100 W or even 150 W. [0019] The solar lighting system further comprises a support engagement. The support engagement is adapted for engaging a pole in use. As such, the support engagement may be bifurcated so as to be configurable in an open configuration for receiving the pole therein, and subsequently configured in a close configuration for securing the pole therein. The support engagement may further comprise a first bifurcated portion and a second bifurcated portion and wherein the first bifurcated portion and the second bifurcated portion are adapted for making electrical contact.
[0020] The solar lighting system further comprises a power supply module wherein the power supply module comprises a battery. Preferably, the battery is a rechargeable battery such as a lead acid battery or other battery chemistries specific to the demands of the location of the solar street light.
[0021] The battery is operably coupled to the lighting module and may have sufficient capacity to power the lighting module for greater than substantially 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours or even 48 hours and up to two weeks without recharge.
[0022] The solar lighting system may comprise a communication module so as to be able to transmit operational parameters and receive operational instructions. The communication module may comprise a wireless module such as an 802.11 wireless module or cellular network wireless module (2G, 3G or 4G subject to area availability).
[0023] The solar lighting system may comprise a motion sensor operably coupled to the lighting module and wherein the lighting module is controlled in accordance with the motion sensor sensing motion. The motion sensor may be is adapted to sense pedestrian motion or vehicular motion.
[0024] The solar lighting system may further comprising a light sensor and wherein the light sensor is operably coupled to the lighting module and wherein the lighting module is controlled in accordance with the light sensor sensing light.
[0025] In further arrangements the system may also comprise additional environmental monitoring sensors, for example, the lighting may also comprise one or more of nuclear, chemical or biological sensors for detection of ambient air contaminants in the vicinity of the lighting module in use.
[0026] Other aspects of the invention are also disclosed. Brief Description of the Drawings
[0027] Notwithstanding any other forms which may fall within the scope of the present invention, a preferred embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:
[0028] . Figures 1 to 11 show a solar lighting system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
[0029] Figure 12 shows an example implementation of a lighting system incorporating an environmental sensor;
[0030] . Figure 13 shows a controller for the solar lighting system in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention;
[0031 ] . Figures 14A and 14B show functional block diagrams of the solar lighting system in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention;
[0032] Figure 15 shows a solar lighting system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
[0033] Figure 16 shows a particular arrangement of a primary reflector in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
[0034] Figure 17 shows a particular arrangement of a secondary reflector in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention when used in conjunction with the primary reflector of Figure 16; and
[0035] Figures 18A and 18B show perspective views of a solar lighting system in accordance with preferred embodiments of the present invention in use mounted to a pole 130.
Description of Embodiments
[0036] Referring to the accompanying drawings, there is provided a solar lighting system 100 preferably used for street lighting. In the embodiments that will be described below, it will become apparent that the solar lighting system 100 is primarily adapted for use as "off grid" street lighting conferring advantages in being able to provide solar powered street lighting in accordance with the requisite lighting standards and in an efficient manner. It should be noted that the solar lighting system 100 described herein may be used for other applications also as opposed to street lighting. [0037] Referring now to the accompanying drawings, Figures 1A and IB shows exploded views of the components of two example embodiments of the solar lighting system 100 and 500 respectively. The ensuing drawings then show various views of the solar lighting system 100/500 wherein Figures 2Aand 2B show side elevation views of the two example embodiments respectively, Figures 3A and 3B respectively show a top perspective view of solar lighting system embodiments 100/500 respectively, Figures 4A and 4B respectively show a bottom perspective view of solar lighting system embodiments 100/500, Figures 5A and 5B show a rear are elevation view of solar lighting system embodiments 100/500 respectively, Figures 6Aand 6B show a front elevation view of solar lighting system embodiments 100/500 respectively, Figure 7 shows a top plan view of embodiment 100, Figure 8 shows a bottom plan view of embodiment 100, Figures 9A and 9B show a side elevation cross-section of embodiments 100 and 500 respectively, Figure 10 shows a magnified side elevation cross-section and Figure 11 shows a bottom plan view cross- section.
[0038] Now, referring specifically to Figure 1, the solar lighting system 100 comprises a concentrated photovoltaic module 170 and a lighting module 175.
[0039] The use of the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 confers advantages compared to existing solar lighting systems utilising solar panels. As will become apparent from the description below, the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 allows for a compact design, light energy conversion efficiency, resistance to degradation in performance from debris, sun tracking and more.
[0040] In a preferred embodiment, the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 has a high concentration photovoltaic module. In this manner, the high concentration photovoltaic module is adapted to concentrate sunlight by greater than substantially 1000 times. For example, the solar concentration factor may be between about 1000 and about 2000, or between about 1100 and about 2000, between about 1200 and about 2000, between about 1300 and about 2000, between about 1400 and about 2000, between about 1500 and about 2000, between about 1600 and about 2000, between about 1700 and about 2000, between about 1800 and about 2000, between about 1900 and about 2000. For example the solar concentration factor may be about 1000, 1100, 1200, 130, 1400, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800, 1900, or about 2000 or greater. [0041] In a further preferred embodiment, the high concentration photovoltaic module is adapted to concentrate sunlight by substantially 2000 times. The substantially 2000 times concentration provides for potentially the highest feasible concentration while yet being able to use passive cooling as will be described in further detail below as opposed to active cooling which would reduce the solar conversion efficiency of the solar lighting system 100.
[0042] Now, Example embodiments 100 and 500 shown in exploded view in Figures 1A and IB respectively shows the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 comprises a primary reflector 110. The primary reflector 110 lies beneath a fixed translucent dome 105. The fixed translucent dome 105 may be manufactured from any suitable translucent material such as glass, plastic and the like. Furthermore, the fixed translucent dome 105 is sufficiently domed so as to allow debris, such as bird droppings and the like, to wash naturally from the surface of the dome 105 in rain so as to negate the need for manual cleaning or the like.
[0043] In this manner, sunlight passes through the fixed translucent dome 105 for reflection by the primary reflector 110. In a preferred embodiment, the primary reflector 110 has a diameter of between about 500mm and about 600 mm. In particular arrangements the primary reflector 110 has a diameter of about 550 mm. In a preferred embodiment, the primary reflector 110 has a Radius of Curvature (RoC) of between about 450 mm and about 500 mm. In particular arrangements the primary reflector 110 has an RoC of about 483 mm.
[0044] The concentrated photovoltaic module 170 further comprises a secondary reflector 115 adapted to receive reflected light from the primary reflector 110, in Figure IB showing an embodiment where the primary mirror 110 comprises two cut-out edges 111 to maximise the solar collection efficiency, particularly at or near sunrise and sunset. As is apparent, the secondary reflector 115 is much smaller in diameter when compared to the primary reflector 110. Generally, the secondary reflector 115 is poised between the dome 105 and the primary reflector 110. In this regard, the secondary reflector 150 may be supported by secondary reflector supports 120.
[0045] Furthermore, the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 comprises a solar cell 140 adapted to receive reflected light from the secondary reflector 115 for conversion into electrical energy.
[0046] In a preferred embodiment, the concentrated photovoltaic module 170 comprises a waveguide located between the secondary reflector 115 and the solar cell 140 so as to ensure that all or most of the light reflected from the secondary reflector 115 strikes the solar cell 140. The waveguide affords advantages including greater tolerance of the position of the sun.
[0047] In one embodiment, the waveguide comprises a prism 135. The prism 135 is tapered towards the solar cell 140 so as to be able to capture light from a wider angle as compared to the angle from which lights passes out of the prism 135. In other embodiments, other waveguide may be employed, including fibre-optic waveguide and the like. The use of the fibre-optic waveguide provides advantages including in being flexible so as to allow the primary reflector 110 to move with respect to the solar cell 140, especially advantageous where the position of the primary reflector 110 is controlled by a solar tracker.
[0048] In another embodiment, e.g. embodiment 500 of Figure IB the solar lighting system further comprises active dual-axis tracking system 117 for solar tracking to maximise solar collection efficiency throughout the day. In the second embodiment, the primary mirror is raised out of the housing to allow for greater field of view of to be available to the primary reflector 110, and dome 105 is larger to accommodate the raised primary reflector 110. Solar lighting system 500 as seen in Figure 2 also comprises heatsink housings 118 and 119, and also dedicated housing 131 wherein, in this embodiment, the primary PCB electronics controller is housed. Heatsink housings 118 and 119 are also designed to house motor and gear workings for the system, e.g. for the active tracking system 117 and other systems as required, as well as associated electronics and firmware.
[0049] As such, in a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100 comprises a sun tracking module. Referring to Figure 14A, there is shown a functional schematic of the solar lighting system 100 wherein the sun tracking module 190 is shown.
[0050] Generally, the sun tracking module 190 is adapted to track the position of the sun, so as to position either or both of the primary reflector 1 10 and the secondary reflector 115 in an optimal position.
[0051] In one embodiment the sun tracking module 190 is an active system controlled by a controller (described below) and comprising appropriate electromechanical actuators to configure the position of the primary reflector 110 or secondary reflector 115. In other embodiments, the sun tracking module 190 may be passive such as by a sun tracking module 190 utilising differential thermal expansion technique.
[0052] In a preferred embodiment, the sun tracking module 190 is operably coupled to the primary reflector 110 wherein the secondary reflector 115 is fixed with respect to the primary reflector 110 by the secondary reflector supports 120. In this manner, the sun tracking module 190 need only control the position of the primary reflector 110. In this embodiment, the sun tracking module 190 preferably comprises at least two electromechanical actuators so as to be able to position the primary reflector 110 across two axes.
[0053] In other embodiments, the sun tracking module 190 may be adapted to control the orientation and position of the secondary reflector 115 while the primary reflector 1 10 remains fixed in place. In a yet further embodiment, as alluded to above, the sun tracking module 190 may be adapted to control with the orientation of the primary reflector 1 10 and the orientation and position of the secondary reflector 115.
[0054] Now, referring again to Figure 1, the lighting module 175 comprises at least one LED. The utilisation of the LED lighting allows for energy-efficient conversion of electrical energy into light. As is apparent from the embodiment given, the lighting module 175 comprises six LEDs in a circular arrangement. In other embodiments, any number of LEDs may be employed depending on the application. Furthermore, as will be described in further detail below, the light output of the LEDs may be controlled by a controller according to differing operational parameters either by way of pulse width modulation or selective powering of a subset of the LEDs.
[0055] In a yet further preferred embodiment, each LED 150 comprises a lens (not shown) wherein the lens is adapted to disperse the light emitted from each LED 150 in accordance with a desired lighting pattern. For example, the lighting pattern may be substantially rectangular in shape so as to illuminate a rectangular region on a road surface beneath the solar lighting system 100. In this manner, a plurality of spaced apart solar lighting systems 100, each illuminating respective coverage rectangles may illuminate a road surface and surrounding pedestrian area.
[0056] In a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100 comprises a heatsink 145. In this preferred embodiment, the heatsink 145 has as a dual purpose in cooling not only the solar cell 140 during the day, but also the LEDs 150 during night-time operation.
[0057] A preferred design parameter of the solar lighting system 100 is the absence of moving parts and therefore in a preferred embodiment of the heatsink 145 is a passive heatsink. In this manner, the heatsink comprises a plurality of blades so as to increase a surface area of the heatsink. Further preferably, the heatsink 145 comprises portions co- located with the solar cell 140 and each LED 150 so as to provide for maximum localised heat dissipation. As is apparent, the portion adjacent to the solar cell 140 substantially conical whereas the portions adjacent each LED 150 substantially rectangular.
[0058] In a preferred embodiment, the heatsink 145 is adapted to dissipate about 150 W.
[0059] In the embodiment shown, the heatsink 145 is enclosed within the solar lighting system 100. However, so as to increase the propagation of heat out of the solar lighting system 100, the heatsink 145, a body portion of the solar lighting system 100 may be made of a family conductive material such as metal and in contact with the heatsink 145 so as to draw heat from the heatsink 145. In other embodiments, the heatsink 145 may extend out of the interior of the body of the solar lighting system 100, so as to provide heatsink blades free to dissipate heat into the surrounding air.
[0060] In further embodiments, the base cover 155 may be omitted so as to allow the heatsink 145 to make direct contact with the surrounding air.
[0061] In a yet further embodiment, the solar lighting system 100 may be adapted to encourage conventional airflow while maintaining the water tightness and weather resistance of the solar lighting system 100. In this manner, the solar lighting system 100 may comprise appropriately located and weatherproofed air inlets and air outlets so as to allow cool air to be drawn within the body of the solar lighting system 100 and hot air to be expelled.
[0062] Now, as alluded to above, the solar lighting system 100 is adapted for engagement of street poles. Specifically, referring to Figures 2Aand 2B, there is shown the solar lighting system embodiments 100 and 500 respectively in situ when engaged with a street pole 130.
[0063] As such, the solar lighting system 100/500 comprises a support engagement 165. In a preferred embodiment, the supporting engagement 165 is adapted for being configured in an open configuration so as to receive the pole 130 therein, and then configured in a closed configuration so as to secure the pole 130 therein.
[0064] In a preferred embodiment, the support engagement 165 is bifurcated, comprising a first bifurcated portion and a second bifurcated portion. In this manner, the first and second bifurcated portions cooperate to surround and engage the pole 130. It portion may comprise appropriate mechanical couplings and the like so as to maintain the engagement.
[0065] In a preferred embodiment, the support engagement 165 is configured so as to allow for pole diameter tolerance. In one embodiment, the solar lighting system 100/500 may comprise removal inserts, or internally orientated configurable protrusions (such as screws) to allow for adjustment for differing pole diameters. In embodiments, and especially for wooden poles 130, the support engagement 165 may comprise inwardly orientated spikes or the like for enhancing the engagement of a wooden pole. For metal poles 130 the support engagement 165 may comprise rubber, foam or the like padding to provide for the frictional engagement of the metal pole 130.
[0066] In a preferred embodiment, where the first bifurcated portion comprises a battery pack (as will be described below) each of the first and second bifurcated portions may comprise electrical contacts through support arms 125 that may contact when the support engagement 165 is in the engage configuration, so as to allow for the electric coupling of the battery to the remainder of the solar lighting system 100/500.
[0067] In a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100/500 further comprises a power supply module 160. In a preferred embodiment, the power supply module 160 comprises a battery. In this regard, it should be noted that in certain embodiments, the solar lighting system 100/500 may be adapted to draw all or auxiliary power from an auxiliary power supply. For example, in situations where the battery does not provide sufficient capacity, the solar lighting system 100/500 may be adapted to draw additional power from an axillary power system if available, such as from a mains power supply or three-phase power supply s necessary. It should be noted to that, in certain embodiments, where the solar lighting system 100/500 generates an oversupply of power greater than the capacity of the battery, the solar lighting system 100/500 may be adapted to inject the additional power into the auxiliary or mains power system if available.
[0068] In a preferred embodiment, the battery is a lead acid battery, providing advantages in temperature variation tolerance and therefore longevity. Furthermore, the weight of the lead acid battery may provide as a counterbalance for the solar lighting system 100 about the pivot point at the support engagement 165 such as mounting pole 130.
[0069] Furthermore, a battery of sufficient capacity is employed depending on the operational requirements. In embodiment, a battery with sufficient capacity to power the lighting module 175 for a 12 hour period is employed. In this manner, the battery has sufficient capacity to power the solar lighting system 100/500 overnight. However, during periods of inclement weather, the solar lighting system 100/500 may not receive sufficient sunlight to sufficiently charge the battery. In this manner, larger capacity batteries may be employed, such as those being capable of powering the lighting module 175 for a 24 or 48 hour period. In this manner, should the solar lighting system 100/500 not receive sufficient light for one or more days, the lighting module 175 may still illuminate.
[0070] In one embodiment, as will be described in further detail below, the solar lighting system 100/500 comprises a controller comprising a battery controller which controls the charging of the battery, monitors the battery levels and the like. In this manner, should the battery controller determine an insufficient charge state, the controller may control the lighting module 175 accordingly, such as to, for example, draw less power.
[0071] In a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100/500 comprises a communication module so as to allow the solar lighting system 100/500 to transmit operational parameters and receive operational structures to and from a centralised control station. Such operational parameters may comprise fault conditions, such as LED failure, battery failure, overheating and the like. The operational parameters may comprise other informational so, such as battery charge state and the like.
[0072] Also, the communication module may receive operational instructions from the centralised control station. For example, the operational instructions may comprise instructions to enable or disable the lighting module 175 or control and operational mode of the solar lighting system 100/500 such as high power output or battery capacity preservation modes.
[0073] While the communication module may be operably coupled with a wide communication network such as the PSTN where available, in a preferred embodiment, the communication module is a wireless module. The wireless module may be a long range cellular network module so as to allow each communication module to send and receive data across great distances. Alternatively, the wireless module may be a shorter range wireless module such as an 802.11 Wi-Fi or Bluetooth module. In this manner, the short-range wireless module may communicate with adjacent Wi-Fi hotspots where available, or alternatively "daisychain" using adjacent solar lighting systems 100/500. In a yet further embodiment, the short-range wireless communication module may be adapted to communicate with a mobile monitoring vehicle which passes within communication proximity from time to time to upload and download data.
[0074] In a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100/500 comprises a motion sensor 180 so as to be adapted to sense motion. The motion sensor 180 is advantageous in be able to be used by the solar lighting system 100/500 to provide lighting only when required so as to conserve battery power. In embodiments, the motion sensor 180 may sense pedestrian and or vehicular motion depending on the application.
[0075] For example, the solar lighting system 100/500 may be configured such that when a pedestrian is within 4 m and the vehicle is within 10 m of the solar lighting system 100/500, the lighting module 175 provides light.
[0076] The motion sensor 180 may use any appropriate motion sensing technology such as passive infrared, laser, acoustic, image recognition and the like. Furthermore, motion sensors 180 of adjacent solar lighting systems 100/500 may communicate with each other so as to extend the detection range of each solar lighting system 100/500 beyond the detection range of each individual motion sensor 180.
[0077] In one embodiment, the solar lighting system 100/500 may keep records of pedestrian or vehicular activity for the purposes of determining capacity requirements. For example, should the solar lighting system 100/500 to detect a low volume of pedestrian and vehicular activity, the solar lighting system 100/500 need not necessarily conserve battery power. For example, should the solar lighting system 100/500 determine that there is generally no pedestrian or vehicular activity after 2 AM in the morning, the solar lighting system 100 may adapt to substantially exhaust the battery capacity by 2 AM in the morning.
[0078] Furthermore, the solar lighting system 100 may comprise a light sensor 215 adapted to detect daylight. Preferably, the light sensor 215 is configured so as to be substantially immune from stray light such as from car headlights and the like. The solar lighting system 100 may utilise the light sensor 215 to determine when to power the lighting module 175.
[0079] Further still, the solar lighting system 100 may comprise one or more environmental monitoring sensors, for example, the lighting may also comprise one or more of nuclear, chemical or biological sensors for detection of ambient air contaminants in the vicinity of the lighting module in use. Such environmental sensors may be adapted to provide independent environmental monitoring to a government or regulation authority and/or to a private industrial organisation. For example, in the vicinity of a nuclear power station solar lighting modules 100 may be provided with nuclear radiation monitoring sensors within a certain radius of the power station. In this manner, the radiation-sensing-equipped solar lighting systems may provide third party independent feedback and tracking of any radiation leaks from the power plant. In particular arrangements, the radiation sensing-equipped solar lighting system may perform radiation measurements on a predetermined time schedule, for example every 6 or 12 hours or as required. In the event that an elevated radiation reading is detected at any predetermined monitoring instant, the radiation sensing-equipped module may switch to a real-time detection mode whereby radiation measurements are performed at a much shorter time intervals, for example, say every 1 or 5 minutes. In this way, a radiation leak from a nearby nuclear power station can be detected and its spread and rate of spread can be monitored in real-time. An example implementation of a solar lighting system 100 incorporating an environmental sensor 400 is depicted in Figure 12. In the present example, environmental sensor 400 is incorporated into support arm 166 of solar lighting system 100. Environmental sensor 400 comprises a plurality of vanes 401 adapted to draw in ambient air from the environment in order to be sampled by environmental sensor 400.
[0080] In further arrangements the solar lighting system 100 may additionally comprise a tilt sensor adapted to detect when, for example a pole upon which the lighting module is mounted is knocked over and the lighting module is lying down. If such a situation is detected by the tilt sensor the active solar tracking may be disabled such that the primary reflector is not attempting to track the solar radiation from an undesirable orientation of the lighting module itself, thus potentially causing damage to the tracking system of the lighting module.
[0081] Referring to Figure 13, in a preferred embodiment, the solar lighting system 100 comprises a controller 220 for controlling the various operations of the solar lighting system 100. The controller 220 comprises a processor 240 for processing digital data. The controller 220 further comprises a memory device 230 for storing digital data, including computer program code, the memory device 230 being operably coupled to the processor by way of bust 235. In operation, the processor 240 executes computer code instructions obtained from the memory device 230. The memory device 230 may comprise volatile and non-volatile memory.
[0082] The controller 220 may further comprise a network interface 160 for sending and receiving data across a data network 265. In a preferred embodiment, the network interface 260 is the above-mentioned wireless communication module. In a yet further preferred embodiment, the contents of the memory device 250 may be updated via the network interface 260 so as to allow the remote updating of the firmware of the solar lighting system 100. [0083] Furthermore, the controller 220 further comprises an I/O interface 255 for interfacing with various peripheral modules. The I/O interface 255 may comprise a digital interface, an analogue interface, analogue to digital interface and the like. It should be noted that the I O interface 255 may be a bidirectional interface so as to be able to but only receive input data, but also to send control data and the like.
[0084] The I/O interface 255 may interface with peripheral devices including the light sensor 270, motion sensor 275, battery controller 280, lighting module 175 285 and sun tracking module 290. Additionally, as discussed above, the I/O interface 255 may also interface with additional peripheral sensing devices such as environmental monitoring sensors, for example radiation, chemical or biological sensors (not shown), or additional sensors (not shown)as per requirements, for example a tilt sensor (not shown) as described above.
[0085] Referring now to Figure 14A, there is shown a functional block diagram of the solar lighting system 100. Specifically, the solar lighting system 100 comprises the solar cell 140 which receives solar energy. In addition, the sun tracker 190 ascertains the position of the sun so as to control the positions of the primary reflector and all the secondary reflector 115.
[0086] The solar cell 140 interfaces with an electrical converter which may convert the electrical energy from the solar cell into an appropriate voltage and current, including direct and alternating-current.
[0087] The solar lighting system 100 may further comprise electronics 295 and associated software which may comprise the above-mentioned controller 220.
[0088] The electronics 230 may interface with the battery 205 for the purposes of charging and discharging the battery, monitoring the battery level, ascertaining the battery capacity and the like. Furthermore, the electronics 230 may interface with the lighting module 175, the lighting module 175 dissipating heat through the heatsinks 145 and generating light for the LED lenses 200.
[0089] Further interfacing with the electronics 205 is the light sensor 250 and the motion sensor 180.
[0090] Figure 14B shows an example functional schematic diagram 300 of the electronic circuity of the solar lighting system 100 as disclosed herein. Functional circuitry 300 is shown comprising functional modules which may be included in the solar lighting system 100 including communication protocols such as, for example a modem 301, wifi 302, or mesh network 303. Functional circuitry 300 is shown also comprising optional functional sensor modules including, for example, fog detection sensor 304, traffic detection sensor 305, environmental sensor 306 (nuclear, biological or chemical sensor), tilt detection sensor 307 and ambient light detection sensor 308. Of course, as would be appreciated by the skilled addressee, other sensors or functional elements in accordance with requirements, may also optionally be included, for example camera module 309 may be an optional inclusion depending on the application, for example, camera module 309 may optionally be included where the lighting system 100 is desired to also function as a neighbourhood security camera option, however camera module 309 may not be included, for instance in a private residential application.
[0091] Also shown in Figure 14B is an optional electrical input 310 from mains power supply 311 to form a hybrid system whereby the main supplier is connected to an AC/DC converter 312 which in turn then is connected to the battery charger 313 for charging either or both main battery 314 or axillary battery 315 in the event that solar collection is insufficient for charging the batteries.
[0092] Figure 15 shows an example embodiment of the solar lighting system showing fixed translucent dome 105, primary reflector 110, and second reflector 115. Solar lighting system 100 or so may comprise further heat sink arrangements such as vanes 145a. Vanes 145a may be either a passive heat sink arrangement adapted to dissipate heat from either or both the solar cells, heat from within the dome 110, or heat dissipated by leads of the solar lighting system. Alternatively, in the veins may be an active heatsink comprising fins (not shown) in conjunction with a motor which acts to rotate the veins about the central axis of the lighting system thereby to either draw heat away from the dome or to direct cool air into the dome thereby to cool the dome and/or solar cells and/or LEDs as necessary. In further arrangements, the vanes may comprise the plurality of vent holes for additional ventilation and cooling and also to reduce the weight of the vanes on the lighting model.
[0093] In further arrangements the lighting module may comprise a pressure equalisation vent and/or valve (not shown) to maintain pressure equalisation between the internal dome space and the ambient air pressure. [0094] Figure 16 depicts an example of a particular arrangement of the primary reflector 110 comprising a parabolic reflector of diameter 550 mm. In this particular arrangement the primary reflector is shown with a truncated edge 111 to maximise the solar collecting surface area of the primary reflector 110. Truncated edge 111 enables the maximum collection when the sun is at or near the horizon. Referring back to Figure 15, primary reflector 110 is depicted having two truncated edges 111. This arrangement it to truncated edges enable maximum solar collection at both sunrise and sunset as the active tracking of the sun by primary reflector proceeds from near 0° at sunrise through 90° at midday to approximately 180° at sunset. Referring again to Figure 16, primary collector 110 having only a single truncated edge 111 also enables maximum solar collection from sunrise through to sunset with the incorporation of a rotation of the primary solar reflector 110 as the reflector tracks the movement of the sun through 0° to 180°. That is as the primary solar reflector 110 tracks the sun it performs a 180° rotation such that truncated edge permits maximum solar collection at sunset when the sun is at or near 180°. In particular arrangements, the cutout 111 of primary solar reflector 110 is configured to provide maximum solar collection when the sun is approximately 10° above the horizon at sunrise through to approximately 170° from the horizon at sunset with the incorporation with a rotation of primary solar reflector 110 as discussed above.
[0095] Figure 17 depicts an example an example of a particular arrangement of the secondary reflector 115 comprising a reflector of diameter about 64 mm and a mirror sag of about 9.70 mm, optimised for use in solar lighting system 100 in conjunction with primary reflector 110 is depicted in Figure 16.
[0096] Figures 18A and 18B depict example implementations of solar lighting system 100 when installed for use on a pole 130.
Definitions
[0097] The following definitions are provided as general definitions and should in no way limit the scope of the present invention to those terms alone, but are put forth for a better understanding of the following description.
[0098] Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by those of ordinary skill in the art to which the invention belongs. It will be further understood that terms used herein should be interpreted as having a meaning that is consistent with their meaning in the context of this specification and the relevant art and will not be interpreted in an idealized or overly formal sense unless expressly so defined herein. For the purposes of the present invention, additional terms are defined below. Furthermore, all definitions, as defined and used herein, should be understood to control over dictionary definitions, definitions in documents incorporated by reference, and/or ordinary meanings of the defined terms unless there is doubt as to the meaning of a particular term, in which case the common dictionary definition and/or common usage of the term will prevail.
[0099] For the purposes of the present invention, the following terms are defined below.
[0100] The articles "a" and "an" are used herein to refer to one or to more than one (i.e. to at least one) of the grammatical object of the article. By way of example, "an element" refers to one element or more than one element.
[0101] The term "about" is used herein to refer to quantities that vary by as much as 30%, preferably by as much as 20%, and more preferably by as much as 10% to a reference quantity. The use of the word 'about' to qualify a number is merely an express indication that the number is not to be construed as a precise value.
[0102] Throughout this specification, unless the context requires otherwise, the words "comprise", "comprises" and "comprising" will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated step or element or group of steps or elements but not the exclusion of any other step or element or group of steps or elements.
[0103] Any one of the terms: "including" or "which includes" or "that includes" as used herein is also an open term that also means including at least the elements/features that follow the term, but not excluding others. Thus, "including" is synonymous with and means "comprising".
[0104] The term "real-time", for example, "displaying real-time data," refers to the display of the data without intentional delay, given the processing limitations of the system and the time required to accurately measure the data.
[0105] Although any methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the present invention, preferred methods and materials are described. It will be appreciated that the methods, apparatus and systems described herein may be implemented in a variety of ways and for a variety of purposes. The description here is by way of example only. [0106] As used herein, the term "exemplary" is used in the sense of providing examples, as opposed to indicating quality. That is, an "exemplary embodiment" is an embodiment provided as an example, as opposed to necessarily being an embodiment of exemplary quality for example serving as a desirable model or representing the best of its kind.
Interpretation
Wireless:
[0107] The invention may be embodied using devices conforming to other network standards and for other applications, including, for example other WLAN standards and other wireless standards. Applications that can be accommodated include IEEE 802.1 1 wireless LANs and links, and wireless Ethernet.
[0108] In the context of this document, the term "wireless" and its derivatives may be used to describe circuits, devices, systems, methods, techniques, communications channels, etc., that may communicate data through the use of modulated electromagnetic radiation through a non-solid medium. The term does not imply that the associated devices do not contain any wires, although in some embodiments they might not. In the context of this document, the term "wired" and its derivatives may be used to describe circuits, devices, systems, methods, techniques, communications channels, etc., that may communicate data through the use of modulated electromagnetic radiation through a solid medium. The term does not imply that the associated devices are coupled by electrically conductive wires.
Processes:
[0109] Unless specifically stated otherwise, as apparent from the following discussions, it is appreciated that throughout the specification discussions utilizing terms such as "processing", "computing", "calculating", "determining", "analysing" or the like, refer to the action and/or processes of a computer or computing system, or similar electronic computing device, that manipulate and/or transform data represented as physical, such as electronic, quantities into other data similarly represented as physical quantities.
Processor:
[01 10] In a similar manner, the term "processor" may refer to any device or portion of a device that processes electronic data, e.g., from registers and/or memory to transform that electronic data into other electronic data that, e.g., may be stored in registers and/or memory. A "computer" or a "computing device" or a "computing machine" or a "computing platform" may include one or more processors. [01 1 1] The methodologies described herein are, in one embodiment, performable by one or more processors that accept computer-readable (also called machine-readable) code containing a set of instructions that when executed by one or more of the processors carry out at least one of the methods described herein. Any processor capable of executing a set of instructions (sequential or otherwise) that specify actions to be taken are included. Thus, one example is a typical processing system that includes one or more processors. The processing system further may include a memory subsystem including main RAM and/or a static RAM, and/or ROM.
Computer-Readable Medium:
[01 12] Furthermore, a computer-readable carrier medium may form, or be included in a computer program product. A computer program product can be stored on a computer usable carrier medium, the computer program product comprising a computer readable program means for causing a processor to perform a method as described herein.
Networked or Multiple Processors:
[01 13] In alternative embodiments, the one or more processors operate as a standalone device or may be connected, e.g., networked to other processor(s), in a networked deployment, the one or more processors may operate in the capacity of a server or a client machine in server- client network environment, or as a peer machine in a peer-to-peer or distributed network environment. The one or more processors may form a web appliance, a network router, switch or bridge, or any machine capable of executing a set of instructions (sequential or otherwise) that specify actions to be taken by that machine.
[01 14] Note that while some diagram(s) only show(s) a single processor and a single memory that carries the computer-readable code, those in the art will understand that many of the components described above are included, but not explicitly shown or described in order not to obscure the inventive aspect. For example, while only a single machine is illustrated, the term "machine" shall also be taken to include any collection of machines that individually or jointly execute a set (or multiple sets) of instructions to perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein.
Additional Embodiments:
[01 15] Thus, one embodiment of each of the methods described herein is in the form of a computer-readable carrier medium carrying a set of instructions, e.g., a computer program that are for execution on one or more processors. Thus, as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, embodiments of the present invention may be embodied as a method, an apparatus such as a special purpose apparatus, an apparatus such as a data processing system, or a computer-readable carrier medium. The computer-readable carrier medium carries computer readable code including a set of instructions that when executed on one or more processors cause a processor or processors to implement a method. Accordingly, aspects of the present invention may take the form of a method, an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects. Furthermore, the present invention may take the form of carrier medium (e.g., a computer program product on a computer-readable storage medium) carrying computer-readable program code embodied in the medium.
Carrier Medium:
[01 16] The software may further be transmitted or received over a network via a network interface device. While the carrier medium is shown in an example embodiment to be a single medium, the term "carrier medium" should be taken to include a single medium or multiple media (e.g., a centralized or distributed database, and/or associated caches and servers) that store the one or more sets of instructions. The term "carrier medium" shall also be taken to include any medium that is capable of storing, encoding or carrying a set of instructions for execution by one or more of the processors and that cause the one or more processors to perform any one or more of the methodologies of the present invention. A carrier medium may take many forms, including but not limited to, non-volatile media, volatile media, and transmission media.
Implementation:
[01 17] It will be understood that the steps of methods discussed are performed in one embodiment by an appropriate processor (or processors) of a processing (i.e., computer) system executing instructions (computer-readable code) stored in storage. It will also be understood that the invention is not limited to any particular implementation or programming technique and that the invention may be implemented using any appropriate techniques for implementing the functionality described herein. The invention is not limited to any particular programming language or operating system.
Means For Carrying out a Method or Function
[01 18] Furthermore, some of the embodiments are described herein as a method or combination of elements of a method that can be implemented by a processor of a processor device, computer system, or by other means of carrying out the function. Thus, a processor with the necessary instructions for carrying out such a method or element of a method forms a means for carrying out the method or element of a method. Furthermore, an element described herein of an apparatus embodiment is an example of a means for carrying out the function performed by the element for the purpose of carrying out the invention.
Connected
[01 19] Similarly, it is to be noticed that the term connected, when used in the claims, should not be interpreted as being limitative to direct connections only. Thus, the scope of the expression a device A connected to a device B should not be limited to devices or systems wherein an output of device A is directly connected to an input of device B. It means that there exists a path between an output of A and an input of B which may be a path including other devices or means. "Connected" may mean that two or more elements are either in direct physical or electrical contact, or that two or more elements are not in direct contact with each other but yet still co-operate or interact with each other.
Embodiments:
[0120] Reference throughout this specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in one embodiment" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment, but may. Furthermore, the particular features, structures or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art from this disclosure, in one or more embodiments.
[0121] Similarly it should be appreciated that in the above description of example embodiments of the invention, various features of the invention are sometimes grouped together in a single embodiment, figure, or description thereof for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure and aiding in the understanding of one or more of the various inventive aspects. This method of disclosure, however, is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed invention requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment. Thus, the claims following the Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments are hereby expressly incorporated into this Detailed Description of Specific Embodiments, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment of this invention. [0122] Furthermore, while some embodiments described herein include some but not other features included in other embodiments, combinations of features of different embodiments are meant to be within the scope of the invention, and form different embodiments, as would be understood by those in the art. For example, in the following claims, any of the claimed embodiments can be used in any combination.
[0123]
Different Instances of Objects
[0124] As used herein, unless otherwise specified the use of the ordinal adjectives "first", "second", "third", etc., to describe a common object, merely indicate that different instances of like objects are being referred to, and are not intended to imply that the objects so described must be in a given sequence, either temporally, spatially, in ranking, or in any other manner.
Specific Details
[0125] In the description provided herein, numerous specific details are set forth. However, it is understood that embodiments of the invention may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known methods, structures and techniques have not been shown in detail in order not to obscure an understanding of this description.
Terminology
[0126] In describing the preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawings, specific terminology will be resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents which operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar technical purpose. Terms such as "forward", "rearward", "radially", "peripherally", "upwardly", "downwardly", and the like are used as words of convenience to provide reference points and are not to be construed as limiting terms.
Comprising and Including
[0127] In the claims which follow and in the preceding description of the invention, except where the context requires otherwise due to express language or necessary implication, the word "comprise" or variations such as "comprises" or "comprising" are used in an inclusive sense, i.e. to specify the presence of the stated features but not to preclude the presence or addition of further features in various embodiments of the invention. [0128] Any one of the terms: including or which includes or that includes as used herein is also an open term that also means including at least the elements/features that follow the term, but not excluding others. Thus, including is synonymous with and means comprising.
Scope of Invention
[0129] Thus, while there has been described what are believed to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, those skilled in the art will recognize that other and further modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention, and it is intended to claim all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope of the invention. For example, any formulas given above are merely representative of procedures that may be used. Functionality may be added or deleted from the block diagrams and operations may be interchanged among functional blocks. Steps may be added or deleted to methods described within the scope of the present invention.
[0130] Although the invention has been described with reference to specific examples, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention may be embodied in many other forms.
Industrial Applicability
[0131] It is apparent from the above, that the arrangements described are applicable to the solar lighting system industries.

Claims

The claims defining the invention are as follows:
1. A solar lighting system for street lighting, the solar lighting system comprising:
a concentrated photovoltaic module; and
a lighting module.
2. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 1 wherein a concentrated photovoltaic module is a high concentration photovoltaic module.
3. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 2 wherein the high concentration photovoltaic module is adapted to concentrate sunlight by greater than substantially XI 000.
4. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 2 wherein the high concentration photovoltaic module is adapted to concentrate sunlight by greater than substantially XI 500.
5. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 2 wherein the high concentration photovoltaic module is adapted to concentrate sunlight by greater than substantially X2000.
6. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the concentrated photovoltaic module comprises a primary reflector.
7. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 6 wherein the primary reflector has a diameter of between 400 and 600 mm
8. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 7 wherein the primary reflector has a diameter of about 550 mm.
9. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of claims 6 to 8 wherein the primary reflector is a parabolic reflector.
10. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of claims 6 to 9 wherein the primary reflector has a Radius of Curvature (RoC) of between about 450mm and about 500mm.
11. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 10 wherein the primary reflector has a RoC of about 483 mm.
12. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of claims 6 to 11 wherein the primary reflector comprises a truncated edge.
13. A solar lighting system as claimed in either claim 11 or claim 12 wherein the primary reflector has a mirror sag of between about 75 and about 80 mm.
14. A solar lighting system as claimed claim 13 wherein the primary reflector has a mirror sag of about 78 mm.
15. A solar lighting system as claimed in either claim 6 or claim 7 wherein the concentrated photovoltaic module comprises a secondary reflector adapted to receive reflected light from the primary reflector.
16. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 15 wherein the secondary reflector is a hyperboloid.
17. A solar lighting system as claimed in either claim 15 or claim 16 wherein the secondary reflector has a Radius of Curvature (RoC) of between about 35 and 40mm.
18. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 17 has a RoC of about 38 mm.
19. A solar lighting system as claimed in either claim 15 or claim 18 wherein the secondary reflector has a mirror sag of between about 9 and about 10 mm.
20. A solar lighting system as claimed claim 19 wherein the secondary reflector has a mirror sag of about 9.7 mm.
21. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 15 wherein the concentrated photovoltaic module comprises a solar cell adapted to receive reflected light from the secondary reflector.
22. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 21 wherein the concentrated photovoltaic module comprises a waveguide between the secondary reflector and the solar cell.
23. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 22 wherein the waveguide comprises a frustum reflector.
24. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 22 wherein the waveguide comprises a prism.
25. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 24 wherein the prism has a first cross- section facing the secondary reflector and a second cross-section facing the solar cell and wherein the first cross-section is greater than the second cross-section.
26. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 25 wherein the second cross-section is sized in accordance with a size of the solar cell.
27. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 22 wherein the waveguide comprises optic fibre.
28. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 15 further comprising a sun tracking module.
29. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 28 wherein the sun tracking module is operably coupled to the primary reflector.
30. A solar lighting system as claimed in either claim 28 or claim 29 wherein the sun tracking module is operably coupled to the secondary reflector.
31. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the lighting module comprises an LED.
32. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 31 wherein the lighting module further comprises a lens operably coupled to the LED.
33. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 32 wherein the lens is adapted to output a desired lighting pattern.
34. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 33 wherein the desired lighting pattern is substantially rectangular.
35. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a heatsink.
36. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 35 wherein the heatsink is a passive heatsink.
37. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 35 wherein the heatsink is operably coupled to the lighting module.
38. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 37 wherein the heatsink comprises an LED heatsink portion adapted for being operably coupled to an LED of the lighting module.
39. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 35 wherein the heatsink is operably coupled to the concentrated photovoltaic module.
40. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 39 wherein the heatsink comprises a solar cell heatsink portion adapted for being operably coupled to a solar cell of the concentrated photovoltaic module.
41. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim wherein the heatsink is operably coupled to both the concentrated photovoltaic module and to the lighting module
42. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of claims 35 to 41 wherein the heatsink is adapted to dissipate greater than substantially 100 W.
43. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of claims 35 to 41 wherein the heatsink is adapted to dissipate greater than substantially 150 W.
44. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a support engagement
45. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 44 wherein the support engagement is adapted for engaging a pole in use.
46. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 45 wherein the support engagement is bifurcated.
47. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 46 wherein, in use, the support engagement is adapted for being configured in an open configuration for receiving a pole therein, and subsequently configured in a close configuration for securing the pole therein.
48. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 47 wherein the support engagement comprises a first bifurcated portion and a second bifurcated portion and wherein the first bifurcated portion and the second bifurcated portion are adapted for making electrical contact.
49. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 1 , further comprising a power supply module.
50. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 49 wherein the power supply module comprises a battery.
51. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 50 wherein the battery is a rechargeable battery.
52. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 51 wherein the rechargeable battery is a lead acid battery.
53. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 51 wherein the battery is operably coupled to the lighting module and wherein the battery has sufficient capacity to power the lighting module for greater than substantially 6 hours.
54. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 51 wherein the battery has sufficient capacity to power the lighting module for greater than substantially 12 hours.
55. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 51 wherein the battery has sufficient capacity to power the lighting module for greater than substantially 24 hours.
56. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 51 wherein the battery has sufficient capacity to power the lighting module for greater than substantially 48 hours.
57. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a communication module.
58. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 57 wherein the communication module is adapted to transmit operational parameters.
59. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 57 wherein a communication module is adapted to receive operational instructions.
60. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 57 wherein the communication module comprises a wireless module.
61. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 60 wherein the wireless module comprises an 802.1 1 wireless module
62. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 60 wherein the wireless module comprises a cellular network wireless module
63. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of the preceding claims further comprising a motion sensor.
64. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 63 wherein the motion sensor is operably coupled to the lighting module and wherein the lighting module is controlled in accordance with the motion sensor sensing motion.
65. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 63 wherein the motion sensor is adapted to sense pedestrian motion.
66. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 63 wherein the motion sensor is adapted to sense vehicular motion.
67. A solar lighting system as claimed in any one of the preceding claims further comprising a light sensor.
68. A solar lighting system as claimed in claim 67 wherein the light sensor is operably coupled to the lighting module and wherein the lighting module is controlled in accordance with the light sensor sensing light.
PCT/AU2015/000057 2014-02-05 2015-02-05 A solar lighting system WO2015117186A1 (en)

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AU2019272004A AU2019272004B2 (en) 2014-02-05 2019-11-28 A solar lighting system

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