WO2015095239A1 - Systems and methods for detecting leaks - Google Patents

Systems and methods for detecting leaks

Info

Publication number
WO2015095239A1
WO2015095239A1 PCT/US2014/070681 US2014070681W WO2015095239A1 WO 2015095239 A1 WO2015095239 A1 WO 2015095239A1 US 2014070681 W US2014070681 W US 2014070681W WO 2015095239 A1 WO2015095239 A1 WO 2015095239A1
Authority
WO
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
fluid
sample
system
embodiments
handling
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2014/070681
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Peter Rule
III James D. CAUSEY
Original Assignee
Optiscan Biomedical Corporation
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01MTESTING STATIC OR DYNAMIC BALANCE OF MACHINES OR STRUCTURES; TESTING STRUCTURES OR APPARATUS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G01M3/00Investigating fluid-tightness of structures
    • G01M3/02Investigating fluid-tightness of structures by using fluid or vacuum
    • G01M3/26Investigating fluid-tightness of structures by using fluid or vacuum by measuring rate of loss or gain of fluid, e.g. by pressure-responsive devices, by flow detectors
    • G01M3/28Investigating fluid-tightness of structures by using fluid or vacuum by measuring rate of loss or gain of fluid, e.g. by pressure-responsive devices, by flow detectors for pipes, cables or tubes; for pipe joints or seals; for valves for welds
    • G01M3/2846Investigating fluid-tightness of structures by using fluid or vacuum by measuring rate of loss or gain of fluid, e.g. by pressure-responsive devices, by flow detectors for pipes, cables or tubes; for pipe joints or seals; for valves for welds for tubes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/145Measuring characteristics of blood in vivo, e.g. gas concentration, pH value; Measuring characteristics of body fluids or tissues, e.g. interstitial fluid, cerebral tissue
    • A61B5/14532Measuring characteristics of blood in vivo, e.g. gas concentration, pH value; Measuring characteristics of body fluids or tissues, e.g. interstitial fluid, cerebral tissue for measuring glucose, e.g. by tissue impedance measurement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150015Source of blood
    • A61B5/15003Source of blood for venous or arterial blood
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150206Construction or design features not otherwise provided for; manufacturing or production; packages; sterilisation of piercing element, piercing device or sampling device
    • A61B5/150221Valves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150206Construction or design features not otherwise provided for; manufacturing or production; packages; sterilisation of piercing element, piercing device or sampling device
    • A61B5/150229Pumps for assisting the blood sampling
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150755Blood sample preparation for further analysis, e.g. by separating blood components or by mixing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150763Details with identification means
    • A61B5/150786Optical identification systems, e.g. bar codes, colour codes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150847Communication to or from blood sampling device
    • A61B5/150854Communication to or from blood sampling device long distance, e.g. between patient's home and doctor's office
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150847Communication to or from blood sampling device
    • A61B5/150862Communication to or from blood sampling device intermediate range, e.g. within room or building
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150847Communication to or from blood sampling device
    • A61B5/15087Communication to or from blood sampling device short range, e.g. between console and disposable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/157Devices characterised by integrated means for measuring characteristics of blood
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/1413Modular systems comprising interconnecting elements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/16831Monitoring, detecting, signalling or eliminating infusion flow anomalies
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor
    • A61M5/168Means for controlling media flow to the body or for metering media to the body, e.g. drip meters, counters ; Monitoring media flow to the body
    • A61M5/16831Monitoring, detecting, signalling or eliminating infusion flow anomalies
    • A61M5/16854Monitoring, detecting, signalling or eliminating infusion flow anomalies by monitoring line pressure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/15Devices for taking samples of blood
    • A61B5/150007Details
    • A61B5/150358Strips for collecting blood, e.g. absorbent
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/15Detection of leaks

Abstract

Various embodiments disclosed herein relate to detecting leaks in a patient monitoring system. The system can include a fluid handling network configured to receive a fluid sample drawn from a patient and to deliver at least a portion of the fluid sample to an analyte measurement system. The system can isolate at least a portion of the fluid handling network, can apply pressure to the at least a portion of the fluid handling network, can measure the pressure in the at least a portion of the fluid handling network, and can determine whether a leak is present in the at least a portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure.

Description

SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR DETECTING LEAKS

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This applications claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 1 19(e) of United States Provisional Patent Application No. 61/917,745, filed December 18, 2013, and titled SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR DETECTING LEAKS, the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference and made a part of this specification for ail that it discloses.

BACKGROUND

Field

[0002] Some embodiments of the disclosure relate generally to methods and devices for determining a concentration of an analyte in a sample, such as an analyte in a sample of bodily fluid, as well as methods and devices which can be used to support the making of such determinations. Some embodiments of the disclosure relate to a sample cell for holding a sample fluid.

Description of Related Art

[0003] It is advantageous to measure the levels of certain analytes, such as glucose, in a bodily fluid, such as blood). This can be done, for example, in a hospital or clinical setting when there is a risk that the levels of certain analytes may move outside a desired range, which in turn can jeopardize the health of a patient. Currently known systems for analyte monitoring in a hospital or clinical setting may suffer from various drawbacks.

SUMMARY

[0004] Example embodiments described herein have several features, no single one of which is indispensible or solely responsible for their desirable attributes. Without limiting the scope of the claims, some of the advantageous features will now be summarized.

[0005] Various embodiments disclosed herein can relate to a bodily fluid sample analysis system, which can include an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid and a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes and at least one junction between the plurality of tubes. The fluid handiing network can include a patient end configured to receive bodily fluid drawn from a patient, and the fluid handling network can be configured to provide at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system. The system can include an arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at a location in the fluid handling network, one or more valves having a closed position and an open position, one or more pumps configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network, and at feast one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network. The system can include a controller that is configured to actuate at least one of the one or more pumps to draw bodily fluid from a patient through the patient end into the fluid handling network and to transport the bodily fluid to the location in the fluid handling network associated with the arrival sensor, receive data from the arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the location, determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at feast in part on the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location associated with the arrival sensor, close at least one of the one or more valves to block fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction, apply pressure to the fluid handling network using the one or more pumps, receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the fluid handling network, confirm wrhether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor, actuate the one or more valves to isolate a portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the isolated portion of the fluid handling network using the one or more pumps, receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the isolated portion of the fluid handling network, and determine whether the isolated portion of the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor.

The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time it takes for the bodily fluid to move from a starting point to the location associated with the arrival sensor. The system can include a second arrival sensor ihai can be configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point, and the controller can be configured to receive data from the second arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point. The starting point can be a junction in the fluid handling network and a start time can include the time that the bodily fluid is drawn through the junction. The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with an acceptable time threshold. The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with one or more arrival times fro one or more previous measurement cycles.

The controller can be configured to cause a sample of bodily fluid to be received into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking. The controller can be configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking. The system can be configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and the system can be configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before receiving a fluid sample into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle.

0Θ89] The controller can be configured to isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network, measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network, isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network, measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network, and determine a location of a leak based at least in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network. The first portion of the fluid handling network can overlap at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network, in some embodiments. The first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap, in some embodiments. The controller can be configured to determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network, and to determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network. The controller can be configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak.

[00101 The controller can be configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network when testing for leaks than when providing the at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system. [0011] The analyte can be glucose. The fluid sample can be whole blood. 0012J Various embodiments disclosed herein relate to a patient monitoring system, which can include an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid. The syste can include a fluid handling network including a plurality of tubes and at least one junction between the plurality of tubes. The fluid handling network can include a patient end configured to receive bodily fluid drawn from a patient. The fluid handling network can be configured to provide at least a. portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system. The system can include a valve having a closed position and an open position. The closed position blocks fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction, and the open position can permit fluid flow through the tube between the patient end and the at least one junction. The system can include at least one pump configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network. The system can include at least one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network. The system can include a controller, which can be configured to close the valve to block fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction, apply pressure to fluid handling network using the at least one pump, receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the fluid handling network, and determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor.

[0013] In some embodiments, the controller can be configured to cause a sample of bodily fluid to be drawn into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking. The controller can be configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking.

[0014] The system can be configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and the system can be configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before drawing bodily fluid into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle,

[0015] The controller can be configured to actuate one or more valves to isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pump, measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pressure sensor, actuate the one or more valves to isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pump, measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pressure sensor, and determine a location of a leak based at least in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, the first portion of the fluid handling network overlaps at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap. The controller can be configured to determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network and determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network. The controller can be configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak.

[0016] The controller can be configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network wrhen testing for leaks than when drawing bodily fluid or w en providing the at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the anaiyte measurement system.

[0017] The anaiyte can include glucose. The bodily fluid can include whole blood.

[0018] Various embodiments disclosed herein relate to a method for detecting a leak in a patient monitoring system. The method can include drawing bodily fluid from a patient, through a patient end, and into a fluid handling network that includes a plurality of tubes and at least one junction between the plurality of tubes. The method can include transporting at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid through the fluid handlmg network to a sample cell that is accessible to an anaiyte measurement system. The method can include measuring the concentration of an anaiyte in the at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid using the anaiyte measurement system. The method can include testing the at least one junction for a leak after measuring the concentration of the anaiyte. Testing the fluid handling network for the leak can include blocking fluid flow between the patient end and the at least one junction, applying pressure to the at least one junction, measuring a pressure associated with the at least one junction, determining whether the at least one junction is leaking based at least in part on the measured pressure. [0019] The method can include determining the at least one junction is not leaking, drawing a second sample of bodily fluid from a patient, through the patient end, and into the fluid handling network, transporting at least a portion of the second sample of bodily fluid through the fluid handling network to the sample cell, and measuring the concentration of the analyte in the at least a portion of the second sample of bodily fluid using the analyte measurement system. The method can include determining the at least one junction is leaking and posting an alarm. The method can include drawing a plurality of additional samples of bodily fluid from the patient and checking the fluid handling network for leaks before drawing each of the plurality of additional samples.

[0020] The method can include isolating a first portion of the fluid handling network, applying pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network, measuring a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network, determining whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network, isolating a second portion of the fluid handling network, applying pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network, measuring a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network, det ermining whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network, and determining a location of a leak based at least in part on the determinations of whether a leak is present in the first portion and the second portion of the fluid handling network. The first portion of the fluid handling network can overlap at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network, or the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not o v erlap. The method can include outputting an indicator of the location of the leak.

[0Θ21] The pressure applied to the at least one junction to determine whether the at least one junction is leaking can be greater than pressure applied to the at least one junction during the drawing of bodily fluid from the patien t and/or during the transporting of at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the sample cell.

[0Θ22] The analyte can include glucose. The bodily fluid can include whole blood,

[0023] Various embodiment disclosed herein can relate to a fluid sample analysis system. The system can include an analyte measurement system configured to detennine the concentration of an analyte in a fluid sample and a fluid handling network configured to receive a fluid sample and to provide at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system. The system can include one or more valves having a closed position and an open position and at least one pump configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network. The system can include at least one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network. The system can include a controller configured to actuate the one or more valves to isolate a portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the isolated portion of the fluid handling network- using the at least one pump, receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the isolated portion of the fluid handling network, and detennme whether the isolated portion of the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at feast one pressure sensor.

0024J The controller can he configured to cause a fluid sample to be received into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking. The controller can be configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking.

[0025] The system can be configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and the system can be configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before receiving a fluid sample into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle.

[0026] The controller can be configured to isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network, measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network, isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network, apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network, measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network, and determine a location of a leak based at least in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network. The first portion of the fluid handling network can overlap at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network, or the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap. The controller can be configured to determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network and to determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network. The controller can be configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak,

[0027] The controller can be configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network when testing for leaks than when providing the at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system.

[0028] The analyte an include glucose. The fluid sample can include whole blood.

[0029] Various embodiments disclosed herein can relate to a patient monitoring system, which can include an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid and a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes. The fluid handling network can be configured to draw- bodily fluid from a patient and to provide at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system. The system can include an arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at a location in the fluid handling network, A controller can be configured to actuate at least one pump to draw bodily fluid from a patient into the fluid handling network and to transport the bodily fluid to the location in the fluid handling network associated with the arrival sensor, receive data from the arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the location, and determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location associated with the arrival sensor.

[0030] The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time it takes for the bodily fluid to move from a starting point to the location associated with the arrival sensor. The system can include a second arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point, and the controller can be configured to receive data from the second arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point. In some embodiments, the starting point can be a junction (e.g., between tubes) in the fluid handling network and wherein a start time comprises the time that the bodily fluid is drawn through the junction.

[0031] The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with an acceptable time threshold. The controller can be configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with one or more arrival times from one or more previous measurement cycles.

[0032] Various embodiment disclosed herein can relate to a method of detecting a leak in a fluid sample analysis system. The method can include providing a fluid sample to a fluid sample analysis system. The fluid sample analysis system can include an analyte measurement syste configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in the fluid sample and a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes. The fluid handling network can be configured to receive the fluid sample and to provide at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system. The system can include an arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the fluid sample at a location in the fluid handling network. The method can include transporting a fluid sample from a starting point to the location in the fluid handling network that is associated with the arrival sensor, detecting the arrival of the fluid sample at the location associated with the arrival sensor, and determining whether the fluid handling network has a leak based at least in part on a time it took for the fluid sample to move from the starting point to the location in the fluid handling network that is associated with the arrival sensor.

0Θ33] The method can include detecting the arrival of the fluid sample at the starting point using a second arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the fluid sample at the stalling point. The starting poini can be a junction in the fluid handling network, and the method can include defining a start time as the time that the fluid sample moves through the junction,

0Θ34] The method can include determining whether the fluid handling network has a leak by comparing the time it took for the fluid sample to move from the starting point to the location to an acceptable time threshold. The method can include determining whether the fluid handling network has a leak by comparing the time it took for the fluid sample to move from the starting point to the location to one or more arrival times from one or more previous measurement cycles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

0Θ35] The following drawings and the associated descriptions are provided to illustrate embodiments of the present disclosure and do not limit the scope of the claims,

[0036] FIG. 1 showrs an embodiment of an apparatus for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples. [0037] FIG. 2 illustrates how various other devices can be supported on or near an embodiment of apparatus illustrated in FIG. 1.

[0038] FIG. 3 il lustrates an embodiment of the apparatus in FIG. 1 configured to be connected to a patient,

[0039] FIG. 3A illustrates an embodiment of the apparatus in FIG. 1 ihai is not configured to be connected to a patient but which receives a fluid sample from an extracorporeal fluid container such as, for example, a test tube. This embodiment of the apparatus advantageously provides in vitro analysis of a fluid sample.

[0040] FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a system for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples.

[0041] FIG. 5 schematically illustrates an embodiment of a fluid system that can be part of a system for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples.

[0042] FIG. 6 schematically illustrates another embodiment of a fluid system that can be part of a system for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples.

[0043] FIG. 7 is an oblique schematic depiction of an embodiment of a monitoring device.

[0044] FIG. 8 shows a cut -away side view of an embodiment of a monitoring device.

[0045] FIG. 9 shows a cut-away perspective view of an embodiment of a monitoring device.

[0046] FIG. 10 illustrates an embodiment of a removable cartridge that can interface with a monitoring device.

[0047] FIG. 1 1 illustrates an embodiment of a fluid routing card that can be part of the removable cartridge of FIG, 10.

[0048] FIG. 12 illustrates how non-disposable actuators can interface with the fluid routing card of FIG. 1 1.

[0049] FIG. 13 illustrates a modular pump actuator connected to a syringe housing that can form a portion of a removable cartridge.

[0050] FIG. 14 shows a rear perspective view of internal scaffolding and some pinch valve pump bodies.

[0051] FIG. 15 shows an underneath perspective view of a sample cell holder attached to a centrifuge interface, with a view of an interface with a sample injec or. [0052] FIG. 16 shows a plan view of a sample cell holder with hidden and/or non-surface portions illustrated using dashed lines.

[0053] FIG. 17 shows a top perspective view of the centrifuge interface connected to the sample holder.

[0054] FIG. 18 shows a perspective view of an example optical system.

[0055] FIG. 19 shows a filter wheel that can be part of the optical system of FIG. 18.

[0056] FIG. 20 schematically illustrates an embodiment of an optical system that comprises a spectroscopic analyzer adapted to measure spectra of a fluid sample.

[0057] FIG. 21 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an embodiment of a method for estimating the concentration of an anafyte in the presence of interferents.

[0058] FIG. 22 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an embodiment of a method for performing a statistical comparison of the absorption spectrum of a sample with the spectrum of a sample population and combinations of individual library interferent spectra.

[0059] FIG. 23 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an example embodiment of a method for estimating analyte concentration in the presence of the possible interferents.

[0060] FIGS. 24 and 25 schematically illustrate the visual appearance of embodiments of a user interface for a system for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples.

[0061] FIG. 26 schematically depicts various components and/or aspects of a patient monitoring system and the relationships among the components and/or aspects.

[0062] FIG. 27 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an embodiment of a method of providing gfycemic control.

[0063] FIG. 28 is a flowchart showing an example embodiment of a method for monitoring a patient while checking for leaks in the monitoring system.

[0064] FIG. 29 is a flowchart showing an example embodiment of a method for detecting whether a leak is present in a fluid handling network.

[0065] FIG. 30 is a flowchart showing an example embodiment of a method for identifying a location of a leak in the fluid handling network.

[0066] These and other features will now be described with reference to the drawings summarized above. The drawings and the associated descriptions are provided to illustrate embodiments and not to limit the scope of any claim. Throughout the drawings, reference numbers may be reused to indicate correspondence between referenced elements. In addition, where applicable, the first one or two digits of a reference numeral for an element can frequently indicate the figure number in which the element first appears.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

0Θ67] Although certain preferred embodiments and examples are disclosed below, inventive subject matter extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses and to modifications and equivalents thereof. Thus, the scope of the claims appended hereto is not limited by any of the particular embodiments described below. For example, i any method or process disclosed herein, the acts or operations of the method or process may be performed in any suitable sequence and are not necessarily limited to any particular disclosed sequence. Various operations may be described as multiple discrete operations in turn, in a manner that may be helpful in understanding certain embodiments; however, the order of description should not be construed to imply that these operations are order dependent. Additionally, the structures, systems, and/or devices described herein may be embodied as integrated components or as separate components. For purposes of comparing various embodiments, certain aspects and advantages of these embodiments are described. Not necessarily all such aspects or advantages are achieved by any particular embodiment. Thus, for example, various embodiments may be carried out in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other aspects or advantages as may also be taught or suggested herein.

[0068J The sysiems and methods discussed herein can be used anywhere, including, for example, in laboratories, hospitals, healthcare facilities, intensive care units (ICUs), or residences. Moreover, ihe sysiems and methods discussed herein can be used for invasive techniques, as well as non-invasive techniques or techniques that do not involve a body or a patient such as, for example, in vitro techniques.

ANALYTE MONITORING APPARATUS

0Θ69] FIG. I shows an embodiment of an apparatus 100 for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples. The apparatus 100 includes a monitoring device 102. In some embodiments, the monitoring device 102 can be an "OptiScanner®" monitor available from OptiScan Biomedical Corporation of Flayward, California. In some embodiments, the device 102 can measure one or more physiological parameters, such as the concentration of one or more substance(s) in a sample fluid. The sample fluid can be, for example, whole blood from a patient 302 (see, e.g., FIG. 3) and/or a component of whole blood such as, e.g., blood plasma. In some embodiments, the device 100 can also deliver an infusion fluid to a patient.

[0070] In the illustrated embodiment, the monitoring device 102. includes a display 104 such as, for example, a touch-sensitive liquid crystal display. The display 04 can provide an interface that includes alerts, indicators, charts, and/or soft buttons. The device 102 also can include one or more inputs and/or outputs 106 that provide connectivity and/or permit user interactivity.

[0071] In the embodiment shown i FIG. 1 , the device 102. is mounted on a stand 108. The stand 108 may comprise a cart such as, for example, a wheeled cart 130 as shown in FIG, 1. In some embodiments, the stand 108 is configured to roll on a wheeled pedestal 2.40 (shown in FIG, 2). The stand 108 advantageously can be easily moved and includes one or more poles 1 10 and/or hooks 1 12. The poles 1 10 and hooks 1 12 can be configured to accommodate other medical devices and/or implements, including, for example, infusion pumps, saline bags, arterial pressure sensors, other monitors and medical devices, and so forth. Some stands or carts may become unstable if intravenous (IV) bags, IV pumps, and other medical devices are hung too high on the stand or cart. In some embodiments, the apparatus 100 can be configured to have a low center of gravity, which may overcome possible instability. For example, the stand 108 can be weighted at the bottom to at least partially offset the weight of IV bags, IV pumps and medical devices that may be attached to the hooks 1 12 that are placed above the monitoring device 102. Adding weight toward the bottom (e.g., near the wheels) may help prevent the apparatus 100 from tipping over.

[0072] In some embodiments, the apparatus 100 includes the cart 130, which has an upper shelf 131 on which the monitoring device 102 may be placed (or attached) and a bottom shelf 132 on which a battery 134 may be placed (or attached). The battery 134 may be used as a main or backup power supply for the monitoring device 102 (which may additionally or alternatively accept electrical power from a wall socket). Two or more batteries are used in certain embodiments. The apparatus 100 may be configured so that the upper and lower shelves 131 , 132 are close to ground level, and the battery- provides counterweight. Other types of counterweights may be used. For example, in some embodiments, portions of the cart 130 near the floor (e.g., a lower shelf) are weighted, formed from a substantial quantity of material (e.g., thick sheets of metal), and/or formed from a relatively high-density metal (e.g., lead). In some embodiments the bottom shelf 132 is approximately 6 inches to 1 foot above ground level, and the upper shelf 131 is approximately 2 feet to 4 feet above ground level. In some embodiments the upper shelf 131 may be configured to support approximately 40 pounds (lbs), and the bottom shelf 1 32 may be configured to support approximately 20 lbs. One possible advantage of embodiments having such a configuration is that IV pumps, bags containing saline, blood and/or drugs, and other medical equipment weighing approximately 60 lbs, collectively, can be hung on the hooks 1 12 above the shelves without making the apparatus 1 00 unstable. The apparatus 100 may be moved by applying a horizontal force on the apparatus 100, for example, by pushing and/or pulling the poles 1 10. in many cases, a user may exert force on an upper portion of the apparatus 100, for example, close to shoulder-height. By counterbalancing the weight as described above, the apparatus 100 may be moved in a reasonably stable manner.

0Θ73] In the illustrated embodiment, the cart 130 includes the bottom shelf 132 and an intermediate shelf 133, which are enclosed on three sides by walls and on a fourth side by a door 135. The door 135 can be opened (as shown in FIG. 1 ) to provide access to the shelves 132, 133. In other embodiments, the fourth side is not enclosed (e.g., the door 135 is not used). Many cart variations are possible. In some embodiments the battery 134 can be placed on the bottom shelf 134 or the intermediate shelf 133.

[0074] FIG. 2 illustrates ho various other devices can be supported on or near the apparatus 100 illustrated in FIG. 1. For example, the poles 1 10 of the stand 108 can be configured (e.g., of sufficient size and strength) to accommodate multiple devices 202, 204, 206. In some embodiments, one or more COLLEAGUE® volumetric infusion pumps available from Baxter International Inc. of Deerfield, IL can be accommodated. In some embodiments, one or more Alaris® PC units available from Cardinal Health, Inc. of Dublin, Ohio can be accommodated. Furthermore, various other medical devices (including the two examples mentioned here), can be integrated with the disclosed monitoring device 102 such that multiple devices function in concert for the benefit of one or multiple patients without the devices interfering with each other.

[0075] FIG. 3 illustrates the apparatus 100 of FIG. 1 as it can be connected to a patient 302. The monitoring device 102 can be used to determine the concentration of one or more substances in a sample fluid. The sample fluid can come can come from the patient 302, as illustrated in FIG. 3, or the sample fluid can come from a fluid container, as illustrated in FIG. 3 A.. In some preferred embodiments, the sample fluid is whole blood.

0Θ76] In some embodiments (see, e.g., FIG. 3), the monitoring device 102 can also deliver an infusion fluid to the patient 302. An infusion fluid container 304 (e.g., a saline bag), which can contain infusion fluid (e.g., saline and/or medication), can be supported by the hook 1 12. The monitoring device 102 can be in fluid communication with both the container 304 and the sample fluid source (e.g., the patient 302), through tubes 306. The infusion fluid can comprise any combination of fluids and/or chemicals. Some advantageous examples include (but are not limited to): water, saline, dextrose, lactated Ringer's solution, drugs, and insulin.

[0077] The example monitoring device 102 schematically illustrated in FIG. 3 allows the infusion fluid to pass to the patient 302 and/or uses the infusion fluid itself (e.g., as a flushing fluid or a standard with known optical properties, as discussed fijrther below). In some embodiments, the monitoring device 102 may not employ infusion fluid. The monitoring device 102 may thus draw samples without delivering any additional fluid to the patient 302. The monitoring device 102 can include, but is not limited to, fluid handling and analysis apparatuses, connectors, passageways, catheters, tubing, fluid control elements, valves, pumps, fluid sensors, pressure sensors, temperature sensors, hematocrit sensors, hemoglobin sensors, colorimetric sensors, gas (e.g., "bubble") sensors, fluid conditioning elements, gas injectors, gas filters, blood plasma separators, and or communication devices (e.g., wireless devices) to permit the transfer of information within the monitoring device 102 or between the monitoring device 102 and a network,

[0078] In some embodiments, the apparatus 100 is not connected to a patient and may receive fluid samples from a container such as a decanter, flask, beaker, tube, cartridge, test strip, etc., or any other extracorporeal fluid source. The container may- include a biological fluid sample such as, e.g., a body fluid sample. For example, FIG. 3 A schematically illustrates an embodiment of the monitoring device 102 that is configured to receive a fluid sample from one or more test tubes 350. This embodiment of the monitoring device 102 is configured to perform in vitro analysis of a fluid (or a fluid component) in the test tube 350. The test tube 350 may comprise a tube, vial, bottle, or other suitable container or vessel. The test tube 350 may include an opening disposed at one end of the tube through which the fluid sample may be added prior to delivery of the test tube to the monitoring device 102. in some embodiments, the test tubes 350 may also include a cover adapted to seal the opening of the tube. The cover may include an aperture configured to permit a tube, nozzle, needle, pipette, or syringe to dispense the fluid sample into the test tube 350, The test tubes 350 may comprise a material such as, for example, glass, polyethylene, or poly-meric compounds. In various embodiments, the test tubes 350 may be re-usable units or may be disposable, single-use units. In certain embodiments, the test tubes 350 may comprise commercially available low pressure/vacuum sample bottles, test bottles, or test tubes.

[0079 J In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3 A, the monitoring device 102 comprises a fluid delivery system 360 configured to receive a container (e.g., the test tube 350) containing a fluid sample and deliver the fluid sample to a fluid handling system (such as, e.g., fluid handling system 404 described below). In some embodiments, the fluid handling system delivers a portion of the fluid sample to an analyte detection system for in vitro measurement of one or more physiological parameters (e.g., an analyte concentration). Prior to measurement, the fluid handling system may, in some embodiments, separate the fluid sample into components, and a measurement may be performed on one or more of the components. For example, the fluid sample in the test tube 350 may comprise whole blood, and the fluid handling system may separate blood plasma from the sample (e.g., by filtering and/or centrifuging).

[008(1] In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3A, the fluid delivery system 360 comprises a carousel 362 having one or more openings 364 adapted to receive the test tube 350. The carousel 362 may comprise one, two, four, six, twelve, or more openings 364. In the illustrated embodiment, the carousel 362. is configured to rotate around a central axis or spindle 366 so that a test tube 350 inserted into one of the openings 364 is delivered to the monitoring device 102. In certain embodiments, the fluid handling system of the monitoring device 102 comprises a sampling probe that is configured to collect a portion of the fluid sample from the test tube 350 (e.g., by suction or aspiration). The collected portion may then be transported in the device 102 as further described below (see, e.g., FIGS. 4-7). For example, in one embodiment suitable for use with whole blood, the collected portion of the whole blood sample is transported to a centrifuge for separation into blood plasma, a portion of the blood plasma is transported to an infrared spectroscope for measurement of one or more analytes (e.g., glucose), and the measured blood plasma is then transported to a waste container for disposal.

[01)81] In other embodiments of the apparatus 100 shown in FIG. 3 A, the fluid delivery system 360 may comprise a turntable, rack, or caddy adapted to receive the test tube 350. In yet other embodiments, the monitoring device 102 may comprise an inlet port adapted to receive the test tube 350. Additionally, in other embodiments, the fluid sample may be delivered to the apparatus 100 using a test cartridge, a test strip, or other suitable container. Many variations are possible.

[0082] In some embodiments, one or more components of the apparatus 100 can be located at another facility, room, or other suitable remote location. One or more components of the monitoring device 102. can communicate with one or more other components of the monitoring device 102 (or with other devices) by communication interface(s) such as, but not limited to, optical interfaces, electrical interfaces, and/or wireless interfaces. These interfaces can be part of a local network, internet, wireless network, or other suitable networks.

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

[0083] FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a system 400 for sampling and analyzing fluid samples. The monitoring device 102 can comprise such a system. The system 400 can include a fluid source 402 connected to a fluid-handling system 404. The fluid- handling system 404 includes fluid passageways and other components that direct fluid samples. Samples can be withdrawn from the fluid source 402 and analyzed by an optical system 412. The fluid-handling system 404 can be controlled by a fluid system controller 405, and the optical system 412 can be controlled by an optical system controller 413. The sampling and analysis system 400 can also include a display system 414 and an algorithm processor 416 that assist in fluid sample analysis and presentation of data.

[0084] In some embodiments, the sampling and analysis system 400 is a mobile point-of-care apparatus that monitors physiological parameters such as, for example, blood glucose concentration. Components within the system 400 that may- contact fluid and/or a patient, such as tubes and connectors, can be coated with an antibacterial coating to reduce the risk of infection. Connectors between at least some components of the system 400 can include a self-sealing valve, such as a spring valve, in order to reduce the risk of contact between port openings and fluids, and to guard against fluid escaping from the system. Other components can also be included in a system for sampling and analyzing flu d in accordance with the described embodiments.

[0085] The sampling and analysis system 400 can include a fluid source 402 (or more than one fluid source) that contain(s) fluid to be sampled. The fluid-handling system 404 of the sampling and analysis system 400 is connected to, and can draw fluid from, the fluid source 402. The fluid source 402 can be, for example, a blood vessel such as a vein or an artery, a container such as a decanter, flask, beaker, tube, cartridge, test strip, etc., or any other corporeal or extracorporeal fluid source. For example, in some embodiments, the fluid source 402 may be a vein or artery in the patient 302 (see, e.g., FIG. 3). In other embodiments, the fluid source 402 may comprise an extracorporeal container 350 of fluid delivered to the system 400 for analysis (see, e.g., FIG. 3B). The fluid to be sampled can be, for example, blood, plasma, interstitial fluid, lymphatic fluid, or another fluid. In some embodiments, more than one fluid source can be present, and more than one fluid and/or type of fluid can be provided.

[0086] In some embodiments, the fluid-handling system 404 withdraws a sample of fluid from the fluid source 402 for analysis, centrifuges at lea st a portion of the sample, and prepares at least a portion of the sample for analysis by an optical sensor such as a spectrophotometer (which can be part of an optical system 412, for example). These functions can be controlled by a fluid system controller 405, which can also be integrated into the fluid- handling system 404. The fluid system controller 405 can also control the additional functions described below. In some embodiments, the sample can be withdrawn continuously or substantially continuously at certain time intervals with a given period. The time intervals at which the sample is withdrawn can be periodic or aperiodic and range from approximately 1 minute to approximately 15 minutes (e.g., the sample can be withdrawn at time intervals of 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes or 15 minutes). In some embodiments, the sample can be withdrawn at discrete time intervals (e.g., once every 30 minutes, once every 45 minutes or once every hour).

[0087] The duration of time over which the sample of fluid is withdrawn, referred to as "draw period", may be set to avoid clinical drawbacks, and/or it can be varied according to a health-care provider's wishes. For example, in some embodiments, fluid may be continuously withdrawn into the sampling and analysis system 400 over a draw period lasting approximately 10 seconds to approximately 5 minutes. 0Θ88] In some embodiments, the amount of sample withdrawn from the fluid source 402 can be small. For example, in some embodiments, the volume of sample withdrawn from the fluid source can be between approximately 1 .0 ml and approximately 10.0 ml in a draw period (e.g. 2.0 ml -6.0 ml of sample can be withdrawn in a draw period of approximately 1 minute). In some embodiments, the amount of sample withdrawn can be in the range of approximately 20 ml/day to approximately 500 ml/day. In some embodiments, the amount of sample withdrawn can be outside this range.

[0089] In some embodiments, at least a portion of the sample is returned to the fluid source 402. At least some of the sample, such as portions of the sample that are mixed with other materials or portions that are othenvise altered during the sampling and analysis process, or portions that, for any reason, are not to be returned to the fluid source 402, can also be placed in a waste bladder (not shown in FIG. 4). The waste bladder can be integrated into the fluid- handling system 404 or supplied by a user of the system 400. The fluid-handling system 404 can also be connected to a saline source, a detergent source, and/or an anticoagulant source, each of which can be supplied by a user, attached to the fluid-handling system 404 as additional fluid sources, and/or integrated into the fluid-handling system 404.

[009Θ] Components of the fluid-handling system 404 can be modularized into one or more non-disposable, disposable, and or replaceable subsystems. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, components of the fluid-handling system 404 are separated into a non-disposable subsystem 406, a first disposable subsystem 408, and a second disposable subsystem 410.

[0091] The non-disposable subsystem 406 can include components that, while they may be replaceable or adjustable, do not generally require regular replacement during the useful lifetime of the system 400. In some embodiments, the non-disposable subsystem 406 of the fluid-handling system 404 includes one or more reusable valves and sensors. For example, the non-disposable subsystem 406 can include one or more valves (or non-disposable portions thereof), (e.g., pinch-valves, rotary valves, etc.), sensors (e.g., ultrasonic bubble sensors, non-contact pressure sensors, optical blood dilution sensors, etc). The non-disposable subsystem 406 can also include one or more pumps (or non- disposable portions thereof). For example, some embodiments can include pumps available from Hospira. in some embodiments, the components of the non-disposable subsystem 406 are not directly exposed to fluids and'Or are not readily susceptible to contamination,

[0092] The first and second disposable subsystems 408, 410 can include components that are regularly replaced under certain circumstances in order to facilitate the operation of the system 400. For example, the first disposable subsystem 408 can be replaced after a certain period of use, such as a few days, has elapsed. R eplacement maybe necessary, for example, when a bladder within the first disposable subsystem 408 is filled to capacity. Such replacement may mitigate fluid system performance degradation associated with and'Or contamination wear on system components.

[0093] In some embodiments, the first disposable subsystem 408 includes components that may contact fluids such as patient blood, saline, flushing solutions, anticoagulants, and'or detergent solutions. For example, the first disposable subsystem 408 can include one or more tubes, fittings, cleaner pouches and'or waste bladders. The components of the first disposable subsystem 408 can be sterilized in order to decrease ihe risk of infection and can be configured to be easily replaceable.

[0094] In some embodiments, the second disposable subsystem 410 can be designed to be replaced under certain circumstances. For example, ihe second disposable subsystem 410 can be replaced when the patient being monitored by ihe system 400 is changed. The components of the second disposable subsystem 410 may not need replacement at the same intervals as the components of the first disposable subsystem 408. For example, the second disposable subsystem 410 can include a sample holder and'or at least some components of a centrifuge, components that may not become filled or quickly worn during operation of the system 400. Replacement of the second disposable subsystem 410 can decrease or eliminate the risk of transferring fluids from one patient to another during operation of the system 400, enhance the measurement performance of system 400, and'or reduce the risk of contamination or infection.

[0095] In some embodiments, the sample holder of the second disposable subsystem 410 receives the sample obtained from the fluid source 402 via fluid passageways of the first disposable subsystem 408. The sample holder is a container that can hold fluid for the centrifuge and can include a window to the sample for analysis by a spectrometer. In some embodiments, the sample holder includes windows that are made of a material that is substantially transparent to electromagnetic radiation in the mid- infrared range of the spectrum. For example, the sample holder windows can be made of calcium fluoride.

[0096] An injector can provide a fluid connection between the first disposable subsyste 408 and the sample holder of the second disposable subsystem 410. In some embodiments, the injector can be removed from the sample holder to allow for free spinning of the sample holder during centrifugation,

[0097] In some embodiments, the components of the sample are separated by centrifuging for a period of time before measurements are performed by the optical system 412. For example, a fluid sample (e.g., a blood sample) can be centrifuged at a relatively high speed. The sample can be spun at a certain number of revolutions per minute (RPM) for a given length of time to separate blood plasma for spectral analysis. In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at about 7200 RPM. In some embodiments, the sample is spun at about 5000 RPM. In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at about 4500 RPM. In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at more than one rate for successive time periods. The length of time can be approximately 5 minutes. In some embodiments, the length of time is approximately 2. minutes. Separation of a sample into the components can permit measurement of solute (e.g., glucose) concentration in plasma, for example, without interference from other blood components. This kind of post-separation measurement, (sometimes referred to as a "direct measurement") has advantages o ver a solute measurement taken from whole blood because the proportions of plasma to other components need not be known or estimated in order to infer plasma glucose concentration. In some embodiments, the separated plasma can be analyzed electrically using one or more electrodes instead of, or in addition to, being analyzed optically. This analysis may occur within the same device, or within a different device. For example, in certain embodiments, an optical analysis device can separate blood into components, analyze the components, and then allow the components to be transported to another analysis device that can further analyze the components (e.g., using electrical and/or electrochemical measurements),

0Θ98] An anticoagulant, such as, for example, heparin can be added to the sample before centrifugation to prevent clotting. The fluid-handling system 404 can be used with a variety of anticoagulants, -including anticoagulants supplied by a hospital or other user of the monitoring system 400. A detergent solution formed by mixing detergent powder from a pouch connected to the fluid-handling system 404 with saline can be used to periodically clean residual protein and other sample remnants from one or more components of the fluid-handling system 404, such as the sample holder. Sample fluid to which anticoagulant has been added and used detergent solution can be transferred into the waste bladder,

[0099 J The system 400 shown in FIG. 4 includes an optical system 412 that can measure optical properties (e.g., transmission) of a fluid sample (or a portion thereof). In some embodiments, the optical system 412 measures transmission in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum. In some embodiments, the optical system 412 includes a spectrometer that measures the transmission of broadband infrared light through a portion of a sample holder filled with fluid. The spectrometer need not come into direct contact with the sample. As used herein, the term "sample holder" is a broad term that carries its ordinary meaning as an object that can provide a place for fluid. The fluid can enter the sample holder by flowing.

[0100J In some embodiments, the optical system 412 includes a filter wheel that contains one or more filters. In some embodiments, more than ten filters can be included, for example twelve or fifteen filters. In some embodiments, more than 20 filters (e.g., twenty-five filters) are mounted on the filter wheel. The optical system 412 includes a light source that passes light through a filter and the sample holder to a detector. In some embodiments, a stepper motor moves the filter wheel in order to position a selected filter in the path of the light. An optical encoder can also be used to finely position one or more filters. In some embodiments, one or more tunable filters may be used to filter light into multiple wavelengths. The one or more tunable filters may provide the multiple wavelengths of light at the same time or at different times (e.g., sequentially). The light source included in the optical system 412 may emit radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and/or far-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In some embodiments, the light source can be a broadband source that emits radiation in a broad spectral region (e.g., from about 1500 nm to about 6000 nm). In other embodiments, the light source may emit radiation at certain specific wavelengths. The light source may comprise one or more light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting radiation at one or more wavelengths in the radiation regions described herein. In other embodiments, the light source may comprise one or more laser modules emiiting radiation at one or more wavelengths. The laser modules may comprise a solid state laser (e.g., a Nd:YAG laser), a semiconductor based laser (e.g., a GaAs and/or InGaAsP laser), and/or a gas laser (e.g., an Ar-ion laser). In some embodiments, the laser modules may comprise a fiber laser. The laser modules may emit radiation at certain fixed wavelengths. In some embodiments, the emission wavelength of the laser module(s) may be tunable over a wide spectral range (e.g., about 30 nm to about 100 nm). In some embodiments, the light source included in the optical system 412 may be a thermal infrared emitter. The light source can comprise a resistive heating element, which, in some embodiments, may be integrated on a thin dielectric membrane on a micromachined silicon structure. In one embodiment the light source is generally similar to the electrical modulated thermal infrared radiation source, IRSourceIM, available from the Axetris Microsystems division of Leister Technologies, LLC (Itasca, Illinois).

0101J The optical system 412 can be controlled by an optical system controller 413. The optical system controller can, in some embodiments, be integrated into the optical system 412. In some embodiments, the fluid system controller 405 and the optical system controller 413 can communicate with each other as indicated by the line 411. In some embodiments, the function of these two controllers can be integrated and a single controller can control both the fluid -hand ling system 404 and the optical system 412. Such an integrated control can be advantageous because the two systems are preferably integrated, and the optical system 412 is preferably configured to analyze the very same fluid handled by the fluid-handling system 404. Indeed, portions of the fluid- handling system 404 (e.g., the sample holder described above with respect to the second disposable subsystem 410 and/or at least some components of a centrifuge) can also be components of the optical system 412. Accordingly, the fluid-handling system 404 can be controlled to obtain a fluid sample for analysis by optical system 412, when the fluid sample arrives, the optical system 412. can be controlled to analyze the sample, and when the analysis is complete (or before), the fluid-handling system 404 can be controlled to return some of the sample to the fluid source 402. and/or discard some of the sample, as appropriate.

[0182] The system 400 shown in FIG. 4 includes a display system 414 that provides for communication of information to a user of the system 400. In some embodiments, the display 414 can be replaced by or supplemented with other communication devices that communicate in non-visual ways. The display system 414 can include a display processor that controls or produces an interface io communicate information to the user. The display system 414 can include a display screen. One or more parameters such as, for example, blood glucose concentration, system 400 operating parameters, and/or other operating parameters can be displayed on a monitor (not shown) associated with the system 400. An example of one way such information can be displayed is hown in Figures 24 and 25. In some embodiments, the display system 414 can communicate measured physiological parameters and/or operating parameters to a computer system over a communications connection.

[0103] The system 400 shown in FIG. 4 includes an algorithm processor 416 that can receive spectral information, such as optical density (OD) values (or other analog or digital optical data) from the optical system 412 and or the optical system controller 413. in some embodiments, the algorithm processor 16 calculates one or more physiological parameters and can analyze the spectral information. Thus, for example and without limitation, a model can be used that determines, based on the spectral information, physiological parameters of fluid from the fluid source 402. The algorithm processor 416, a controller that may be part of the display system 414, and any embedded controllers within the system 400 can be connected to one another with a communications bus.

[0184] Some enibodimenis of the systems described herein (e.g., the system 400), as well as some embodiments of each method described herein, can include a computer program accessible to and/or executable by a processing sysiem, e.g., a one or more processors and memories that are part of an embedded system. Indeed, the controllers may comprise one or more computers and/or may use software. Thus, as will be appreciaied by ihose skilled in the art, various enibodimenis may be embodied as a method, an apparatus such as a special purpose apparatus, an apparatus such as a data processing system, or a carrier medium, e.g., a computer program product. The carrier medium carries one or more computer readable code segments for controlling a processing system to implement a method. Accordingly, various embodiments may take ihe form of a method, an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects. Furthermore, any one or more of the disclosed methods (including but not limited to the disclosed methods of measurement analysis, inierferent determination, and/or calibration constant generation) may be stored as one or more computer readable code segments or data compilations on a carrier medium. Any suitable computer readable carrier medium may be used including a magnetic storage device such as a diskette or a hard disk; a memory cartridge, module, card or chip (either alone or installed within a larger device); or an optical storage device such as a CD or DVD.

FLUID HANDLING SYSTEM

[010S] The generalized fluid-handling system 404 can have various configurations. In this context, FIG. 5 schematically illustrates the layout of an example embodiment of a fluid system 510. In this schematic representation, various components are depicted that may be part of a non-disposable subsystem 406, a first disposable subsystem 408, a second disposable subsystem 410, and/or an optical system 412. The fluid system 510 is described practically to show an example cycle as fluid is drawn and analyzed.

[0106] In addition to the reference numerals used below, the various portions of the illustrated fluid system 510 are labeled for convenience with letters to suggest their roles as follows: T# indicates a section of tubing, C# indicates a connector that joins multiple tubing sections. V# indicates a valve. BS# indicates a bubble sensor or ultrasonic air detector. N# indicates a needle (e.g., a needle that injects sample into a sample holder). PS# indicates a pressure sensor (e.g., a reusable pressure sensor). Pump# indicates a fluid pump (e.g., a syringe pump with a disposable body and reusable drive). "Hb 12" indicates a sensor for hemoglobin (e.g., a dilution sensor that can detect hemoglobin optically),

[0187] The term "valve" as used herein is a broad term and is used, in accordance with its ordinary meaning, to refer to any flow regulating device. For example, the term "valve" can include, without limitation, any device or system that can controllably allow, prevent, or inhibit the flow of fluid through a fluid passageway. The term "valve" can include some or all of the following, alone or in combination: pinch valves, rotary valves, stop cocks, pressure valves, shuttle valves, mechanical valves, electrical valves, electro-mechanical flow regulators, etc. In some embodiments, a valve can regulate flow using gravitational methods or by applying electrical voltages or by both.

[0188] The term "pump" as used herein is a broad term and is used, in accordance with its ordinary meaning, to refer to any device that can urge fluid flow. For example, the term "pump" can include any combination of the following: syringe pumps, peristaltic pumps, vacuum pumps, electrical pumps, mechanical pumps, hydraulic pumps, etc. Pumps and/or pump components that are suitable for use with some embodiments can be obtained, for example, from or through Hospira.

[0189] The function of the valves, pumps, actuators, drivers, motors (e.g., the centrifuge motor), etc. described below is controlled by one or more controllers (e.g., the fluid system controller 405, the optical system controller 413, etc.) The controllers can include software, computer memory, electrical and mechanical connections to the controlled components, etc.

[0110] At the start of a measurement cycle, most lines, including a patient tube 512 (Tl), an Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4), an anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3), and a sample cell 548 can be filled with saline that can be introduced into the system through the infusion tube 514 and the saline tube 516, and which can come from an infusion pump 518 and/or a saline bag 520. The infusion pump 518 and the saline bag 520 can be provided separately from (he system 510. For example, a hospital can use existing saline bags and infusion pumps to interface with the described system. The infusion valve 521 can be open to allow saline to flow into the tube 512. (Tl).

[0111] Before drawing a sample, the saline in part of the system 510 can be replaced with air. Thus, for example, the following valves can be closed: air valve 503 (PVO), the detergent tank valve 559 (V7b), 566 (V3b), 523 (VO), 529 (V7a), and 563 (V2b). At the same time, the following valves can be open: valves 531 (Via), 533 (V3a) and 577 (V4a). Simultaneously, a second pump 532 (pump #0) pumps air through the system 510 (including tube 534 (T3), sample cell 548, and tube 556 (T6)), pushing saline through tube 534 (T3) and sample cell 548 into a waste bladder 554.

[0112] Next, a sample can be drawn. With the valves 542 (PV1 ), 559 (V7b), and 561 (V4b) closed, a first pump 522 (pump til ) is actuated to draw sample fluid to be analyzed (e.g. blood) from a fluid source (e.g., a laboratory sample container, a living patient, etc.) up into the patient tube 512 (Tl), through the tube past the two flanking portions of the open pinch- valve 523 (V0), through the first connector 524 (CI ), into the looped tube 530, past the arrival sensor 526 (Hbl 2), and into the arrival sensor tube 528 (T4). The arrival sensor 526 may be used to detect the presence of blood in the tube 528 (T4). For example in some embodiments, the arrival sensor 526 may comprise a hemoglobin sensor. Tn some other embodiments, the arrival sensor 526 may comprise a color sensor that detects the color of fluid flowing through the tube 528 (T4). During this process, the valve 529 (V7a) and 523 (V0) are open to fluid flow, and the valves 531 (Via), 533 (V3a), 542 (PVl ), 559 (V7b), and 561 (V4b) can be closed and therefore block (or substantially block) fluid flow by pinching the tube,

[0113] Before drawing the sample, the tubes 512 (Tl) and 528 (T4) are filled with saline and the hemoglobin (Hb) level is zero. The tubes that are filled with saline are in fluid communication with the sample source (e.g., the fluid source 402). The sample source can be the vessels of a living human or a pool of liquid in a laboratory sample container, for example. When the saline is drawn toward the first pump 522, fluid to be analyzed is also drawn, into the system because of the suction forces in the closed fluid system. Thus, the first pump 522 draws a relatively continuous column of fluid that first comprises generally nondiluted saline, then a mixture of saline and sample fluid (e.g., blood), and then eventually nondiluted sample fluid, in the example illustrated here, the sample fluid is blood.

[0114] The arrival sensor 526 (Hbl2) can detect and/or verify the presence of blood in the tubes. For example, in some embodiments, the arrival sensor 526 can determine the color of the fluid in the tubes. In some embodiments, the arrival sensor 526 (Hb 12) can detect the level of Hemoglobin in the sample fluid. As blood starts to arrive at the arrival sensor 526 (Hbl2), the sensed hemoglobin level rises. A hemoglobin level can be selected, and the system can be pre-sei to determine when that level is reached, A controller such as the fluid system controller 405 of FIG. 4 can be used to set and react to the pre-set value, for example. In some embodiments, when the sensed hemoglobin level reaches the pre-sei value, substantially undiluted sample is present at the first connector 524 (C I). The preset value can depend, in part, on the length and diameter of any tubes and or passages traversed by the sample. In some embodiments, the pre-set value can be reached after approximately 2 mL of fluid (e.g., blood) has been drawn from a fluid source. A nondiluted sample can be, for example, a blood sample thai is not diluted with saline solution, but instead has the characteristics of the rest of the blood flowing through a patient's body. A loop of tubing 530 (e.g., a 1-mL loop) can be advantageously positioned as illustrated to help insure that undiluted fluid (e.g., undiluted blood) is present at the first connector 524 (CI ) when the arrival sensor 526 registers that the preset Hb threshold is crossed. The loop of tubing 530 provides additional length to the Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4) to make it less likely that the portion of the fluid column in the tubing at the first connector 524 (CI) has advanced all the way past the mixture of saline and sample fluid, and the nondiluted blood portion of that fluid has reached the first connector 524 (CI).

[0115] Tn some embodiments, when nondiluted blood is present at the first connector 52.4 (CI), a sample is mixed with an anticoagulant and is directed toward the sample cell 548. An amount of anticoagulant (e.g., heparin) can be introduced into the tube 534 (T3), and then the undiluted blood is mixed with the anticoagulant. A heparin vial 538 (e.g., an insertable vial provided independently by the user of the system 510) can be connected to a tube 540. A anticoagulant valve 541 (which can be a shuttle valve, for example) can be configured to connect to both the tube 540 and the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3). The valve can open the tube 540 to a suction force (e.g., created by the pump 532), allowing heparin to be drawn from the vial 538 into the valve 541. Then, the anticoagulant valve 541 can slide the heparin over into fluid communication with the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3). The anticoagulant valve 541 can then return to its previous position. Thus, heparin can be shuttled from the tube 540 into the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3) to provide a controlled amount of heparin into the tube 534 (T3).

[0116] With the valves 542 (PV1), 559 (V7b), 561 (V4b), 523 (V0), 531 (V ia), 566 (V3b), and 563 (V2b) closed, and the valves 529 (V7a) and 533 (V3a) open, first pump 522 (pump #1) pushes the sample from tube 528 (T4) into tube 534 (T3), where the sample mixes with the heparin injected by the anticoagulant valve 541 as it flows through ihe system 510, As ihe sample proceeds through ihe tube 534 (T3), the air ihai was previously introduced into the tube 534 (T3) is displaced. The sample continues to flo until a bubble sensor 535 (BS9) indicates a change from air to a liquid, and thus the arrival of a sample at the bubble sensor. In some embodiments, the volume of tube 534 (T3) from connector 52.4 (CI ) to bubble sensor 535 (BS9) is a known and/or engineered amount, and may be approximately 500 uL, 200 uL or 100 uL, for example. In some embodiments, the volume of tube 534 (T3) from connector 524 (CI ) to bubble sensor 535 (BS9) may be approximately less than 10 ml.

[0117] When bubble sensor 535 (BS9) indicates the presence of a sample, the remainder of the sampled blood can be returned to its source (e.g., the patient veins or arteries). The first pump 522 (pump #1) pushes the blood out of the Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4) and back to the patient by opening the valve 523 (V0), closing the valves 531 (Via) and 533 (V3a), and keeping the valve 529 (V7a) open. The Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4) is preferably flushed with approximately 2 mL of saline. This can be accomplished by closing the valve 529 (V7a), opening the valve 542 (PVI), drawing saline from the saline source 520 into the tube 544, closing the valve 542 (PVI ), opening the valve 529 (V7a), and forcing the saline down the Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4) with the pump 522. in some embodiments, less than two minutes elapse between the time that blood is drawn from the patient and the time that the blood is returned to the patient.

[0118] Following return of the unused patient blood sample, the sample is pushed up the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3), through the second connector 546 (C2), and into the sample cell 548, which can be located on the centrifuge rotor 550. This fluid movement is facilitated by the coordinated action (either pushing or drawing fluid) of the pump 52.2 (pump #1 ), the pump 532 (pump #0), and the various illustrated valves. In particular, valve 531 (V ia) can be opened, and valves 503 (PVO) and 559 (V7b) can be closed. Pump movement and valve position corresponding to each stage of fluid movement can be coordinated by one ore multiple controllers, such as the fluid system controll er 405 of FIG. 4.

[0119] After the unused sample is returned to the patient, the sample can be divided into separate slugs before being delivered into the sample cell 548, Thus, for example, valve 533 (V3a) is opened, valves 566 (V3b), 523 (V0) and 529 (V7a) are closed, and the pump 532 (pump #0) uses air to push the sample toward sample cell 548. In some embodiments, the sample (for example, 200 uL or 100 uL) is divided into multiple (e.g., more than two, five, or four) "slugs" of sample, each separated by a small amount of air. As used herein, the term "slug" refers to a continuous column of fluid that can be relatively short. Slugs can be separated from one another by small amounts of air (or bubbles) that can be present at intervals in the tube. In some embodiments, the slugs are formed by injecting or drawing air into fluid in the first connector 546 (C2).

[0120] In some embodiments, when the leading edge of the sample reaches blood sensor 552 (BS14), a small amount of air (the first "bubble") is injected at a connector C6. This bubble helps define the first "slug" of liquid, which extends from the bubble sensor to the first bubble. In some embodiments, the valves 533 (V3a) and 566 (V3b) are alternately opened and closed to form a bubble at connector C6, and the sample is pushed toward the sample ceil 548. Thus, for example, with pump 532 actuated, valve 566 V(3b) is briefly opened and valve 533 (V3a) is briefly closed to inject a first air bubble into the sample. [0121] In some embodiments, the volume of the tube 534 (T3) from the connector 546 (C2) to the bubble sensor 552 (BS 14) is less than the volume of tube 534 (T3) from the connector 524 (C I ) to the bubble sensor 535 (BS9). Thus, for example and without limitation, the volume of the tube 534 (T3) from the connector 524 (C I ) to the bubble sensor 535 (BS9) can be i the range of approximately 80 μί, to approximately 120 ,uL, (e.g., 100 ,uL.) and the volume of the tube 534 (T3) from the connector 546 (C2) to the bubble sensor 552 (BS 14) can be in the range of approximately 5 ,u,L to approximately 25 μϊ_· (e.g. , 15 μΐ,). In some embodiments, multiple blood slugs are created. For example, more than two blood slugs can be created, each having a different volume. In some embodiments, five blood slugs are created, each having approximately the same volume of approximately 20 μΐ. each. In some embodiments, three blood slugs are created, the first two having a volume of 10 μΐ, and the last having a volume of 20 μΐ,. Tn some embodiments, four blood slugs are created; the fsrst three blood slugs can have a volume of approximately 15μΙ, and the fourth can have a volume of approximately 35μΙ„

[0122] A second slug can be prepared by opening the valve 533 (V3a), closing the valve 566 (V3b), with pump 532 (pump #0) operating to push the first slug through a first sample cell holder interface tube 582 (Nl), through the sample cell 548, through a second sample cell holder interface tube 584 (N2), and toward the waste bladder 554. When the first bubble reaches the bubble sensor 552. (BS 14), the open/closed configurations of valves 533 (V3a) and 566 (V3b) are reversed, and a second bubble is injected into the sample, as before, A third slug can be prepared in the same manner as the second (pushing the second bubble to bubble sensor 552 (BS 14) and injecting a third bubble). After the injection of the third air bubble, the sample can be pushed through system 510 until the end of the sample is detected by bubble sensor 552 (BS 14). The system can be designed such that when the end of the sample reaches this point, the last portion of the sample (a fourth slug) is within the sample cell 548, and the pump 532. can stop forcing the fluid column through the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3) so that the fourth slug remains within the sample cell 548. Thus, the first three blood slugs can serve to flush any residual saline out the sample cell 548. The three leading slugs can be deposited in the waste bladder 554 by passing through the tube 556 (T6) and past the tube-flanking portions of the open pinch valve 557 (V4a).

[0123] In some embodiments, the fourth blood slug is centrifuged for a given length of time (e.g., more than 1 minute, five minutes, or 2 minutes, to take three advantageous examples) at a relatively fast speed (e.g., 7200 RPM, 5000 RPM, or 4500 RPM, to take three examples). Thus, for example, the sample cell holder interface tubes 582 (Nl ) and 584 (N2) disconnect the sample cell 548 from the tubes 534 (T3) and 562 (T7), permitting the centrifuge rotor 550 and the sample cell 548 to spin together. Spinning separates a sample (e.g., blood) into its components, isolates the plasma, and positions the plasma in the sample cell 548 for measurement. The centrifuge 550 can be stopped with the sample ceil 548 in a beam of radiation (not shown) for analysis. The radiation, a detector, and logic can be used to analyze a portion of the sample (e.g., the plasma) spectroscopicaily (e.g., for glucose, lactate, or other analyte concentration). In some embodiments, some or all of the separated components (e.g., the isolated plasma) may be transported to a different analysis chamber. For example, another analysis chamber can have one or more electrodes in electrical communication with the chamber's contents, and the separated components may be analyzed electrically. At any suitable point, one or more of the separated components can be transported to the waste bladder 554 when no longer needed. In some chemical analysis systems and apparatus, the separated components are analyzed electrically. Analysis devices may be connected serially, for example, so that the analyzed substance from an optical analysis system (e.g., an "OptiScanner®" fluid analyzer) can be transferred to an independent analysis device (e.g., a chemical analysis device) for subsequent analysis, in certain embodiments, the analysis devices are integrated into a single system. Many variations are possible.

[0124] In some embodiments, portions of the system 510 that contain blood after the sample cell 548 has been provided with a sample are cleaned to prevent blood from clotting. Accordingly, the centrifuge rotor 550 can include two passageways for fluid that may be connected to the sample cell holder interface tubes 582 (N l) and 584 (N2). One passageway is sample cell 548, and a second passageway is a shunt 586. An embodiment of the shunt 586 is illustrated in more detail in FIG. 16 (see reference numeral 1586).

[0125] The shunt 586 can allow cleaner (e.g., a detergent such as tergazyme A) to flow through and clean the sample ceil holder interface tubes without flowing through the sample ceil 548. After the sample cell 548 is provided with a sample, the interface tubes 582 (Nl) and 584 (N2) are disconnected from the sample ceil 548, the centrifuge rotor 550 is rotated to align the shunt 586 with the interface tubes 582 (N l) and 584 (N2), and the interface tubes are connected with the shunt. With the shunt in place, the detergent tank 559 is pressurized by the second pump 532 (pump #0) with valves 561 (V4b) and 563 (V2b) open and valves 557 (V4a) and 533 (V3a) closed to flush the cleaning solution back through the interface tubes 582 (N l) and 584 ( 2) and into the waste bladder 554, Subsequently, saline can be drawn from the saline bag 520 for a saline flush. This flush pushes saline through the Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4), the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3), the sample cell 548, and the waste tube 556 (T6). Thus, in some embodiments, the following valves are open for this flush: 529 (V7a), 533 (V3a), 557 (V4a), and the following valves are closed: 542 (PVl), 523 (V0), 531 (Via), 566 (V3b), 563 (V2b), and 561 (V4b).

[0126] Following analysis, the second pump 532 (pump #0) flushes the sample cell 548 and sends the flushed contents to the waste bladder 554. This flush can be done with a cleaning solution from the detergent tank 558. In some embodiments, the detergent tank valve 559 (V7b) is open, providing fluid communication between the second pump 532 and the detergent tank 558. The second pump 532. forces cleaning solution from the detergent tank 558 between the tube-flanking portions of the open pinch valve 561 and through the tube 562. (T7). The cleaning flush can pass through the sample cell 548, through the second connector 546, through the tube 564 (T5) and the open valve 563 (V2b), and into the waste bladder 554.

[0127] Subsequently, the first pump 522 (pump #1) can flush the cleaning solution out of the sample cell 548 using saline in drawn from the saline bag 520. This flush pushes saline through the Arrival sensor tube 528 (T4), the anticoagulant valve tube 534 (T3), the sample cell 548, and the waste tube 556 (T6), Thus, in some embodiments, the following valves are open for this flush: 529 (V7a), 533 (V3a), 557 (V4a), and the following valves are closed: 542 (PVl), 523 (V0), 531 (V ia), 566 (V3b), 563 (V2b), and 561 (V4b).

[0128] When the fluid source is a living entity such as a patient, a low flow of saline (e.g., 1 -5 mL/hr) is preferably moved through the patient tube 512 (Ti) and into the patient to keep the patient's vessel open (e.g., to establish a keep vessel open, or "KVO" flow). This KVO flow can be temporarily interrupted when fluid is drawn into the fluid system 510. The source of this KVO flow can be the infusion pump 518, the third pump 568 (pump #3), or the first pump 522 (pump #1). In some embodiments, the infusion pump 518 can run continuously throughout the measurement cycle described above. This continuous flow can advantageously avoid any alanns that may be triggered if the infusion pump 518 senses that the flow has stopped or changed in some other way. In some embodiments, when the infusion valve 521 closes to allow pump 522 (pump #1) to withdraw fluid from a fluid source (e.g., a patient), the third pump 568 (pump #3) can withdraw fluid through the connector 570, thus allowing the infusion pump 51 8 to continue pumping normally as if the fluid path was not blocked by the infusion valve 521 . If the measurement cycle is about two minutes long, this withdrawal by the third pump 568 can continue for approximately two minutes. Once the infusion valve 521 is open again, the third pump 568 (pump #3) can reverse and insert the saline back into the system at a low flow rate. Preferably, the time between measurement cycles is longer than the measurement cycle itself (for example, the time interval can be longer than ten minutes, shorter than ten minutes, shorter than five minutes, longer than two minutes, longer than one minute, etc.). Accordingly, the third pump 568 can insert fluid back into the system at a lower rate than it withdrew that fluid. This can help prevent an alarm by the infusion pump.

[0129] FIG. 6 schematically illustrates another embodiment of a fluid system that can be part of a system for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples. In this embodiment, the anticoagulant valve 541 has been replaced with a syringe- style pump 588 (Pump Heparin) and a series of pinch valves around a junction between tubes. For example, a heparin pinch valve 589 (Vhep) can be closed to prevent flow from or to the pump 588, and a heparin waste pinch valve 590 can be closed to prevent flow from or to the waste container from this junction through the heparin waste tube 591. This embodiment also illustrates the shunt 592 schematically. Other differences from FIG. 5 include the check valve 593 located near the detergent tank 558 and the patient loop 594. The reference letters D, for example, the one indicated at 595, refer to components that are advantageously located on the door. The reference letters M, for example, the one indicated at 596, refer to components that are advantageously located on the monitor. The reference letters B, for example, the one indicated at 597, refer to components that can be advantageously located on both the door and the monitor.

[0130J In some embodiments, the system 400 (see FIG. 4), the apparatus 100 (see FIG. 1), or even the monitoring device 102 (see FIG. 1) itself can also actively function not only to monitor analyte levels (e.g., glucose), but also to change and/or control analyte levels. Thus, the monitoring device 102 can be both a monitoring and an infusing device. In some embodiments, the fluid handling system 510 can include an optional anaiyte control subsystem 2780 that will be further described below (see discussion of analyte control).

[0131] Tn certain embodiments, analyte levels in a patient can be adjusted directly (e.g., by infusing or extracting glucose) or indirectly (e.g., by infusing or extracting insulin). FIG. 6 illustrates one way of providing this function. The infusion pinch valve 598 (V8) can allow the port sharing pump 599 (compare to the third pump 568 (pump #3) in FIG. 5) to serve two roles. In the first role, it can serve as a "port sharing" pump. The port sharing function is described with respect to the third pump 568 (pump #3) of FIG. 5, where the third pump 568 (pump #3) can withdraw fluid through the connector 570, thus allowing the infusion pump 518 to continue pumping normally as if the fluid path was not blocked by the infusion valve 521 . In the second role, the port sharing pump 599 can serve as an infusion pump. The infusion pump role allows the port sharing pump 599 to draw a substance (e.g., glucose, saline, etc.) from another source when the infusion pinch valve 598 is open, and then to infuse that substance into the system or the patient when the infusion pinch valve 598 is closed. This can occur, for example, in order to change the level of a substance in a patient in response to a reading by the monitor that the substance is too low. In some embodiments, one or more of the pumps may comprise a reversible infusion pump configured to interrupt the flow of the infusion fluid and draw a sample of blood for analysis.

MECHANICAL / FLUID SYSTEM INTERFACE

[0132] FIG. 7 is an oblique schematic depiction of a modular monitoring device 700, which can correspond to the monitoring device 102. The modular monitoring device 700 includes a body portion 702. having a receptacle 704, which can be accessed by moving a movable portion 706. The receptacle 704 can include connectors (e.g., rails, slots, protrusions, resting surfaces, etc.) with which a removable portion 710 can interface. In some embodiments, portions of a fluidic system that directly contact fluid are incorporated into one or more removable portions (e.g., one or more disposable cassettes, sample holders, tubing cards, etc.). For example, a removable portion 710 can house at least a portion of the fluid system 510 described previously, including portions that contact sample fluids, saline, detergent solution, and/or anticoagulant,

[0133] In some embodiments, a non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 is disposed within the body portion 702 of the monitoring device 700. The first removable portion 710 can include one or more openings that allo portions of the non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 to interface with the removable portion 710, For example, the non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 can include one or more pinch valves that are designed to extend through such openings to engage one or more sections of tubing. When the first removable portion 710 is present in a corresponding first receptacle 704, actuation of the pinch valves can selectively close sections of tubing within the removable portion. The non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 can also include one or more sensors that interface with connectors, tubing sections, or pumps located within the first removable portion 710. The non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 can also include one or more actuators (e.g., motors) that can actuate moveable portions (e.g., the plunger of a syringe) that may be located in the removable portion 710. A portion of the non-disposable fluid-handling subsystem 708 can be located on or in the moveable portion 706 (which can be a door having a slide or a hinge, a detachable face portion, etc.).

[0134] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, the monitoring device 700 includes an optical system 714 disposed within the body portion 702. The optical system 714 can include a light source and a detector that are adapted to perform measurements on fluids within a sample holder (not shown). The light source may comprise a fixed wavelength light source and/or a tunable light source. The light source may comprise one or more sources including, for example, broadband sources, LEDs, and lasers. In some embodiments, the sample holder comprises a removable portion, which can be associated with or disassociated from the removable portion 710. The sample holder can include an optical window through which the optical system 714 can emit radiation for measuring properties of a fluid in the sample holder. The optical system 714 can include other components such as, for example, a power supply, a centrifuge motor, a filter wheel, and/or a beam splitter.

[0135] In some embodiments, the removable portion 710 and the sample holder are adapted to be in fluid communication with each other. For example, the removable portion 710 can include a retractable injector that injects fluids into a sample holder. In some embodiments, the sample holder can comprise or be disposed in a second removable portion (not shown). In some embodiments, the injector can be retracted to allo the centrifuge to rotate the sample holder freely.

[0136] The body portion 702 of the monitoring device 700 can also include one or more connectors for an external battery (not shown). The external battery can serve as a backup emergency power source in the event that a primary emergency power source such as, for example, an internal battery (not shown) is exhausted.

[0137] FIG. 7 shows an embodiment of a system having subcomponents illustrated schematically. By way of a more detailed (but nevertheless non-limiting) example, FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 show more details of the shape and physical configuration of a sample embodiment.

[0138] FIG. 8 shows a cut-away side view of a monitoring device 800 (which can correspond, for example, to the device 102 shown, in FIG. 1). The device 800 includes a casing 802. The monitoring device 800 can have a. fluid system. For example, the fluid system can have subsystems, and a portion or portions thereof can be disposable, as schematically depicted in FIG. 4. As depicted in FIG. 8, the fluid system is generally located at the left -hand portion of the casing 802, as indicated by the reference 801. The monitoring device 800 can also have an optical system. In the illustrated embodiment, the optical system is generally located in the upper portion of the casing 802, as indicated by the reference 803. Advantageously, however, the fluid system 801 and the optical system 803 can both be integrated together such that fluid flows generally through a portion of the optical system 803, and such that radiation flows generally through a portion of the fluid system 801.

[0139] Depicted in FIG. 8 are examples of ways in which components of the device 800 mounted within the casing 802 can interface with components of the device 800 that comprise disposable portions. Not all components of the device 800 are shown in FIG. 8. A disposable portion 804 having a variety of components is shown in the casing 802. In some embodiments, one or more actuators 808 housed within the casing 802, operate syringe bodies 810 located within a disposable portion 804. The syringe bodies 810 are connected to sections of tubing 816 that move fluid among various components of the system. The movement of fluid is at least partially controlled by the action of one or more pinch valves 812 positioned within the casing 802. The pinch valves 812 have arms 814 that extend within the disposable portion 804. Movement of the arms 814 can constrict a section of tubing 816.

[0140] In some embodiments, a sample cell holder 820 can engage a centrifuge motor 818 mounted within the casing 802 of the device 800. A filter wheel motor 822 disposed within the housing 802 rotates a filter wheel 824, and in some embodiments, aligns one or more filters with an optical path. An optical path can originate at a source 826 within the housing 802 that can be configured to emit a beam of radiation (e.g., mfrared radiation, visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, etc.) through the filter and the sample cell holder 820 and to a detector 828. A detector 828 can measure the optical density of the light when it reaches the detector.

[0141] FIG. 9 shows a cut-away perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a monitoring device 900. Many features similar to those illustrated in FIG. 8 are depicted in this illustration of an alternative embodiment. A. fluid system 901 can be partially seen. The disposable portion 904 is shown, in an operative position within the device. One of the actuators 808 can be seen next to a syringe body 910 that is located within the disposable portion 904. Some pinch valves 912 are shown next to a fluid- handling portion of the disposable portion 904. In this figure, an optical system 903 can also be partially seen. The sample holder 920 is located underneath the centrifuge motor 918. The filter wheel motor 922 is positioned near the radiation source 926, and the detector 928 is also illustrated.

[0142] FIG. 10 illustrates two views of a cartridge 1000 ihai can interface with a fluid system such as the fluid system 510 of FIG. 5. The cartridge 1000 can be configured for insertion into a receptacle of the device 800 of FIG. 8 and/or the device 900 shown in FIG, 9. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 can comprise a portion that is disposable and a portion that is reusable. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 can be disposable. The cartridge 1000 can fill the role of the removable portion 710 of FIG. 7, for example. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 can be used for a system having only one disposable subsystem, making it a simple matter for a health care provider to replace and/or track usage time of the disposable portion. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 includes one or more features that facilitate insertion of the cartridge 1000 into a corresponding receptacle. For example, the cartridge 1000 can be shaped so as to promote insertion of the cartridge 1000 in the correct orientation. The cartridge 1000 can also include labeling or coloring affixed to or integrated with the cartridge's exterior casing that help a. handler insert the cartridge 1000 into a receptacle properly.

[0143] The cartridge 1000 can include one or more ports for connecting to material sources or receptacles. Such ports can be provided to connect to, for example, a saline source, an infusion pump, a sample source, and/or a source of gas (e.g., air, nitrogen, etc.). The ports can be connected to sections of tubing within the cartridge 1000. In some embodiments, the sections of tubing are opaque or covered so that fluids within the tubing cannot be seen, and in some embodiments, sections of tubing are transparent to allow interior contents (e.g., fluid) to be seen from outside.

[0144] The cartridge 1000 shown, in FIG. 10 can include a sample injector 1006. The sample injector 1006 can be configured to inject at least a portion of a sample into a sample holder (see, e.g., the sample cell 548), which can also be incorporated into the cartridge 1000. The sample injector 1006 can include, for example, the sample cell holder interface tubes 582 (Nl) and 584 (N2) of FIG. 5, embodiments of which are also illustrated in F G. 15.

[0145] The housing of the cartridge 1000 can include a tubing portion 1008 containing within it a card having one or more sections of tubing. In some embodiments, the body of the cartridge 1000 includes one or more apertures 1009 through which various components, such as, for example, pinch valves and sensors, can interface with ihe fluid- handling portion contained in the cartridge 1000. The sections of tubing found in the tubing portion 1008 can be aligned with the apertures 1009 in order to implement at least some of the functionality shown in the fluid system 510 of FIG. 5.

[0146] The cartridge 1000 can include a pouch space (not shown) that can comprise one or more components of the fluid system 510. For example, one or more pouches and/or bladders can be disposed in the pouch space (not shown). In some embodiments, a cleaner pouch and/or a waste bladder can be housed in a pouch space. The waste bladder can be placed under the cleaner pouch such that, as detergent is removed from the cleaner pouch, the waste bladder has more room to fill. The components placed in the pouch space (not shown) can also be placed side -by-side or in any other suitable configuration.

[0147] The cartridge 1000 can include one or more pumps 1016 that facilitate movement of fluid within the fluid system 510. Each of the pump housings 1016 can contain, for example, a syringe pump having a plunger. The plunger can be configured to interface with an actuator outside the cartridge 1000. For example, a portion of the pump that interfaces with an actuator can be exposed to the exterior of the cartridge 1000 housing by one or more apertures 1018 in the housing.

[0148] The cartridge 1000 can have an optical interface portion 1030 that is configured to interface with (or comprise a portion of) an optical system. In the illustrated embodiment, the optical interface portion 1030 can pivot around a pivot structure 1032. The optical interface portion 1030 can house a sample holder (not shown) in a chamber that can allow the sample holder to rotate. The sample holder can be held by a centrifuge interface 1 036 that can be configured to engage a centrifuge motor (not shown). When the cartridge 1000 is being inserted into a system, the orientation of the optical interface portion 1030 can be different than when it is functioning within the system.

[0149] In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is designed for single patient use. The cartridge 1000 may also be disposable and/or designed for replacement after a period of operation. For example, in some embodiments, if the cartridge 1000 is installed in a continuously operating monitoring device that performs four measurements per hour, the waste bladder may become filled or the detergent in the cleaner pouch depleted after about three days. The cartridge 1000 can be replaced before the detergent and waste bladder are exhausted, in some embodiments, a portion of the cartridge 1000 can be disposable while another portion of the cartridge 1000 is disposable, but lasts longer before being discarded. In some embodiments, a portion of the cartridge 1000 may not be disposable at all. For example, a portion thereof may be configured to be cleaned thoroughly and reused for different patients. Various combinations of disposable and less- or non-disposable portions are possible.

[0150J The cartridge 1000 can be configured for easy replacement. For example, in some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is designed to have an installation time of only minutes. For example, the cartridge can be designed to be installed in less ihan about five minutes, or less than two minutes. During installation, various fluid lines contained in the cartridge 1000 can be primed by automatically filling ihe fluid lines with saline. The saline can be mixed with detergent powder from the cleaner pouch in order to create a cleaning solution.

[0151] The cartridge 1000 can also be designed to have a relatively brief shut down time. For example, the shut down process can be configured to take less than about fifteen minutes, or less than about ten minutes, or less than about five minutes. The shut down process can include flushing the patient line; sealing off the insulin pump connection, the saline source connection, and the sample source connection; and taking other steps to decrease the risk that fluids within the used cartridge 1000 will leak after disconnection from the monitoring device.

[0152] Some embodiments of the cartridge 1000 can comprise a flat package to facilitate packaging, shipping, sterilizing, etc. Advantageously, however, some embodiments can further comprise a hinge or other pivot structure. Thus, as illustrated, an optical interface portion 1030 can be pivoted around a pivot structure 1032 to generally align with the other portions of the cartridge 1000. The cartridge can be provided to a medical provider sealed in a removable wrapper, for example.

[0153] In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is designed to fst within standard waste containers found in a hospital, such as a standard biohazard container. For example, the cartridge 1000 can be less than one foot long, less than one foot wide, and less than two inches thick. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is designed to withstand a substantial impact, such as that caused by hitting the ground after a four foot drop, without damage to the housing or internal components. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is designed to withstand significant clamping force applied to its casing. For example, the cartridge 1000 can be built to withstand five pounds per square inch of force without damage. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 can be designed to be less sturdy and more biodegradable. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 can be formed and configured to withstand more or less than five pounds of force per square inch without damage. In some embodiments, the cartridge 1000 is non pyrogenic and/or latex free.

[0154] FIG. 1 1 illustrates an embodiment of a fluid-routing card 1038 that can be part of the removable cartridge of FIG. 10. For example, the fluid- routing card 1038 can be located generally within the tubing portion 1008 of the cartridge 1000. The fluid - routing card 1038 can contain various passages and/or tubes through which fluid can flow- as described with respect to FIG. 5 and/or FIG, 6, for example. Thus, the illustrated tube openings can be in fluid communication with the following fluidic components, for example:

Figure imgf000042_0001

Table 1 - tube openings and fluidk components

[0155] The depicted fluid-routing card 1038 can have additional openings that allow operative portions of actuators and/or valves to protrude through the fluid-routing card 1038 and interface with the tubes.

[Θ156] FIG. 12 illustrates how actuators, which can sandwich the fluid-routing card 1038 between them, can interface with the fluid-routing card 1038 of FIG. 1 1. Pinch valves 812 can have an actuator portion that protrudes away from the fluid-routing card 1038 containing a motor. Each motor can correspond to a pinch platen 1202, which can be inserted into a pinch platen receiving hole 1204. Similarly, sensors, such as a bubble sensor 1206 can be inserted into receiving holes (e.g., the bubble sensor receiving hole 1208). Movement of the pinch valves 812 can be detected by the position sensors 12.10, [0157] FIG. 13 illustrates an actuator 808 that is connected to a corresponding syringe body 810. The actuator 808 is an example of one of the actuators 808 that is illustrated in FIG. 8 and in FIG. 9, and the syringe body 810 is an example of one of the syringe bodies 810 that are visible in FIG. 8 and in FIG. 9. A ledge portion 1212. of the syringe body 810 can be engaged (e.g., slid into) a corresponding receiving portion 1214 in the actuator 808. In some embodiments, the receiving portion 1214 can slide outward to engage the stationary ledge portion 12.12 after the disposable cartridge 804 is in place. Similarly, a receiving tube 1222 in the syringe plunger 1223 can be slide onto (or can receive) a protruding portion 1224 of the actuator 808. The protruding portion 1224 can slide along a track 12.26 under the influence of a motor inside the actuator 808, thus actuating the syringe plunger 1223 and causing fluid to flow into or out of the syringe tip 1230.

[0158] FIG. 14 shows a rear perspective view of internal scaffolding 1231 and the protruding bodies of some pinch valves 812, The internal scaffolding 1231 can be formed from metal and can provide structural rigidity and support for other components. The scaffolding 1231 can have holes 1232 into which screws can be screwed or other connectors can be inserted. In some embodiments, a pair of sliding rails 1234 can allow relative movement between portions of an analyzer. For example, a slidable portion 1236 (which can correspond to the movable portion 706, for example) can be temporarily slid away from the scaffolding 1231 of a main unit in order to allow an insertable portion (e.g., the cartridge 804) to be inserted.

[0159] FIG. 15 shows an underneath perspective view of the sample cell holder 820, which is attached to the centrifuge interface 1036. The sample cell holder 820 can have an opposite side (see FIG. 17) that allows it to slide into a receiving portion of the centrifuge interface 1036. The sample cell holder 820 can also have receiving nubs 1512A that provide a pathway into a sample cell 1548 held by the sample cell holder 820. Receiving nubs 1512B can provide access to a shunt 1586 (see FIG. 16) inside the sample cell holder 820. The receiving nubs 1512A and 1512B can receive and or dock with fluid nipples 1514. The fluid nipples 1514 can protrude at an angle from the sample injector 1006, which can in turn protrude from the cartridge 1000 (see FIG. 10). The tubes 1516 shown protruding from the other end of the sample injector 1006 can be in fluid communication with the sample cell holder interface tubes 582 (Nl ) and 584 (N2) (see FIG. 5 and FIG. 6), as well as 1074 and 1078 (see FIG. 11). [0160] FIG. 16 shows a plan view of the sample cell holder 820 with hidden and/or non-surface portions illustrated using dashed lines. The receiving nubs 1512A communicate with passages 1550 inside the sample cell 1548 (which can correspond, for example to the sample cell 548 of FIG. 5). The passages widen out into a wider portion 1552 that corresponds to a window 1556. The window 1556 and the wider portion 1552 can be configured to house the sample when radiation is emitted along a pathlength that is generally non-parallel to the sample cell 1548. The window 1556 can allow calibration of the instrument with the sample cell 1548 in place, even before a sample has arrived in the wider portion 1552.

[0161] An opposite opening 1530 can provide an alternative optical pathway between a radiation source and a radiation detector (e.g., the radiation source 826 of FIG. 18) and may be used, for example, for obtaining a calibration measurement of the source and detector without an intervening window or sample. Thus, the opposite opening 1530 can be located generally at the same radial distance from the axis of rotation as the window 1556.

[0162] The receiving nubs 1512B communicate with a shunt passage 1586 inside the sample ceil holder 820 (which can correspond, for example to the shunt 586 of FIG. 5).

[0163] Other features of the sample cell holder 820 can provide balancing properties for even rotation of the sample cell holder 820. For example, the wide trough 1562 and the narrower trough 1564 can be sized or otherwise configured so that the weight and'Or mass of the sample cell holder 820 is evenly distributed from left to right in the view of FIG. 16, ami/or from top to bottom in this view of FIG. 16.

[0164] FIG. 17 shows a top perspective view of the centrifuge interface 1036 connected to the sample cell holder 820. The centrifuge interface 1036 can have a bulkhead 1520 with a rounded slot 1522 into which an actuating portion of a centrifuge can be slid from the side. The centrifuge interface 1036 can thus be spun about an axis 1524, along with the sample cell holder 820, causing fluid (e.g., whole blood) within the sample cell 1548 to separate into concentric strata, according to relative density of the fluid components (e.g., plasma, red blood cells, buffy coat, etc.), within the sample cell 1548. The sample cell holder 820 can be transparent, or it can at feast have transparent portions (e.g., the window 1556 and'Or the opposite opening 1530) through which radiation can pass, and which can be aligned with an optical pathway between a radiation source and a radiation detector (see, e.g., FIG, 20). In addition, a round opening 1530 through centrifuge rotor 1520 provides an optical pathway between the radiation source and radiation detector and may be used, for example, for obtaining a calibration measurement of the source and detector without an intervening window or sample.

[016S] FIG. 18 shows a perspective view of an example optical system 803. Such a system can be integrated with other systems as shown in FIG. 9, for example. The optical system 803 can fill the role of the optical system 412, and it can be integrated with and/or adjacent to a fluid system (e.g., the fluid-handling system 404 or the fluid system 801). The sample cell holder 820 can be seen attached to the centrifuge interface 1036, which is in turn connected to, and rotatable by the centrifuge motor 818. A. filter wheel housing 1812. is attached to the filter wheel motor 822 and encloses a filter wheel 1814. A protruding shaft assembly 1816 can be connected to the filter wheel 1814. The filter wheel 1814 can have multiple filters (see FIG. 19). The radiation source 826 is aligned to transmit radiation through a fsiter in the filter wheel 1814 and then through a portion of the sample cell holder 820. Transmitted and/or reflected and/or scattered radiation can then be detected by a radiation detector.

[0166] FIG. 19 shows a view of ihe filter wheel 1814 when it is not located within the filter wheel housing 1812 of the optical system 803. Additional features of the protruding shaft assembly 1816 can be seen, along with multiple filters 1820. In some embodimenis, the filters 1820 can be removably and/or repiaceablv inserted into the filter wheel 1814.

SPECTROSCOPIC SYSTEM

[0167] As described above with reference to FIG. 4, the system 400 comprises the optical system 412 for analysis of a fluid sample. In various embodiments, the optical system 412 comprises one or more optical components including, for example, a spectrometer, a photometer, a refiectometer, or any other suitable device for measuring optical properties of the fluid sample. The optical system 412 may perform one or more optical measurements on the fluid sample including, for example, measurements of transmittance, absorbance, reflectance, scattering, and/or polarization. The optical measurements may be performed in one or more wavelength ranges including, for example, infrared (TR) and/or optical wavelengths. As described with reference to FIG. 4 (and further described below), the measurements from the optical system 412 are communicated to the algorithm processor 416 for analysis. For example, In some embodiments the algorithm processor 416 computes concentration of analyte(s) (and/or interferent(s)) of interest in the flu d sample. Analytes of interest include, e.g., glucose and lactate in whole blood or blood plasma,

[0168] FIG. 20 schematically illustrates an embodiment of the optical system 412 that comprises a spectroscopic analyzer 2010 adapted to measure spectra of a fluid sample such as, for example, blood or blood plasma. The analyzer 2010 comprises an energy source 2012. disposed along an optical axis X of the analyzer 2010. When activated, the energy source 2012. generates an electromagnetic energy beam E, which advances from the energy source 2012 along the optical axis X, In some embodiments, the energy source 2012 comprises an infrared energy source, and the energy beam E comprises an infrared beam. In some embodiments, the infrared energy beam E comprises a mid-infrared energy beam or a near-infrared energy beam. n some embodiments, the energy beam E can include optical and/or radio frequency wavelengths.

[0169] The energy source 2012 may comprise a broad-band and/or a narrowband source of electromagnetic energy. In some embodiments, the energy source 2012 comprises optical elements such as, e.g., filters, collimators, lenses, mirrors, etc, that are adapted to produce a desired energy beam E. For example, in some embodiments, the energy beam E is an infrared beam in a wavelength range between about 2 μιη and 20 μηι, In some embodiments, the energy beam E comprises an infrared beam in a wavelength range between about 4 μιη and 10 μιη. In the infrared wavelength range, water generally is the main contributor to the total absorption together with features from absorption of other blood components, particularly in the 6 μιη - 10 μιη range. The 4 μιη to 10 μηι wavelength band has been found to be advantageous for determining glucose concentration, because glucose has a strong absorption peak structure from about 8.5 μιη to 10 μηι, whereas most other blood components have a relatively low and flat absorption spectrum in the 8.5 μηι to 10 μιη range. Two exceptions are water and hemoglobin, which are interferents in this range.

[0170] The energy beam E may be temporally modulated to provide increased signal-to-noise ratio (8/N) of the measurements provided by the analyzer 2010 as further described below. For example, in some embodiments, the beam E is modulated at a frequency of about 10 Hz or in a range from about I Hz to about 30 Hz. A suitable energy source 2012 may be an electrically modulated thin-film thermoresistive element such as the HawkEye IR-50 available from Ha keye Technologies of Milford, Connecticut. [0171] As depicted in FIG. 20, the energy beam E propagates along the optical axis A" and passes through an aperture 2014 and a filter 2015 thereby providing a filtered energy beam !¾. The aperture 2014 helps collimate the energy beam E and cars include one or more filters adapted to reduce the filtering burden of the filter 2015. For example, the aperture 2014 may comprise a broadband filter that substantially attenuates beam energy outside a wavelength band between about 4 μνη to about 10 μνη. The filter 2015 may comprise a narrow-band filter that substantially attenuates beam energy having wavelengths outside of a filter passband (which may be tunable or user-selectable in some embodiments). The filter passband may be specified by a half-power bandwidth ("HPBW"). In some embodiments, the filter 2015 may have an HPBW in a range from about 0.1 μιη to about 2 μηι, or 0.01 μιη to about 1 μηι. In some embodiments, the bandwidths are in a range from about 0.2 μιη to 0.5 μηι, or 0.1 μιη to 0.35 μηι. Other filter bandwidths may be used. The filter 2015 may comprise a varying-passband filter, an electronically tunable filter, a liquid crystal filter, an interference filter, and/ or a gradient filter. In some embodiments, the filter 2015 comprises one or a combination of a grating, a prism, a mo ochrometer, a Fabry-Perot etaion, and/or a polarizer. Other optical elements may be utilized as well.

[0172] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 20, the analyzer 2010 comprises a filter wheel assembly 2021 configured to dispose one or more filters 2015 along the optical axis X. The filter wheel assembly 202.1 comprises a filter wheel 2018, a filter wheel motor 2016, and a position sensor 2020, The filter wheel 2018 may be substantially circular and have one or more filters 2015 or other optical elements (e.g., apertures, gratings, polarizers, mirrors, etc.) disposed around the circumference of the wheel 2018. In some embodiments, the number of filters 2015 in the filter wheel 2016 may be, for example, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, or more. The motor 2016 is configured to rotate the filter wheel 2018 to dispose a desired filter 2015 (or other optical element) in the energy beam E so as to produce the filtered beam Ef. In some embodiments, the motor 2016 comprises a stepper motor. The position sensor 2020 determines the angular position of the filter wheel 2016, and communicates a corresponding filter wheel position signal to the algorithm processor 416, thereby indicating which filter 2015 is in position on the optical axis X. In various embodiments, the position sensor 2020 may be a mechanical, optical, and/or magnetic encoder. An alternative to the filter wheel 2018 is a linear filter translated by a motor. The linear filter can include an array of separate filters or a single filter with properties that change along a linear dimension.

[0173] The filter wheel motor 2016 rotates the filter wheel 2018 to position the filters 2015 in the energy beam E to sequentially vary the wavelengths or the wavelength bands used to analyze the fluid sample. In some embodiments, each individual filter 2015 is disposed in the energy beam E for a dwell time during which optical properties in the passband of the filter are measured for the sample. The filter wheel motor 2016 then rotates the filter wheel 2.0 8 to position another filter 2015 in the beam E, In some embodiments, 2.5 narrow-band filters are used in the filter wheel 2018, and the dwell time is about 2. seconds for each filter 2015. A set of optical measurements for all the filters can be taken in about 2. minutes, including sampling time and filter wheel movement. In some embodiments, the dwell time may be different for different filters 2015, for example, to provide a substantially similar S/N ratio for each filter measurement. Accordingly, the filter wheel assembly 2.021 functions as a varying- passband filter that allows optical properties of the sample to be analyzed at a number of wavelengths or wavelength bands in a sequential manner.

[0174] In some embodiments of the analyzer 2010, the filter wheel 2018 includes 25 finite-bandwidth infrared filters having a Gaussian transmission profile and full-width half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 28 em" corresponding to a bandwidth that varies from 0.14 μχη at 7.08 μηι to 0.28 μ,ηι at 10 μιη. The central wavelength of the filters are, in microns: 7.082, 7.158, 7.241 , 7.331, 7.424, 7.513, 7.605, 7.704, 7.800, 7.905, 8.019, 8.150, 8.271, 8.598, 8.718, 8.834, 8.969, 9.099, 9.217, 9.346, 9.461, 9.579, 9.718, 9.862, and 9.990.

[0175] With further reference to FIG. 20, the filtered energy beam Ef propagates to a beamsplitter 2022 disposed along the optical axis X. The beamsplitter 2022 separates the filtered energy beam Ef into a sample beam Es and a reference beam Er. The reference beam Er propagates along a minor optical axis Y, which in this embodiment is substantially orthogonal to the optical axis X. The energies in the sample beam E, and the reference beam Er may comprise any suitable fraction of the energy in the filtered beam Ef. For example, in some embodiments, the sample beam Es comprises about 80%, and the reference beam Er comprises about 20%, of the filtered beam energy Ef. A reference detector 2036 is positioned along the minor optical axis Y. An optical element 2034, such as a lens, may be used to focus or collimate the reference beam Er onto the reference detector 2036. The reference detector 2036 provides a reference signal, which can be used to monitor fluctuations in the intensity of the energy beam E emitted by the source 2012. Such fluctuations may be due to drift effects, aging, wear, or other imperfections in the source 2012. The algorithm processor 416 may utilize the reference signal to identify changes in properties of the sample beam Es that are attributable to changes in the emission from the source 2012 and not to the properties of the fluid sample. By so doing, the analyzer 2010 may advantageously reduce possible sources of error in the calculated properties of the fluid sample (e.g., concentration), in other embodiments of the analyzer 2010, the beamsplitter 2022 is not used, and substantially all of the filtered energy beam E,~ propagates to the fluid sample.

[0176] As illustrated in FIG. 20, the sample beam Es propagates along the optical axis X, and a relay lens 2024 transmits the sample beam Es into a sample cell 2048 so that at least a fraction of the sample beam Es is transmitted through at least a portion of the fluid sample in the sample cell 2048. A. sample detector 2030 is positioned along the optical axis X to measure the sample beam Es that has passed through the portion of the fluid sample. An optical element 2028, such as a Jens, may be used to focus or colJimate the sample beam Es onto the sample detector 2030. The sample detector 2030 provides a sample signal that can be used by the algorithm processor 416 as part of the sample analysis.

[0177] In the embodiment of the analyzer 2010 shown in FIG, 20, the sample cell 2048 is located toward the outer circumference of the centrifuge wheel 2050 (which can correspond, for example, to the sample cell holder 820 described herein). The sample cell 2048 preferably comprises windows ihai are substantially transmissive to energy in the sample beam Es. For example, in implementations using mid-infrared energy, the windows may comprise calcium fluoride. As described herein with reference to FIG, 5, the sample cell 2048 is in fluid communication with an injector system that permits filling the sample cell 2048 with a fluid sample (e.g., whole blood) and flushing the sample ceil 2048 (e.g., with saline or a detergent). The injector system may disconnect after filling the sample ceil 2.048 with the fluid sample to permit free spinning of the centrifuge wheel 2050.

[0178] The centrifuge wheel 2050 can be spun by a centrifuge motor 2026. In some embodiments of the analyzer 2010, the fluid sample (e.g., a whole blood sample) is spun at a certain number of revolutions per minute (RPM) for a given length of time to separate blood plasma for spectral analysis. In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at about 7200 RPM. In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at about 5000 RPM or 4500 RPM, In some embodiments, the fluid sample is spun at more than one rate for successive time periods. The length of time can be approximately 5 minutes. In some embodiments, the length of time is approximately 2 minutes. In some embodiments, an anti-clotting agent such as heparin may be added to the fluid sample before centrifuging to reduce clotting. With reference to FIG. 20, the centrifuge wheel 2050 is rotated to a position where the sample cell 2048 intercepts the sample beam Es, allowing energy to pass through the sample cell 2048 to the sample detector 2030.

[0179] The embodiment of the analyzer 2010 illustrated in FIG. 20 advantageously permits direct measurement of the concentration of analyt.es in the plasma sample rather than by inference of the concentration from measurements of a whole blood sample. An additional advantage is that relatively small volumes of fluid may be spectroseopically analyzed. For example, in some embodiments the fluid sample volume is between about 1 μΐ. and 80

Figure imgf000050_0001
and is about 2.5 ,uL in some embodiments. In some embodiments, the sample cell 2048 is disposable and is intended for use with a single patient or for a single measurement.

[0180J In some embodiments, the reference detector 2036 and the sample detector 2.030 comprise broadband pyroelectric detectors. As known in the art, some pyroelectric detectors are sensitive to vibrations. Thus, for example, the output of a pyroelectric infrared detector is the sum of the exposure to infrared radiation and to vibrations of the detector. The sensitivity to vibrations, also known as "microphonics," can introduce a noise component to the measurement of the reference and sample energy beams Er, Es using some pyroelectric infrared detectors. Because it may be desirable for the analyzer 2010 to provide high signal-to-noise ratio measurements, such as, e.g., S/N in excess of l QOdB, some embodiments of the analyzer 2010 utilize one or more vibrational noise reduction apparatus or methods. For example, the analyzer 2010 may be mechanically isolated so that high S/N spectroscopic measurements can be obtained for vibrations below an acceleration of about 1 ,5 G,

[0181] In some embodiments of the analyzer 2010, vibrational noise can be reduced by using a temporally modulated energy source 2012 combined with an output filter. In some embodiments, the energy source 2012 is modulated at a known source frequency, and measurements made by the detectors 2036 and 2030 are filtered using a narrowband filter centered at the source frequency. For example, in some embodiments, the energy output of the source 2012 is sinusoidally modulated at 10 Hz, and outputs of the detectors 2036 and 2030 are filtered using a narrow bandpass filter of less than about 1 Hz centered at 10 Hz. Accordingly, microphonic signals that are not at 10 Hz are significantly attenuated, in some embodiments, the modulation depth of the energy beam E may be greater than 50% such as, for example, 80%. The duty cycle of the beam may be between about 30%> and 70%. The temporal modulation may be sinusoidal or any other waveform, ΐη embodiments utilizing temporally modulated energy sources, detector output may be filtered using a synchronous demodulator and digital filter. The demodulator and filter are software components that may be digitally implemented in a processor such as the algorithm processor 416. Synchronous demodulators, coupled with low pass filters, are often referred to as "lock in amplifiers."

[0182] The analyzer 2010 may also include a vibration sensor 2032 (e.g., one or more accelerometers) disposed near one (or both) of the detectors 2036 and 2030. The output of the vibration sensor 2032 is monitored, and suitable actions are taken if the measured vibration exceeds a vibration threshold. For example, in some embodiments, if the vibration sensor 2032 detects above-threshold vibrations, the system discards any ongoing measurement and "holds off on performing further measurements until the vibrations drop below the threshold. Discarded measurements may be repeated after the vibrations drop below the vibration threshold. In some embodiments, if the duration of the "hold off is sufficiently long, the fluid in the sample cell 2030 is flushed, and a new fluid sample is delivered to the cell 2030 for measurement. The vibration threshold may be selected so that the error in anaiyte measurement is at an acceptable level for vibrations below the threshold, in some embodiments, the threshold corresponds to an error in glucose concentration of 5 mg/'dL. The vibration threshold may be determined individually for each filter 2015.

[0183] Certain embodiments of the analyzer 2010 include a temperature system (not shown in Fig. 20) for monitoring and/or regulating the temperature of system components (such as the detectors 2036, 2030) and/or the fluid sample. Such a iemperature system can include temperature sensors, themioelectrical heat pumps (e.g., a Peltier device), and/or thermistors, as well as a control system for monitoring and/or regulating temperature. In some embodiments, the control system comprises a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) control. For example, in some embodiments, the temperature system is used to regulate the temperature of the detectors 2030, 2036 to a desired operating temperature, such as 35 degrees Celsius.

OPTICAL MEASUREMENT

[0184] The analyzer 2010 illustrated in FIG. 2.0 can be used to determine optical properties of a substance in the sample cell 2048. The substance can include whole blood, plasma, saline, water, air or other substances. In some embodiments, the optical properties include measurements of an absorbance, transsnittance, and/or optical density in the wavelength passbands of some or all of the filters 2015 disposed in the filter wheel 2.018. As described above, a measurement cycle comprises disposing one or more filters 2015 in the energy beasn E for a dwell tisne and measuring a reference signal with the reference detector 2036 and a sample signal with the sample detector 2030. The number of filters 2015 used in the measurement cycle will be denoted by N, and each filter 2015 passes energy in a passband around a center wavelength λ;, where i is an index ranging over the number of filters (e.g., from 1 to N). The set of optical measurements from the sample detector 2.036 in the passbands of the Is! filters 2.015 provide a wavelength-dependent spectrum of the substance in the sample ceil 2048. The spectrum will be denoted by CJX- , where Cs may be a transmittan.ee, absorbance, optical density, or some other measure of an optical property of the substance. In some embodiments, the spectrum is normalized with respect to one or more of the reference signals measured by the reference detector 2.030 and/or with respect to spectra of a reference substance (e.g., air or saline). The measured spectra are communicated to the algorithm processor 416 for calculation of the concentration of the anaiyte(s) of interest in the fluid sample.

[0185] In some embodiments, the analyzer 2010 performs spectroscopic measurements on the fluid sample (known as a "wet" reading) and on one or more reference samples. For example, an "air" reading occurs when the sample detector 2036 measures the sample signal without the sample ceil 2048 in place along the optical axis X. (This can occur, for example, when the opposite opening 1530 is aligned with the optical axis X). A "water" or "saline" reading occurs when the sample ceil 2048 is filled with waier or saline, respectively. The algorithm processor 416 may be programmed io calculate analyte concentration using a combination of these spectral measurements.

[0186] In some embodiments, a pathlength corrected spectrum is calculated using wet, air, and reference readings. For example, the transmittance at wavelength λ;, denoted by T;, may be calculated according to Ί\ (¾(wet)/R,-(wet)) / (S;(air)/R;(air)), where S; denotes the sample signal from the sample detector 2036 and R; denotes the corresponding reference signal from the reference detector 2030. in some embodiments, the algorithm processor 416 calculates the optical density, 0!¾ as a logarithm of the transmittance, e.g., according to OD, = -Log(Ti). In one implementation, the analyzer 2010 takes a set of wet readings in each of the N filter passbands and then takes a set of air readings in each of the filter passbands. in other embodiments, the analyzer 2010 may take an air reading before (or after) the corresponding wet reading.

[0187] The optical density GD; is the product of the absorption coefficient at wavelength λ;; <¾, times the pathlength L over which the sample energy beam Es interacts with the substance in the sample cell 2048, e.g., OD; = ¾ L. The absorption coefficient <¾ of a substance may be written as the product of an absorptivity per mole times a molar concentration of the substance. FIG. 20 schematically illustrates the pathlength L of the sample cell 2048. The pathlength L may be determined from spectral measurements made when the sample cell 2048 is filled with a reference substance. For example, because the absorption coefficient for water (or saline) is known, one or more water (or saline) readings can be used to determine the pathlength L from measurements of the transmittance (or optical density) through the cell 2048. in some embodiments, several readings are taken in different wavelength passbands, and a curve-fitting procedure is used to estimate a best-fit pathlength L. The pathlength L may be estimated using other methods including, for example, measuring interference fringes of light passing through an empty sample cell 2048.

[0188] The pathlength L may be used to determine the absorption coefficients of the fluid sample at each wavelength. Molar concentration of an anaiyte of interest can be determined from the absorption coefficient and the known molar absorptivity of the anaiyte. In some embodiments, a sample measurement cycle comprises a saline reading (at one or more wavelengths), a set of N wet readings (taken, for example, through a sample cell 2048 containing saline solution), followed by a set of N air readings (taken, for example, through the opposite opening 1530). As discussed above, the sample measurement cycle can be performed in a given length of time that may depend, at least in part, on filter dwell times. For example, the measurement cycle may take five minutes when the filter dwell times are about five seconds. In some embodiments, the measurement cycle may take about two minutes when the filter dwell times are about two seconds. After the sample measurement cycle is completed, a detergent cleaner may be flushed through the sample cell 2048 to reduce buildup of organic matter (e.g., proteins) on the windows of the sample cell 2048. The detergent is then flushed to a waste bladder.

[0189] In some embodiments, the system stores information related to the spectral measurements so that the information is readily available for recall by a user. The stored information can include wavelength-dependent spectral measurements (including fluid sample, air, and/or saline readings), computed analyte values, system temperatures and electrical properties (e.g., voltages and currents), and any other data related to use of the system (e.g., system alerts, vibration readings, S/N ratios, etc.). The stored information may be retained in the system for a time period such as, for example, 30 days. After this time period, the stored information may be communicated to an archival data storage system and then deleted from the system. In some embodiments, the stored information is communicated to the archival data storage system via wired or wireless methods, e.g., over a hospital information system (HIS).

ANALYTE ANALYSIS

[0190 J The algorithm processor 416 (Fig. 4) (or any other suitable processor or processors) may be configured to receive from the analyzer 2010 the wavelength- dependent optical measurements Cs( ;) of the fluid sample. In some embodiments, the optical measurements comprise spectra such as, for example, optical densities ODj measured in each of the N filter passbands centered around wavelengths λ;. The optical measurements CS(A,) are communicated to the processor 416, which analyzes the optical measurements to detect and quantify one or more analvtes in the presence of interferents. In some embodiments, one or more poor quality optical measurements Cs(l,) are rejected (e.g., as having a S/N ratio that is too low), and the analysis performed on the remaining, sufficiently high-quality measurements. In another embodiment, additional optical measurements of the fluid sample are taken by the analyzer 2010 to replace one or more of the poor quality measurements.

[0191] Interferents can comprise components of a material sample being analyzed for an analyte, where the presence of the interferent affects the quantification of the analyte. Thus, for example, in the spectroscopic analysis of a sample to determine an analyte concentration, an interferent could be a compound having spectroscopic features that overlap with those of the analyte, in at least a portion of the wavelength range of the measurements. The presence of such an interferent can introduce errors in the quantification of the analyte. More specifically, the presence of one or more interferents can affect the sensitivity of a measurement technique to the concentration of analytes of interest in a material sample, especially when the system is calibrated in the absence of, or with an unknown amount of, the interferent,

[0192] Independently of or in combination with the attributes of interferents described above, interferents can be classified as being endogenous (i.e., originating within the body) or exogenous (i.e., introduced from or produced outside the body). As an example of these classes of interferents, consider the analysis of a blood sample (or a blood component sample or a blood plasma sample) for the analyte glucose. Endogenous interferents include those blood components having origins within the body that affect the quantification of glucose, and can include water, hemoglobin, blood cells, and any other component that naturally occurs in blood. Exogenous interferents include those blood components having origins outside of the body that affect the quantification of glucose, and can include items administered to a person, such as medicaments, drags, foods or herbs, whether administered orally, intravenously, topically, etc.

[0193] Independently of or in combination with the attributes of interferents described above, interferents can comprise components which are possibly, but not necessarily, present in the sample type under analysis. In the example of analyzing samples of blood or blood plasma drawn from patients who are receiving medical treatment, a medicament such as acetaminophen is possibly, but not necessarily, present in this sample type. In contrast, water is necessarily present in such blood or plasma samples.

[0194] Certain disclosed analysis methods are particularly effective if each analyte and interferent has a characteristic signature in the measurement (e.g., a characteristic spectroscopic feature), and if the measurement is approximately affme (e.g., includes a linear term and an offset) with respect to the concentration of each analyte and interferent. In such methods, a calibration process is used to determine a set of one or more calibration coefficients and a set of one or more optional offset values that permit the quantitative estimation of an analyte. For example, the calibration coefficients and the offsets may be used to calculate an analyte concentration from spectroscopic measurements of a material sample (e.g., the concentration of glucose in biood plasma). In some of these methods, the concentration of the analyte is estimated by multiply ing the calibration coefficient by a measurement value (e.g., an optical density) to estimate the concentration of the analyte. Both the calibration coefficient and measurement can comprise arrays of numbers. For example, in some embodiments, the measurement comprises spectra Γ3(λ;) measured at the wavelengths λ÷, and the calibration coefficient and optional offset comprise an array of values corresponding to each wavelength λι. in some embodiments, as further described below, a hybrid linear analysis (HLA) technique is used to estimate analyte concentration in the presence of a set of interferents, while retaining a high degree of sensitivity to the desired analyte. The data used to accommodate the set of possible interferents can include (a) signatures of each of the members of the family of potential additional substances and (b) a typical quantitative level at which each additional substance, if present, is likely to appear. In some embodiments, the calibration coefficient (and optional offset) are adjusted to minimize or reduce the sensitivity of the calibration to the presence of interferents that are identified as possibly being present in the fluid sample.

[0195] In some embodiments, the analyte analysis method uses a set of training spectra each having known analyte concentration and produces a calibration that minimizes the variation in estimated analyte concentration with interferent concentration. The resulting calibration coefficient indicates sensitivity of the measurement to analyte concentration. The training spectra need not include a spectru from the individual whose analyte concentration is to be determined. That is, the term "training" when used in reference to the disclosed methods does not require training using measurements from the individual whose analyte concentration will be estimated (e.g., by analyzing a bodily fluid sample drawn from the individual).

[0196] Several terms are used herein to describe the analyte analysis process. The term "Sample Population" is a broad term and includes, without limitation, a large number of samples having measurements that are used in the computation of calibration values (e.g., calibration coefficients and optional offsets). In some embodiments, the term Sample Population comprises measurements (such as, e.g., spectra) from individuals and may comprise one or more analyte measurements determined from those same individuals. Additional demographic information may be available for the individuals whose sample measurements are included in the Sample Population, For an embodiment involving the spectroscopic determination of glucose concentration, the Sample Population measurements may include a spectrum (measurement) and a glucose concentration (analyte measurement). [0197] Various embodiments of Sample Populations may be used in various embodiments of the systems and methods described herein. Several examples of Sample Populations will now be described. These examples are intended to illustrate certain aspects of possible Sample Population embodiments but are not intended to limit the types of Sample Populations that may be generated. In certain embodiments, a Sample Population may include samples from one or more of the example Sample Populations described below.

[0198] In some embodiments of the systems and methods described herein, one or more Sample Populations are included in a '"Population Database." The Population Database may be implemented and/or stored on a computer-readable medium, m certain embodiments, the systems and methods may access the Population Database using wired and/or wireless techniques. Certain embodiments may utilize several different Population Databases that are accessible locally and/or remotely. In some embodiments, the Population Database includes one or more of the example Sample Populations described below. In some embodiments, two or more databases can be combined into a single database, and in other embodiments, any one database can be divided into multiple databases.

[0199] An example Sample Population may comprise samples from individuals belonging to one or more demographic groups including, for example, ethnicity, nationality, gender, age, etc. Demographic groups may be established for any- suitable set of one or more distinctive factors for the group including, for example, medical, cultural, behavioral, biological, geographical, religious, and genealogical traits. For example, in certain embodiments, a Sample Population includes samples from individuals from a specific ethnic group (e.g., Caucasians, Hispanics, Asians, African Americans, etc.). In another embodiment, a Sample Population includes samples from individuals of a specific gender or a specific race. In some embodiments, a Sample Population includes samples from individuals belonging to more than one demographic group (e.g., samples from Caucasian women).

[0280] Another example Sample Population can comprise samples from individuals having one or more medical conditions. For example, a Sample Population may include samples from individuals who are healthy and unmedicated (sometimes referred to as a Normal Population). In some embodiments, the Sample Population includes samples from individuals having one or more health conditions (e.g., diabetes). In some embodiments, the Sample Population includes samples from individuals taking one or more medications, in certain embodiments, Sample Population includes samples from individuals diagnosed to have a certain medical condition or from individuals being treated for certain medical conditions or some combination thereof. The Sample Population may include samples from individuals such as, for example, ICU patients, maternity patients, and so forth.

0201J An example Sample Population may comprise samples that have the same interferent or the same type of interferents. In some embodiments, a Sample Population can comprise multiple samples, all lacking an interferent or a ty e of interferent. For example, a Sample Population may comprise samples that have no exogenous interferents, that have one or more exogenous interferents of either known or unknown concentration, and so forth. The number of interferents in a sample depends on the measurement and analyte(s) of interest, and may number, in general, from zero to a very large number (e.g., greater than 300). All of the interferents typically are not expected to be present in a particular material sample, and in many cases, a smaller number of interferents (e.g., 0, 1 , 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, or 25) may be used in an analysis. In certain embodiments, the number of interferents used in the analysis is less than or equal to the number of wavelength-dependent measurements N in the spectrum Cs( A.;).

[0282] Certain embodiments of the systems and methods described herein are capable of analyzing a material sample using one or more Sample Populations (e.g., accessed from the Population Database). Certain such embodiments may use information regarding some or all of the interferents which may or may not be present in the material sample. In some embodiments, a list of one or more possible interferents, referred to herein as forming a "Library of Interferents," can be compiled. Each interferent in the Library can be referred to as a "Librar Interferent." The Library Interferents may include exogenous interferents and endogenous interferents that may be present in a material sample. For example, an interferent may be present due to a medical condition causing abnormally high concentrations of the exogenous and endogenous interferents. In some embodiments, the Library of Interferents may not include one or more interferents that are known to be present in all samples. Thus, for example, water, which is a glucose interferent for many spectroscopic measurements, may not be included in the Library of Interferents. In certain embodiments, the systems and methods use samples in the Sample Population to train calibration methods. [0203] The material sample being measured, for example a fluid sample in the sample cell 2048, may also include one or more Library lnterferents which may include, but is not limited to, an exogenous mterferent or an endogenous mterferent. Examples of exogenous mterferent can include medications, and examples of endogenous mterferents can include urea in persons suffering from renal failure. In addition to components naturally found in the blood, the ingestion or injection of some medicines or illicit drugs can result in very high and rapidly changing concentrations of exogenous mterferents.

[0284] In some embodiments, measurements of a material sample (e.g., a bodily fluid sample), samples in a Sample Population, and the Library lnterferents comprise spectra (e.g., infrared spectra). The spectra obtained from a sample and/or an mterferent may be temperature dependent. In some embodiments, it may be beneficial to calibrate for temperatures of the individual samples in the Sample Population or the mterferents in the Library of lnterferents. In some embodiments, a temperature calibration procedure is used to generate a temperature calibration factor ihai substantially accounts for the sample temperature. For example, the sample temperature can be measured, and the temperature calibration factor can be applied to the Sample Population and/or the Library Interferent spectral data. In some embodiments, a water or saline spectrum is subtracted from the sample spectrum to account for temperature effects of water in the sample.

[0285] In other embodiments, temperature calibration may not be used. For example, if Library Interferent spectra, Sample Population spectra, and sample spectra are obtained at approximately the same temperature, an error in a predicted analyte concentration may be within an acceptable tolerance. If the temperature at which a material sample spectrum is measured is within, or near, a temperature range (e.g., several degrees Celsius) at which the plurality of Sample Population spectra are obtained, then some analysis methods may be relatively insensitive to temperature variations. Temperature calibration may optionally be used in such analysis methods.

Systems and Methods for Estimating Analyte Concentration in the Presence of lnterferents

[0286] Figure 21 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an embodiment of a method 2100 for estimating the concentration of an analyte in the presence of mterferents. In block 21 10, a measurement of a sample is obtained, and in block 2120 data relating to the obtained measurement is analyzed to identify possible mterferents to the analyte. In block 2130, a model is generated for predicting the analyte concentration in the presence of the identified possible iiiterferents, and in block 2140 the model is used to estimate the analyte concentration in the sample from the measurement. In certain embodiments of the method 2100, the model generated in block 2130 is selected to reduce or minimize the effect of identified iiiterferents that are not present in a general population of which the sample is a member.

[0207] An example embodiment of the method 2100 of Figure 21 for the determination of an analyte (e.g., glucose) in a blood sample will now be described. This example embodiment is intended to illustrate various aspects of the method 2100 but is not intended as a limitation on the scope of the method 2100 or on the range of possible analytes. In this example, the sample measurement in block 21 10 is an absorption spectrum, Cs(A.;), of a measurement sample S that has, in general, one analyte of interest, glucose, and one or more interferents.

[0288] In block 2120, a statistical comparison of the absorption spectrum of ihe sample S with a spectrum of the Sample Population and combinations of individual Library Interferent spectra is performed. The statistical comparison provides a list of Library Interferents that are possibly contained in sample S and can include either no Library Interferents or one or more Librar Interferents. In this example, in block 2130, one or more sets of spectra are generated from spectra of the Sample Population and their respective known analyte concentrations and known spectra of the Library Interferents identified in block 2120. In block 2130, the generated spectra are used to calculate a model for predicting the analyte concentration from the obtained measurement. In some embodiments, the model comprises one or more calibration coefficients κ(λ;) that can be used with the sample measurements Cs(li) to provide an estimate of the analyte concentration, gcst. In block 2140, the estimated analyte concentration is determined form the model generated in block 2130. For example, in some embodiments of HLA, the estimated analyte concentration is calculated according to a linear formula: gesi = K(Xt)*Cs( i). Because the absorption measurements and calibration coefficients may represent arrays of numbers, the multiplication operation indicated in the preceding formula may comprise a sum of the products of the measurements and coefficients (e.g., an inner product or a matrix product). In some embodiments, the calibration coefficient is determined so as to have reduced or minimal sensitivity to the presence of the identified Library Interferents. [0209 J An example embodiment of block 2120 of the method 2100 will now be described with reference to Figure 22. In this example, block 2120 includes forming a statistical Sample Population model (block 2210), assembling a library of mterferent data (block 2220), assembling all subsets of size K of the library interferents (block 2225), comparing the obtained measurement and statistical Sample Population model with data for each set of interferents from an interferent library (block 2230), performing a statistical test for the presence of each interferent from the interferent library (block 2240), and identifying possible interferents that pass the statistical test (block 2.250). The size K of the subsets may be an integer such as, for example, 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, or more. The acts of block 222.0 can be performed once or can be updated as necessary, in certain embodiments, the acts of blocks 2230, 2240, and 2250 are performed sequentially for all subsets of Library interferents that pass the statistical test (block 22.40). In this example, in block 2210, a Sample Population Database is formed that includes a statistically large Sample Population of individual spectra taken over the same wavelength range as the sample spectrum, Cs(A.;). The Database also includes an analyte concentration corresponding to each spectrum. For example, if there are P Sample Population spectra, then the spectra in the Database can be represented as C = {C;, C2, Cp}, and the analyte concentration corresponding to each spectrum can be represented as g = {g;, g?, .... gp} . In some embodiments, the Sample Population does not have any of the Librasy Interferents present, and the material sample has interferents contained in the Sample Population and one or more of the Library interferents.

[0210J In some embodiments of block 2210, the statistical sample model comprises a mean spectrum and a covariance matrix calculated for the Sample Population. For example, if each spectrum measured at N wavelengths λ,- is represented by an N x 1 array, C, then the mean spectrum, μ, is an N x 1 array having values at each wavelength averaged over the range of spectra in the Sample Population, The covariance matrix, V, is calculated as the expected value of the deviation between C and μ and can be written as V = Ε((Ομ) (C-μ) ') where Ε(·) represents the expected value and the superscript T denotes transpose. In other embodiments, additional statistical parameters may be included in the statistical model of the Sample Population spectra.

[0211] Additionally, a Library of Interferents may be assembled in block 2220. A number of possible interferents can be identified, for example, as a list of possible medications or foods that might be ingested by the population of patients at issue. Spectra of these interferents can be obtained, and a range of expected interferent concentrations in the blood, or other expected sample material, can be estimated, in certain embodiments, the Librar '- of Interferents includes, for each of "M" interferents, the absorption spectrum normalized to unit interferent concentration of each interferent, IF - {TFj, IF2, IFM}, and a range of concentrations for each interferent from Tmax = {Tmaxi, Tmax2, Tmaxivl) to Tmin = {Tmini, Tmin2, Tmi M). Information in the Library may be assembled once and accessed as needed. For example, the Library and the statistical model of the Sample Population may be stored in a storage device associated with the algorithm processor 416 (see, Fig. 4).

[0212] Continuing in block 22.25, the algorithm processor 416 assembles one or more subsets comprising a number K of spectra taken from the Library of Interferents. The number K may be an integer such as, for example, 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, or more. In some embodiments, the subsets comprise all combinations of the M Library spectra taken K at a time. In these embodiments, the number of subsets having K spectra is M! /' ( K! (M-K)! ), where ! represents the factorial function.

[0213] Continuing in block 2230, the obtained measurement data (e.g., the sample spectrum) and the statistical Sample Population model (e.g., the mean spectrum and the covariance matrix) are compared with data for each subset of interferents determined in block 22.25 in order to determine the presence of possible interferents in the sample (block 2240). In some embodiments, the staiistical test for the presence of an interferent subset in block 22.40 comprises determining the concentrations of each subset of interferences that minimize a statistical measure of "distance" between a modified spectrum of the material sample and the statistical model of the Sample Population (e.g., the mean μ and the covariance V). The term "concentration" used in this context refers to a computed value, and, in some embodiments, that computed value may not correspond to an actual concentration. The concentrations may be calculated numerically. In some embodiments, the concentrations are calculated by algebraically solving a set of linear equations. The statistical measure of distance may comprise the well-known Mahalanobis distance (or square of the Mahalanobis distance) and/or some other suitable statistical distance metric (e.g., Hotellmg's T-square statistic). In certain implementations, the modified spectrum is given by C'S(T) = Cs - IF-T where T = (Tj, T2, ...TK)T is a K- dimensional column vector of interferent concentrations and IF = {IF-,, IF?., ... IFK} represents the K interferent absorption spectra of the subset. In some embodiments, concentration of the i interferent is assumed to be in a range from a minimum value, Tmioi, to a maximum value, Tmax,. The value of Tmioi may be zero, or may be a value between zero and Tmax;, such as a fraction of Tmax;, or may be a negative value. Negative values represent mterferent concentrations that are smaller than baseline mterferent values in the Sample Population.

[0214] In block 2250, a list of a number s of possible interferent subsets ξ may be identified as the particular subsets that pass one or more statistical tests (in block 2240) for being present in the material sample. One or more statistical tests may be used, alone or in combination, to identify the possible interferents. For example, if a statistical test indicates that an f1 interferent is present in a concentration outside the range Tm ii to Tmax;, then this result may be used to exclude the im interferent from the list of possible interferents. In some embodiments, only the single most probable interferent subset is included on the fist, for example, the subset having the smallest statistical distance (e.g., Mahalanohis distance). In an embodiment, the list includes the subsets ξ having statistical distances smaller than a threshold value. In certain embodiments, the list includes a number s of subsets having the smallest statistical distances, e.g., the list comprises the "best" candidate subsets. The number Ns may be any suitable integer such as 10, 20, 50, 1 00, 200, or more. An advantage of selecting the "best" Ns subsets is reduced computational burden on the algorithm processor 416. In some embodiments, the list includes all the Library Interferents. In certain such embodiments, the list is selected to comprise combinations of the Ns subsets taken L at a time. For example, in some embodiments, pairs of subsets are taken (e.g., L = 2). An advantage of selecting pairs of subsets is that pairing captures the most likely combinations of interferents and the "best" candidates are included multiple times in the list of possible interferents. In embodiments in which combinations of L subsets are selected, the number of combinations of subsets in the list of possible interferent subsets is Ns' / (L! (Ns-L)!).

[02151 In other embodiments, the list of possible interferent subsets ξ is determined using a combination of some or all of the above criteria. In another embodiment, the list of possible interferent subsets ς includes each of the subsets assembled in block 2225. Many selection criteria are possible for (he list of possible interferent subsets ξ.

[0216] Returning to Figure 21 , the method 2100 continues in block 2130 where analyse concentration is estimated in the presence of the possible interferent subsets ς determined in block 2250. Figure 23 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an example embodiment of the acts of block 2130. in block 2310, synthesized Sample Population measurements are generated to form an Interferent Enhanced Spectral Database (IESD). Tn block 2360, the TESD and known analyte concentrations are used to generate calibration coefficients for the selected interferent subset. As indicated in block 2365, blocks 2310 and 2360 may be repeated for each interferent subset ξ identified in the list of possible interferent subsets (e.g., in block 2250 of Figure 22). In this example embodiment, when all the interferent subsets ξ have been processed, the method continues in block 2370, wherein an average calibration coefficient is applied to the measured spectra to determine a set of analyte concentrations.

[0217] In one example embodiment for block 2310, synthesized Sample Population spectra are generated by adding random concentrations of each interferent in one of the possible interferent subsets ς. These spectra are referred to herein as an Interferent-Enhanced Spectral Database or IESD. In one example method, the IESD is formed as follows. A plurality of Randomly-Scaled Single Interferent Spectra (RSIS) are formed for each interferent in the interferent subset ξ. Each RSIS is formed by combinations of the interferent having spectrum IF multiplied by the maximum concentration Tmax, which is scaled by a random factor between zero and one. In certain embodiments, the scaling places the maximum concentration at the 95" percentile of a log-normal distribution in order to generate a wide range of concentrations. In some embodiments, the log-normal distribution has a standard deviation equal to half of its mean value.

[0218] In this example method, individual RSIS are then combined independently and in random combinations to fonn a large family of Combination Interferent Spectra (CIS), with each spectrum in the CIS comprising a random combination of RSIS, selected from the full set of identified Library Interferents. An advantage of this method of selecting the CIS is that it produces adequate variability with respect to each interferent, independently across separate interferents.

[0219] The CIS and replicates of the Sample Population spectra are combined to form the IESD. Since the interferent spectra and the Sample Population spectra may have been obtained from measurements having different optical pathlengths, the CIS may be scaled to the same pathiength as the Sample Population spectra. The Sample Population Database is then replicated R. times, where R depends on factors including the size of the Database and the number of interferents. The IESD includes R copies of each of the Sample Population spectra, where one copy is the original Sample Population Data, and the remaining R-1 copies each have one randomly chosen CIS spectra added. Accordingly, each of the IESD spectra has an associated analyte concentration from the Sample Population spectra used to form the particular IESD spectrum, in some embodiments, a 10-fold replication of the Sample Population Database is used for 130 Sample Population spectra obtained from 58 different individuals and 18 Library interferents. A smaller replication factor may be used if there is greater spectral variety among the Library Interferent spectra, and a larger replication factor may be used if there is a greater number of Library Interferents.

[0220] After the IESD is generated in block 2310, in block 2360, the IESD spectra and the known, random concentrations of the subset interferents are used to generate a calibration coefficient for estimating the analyte concentration from a sample measurement. The calibration coefficient is calculated in some embodiments using a hybrid linear analysis (HLA) technique. In certain embodiments, the HLA technique uses a reference analyte spectrum to construct a set of spectra that are free of the desired analyte, projecting the analyte's spectrum orthogonally away from the space spanned by the analyte-free calibration spectra, and normalizing the result to produce a unit response. Further description of embodiments of HLA techniques may be found in, for example, "Measurement of Analytes in Human Serum and Whole Blood Samples by Near-Infrared Raman Spectroscopy," Chapter 4, Andrew J. Berger, Ph. D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1998, and "An Enhanced Algorithm for Linear Multivariate Calibration," by Andrew J. Berger, et al.. Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 70, No. 3, February 1 , 1998, pp. 623-627, the entirety of each of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. In other embodiments, the calibration coefficients may be calculated using other techniques including, for example, regression techniques such as, for example, ordinary least squares (OLS), partial least squares (PLS), and/or principal component analysis.

[0221] In block 2365, the processor 416 determines whether additional interferent subsets ξ remain in the list of possible interferent subsets. If another subset is present in the list, the acts in blocks 2310-2360 are repeated for the next subset of interferents using different random concentrations. In some embodiments, blocks 2310- 2360 are performed for only the most probable subset on the list. [0222] The calibration coefficient determined in block 2360 corresponds to a single interferent subset ξ from the list of possible interferent subsets and is denoted herein as a single-interferent-subset calibration coefficient κ?Λ¾(ξ). Tn this example method, after all subsets ξ have been processed, the method continues in block 2370, in which the single-interferent-subset calibration coefficient is applied to the measured spectra Cs to determine an estimated, single-interferent-subset analyte concentration, g(§) = K'aVgi¾) "Cs, for the interferent subset ξ. The set of the estimated, single-interferent- subset analyte concentrations g( ) for all subsets in the list may be assembled into an array of single-interferent-subset concentrations. As noted above, in some embodiments the blocks 2310-2370 are performed once for the most probable single-interferent-subset on the list (e.g., the array of single-interferent analyte concentrations has a single member).

[0223] Returning to block 2140 of Figure 21, the array of single-interferent- subset concentrations, g(£), is combined to determine an estimated analyte concentration, gest, for the material sample. In certain embodiments, a weighting function ρ(ς) is determined for each of the interferent subsets ξ on the list of possible interferent subsets. The weighting functions may be normalized such that \ p( ) = 1, where the sum is over all subsets ξ that have been processed from the list of possible interferent subsets. In some embodiments, the weighting functions can be related to the minimum Mahalanobis distance or an optimal concentration. In certain embodiments, the weighting function ρ(ξ), for each subset ξ, is selected to be a constant, e.g., 1/Ns where Ns is the number of subsets processed from the list of possible interferent subsets. In other embodiments, other weighting functions ρ(ξ) can be selected.

[0224] In certain embodiments, the estimated analyte concentration, gesr, is determined (in block 2140) by combining the single-interferent-subset estimates, g(£), and the weighting functions, ρ(ξ), to generate an average analyte concentration. The average concentration may be computed according to gest =∑ g(¾ ρ(ξ), where the sum is over the interferent subsets processed from the list of possible interferent subsets, in some embodiments, the weighting function ρ(ς) is a constant value for each subset (e.g., a standard arithmetic average is used for determining average analyte concentration). By testing the above described example method on simulated data, it has been found that the average analyte concentration advantageously has errors that may be reduced in comparison to other methods (e.g., methods using only a single most probable mterferent).

[0225] Although the flowchart in Figure 21 schematically illustrates an embodiment of the method 2100 performed with reference to the blocks 2110-2140 described herein, in other embodiments, the method 2.100 can be performed differently. For example, some or all of the blocks 21 10-2140 can be combined, performed in a different order than shown, and/or the functions of particular blocks may be reallocated to other blocks and/or to different blocks. Embodiments of the method 2.100 may utilize different blocks than are shown in Figure 21.

[0226] For example, in some embodiments of the method 2100, the calibration coefficient is computed without synthesizing spectra and/or partitioning the data into calibration sets and iest sets. Such embodiments are referred to herein as "Parameter-Free interferent Rejection" (PFIR) methods. In one example embodiment using PFIR, for each of the possible interferent subsets ξ, the following calculations may be performed to compute an estimate of a calibration coefficient for each subset ξ. An average concentration may be estimated according to gest =∑ g(¾ ρ(ξ), where the sum is over the interferent subsets processed from the list of possible interferent subsets.

[0227] An example of an alternative embodiment of block 2130 includes the following steps and calculations.

[0228] Step 1 : For a subset's N!F interferents, form a scaled interferent spectra matrix. In certain embodiments, the scaled interferent spectra matrix is the product of an interferent spectral matrix, IF, multiplied by an interferent concentration matrix, T'max, and can be written as: IF Tmax- In certain such embodiments, the interferent concentration matrix Tmax is a diagonal matrix having entries given by the maximum plasma concentrations for the various interferents.

[0229] Step 2: Calculate a covariance for the interferent component. If X denotes the IESD, the covariance of X, covfX), is defined as the expectation E((X - mean(X))(X - meaniX))1) and is

cov(X) « X X1 / (N- 1 ) - mean(X) meanfX)1 .

As described above, the IESD (e.g., X) is obtained as a combination of Sample Population Spectra, C, with Combination Interferent Spectra (CIS): X) = Q + IF) ¾, therefore the covariance is:

cov(X) « C CT /(N-1 ) + IF Ξ≡'f IF1 /(N-1) - mean(X) mean(X)T , which can he written as,

cov(X) K cov(C) + IF covf Ξ ) IFT .

If the weights in the weighting matrix Ξ are independent and identically distributed, the covariance of Ξ, cov( Ξ ), is a diagonal matrix having along the diagonal the variance, v, of the samples in Ξ. The last equation may be written as

cov(X) « Vo + v Φ,

where Vo is the covariance of the original sample population and Φ is the covariance of the IF spectral set.

[0230] Step 3: The group's covariance may be at least partially corrected for the presence of a single replicate of the Sample Population spectra with the IESD as formed from !F replicates of the Sample Population Spectra with Combined Interferent Spectra. This partial correction may be achieved by multiplying the second term in the covariance formula given above by a correction factor p:

V = Vo + p v Φ,

where p is a scalar weighting function that depends on the number of interferenis in the group. In some embodiments, the scalar weighting function is p - JF/( JF+1). In certain embodiments, the variance v of the weights is assumed to be the variance of a log-normal random variable having a 95th percentile at a value of 1.0, and a standard deviation equal to half of the mean value.

[0231] Step 4: The eigenvectors and the corresponding eigenvalues of the covariance matrix V are determined using any suitable linear algebraic methods. The number of eigenvectors (and eigenvalues) is equal to the number of wavelengths L in the spectral measurements. The eigenvectors may be sorted based on decreasing order of their corresponding eigenvalues.

[0232] Step 5: The matrix of eigenvectors is decomposed so as to provide an orthogonal matrix Q. For example, in some embodiments, a QR-decomposition is performed, thereby yielding the matrix Q having orthonormal columns and rows.

[0233] Step 6: The following matrix operations are performed on the orthogonal matrix Q. For n = 2 to L- 1 , the product Pl n = Q(:, 1 :n) Q(i, 1 in) τ is calculated, where Q(:, l :n) denotes the submatrix comprising the first n columns of the full matrix Q. The orthogonal projection, P , away from the space spanned by Q(:,l :n) is determined by subtracting Pl !„ from the LxL identity matrix I. The ntjJ calibration vector is then determined from κη = P '„ o¾ / αχ ίΡ a¾ and the n* error variance En is determined as the projection of the full covariance V onto the subspace spanned by κη as follows: En η T V κη.

[0234] The steps 4-6 of this example are an embodiment of the HLA technique.

[0235] In some embodiments, the calibration coefficient κ is selected as the calibration vector corresponding to the minimum error variance En. Thus, for example, the average group calibration coefficient κ may be found by searching among all the error variances for the error variance Ea that has the minimum value. The calibration coefficient is then selected as the n:h calibration vector κη corresponding to the minimum error variance En. In other embodiments, the calibration coefficient is determined by averaging some or all of the calibration vectors κ.

Examples of Algorithm Results and Effects of Sample Population

[0236] Embodiments of the above-described methods have been used to estimate blood plasma glucose concentrations in humans. Four example experiments will now be described. The population of individuals from whom samples were obtained for analysis (estimation of glucose concentration) will be referred to as the "target population." Infrared spectra obtained from the target population will be referred to as the "target spectra." In the four example experiments, the target population included 41 intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Fifty-five samples were obtained from the target population.

Example Experiment 1

[0237] In this example experiment, a partial least squares (PLS) regression method was applied to the infrared target spectra of the target patients' blood plasma to obtain the glucose estimates. In example experiment 1 , estimated glucose concentration was not corrected for effects of interferents. The Sample Population used for the analysis included infrared spectra and independently measured glucose concentrations for 92 individuals selected from the general population. This Sample Population will be referred to as a "Normal Population."

'Example Experiment 2

[0238] In example experiment 2, an embodiment of the Parameter-Free Interferent Rejection (PFIR) method was used to estimate glucose concentration for the same target population of patients in example experiment 1. The Sample Population was the Normal Population. Tn this example, calibration for Library Interferents was applied to the measured target spectra. The Library of Interferents included spectra of the 59 substances listed below:

Figure imgf000070_0001

Table 2 - Library of Interfe

[0239] In some embodiments, the calibration data set is determined according to two criteria: the calibration method itself (e.g., HLA, PLS, OLS, PFIR) and the intended application of the method. The calibration data set may comprise spectra and corresponding analyte levels derived from a set of plasma samples from the Sample Population. In some embodiments, e.g., those where an HLA calibration method is used, the calibration data set may also include spectra of the analyte of interest.

[024(1] In the example experiments 1 and 2, the Sample Population was the Normal Population. Thus, samples were drawn from a population of normal individuals who did not have identifiable medical conditions that might affect the spectra of their plasma samples. For example, the sample plasma spectra typically did not show effects of high levels of medications or other substances (e.g., ethanol), or effects of chemicals that are indicative of kidney or liver malfunction.

[0241] In some embodiments, an analysis method may calibrate for deviations from the distribution defined by the calibration plasma spectra by identifying a "base" set of interferent spectra likely to be responsible for the deviation. The analysis method may then recalibrate with respect to an enhanced spectral data set. In some embodiments, the enhancement can be achieved by including the identified interferent spectra into the calibration plasma spectra. When it is anticipated that the target population may have been administered significant amounts of substances not present in the samples of the calibration set, or when the target population have many distinct interferents, estimation of the interferents present in the target spectrum may be subject to a large degree of uncertainty. In some cases, this may cause anafyte estimation to be subject to errors.

[0242] Accordingly, in certain embodiments, the calibration data set may be enhanced beyond the base of "normal" samples to include a population of samples intended to be more representative of the target population. The enhancement of the calibration set may be generated, in some embodiments, by including samples from a sufficiently diverse range of individuals in order to represent the range of likely interferents (both in type and in concentration) and/or the normal variability in underlying plasma characteristics. The enhancement may, additionally or alternatively, be generated by synthesizing interferent spectra having a range of concentrations as described above (see, e.g., discussion of block 2310 in FIG. 2.3). Using the enhanced calibration set may reduce the error in estimating the anaiyte concentration in the target spectra.

Example Experiments 3 and 4

[0243] Example experiments 3 and 4 use the analysis methods of example experiments 1 and 2, respectively (PLS without interferent correction and PFIR with interferent correction). However, example experiments 3 and 4 use a Sample Population having blood plasma spectral characteristics different from the Normal Population used in example experiments 1 and 2. In example experiments 3 and 4, the Sample Population was modified to include spectra of both the Normal Population and spectra of an additional population of 55 ICU patients. These spectra will be referred to as the "Normai+Target Spectra." In experiments 3 and 4, the ICU patients included Surgical ICU patients, Medical ICU patients as well as victims of severe trauma, including a large proportion of patients who had suffered major blood loss. Major blood loss may- necessitate replacement of the patient's total blood volume multiple times during a single day and subsequent treatment of the patient via electrolyte and/or fluid replacement therapies. Major blood loss may also require administration of plasma -expanding medications. Major blood loss may lead to significant deviations from the blood plasma spectra representative of a Normal Population. The population of 55 ICU patients (who provided the Target Spectra) has some similarities to the individuals for whom the analyses in experiments 1-4 were performed (e.g., all were ICU patients), but in these experiments, target spectra from individuals in the target population were not included in the Target Spectra.

[0244] Results of example experiments 1 -4 are shown in the following table. The glucose concentrations estimated from the analysis method were compared to independently determined glucose measurements to provide an average prediction error and a standard deviation of the average prediction error. The table demonstrates that independent of the Sample Population used (e.g., either the Normal Population or the ormal+Target Population), calibrating for interferents reduces both the average prediction error and the standard deviation (e.g., compare the results for experiment 2 to the results for experiment 1 and compare the results for experiment 4 to the results for experiment 3). The table further demonstrates that independent of the analysis method used (e.g., either PES or PFIR), using a Sample Population with more similarity to the target population (e.g., the Normal+Target Population) reduces both the average prediction error and the standard deviation (e.g., compare the results for experiment 3 to the results for experiment 1 and compare the results for experiment 4 to the results for experiment 2).

Figure imgf000072_0001

Table 3 - Experiments 1 -4

[0245] [0214] Accordingly, embodiments of analysis methods that use a Sample Population that includes both normal spectra and spectra from individuals similar to those of the target population and that calibrate for possible interferents provide a good match between the estimated glucose concentration and the measured glucose concentration. As discussed abo ve, a suitable Sample Population may be assembled from the Population Database in order to include normal spectra plus suitable target spectra from individuals that match a desired target population including, for example, TCU patients, trauma patients, a particular demographic group, a group having a common medical condition (e.g., diabetes), and so forth.

USER INTERFACE

[0246] The system 400 can include a display system 414, for example, as depicted in FIG. 4. The display system 414 may comprise an input device including, for example, a keypad or a keyboard, a mouse, a touchscreen display, and/or any other suitable device for inputting commands and/or information. The display system 414 may also include an output device including, for example, an LCD monitor, a CRT monitor, a touchscreen display, a printer, and/or any other suitable device for outputting text, graphics, images, videos, etc. In some embodiments, a touchscreen display is advantageously used for both input and output.

[0247] The display system 414 can include a user interface 2400 by which users can conveniently and efficiently interact with the system 400. The user interface 2400 may be displayed on the output device of the system 400 (e.g., the touchscreen display). In some embodiments, the user interface 2400 is implemenied and/or stored as one or more code modules, which may be embodied in hardware, firmware, and'or software,

[0248] Figures 24 and 25 schematically illustrate the visual appearance of embodiments of the user interface 2400. The user interface 2400 may show patient identification information 2402, which can include patient name and'or a patient ID number. The user interface 2400 also can include the current date and time 2404. An operating graphic 2406 shows the operating status of the system 400. For example, as shown in Figures 24 and 25, the operating status is ''Running," which indicates that the system 400 is fluidly connected to the patient ("Jill Doe") and performing normal system functions such as infusing fluid and'or drawing blood. The user interface 2400 can include one or more analyte concentration graphics 2408, 2412, which may show the name of the analyte and its last measured concentration. For example, the graphic 2408 in FIG. 24 shows "Glucose" concentration of 150 mg/dL, while the graphic 2412 shows "Lactate" concentration of 0.5 mmol/L. The particular analytes displayed and their measurement units (e.g., mg/dL, mmol/L, or other suitable unit) may be selected by the user. The size of the graphics 2408, 2412 may be selected to be easily readable out to a distance such as, e.g., 30 feet. The user interface 2400 may also include a next-reading graphic 2410 that indicates the time until the next analyte measurement is to be taken. In FIG. 24, the time until next reading is 3 minutes, whereas in FIG. 25, the time is 6 minutes, 13 seconds.

[0249] The user interface 2400 can include an analyte concentration status graphic 2414 that indicates status of the patient's current analyte concentration compared with a reference standard. For example, the analyte may be glucose, and the reference standard may be a hospital ICU's tight glycemic control (TGC). In FIG. 24, the status graphic 2.414 displays "High Glucose," because the glucose concentration (150 mg/dL) exceeds the maximum value of the reference standard. In FIG. 25, the status graphic 2414 displays "Low Glucose," because the current glucose concentration (79 mg/dL) is below the minimum reference standard. If the analyte concentration is within bounds of the reference standard, the status graphic 2414 may indicate normal (e.g., "Normal Glucose"), or it may not be displayed at all. The status graphic 2414 may have a background color (e.g., red) when the analyte concentration exceeds the acceptable bounds of the reference standard.

[0250] The user interface 2400 can include one or more trend indicators 2.416 that provide a graphic indicating the time history of the concentration of an analyte of interest. In Figures 24 and 25, the trend indicator 2416 comprises a graph of the glucose concentration (in mg/dL) versus elapsed time (in hours) since the measurements started. The graph includes a trend line 2418 indicating the time -dependent glucose concentration. In other embodiments, the trend line 2418 can include measurement error bars and may be displayed as a series of individual data points. In FIG. 25, the glucose trend indicator 2.416 is shown as well as a trend indicator 2430 and trend line 2432. for the lactate concentration. In some embodiments, a user may select whether none, one, or both trend indicators 2416, 2418 are displayed. In some embodiments, one or both of the trend indicators 2416, 2418 may appear only when the corresponding analyte is in a range of interest such as, for example, above or below the bounds of a reference standard.

[0251] The user interface 2400 can include one or more buttons 2420-2426 that can be actuated by a user to provide additional functionality or to bring up suitable context-sensitive menus and/or screens. For example, in the embodiments shown in FIG. 24 and FIG. 25, four buttons 2420-2426 are shown, although fewer or more buttons are used in other embodiments. The button 2420 ("End Monitoring") may be pressed when one or more removable portions (see, e.g., 710 of Fig. 7) are to be removed. In many embodiments, because the removable portions 710, 712 are not reusable, a confirmation window appears when the button 2420 is pressed. If the user is certain that monitoring should stop, the user can confirm this by actuating an affirmative button in the confirmation window. If the button 2420 were pushed by mistake, the user can select a negative button in the confirmation window. If "End Monitoring" is confirmed, the system 400 performs appropriate actions to cease fluid infusion and blood draw and to permit ejection of a removable portion (e.g., the removable portion 710).

[0252] The button 2422 ("Pause") may be actuated by the user if patient monitoring is to be interrupted but is not intended to end. For example, the "Pause" button 2422 may be actuated if the patient is to be temporarily disconnected from the system 400 (e.g., by disconnecting the tubes 306). After the patient is reconnected, the button 2422 may be pressed again to resume monitoring. In some embodiments, after the "Pause" button 2422. has been pressed, the button 2422 displays "Resume."

[0253] The button 2424 ("Delay 5 Minutes") causes the system 400 to delay the next measurement by a delay time period (e.g., 5 minutes in the depicted embodiments). Actuating the delay button 242.4 may be advantageous if taking a reading would be temporarily inconvenient, for example, because a health care professional is attending to other needs of the patient. The delay button 2424 may be pressed repeatedly to provide longer delays. In some embodiments, pressing the delay button 2424 is ineffective if the accumulated delay exceeds a maximum threshold. The next-reading graphic 2.410 automatically increases the displayed time until the next reading for every actuation of the delay button 2424 (up to the maximum delay).

[0254] The button 2426 ("Dose History") may be actuated to bring up a dosing history window that displays patient dosing history for an analyte or medicament of interest. For example, in some embodiments, the dosing history window displays insulin dosing history of the patient and/or appropriate hospital dosing protocols. A nurse attending the patient can actuate the dosing history button 2426 to determine the time when the patient last received an insulin dose, the last dosage amount, and/or the time and amount of the next dosage. The system 400 may receive the patient dosing history via wired or wireless communications from a hospital information system.

[0255] In other embodiments, the user interface 2400 can include additional and/or different buttons, menus, screens, graphics, etc. that are used to implement additional and/or different functionalities. RELATED COMPONENTS

[0256] FIG. 26 schematically depicts various components and/or aspects of a patient monitoring system 2630 and how those components and/or aspects relate to each other. In some embodiments, the monitoring system 2630 can be the apparatus 100 for withdrawing and analyzing fluid samples. Some of the depicted components can be included in a kit containing a plurality of components. Some of the depicted components, including, for example, the components represented within the dashed rounded rectangle 2640 of FIG. 26, are optional and/or can be sold separately from other components.

[0257] The patient monitoring system 2.630 shown in FIG. 2.6 includes a monitoring apparatus 2632. The monitoring apparatus 2.632 can be the monitoring device 102, shown in FIG. 1 and/ or the system 400 of FIG. 4. The monitoring apparatus 2632 can provide monitoring of physiological parameters of a paiient. In some embodiments, the monitoring apparatus 2632 measures glucose and/or lactate concentrations in the patient's blood. In some embodiments, the measurement of such physiological parameters is substantially continuous. The monitoring apparatus 2632 may also measure other physiological parameters of the patient. In some embodiments, the monitoring apparatus 2632 is used in an intensive care unit (ICO) environment. In some embodiments, one monitoring apparatus 2632 is allocated to each patient room in an ICU.

[0258] The patient monitoring system 2630 can include an optional interface cable 2642. In some embodiments, the interface cable 2642 connects the monitoring apparatus 2632 to a patient monitor (not shown). The interface cable 2642 can be used to transfer data from the monitoring apparatus 2632 to the patient monitor for display. In some embodiments, the patient monitor is a bedside cardiac monitor having a display that is located in the patient room (see, e.g., the user interface 2400 shown in FIG. 24 and FIG. 25.) In some embodiments, the interface cable 2642 transfers data from the monitoring apparatus 2632 to a central station monitor and/or to a hospital information system (HIS). The ability to transfer data to a central station monitor and/or to a HIS may depend on the capabilities of the patient monitor system.

[0259] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 26, an optional bar code scanner 2644 is connected to the monitoring apparatus 2632. In some embodiments, the bar code scanner 2644 is used to enter patient identification codes, nurse identification codes, and/or other identifiers into the monitoring apparatus 2632. In some embodiments, the bar code scanner 2644 contains no moving parts. The bar code scanner 2644 can be operated by manually sweeping the scanner 2644 across a printed bar code or by any other suitable means. Tn some embodiments, the bar code scanner 2644 includes an elongated housing in the shape of a wand.

[0260] The patient monitoring system 2630 includes a fluid system kit 2634 connected to the monitoring apparatus 2632. in some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 includes fluidic tubes that connect a fluid source to an analytic subsystem. For example, the fluidic tubes can facilitate fluid communication between a blood source or a saline source and an assembly including a sample holder and/or a centrifuge, in some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 includes many of the components that enable operation of the monitoring apparatus 2632. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 can be used with anti-clotting agents (such as heparin), saline, a saline infusion set, a patient catheter, a port sharing IV infusion pump, and/or an infusion set for an IV infusion pump, any or all of which may be made by a variety of manufacturers. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 includes a monolithic housing that is sterile and disposable. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the fluid system kit 2634 is designed for single patient use. For example, the fluid system kit 2634 can be constructed such that it can be economically discarded and replaced with a new fluid system kit 2634 for every new patient to which the patient monitoring system 2630 is connected, in addition, at least a portion of the fluid system kit 2634 can be designed to be discarded after a certain period of use, such as a day, several days, several hours, three days, a combination of hours and days such as, for example, three days and two hours, or some other period of time. Limiting the period of use of the fluid system kit 2634 may decrease the risk of malfunction, infection, or other conditions that can result from use of a medical apparatus for an extended period of time.

[0261] In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 includes a connector with a luer fitting for connection to a saline source. The connector may be, for example, a three-inch pigtail connector. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 can be used with a variety of spikes and/or IV sets used to connect to a saline bag. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 also includes a three- inch pigtail connector with a luer fitting for connection to one or more IV pumps. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 can be used with one or more IV sets made by a variety of manufacturers, including IV sets obtained by a user of the fluid system kit 2634 for use with an infusion pump. In some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 includes a tube with a lo dead volume luer connector for attachment to a patient vascular access point. For example, the tube can be approximately seven feet in length and can be configured to connect to a proximal port of a cardiovascular catheter, in some embodiments, the fluid system kit 2634 can be used with a variety of cardiovascular catheters, which can be supplied, for example, by a user of the fluid system kit 2634.

[0262] As shown in FIG. 26, the monitoring apparatus 2.632 is connected to a support apparatus 2636, such as an IV pole. The support apparatus 2636 can be customized for use with the monitoring apparatus 2.632. A vendor of the monitoring apparatus 2632. may choose to bundle the monitoring apparatus 2632 with a custom support apparatus 2636. In some embodiments, the support apparatus 2636 includes a mounting platform for the monitoring apparatus 2.632. The mounting platform can include mounts that are adapted to engage threaded inserts in the monitoring apparatus 2.632. The support apparatus 2636 can also include one or more cylindrical sections having a diameter of a standard IV pole, for example, so that other medical devices, such as IV pumps, can be mounted to the support apparatus. The support apparatus 2636 can also include a clamp adapted to secure the apparatus to a hospital bed, an ICO bed, or another variety of patient conveyance device.

[0263] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 26, ihe monitoring apparatus 2632 is electrically connected to an optional computer system 2646. The computer system 2646 can comprise one or multiple computers, and it can be used to communicate with one or more monitoring devices. In an ICU environment, the computer system 2646 can be connected to at leasi some of the monitoring devices in the ICU. The computer sysiem 2646 can be used to control configurations and settings for multiple monitoring devices (for example, the system can be used to keep configurations and settings of a group of monitoring devices common). The computer sysiem 2646 can also rim optional software, such as data analysis software 2648, HIS interface software 2650, and insulin dosing software 2652.

[0264] In some embodiments, the computer system 2646 runs optional data analysis software 2648 that organizes and presents information obtained from one or more monitoring devices. In some embodiments, the data analysis software 2648 collects and analyzes data from the monitoring devices in an ICU. The data analysis software 2648 can also present charts, graphs, and statistics to a user of the computer system 2646. [0265] In some embodiments, the computer system 2646 runs optional hospital information system (HIS) interface software 2650 that provides an interface point between one or more monitoring devices and an HIS. The HIS interface software 2650 may also be capable of communicating data between one or more monitoring devices and a laboratory information system (LIS).

[0266] In some embodiments, the computer system 2646 runs optional insulin dosing software 2652 that provides a platform for implementation of an insulin dosing regimen. In some embodiments, the hospital tight glycemic control protocol is mciuded in the software. The protocol allows computation of proper insulin doses for a patient connected to a monitoring device 2646. The insulin dosing software 2652 can communicate with the monitoring device 2646 to ensure that proper insulin doses are calculated.

ANALYTE CONTROL AND MONITORING

[0267] In some embodiments, it may be advantageous to control a le vel of an analyte (e.g., glucose) in a patient using an embodiment of an analyte detection system described herein. Although certain examples of glucose control are described below, embodiments of the systems and methods disclosed herein may be used to monitor and'or control other analytes (e.g., lactate).

[0268] For example, diabetic individuals control their glucose levels by administration of insulin. If a diabetic patient is admitted to a hospital or ICU, the patient may be in a condition in which he or she cannot self-administer insulin. Advantageously, embodiments of the analyte detection sy stems disclosed herein may be used to control the level of glucose in the patient. Additionally, it has been found that a majority of patients admitted to the ICU exhibit hyperglycemia without having diabetes. In such patients it may be beneficial to monitor and control their blood glucose level to be within a particular range of values. Further, it has been shown that tightly controlling blood glucose levels to be within a stringent range may be beneficial to patients undergoing surgical procedures.

[0269] A patient admitted to the ICU or undergoing surgery may be administered a variety of drugs and fluids such as Hetastarch, intravenous antibiotics, intravenous glucose, intravenous insulin, intravenous fluids such as saline, etc, which may act as interferents and make it difficult to determine the blood glucose level. Moreover, the presence of additional drugs and fluids in the blood stream may require different methods for measuring and controlling blood glucose level. Also, the patient may exhibit significant changes in hematocrit levels due to blood loss or internal hemorrhage, and there can be unexpected changes in the blood gas level or a rise in the level of bilirubin and ammonia levels in the event of an organ failure. Embodiments of the systems and methods disclosed herein advantageously may be used to monitor and control blood glucose (and/or other analytes) in the presence of possible interfereiits to estimation of glucose and for patients experiencing health problems.

[0270] In some environments. Tight Glycemic Control (TGC) can include: (1) substantially continuous monitoring (which can include periodic monitoring, at relatively frequent intervals of every 1 , 5, 15, 30, 45, and/or 60 minutes, for example) of glucose levels; (2) determination of substances that tend to increase glucose levels (e.g., sugars such as dextrose) and/or decrease glucose levels (e.g., insulin); and/or (3) responsive delivery of one or more of such substances, if appropriate under the controlling TGC protocol. For example, one possible TGC protocol can be achieved by controlling glucose within a relatively narrow range (for example between 70 mg/dL to 1 10 mg/dL). As will be further described, in some embodiments, 'T'GC may be achieved by using an analyte monitoring system to make continuous and/or periodic but frequent measurements of glucose levels.

[0271] In some embodiments, the analyte defection system schematically illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 may be used to regulate the concentration of one or more analytes in the sample in addition to determining and monitoring the concentration of the one or more analytes. In some cases, the analyte detection system may be used in an ICU to monitor (and/or control) analytes that may be present in patients experiencing trauma. In some implementations, the concentration of the analytes is regulated to be within a certain range. The range may be predetermined (e.g., according to a hospital protocol or a physician's recommendation), or the range may be adjusted as conditions change,

[0272] In an example of glycemic control, a system can be used to determine and monitor the concentration of glucose in the sample. If the concentration of glucose falls below a lower threshold, glucose from an external source can be supplied. If the concentration of glucose increases above an upper threshold, insulin from an external source can be supplied. In some embodiments, glucose or insulin may be infused in a patient continuously over a certain time interval or may be injected in a large quantity at once (referred to as "bolus injection"). [0273] In some embodiments, a glycemic control system may be capable of delivering glucose, dextrose, glycogen, and/or glucagon from an external source relatively quickly in the event of hypoglycemia. As discussed, embodiments of the glycemic control system may be capable of delivering insulin from an external source relatively quickly in the event of hyperglycemia.

[0274] Returning to FIGS. 5 and 6, these figures schematically illustrate embodiments of a fluid handling system that comprise optional analyte control subsystems 2780. The analyte control subsystem 2.780 may be used for providing control of an analyte such as, e.g., glucose, and may provide delivery of the analyte and/or related substances (e.g., dextrose solution and/or insulin in the case of glucose). The analyte control subsystem 2780 comprises a source 2.782 such as, for example, the analyte (or a suitable compound related to the analyte) dissolved in water or saline. For example, if the analyte is glucose, the source 2782 may comprise a bag of dextrose solution (e.g., Dextrose or Dextrose 50%). The source 2782 can be coupled to an infusion pump (not shown). The source 2782 and the infusion pump can be provided separately from the analyte control subsystem 2780, For example, a hospital advantageously can use existing dextrose bags and infusion pumps with the subsystem 2780.

[0275] As schematically illustrated in FIGS, 5 and 6, the source 2782 is in fluid communication with the patient tube 512 via a tube 2784 and suitable connectors. A pinch valve 2786 may be disposed adjacent the tube 2784 to regulate the flo of fluid from the source 2782. A patient injection port can be located at a short distance from the proximal port of the central venous catheter or some other catheter connected to the patient.

[0276] In an example implementation for glycemic control, if the analyte detection system determines that the level of glucose has fallen below a lower threshold value (e.g., the patient is hypoglycemic), a control system (e.g., the fluid system controller 405 in some embodiments) controlling an infusion delivery system may close the pinch valves 521 and'Or 542 to prevent infusion of insulin and/or saline into the patient. The control system may open the pinch valve 2786 and dextrose solution from the source 2782 can be infused (or alternatively injected as a bolus) into the patient. After a suitable amount of dextrose solution has been infused to the patient, the pinch valve 2786 can be closed, and the pinch valves 521 and/or 542 can be opened to allow flow of insulin and/or saline. In some systems, the amount of dextrose solution for infusion (or bolus injection) may be calculated based on one or more detected concentration levels of glucose. The source 2782 advantageously may be located at a short enough fluidic distance from the patient such that dextrose can be delivered to the patient within a time period of about one to about ten minutes. In other embodiments, the source 2782 can be located at the site where the patient tube 512 interfaces with the patient so that dextrose can be delivered within about one minute.

[0277] If the analyte detection system determines that the level of glucose has increased above an upper threshold value (e.g., the patient is hyperglycemic), the control system may close the pinch valves 542 and/or 2786 to prevent infusion of saline and/or dextrose into the patient. The control system may open the pinch valve 521, and insulin can be infused (or alternatively injected as a bolus) into the patient. After a suitable amount of insulin has been infused (or bolus injected) to the patient, the control system can close the pinch valve 521 and open the pinch valves 542. and/or 2786 to allow flow of saline and/or glucose. The suitable amount of insulin may be calculated based on one or more detected concentration levels of glucose in the patient. The insulin source 518 advantageously may be located at a short enough fluidic distance from the patient such that insulin can be delivered to the patient within about one to about ten minutes. In other embodiments, the insulin source 51 8 may be located at the site where the patient tube 512 interfaces with the patient so that insulin can be delivered to the patient within about one minute.

[0278] In some embodiments, sampling bodily fluid from a patient and providing medication to the patient may be achieved through the same lines of the fluid handling system. For example, in some embodiments, a port to a patient can be shared by alternately drawing samples and medicating through the same line. In some embodiments, a bolus can be provided to the patient at regular intervals (in the same or different lines). For example, a bolus of insulin can be provided to a patient after meals. In another embodiment comprising a shared line, a bolus of medication can be delivered when returning part of a body fluid sample back to the patient. In some implementations, the bolus of medication is delivered midway between samples (e.g., every 7.5 minutes if samples are drawn every 15 minutes). In other embodiment, a dual lumen tube can be used, wherein one lumen is used for the sample and the other lumen to medicate. In yet another embodiment, an analyte detection system (e.g., an "OptiScanner®" monitor) may provide suitable commands to a separate insulin pump (on a shared port or different line). Example Method for Glycemic Control

[0279] FIG. 27 is a flowchart that schematically illustrates an example embodiment of a method 2700 of providing analyte control. The example embodiment is directed toward one possible implementation for glycemic control (including but not limited to tight glycemic control) and is intended to illustrate certain aspects of the method 2700 and is not intended to limit the scope of possible analyte control methods. In block 2705, a glucose monitoring apparatus (e.g., the monitoring apparatus 2632 of FIG. 26) draws a sample (e.g., a blood or blood plasma sample) from a sample source (e.g., a patient) and obtains a measurement from the sample (e.g., a portion of the drawn sample). The measurement may comprise an optical measurement such as, for example, an infrared spectrum of the sample. In block 2710, the measurement sample is analyzed to identify possible interferents to an estimation of the glucose concentration in the measurement sample. In block 2715, a model is generated for estimating the glucose concentration from the obtained measurement. In some embodiments, models developed from the algorithms describe above with reference to FIGS. 21-23 are used. The generated model may reduce or minimize effects of the identified interferents on the estimated glucose concentration, in certain embodiments. In block 2720, an estimated glucose concentration is determined from the model and the obtained measurement. In block 2725, the estimated glucose concentration in the sample is compared to an acceptable range of concentrations. The acceptable range may be determined according to a suitable glycemic control protocol such as, for example, a TGC protocol. For example, in certain TGC protocols the acceptable range may be a glucose concentration in a range from about 70 mg/dL to about 1 10 mg/dL. If the estimated glucose concentration lies within the acceptable range, the method 2700 returns to block 2705 to obtain the next sample measurement, which may be made within about one to about thirty minutes (e.g., every fifteen minutes).

[0280J In block 2725, if the estimated glucose concentration is outside the acceptable range of concentrations, then the method 2700 proceeds to block 2740 in which the estimated glucose concentration is compared with a desired glucose concentration. The desired glucose concentration may be based on, for example, the acceptable range of glucose concentrations, the parameters of the particular glycemic protocol, the patient's estimated glucose concentration, and so forth. If the estimated glucose concentration is belo the desired concentration (e.g., the patient is hypoglycemic), a dose of dextrose to he delivered to the patient is calculated in block 2745. This calculation may take into account various factors including, for example, one or more estimated glucose concentrations, presence of additional drugs in the patient's system, time taken for dextrose to be assimilated by the patient, and the delivery method (e.g., continuous infusion or bolus injection). In block 2750, a fluid delivery system (e.g., a system such as the optional subsystem 2780 shown in FIGS. 5 and 6) delivers the calculated dose of dextrose to the patient,

[0281] In block 2740, if the estimated glucose concentration is greater than the desired concentration (e.g., the patient is hyperglycemic), a dose of insulin to be delivered is calculated in block 2755. The dose of insulin may depend on various factors including, for example, one or more estimated glucose concentrations in the patient, presence of other drags, type of insulin used, time taken for insulin to be assimilated by the patient, method of delivery (e.g., continuous infusion or bolus injection), etc. In block 2750, a fluid delivery system (e.g., the optional subsystem 2780 shown in FIGS. 5 and 6) delivers the calculated dose of insulin to the patient.

[0282] In block 2765, the method 2700 returns to block 2705 to await the start of the next measurement cycle, which may be within about one to about thirty minutes (e.g., every fifteen minutes). In some embodiments, the next measurement cycle begins at a different time than normally scheduled in cases in which the estimated glucose concentration lies outside the acceptable range of concentrations under the glycemic protocol. Such embodiments advantageously allow the system to monitor response of the patient to the delivered dose of dextrose (or insulin). In some such embodiments, the time between measurement cycles is reduced so the system can more accurately monitor analyte levels in the patient.

Examples of Some Possible Additional or Alternative Analytes

[0283] Although examples of control and/or monitoring has been described in the illustrative context of glycemic control, embodiments of the systems and methods can be configured for control and/or monitoring of one or more of many possible analytes, in addition to or instead of glucose. Monitor and/or control of analytes may be particularly helpful in ICUs, which receive patients experiencing trauma. For example, another parameter that can be monitored is level of Hemoglobin (Hb). If the lib level of a patient goes down without an apparent external reason, the patient could be suffering from internal bleeding. Indeed, many ICU patients (some estimate as many as 10%) suffer from what appears to be spontaneous internal bleeding that may not be otherwise detectable until the consequences are too drastic to easily overcome, ΐη some embodiments, level of Hb can be measured indirectly, because its relationship to oxygen in the veins and arteries (at different points in the vasculature with respect to the heart and lungs) is understood, in some embodiments, the apparatus, systems and methods described herein can be useful for measuring a level of Hb,

[0284] Another parameter that can be monitored is lactate level, which can be related to sepsis or toxic shock. Indeed, high levels and/or rapid rise in lactate levels can be correlated to organ failure and oxygenation problems in the blood and organs. However, other direct measures of the biological effects related to lactate level problems can be difficult to measure, for example, only becoming measurable with a delay (e.g., 2- 6 hours later). Thus, measurement of lactate level can help provide a valuable early- warning of other medical problems. Indeed, if a problem with lactate levels is detected, a nurse or doctor may be able to prevent the correlated problems by providing more fluids.

[0285] Another parameter that can be monitored is central venous oxygen saturation (Sev02). It can be advantageous to try to maintain an Scv02 of 65-70% or greater in ICU patients (to help avoid sepsis, for example). In some embodiments, the apparatus, systems, and methods described herein can be useful for measuring a level of Scv02.

[0286] Levels of lactate and Scv02 in a patient can be used together to provide information and/or warnings to a health care provider, which can be especially useful in an ICU setting. For example, if lactate and Scv02 are both high, a warning can be provided (e.g., automatically using an alarm). If lactate is high, but Scv02 is low, a patient may benefit from additional fluids. If Scv02 is high, but lactate is low, a cardiac problem may be indicated. Thus, a system that provides information about both lactate and Scv02 can be very beneficial to a patient, especially, for example, in the ICU environment. Although lactate and Scv02 have been used as an illustrative example, in other embodiments different combinations of analyses may be monitored and used to provide information and/or warnings to a health care provider.

LEAK DETECTION

[0287] Various embodiments disclosed herein can relate to the measurement of one or more analytes in a bodily fluid (e.g., blood) of a patient. The bodily fluid can be drawn out of the patient and positioned within the system for processing and/or analysis, as discussed herein. A hole in a fluid system can potentially allow outflow and/or inflow, depending on whether a fluid pump system is increasing or decreasing the pressure within the system, and in particular whether the internal pressure is less than or greater than the external pressure. If a manufacturing, shipping, or use-based event causes an unexpected or undesired hole, problems can result. Thus, in some embodiments, it can be desirable to check the system for leaks, especially when the system is connected directly to a patient (e.g., before drawing bodily fluid into the system).

[0288] Leaks can cause problems in a fluid system because they can reduce the pressure achieved by a hydraulic piston or syringe. Indeed, without a stable and uncompromised fluid envelope, fluid movements urged by a fluid pump of any kind can be unpredictable and difficult to engineer, predict, and control. For example, a system may be precisely engineered to advance fluid by a certain linear distance within a fixed- diameter tube by movement of a syringe pump having a wider diameter chamber by a correlated distance. A leak can cause errors in that precisely engineered syste and can disrupt the expected correlation between distances, times, etc. Thus, leaks can introduce fluid movement and control errors.

[0289] The leaked fluid can also present drawbacks. For example, fluid leaking out of the system can be dangerous to medical service providers and fluid leaking into the system can be potentially dangerous to the patient using the system; undesirable leakage can flow both into and out of the system. In some instances, it is unknown whether a patient's bodily fluid contains dangerous substances. Bodily fluid can potentially include dangerous substances (e.g., niethiciliin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), sepsis, bacterial or fungal infection, etc.). Many embodiments disclosed herein can be used in connection with a critically ill or injured patient (e.g., in an intensive care unit in a hospital) in which infections can sometimes arise unexpectedly. In some instances, infections and other potentially dangerous conditions can go undiagnosed. Moreover, a hole in the fluid system can also be a potential source to introduce unwanted substances into the fluid system and potentially into a patient. The types of infectious diseases that may be present on surfaces in a medical setting can be more dangerous than in other settings because, for example, families of organisms can, over time, build resistances to treatment protocols. Many other drawbacks of leaks exist, including loss of fluid (both a patient's valuable bodily fluid and other expensive medications), inefficiency of the fluid sy stem, etc. [0290] Figure 28 is a flowchart showing an example embodiment of a method 2800 for monitoring a patient while checking for leaks in the monitoring system. The method 2800 can be used in connection with various embodiments disclosed herein (e.g., the apparatus 100, the system 400, the patient monitoring system 2630, and various other embodiments described herein). Indeed, some systems can use existing hardware to check for leaks by updating software and causing a controller to evaluate fluid envelope integrity using the fluid pumps and pressure sensors that also have different roles in the system. At bock 2802, the system can check for leaks, as described herein. At block 1804, the system can obtain a sample of bodily fluid. For example, the system can draw bodily fluid out of the patient, as described herein. At block 2806, the system can measure the concentration of one or more analytes (e.g., glucose) in the sample of bodily fluid, as described herein.

[0291] The system can be configured to obtain multiple samples of bodily fluid and multiple measurements of the one or more analytes over time. For example, the system can be configured to periodically draw a sample of bodily fluid and measure the concentration of the at least one analyte in the sample (e.g., at least once every hour, every 45 minutes, every 30 minutes, every 15 minutes, every 10 minutes, or less), as discussed herein. In some embodiments, the system can check for leaks (e.g., at block 2802) for multiple cycles or of each cycle (e.g., before drawing bodily fluid into the system). With reference to the flowchart of Figure 28, after the system measures the concentration of the at least one analyie, the method 2800 can proceed back to block 2802 and the system can again check for leaks before obtaining another bodily fluid sample (at biock 2804). In some embodiments, the system can check for leaks every time the system is going to draw a sample of the bodily fluid. In some embodiments, the system can be configured to check for leaks periodically (e.g., every other sample draw, or every 3 sample draws, etc., once every hour, or once every 2 hours, etc.).

[0292] The method 2800 can include many additional features that are not specifically shown in the flowchart of Figure 28. For example, the method 2800 can include separating the bodily fluid into a plurality of components (e.g., via a centrifuge and/or a filter). The method 2800 can include detecting and compensating for interferents to determine the concentration of the at least one analyte. The method 2800 can include disposing of the sample bodily fluid after the analysis (e.g., by transporting the bodily fluid to a waste container 554), The method 2800 can include various other features disclosed herein.

[0293] In some embodiments, a system can be configured to detect leaks by applying pressure (negative or positive) to at least a portion of the fluid handling network using a fluid pump, such as a syringe pump for example, and monitoring the pressure in the fluid handling network (e.g., using one or more pressure sensors). The application of pressure for leak diagnosis can occur suddenly or gradually and can be maintained for a long or short duration. The pressure results can be compared to the results from a standardized system known to have no leaks, or they can be compared to results from the particular system (including, e.g., a specific fluid handling cassette or cartridge) that may have been measured previously when it was judged to have no leaks in a manufacturer's testing environment. Leak detection and analysis can occur in discrete portions of a complex fluid system. For example, by opening and closing valves, different segments of a tubing system can be exposed to potential pressurization from a fluid pump, and also exposed to a fluid pressure sensor. Thus, the same pump and sensor may be usable to diagnose leaks in various fluid paths, even without moving the pump and sensor, in some embodiments, more than one pump and/or more than one sensor can be used for such leak detection and analysis.

[0294] By way of example, the system can include an analyte measurement system which can be configured to determine the concentration of at least one analyte in a fluid sample (e.g., bodily fluid drawn from a patient), as discussed herein. The analyte measurement system can include various features described in connection with the monitoring device 102, the analyte detection systems described herein, etc. For example, the analyte measurement system can be configured to optically analyze the fluid sample, e.g., using the optical system 412 or other optical features described herein.

[0295] The system can include a fluid handling system, which can include features described in connection with various embodiments herein (e.g., fluid handling system 404, fluid system 510, etc.). For example, a fluid handling network can include a plurality of tubes (e.g., one or more of the tubes shown in Figure 5 and/or Figure 6, such as tubes 512, 514, 516, 528, 530, 534, 540, 544, and/or 556). A patient end of the fluid handling network can be configitred to receive bodily fluid (e.g., that is drawn from the patient) and to introduce the bodily fluid into the fluid handling network. The patient end can include a medical connector configured to interface with a corresponding medical connector of an external system (e.g., which can be in communication with the patient's vasculature), an end of a tube that is configured to receive bodily fluid into the system, a catheter or other component that is in communication with the patient's vasculature, etc. The fluid handling network can include junctions between tubes (e.g., at connectors C I , C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, C9, CIO, and/or C12 of Figure 5 and/or Figure 6). In some instances, a leak can occur at a junction between tubes (e.g., at an interface between a connector and a tube), and the system can be configured to detect leaks at the junctions. The system can be configured to detect leaks at locations other than the junctions (e.g., in the event a tube raptures or develops a hole). The fluid handling system can include various valves (e.g., the valves shown in Figure 5 and/or Figure 6, such as valves 523, 529, 531 , 533, 563, 566, 557, 561 , 503, 542, 521, 559, and/or 2786), which can be opened and closed to direct fluids along various paths through the fluid handling network. The system can include various pumps (e.g., the pumps shown in Figure 5 and/or Figure 6, such as pumps 532, 522, 568, 588, and/or 599), which can be configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network (e.g., to move liquid or air in the fluid handling network), as discussed herein, ΐη some embodiments, the pumps can be syringe pumps, although other types of pumps can also be used. The system can include various sensors, as discussed herein and as shown in Figure 5 and/or Figure 6. in some embodiments, one or more pressure sensors (e.g., the pressure sensors shown in Figure 5 and/or Figure 6, such as pressure sensors PS9, PS 10, PS1 1, or PS 12) can be used to measure the pressure in the fluid handling network.

[0296] Figure 29 is a flowchart showing an example method 2900 for detecting whether a leak is present in the fluid handling network. At block 2902, the system can isolate at least a portion of the fluid handling network from the patient. For example, one or more valves can be ciosed to block fluid communication between the patient end of the fluid handling network and at least a portion of the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, the valve 523 (V0) of Figure 5 or the valve VOa of Figure 6 can be ciosed to block fluid communication between the paiient end and the portion of the fluid handling network being tested. Other val ves can be closed to isolate at least a portion of the fluid handling network. For example, Tables 4-7, which are discussed below, show various combinations of valve states that can be used to isolate various different portions of the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, the fluid handling network is not in fluid communication with the patient (e.g., the fluid sample can be delivered to an input end of the system by a source other than the patient), and the one or more valves can close to isolate at least a portion of the fluid handling network from the input end. One or more valves can close to isolate at feast a portion of the fluid handling network from other components, such as the saline source 520 (e.g., valve 542 (PV1)), the an air inlet (e.g., valve 503 (PVO) of Figure 5 or valve V3b of Figure 6), the waste container 554 (e.g., valves 563 (V3b) and'or 557 (V4a) of Figure 5 or valves 590, V2b, and/or V4a of Figure 6), the detergent tank 558 (e.g., valves 559 (V7b) and/or 561 (V4b) of Figure 5 or valves PVO, V4b, and'or V7b of Figure 6), and/or the heparin source (e.g., valve 589 (Vhep).

[0297] At block 2904, the system can apply pressure to the fluid handling network (e.g., using one or more pumps, such as pump #0 532 and/or pump #1 522. shown in Figures 5 and 6). The at least one pump used to apply pressure can be a syringe pump, although other types of pumps can be used. The at least one pump can be in fluid communication with the portion of the fluid handling network being tested for leaks. In some embodiments, the at least one pump can apply positive pressure to the fluid handling network (e.g., by driving additional fluid (e.g., saline or air) into the fluid handling network). In some embodiments, the at least one pump can apply negative pressure to the fluid handling network (e.g., by drawing an amount of fluid (e.g., saline or air) out of the fluid handling network). In some embodiments, the system can be configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network (e.g., more positive pressure or more negative pressure) during the leak test than during the drawing and transporting of the fluid sample. By applying more pressure during the leak test than during the rest of the measurement cycle, the leak test can be configured to identify potential leaks so that the leaks don't materialize during while bodily fluid is moving through the tubes. The leak detection can be a pressurized stress test on the system. For example, if a seal or junction is weakened to a point that it is close to being compromised to produce a leak, the elevated pressure of the leak test can compromise the seal or junction to produce the leak during the leak test rather than during the drawing or transporting of bodily fluid.

[0298] At block 2906, the system can measure the pressure in the fluid handling network (e.g., using one or more pressure sensors, such as pressure sensor #10 505 and/or pressure sensor #9 507 shown in Figures 5 and 6). The one or more pressure sensors can be in fluid communication with the portion of the fluid handling network that is being tested (e.g., the portion that is isolated by one or more closed valves and in fluid communication with the one or more pumps applying pressure). The at least one pressure sensor can monitor the pressure, e.g., by measuring the pressure in the fluid handling network periodically (e.g., once every minute, once every 30 seconds, once every 15 seconds, once ever '- 5 seconds, once every 2 seconds, once every second, twice per second, three times per second, five times per second, 10 times per second, etc.). In some embodiments, the at least one pressure sensor can measure the pressure in the fluid handling network on a substantially continuous basis. The at least one pressure sensor can be used to monitor changes in the pressure in the fluid handling network over time, in some embodiments, the at least one pressure sensor does not monitor changes in the pressure over time, and the at least one pressure sensor can be configured to take a single measurement of the pressure (e.g., after waiting for a delay period after the pressure is applied at block 2904).

[0299] At block 2.908, the system can determine whether a leak is present in the portion of the fluid handling network that is being tested (e.g., the portion that is isolated by one or more closed valves and in fluid communication with the one or more pumps applying pressure). In some embodiments, the system can test substantially the entire fluid handling network for leaks, or the system can test a portion of the fluid handling network. The system can include a controller (e.g., the fluid system controller 405 discussed in connection with Figure 4), which can be configured to perform the leak testing disclosed herein. The controller 405 can include at least one computing device (e.g., at least one computer processor configured to execute machine-readable instructions stored on at least one storage device to implement the features described herein, and/or one or more integrated circuits specifically configured to implement the features described herein). The controller 405 can actuate the one or more valves and the at least one pump as described herein.

[0360] The controller 405 can receive data from the at least one pressure sensor. The controller 405 can determine whether a leak is present in the portion of the fluid handling network being tested based at least in part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor. For example, if pressure (e.g., positive or negative pressure) is applied to the fluid handling network and the pressure sensor reports that the pressure (e.g., positive or negative pressure) is maintained at a constant level or is within an expected pressure range, the controller 405 can determine that no leak is present. If positive pressure is applied and the at least one pressure sensor reports that the positive pressure is dropping over time or is below an expected pressure range or threshold value, the controller 405 can determine that a leak is present in the portion of the fluid handling network that is exposed to the positive pressure. If negative pressure is applied to the fluid handling network and the pressure sensor reports that the negative pressure is rising over time or is above an expected pressure range or threshold value, the controller 405 can determine that a leak is present in the portion of the fluid handling network that is exposed to the negative pressure. In some embodiments, a constant pressure can be an indication of a leak, such as if the pressure remains substantially constant or changes by less than an expected amount when the pressure is applied to the fluid handling network at block 2904.

[0301 J If no leak is detected, the method 2900 can proceed to block 2910, and the system can proceed with normal operation of the measurement cycle. For example, the system can proceed to obtain a fluid sample (e.g., by drawing bodily fluid from the patient and into the fluid handling network). Although not shown in Figure 29, the method 2900 can continue to perform additional operations of the measurement cycle, such as measuring the concentration of at least one analyte in the fluid sample. In some embodiments, the system can check for leaks (e.g., as described in connection with Figure 29) before each time the system draws fluid into the fluid handling network. If a leak is detected at block 2908, the method 2900 can proceed to block 2.912, and t e system can post an alarm (e.g., indicating that a leak has been detected). The alarm can be, for example, an audible alarm, a visual alarm (e.g., displayed on a display of the system), or an electronic message sent to an external system (e.g., at a nurse station). In some embodiments, the system can cease operation upon detection of a leak. For example, the system can be configured to not draw bodily fluid from a patient if a leak has been detected in the system.

[0382] In some embodiments, the system can be configured to identify the location of a leak in the fluid handling network. Figure 30 is a flowchart showing an example method 3000 for identifying a location of a leak in the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, the method 3000 can be performed after a leak has been detected. In some embodiments, the method 3000 can be performed as the test to determine whether or not the system has a leak. Accordingly, in some embodiments, the system can detect the presence of a leak and identify the location of the leak using a single algorithm or process.

[0383] At block 3002, the system can isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., similar to block 2902 of Figure 29). For example, one or more valves can be actuated to isolate the first portion of the fluid handling network from the patient, from the saline source 520, from an air inlet, and/or from other portions of the fluid handling network. In some instances the first portion of the fluid handling network can be only part of the fluid handling network, or the first portion can include substantially the entire fluid handling network (e.g., the entire portion that the syste is configured to test for leaks).

[0304] At block 3004, the system can apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using at least one pump, such as similar to the manner described in connection with block 2904 of Figure 29). At block 3006, the system can measure the pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using at least one pressure sensor, such as similar to the ma ner described in connection with block 2906 of Figure 29). At block 3008, the system can determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using a controller 405, such as similar to the manner described in connection with block 2908 of Figure 29).

[0385] At block 3010, the system can isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., similar to block 3002 of Figure 30 and/or 2902 of Figure 29). For example, one or more valves can be actuated to isolate the second portion of the fluid handling network from the patient, from the saline source 520, from an air inlet, and/or from other portions of the fluid handling network. In some instances the second portion of the fluid handling network can be only part of the fluid handling network, or the second portion can include substantially the entire fluid handling network (e.g., the entire portion that the system is configured to test for leaks). The second portion of the fluid handling network can be different than the first portion of the fluid handling network. The second portion of the fluid handling network can be a subset of the first portion of the fluid handling network, or the second portion of the fluid handling network can partially overlap with the first portion of the fluid handling network, or the first portion and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap and are separate portions of the fluid handling network. [0306] At block 3012, the system can apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using at least one pump, such as similar to the manner described in connection with block 3004 of Figure 30 and/or block 2904 of Figure 29). At block 3014, the system can measure the pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using at least one pressure sensor, such as similar to the manner described in connection with block 3006 of Figure 30 and/or block 2906 of Figure 2.9). At block 3016, the system can determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network (e.g., using a controller 405, such as similar to the manner described in connection with block 2.908 of Figure 29).

[0307] At block 3018, the system can determine the location of a leak based at least in part on the determinations of whether or not a leak was present in the fsrst portion of the fluid handling network and/or in the second portion of the fluid handling network. For example, if the first portion of the fluid handling network is determined to have a leak and the second portion of the fluid handing network is determined to not have a leak, the controller 405 can determine, at block 3018, that the leak is located in the part of the second portion of the fluid handling network that does not overlap with the first portion of the fluid handing network. If the first portion of the fluid handling network is determined to have a leak and the second portion of the fluid handing network is determined to have a leak, the controller 405 can determine that the leak is located in the part of the fluid handling network where the first portion and the second portion overlap. In some embodiments, the system can output a message or code indicating the location of the leak.

[0388] Many variations are possible. In some embodiments, the operations of blocks 3008 and/or 3016 can be omitted. For example, the system can be configured to determine a location of a leak directly from the measured pressures from the first and second portions of the fluid handling network (e.g., without independently determining whether a leak is present in the first portion or in the second portion). The method 3000 can include further operations not shown in Figure 30 for isolating, pressurizing, measuring pressure in, and determining whether a leak is present in one or more additional portions of the fluid handling network, which can enable the system to better determine the location of the leak. The system can test 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, or more different portions of the fluid handling network to determine the location of a leak. For example, Table 4 identifies the connectors and other components that are tested for leaks using various different combinations of valve states when applying pressure using the pump #0 532 in the embodiment of Figure 5.

Figure imgf000095_0001

Table 4 - Valve States for Leak Testing

[03091 By way of example, if the test of connectors C5 and C7 (row 1 of Table 4) does not detect a leak and the test of connectors CI , C5, and C7 (row 2. of Table 4) does detect a leak, the system can determine that a leak is likely present at the connector CI . If the test of connectors C5 and C7 (row 1 of Table 4) does not detect a leak and the test of connectors C2, C3, C5, C6, and C7 (row 3 of Table 4) does detect a leak, the system can determine that a leak is likely present at the one of the connectors C2, C3, and C6. Comparing the results of tests of various other portions of the fluid handling network can enable the system to identify leaks at various other locations,

[0310] Table 5 identifies ihe connectors and other components that are tested for leaks using various different combinations of valve states when applying pressure using the pump #1 522 in the embodiment of Figure 5. Comparing the results of tests of various portions of the fluid handling network (as shown in Tables 4 and 5) can enable the system to identify leaks at various locations.

Figure imgf000096_0001

Table 5 - Valve States for Leak Testing

[0311] Table 6 identifies the connectors that are tested for leaks using various different combinations of valve states when applying pressure using the pump #0 532 in the embodiment of Figure 6. Table 7 identifies the connectors that are tested for leaks using various different combinations of valve states when applying pressure using the pump #0 532 in the embodiment of Figure 6. Comparing the results of tests of various portions of the fluid handling network (as shown in Tables 6 and 7) can enable the system to identify leaks at various locations.

Figure imgf000097_0001

Table 6 - Valve Staies for Leak Testing;

Figure imgf000098_0001

Table 7 - Valve Staies for Leak Testing

[0312] In the embodiment of Figure 6, the valves VOa, PVl, and/or V3b can be closed (e.g., to isolate at least a portion of the fluid handling network from the patient, from the saline source, and/or from air) for all the tests shown in Table 6 and/or Table 7. For some rows, other valves can prevent the pressure from reaching valves VOa, PVl, and V3b, such that the valves VOa, PVl , and V3b can be either open or closed. Accordingly, for sake of simplicity, the staies of valves VOa, PVl, and V3b are not shown in Table 6 or Table 7.

[0313] It will be understood that the valve states shown in Tables 4-7 are examples and that in some cases the same portion of the fluid handling network can be tested with multiple different settings, in the tests shown in some rows of Tables 4-7, a connector can be exposed to pressure from multiple tubes coupled to the connector, and the connector can also be tested by a different set of valve states that causes the pressure to reach the connector from a single tube. For example, in the bottom row of Table 7, the same connectors CI, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, and C8 can be tested even if valve Via were to be closed, or if valve V2a were to be closed, since the pressure from pump #1 522 can reach connectors C5 and C7 through either of valves Via and V2a.

[0314] Although tables 6 and 7 list only the connectors that are tested using the various combinations of valve states, various other components can be tested as well, such as the various tubes in the fluid handling network, the sample cell, the detergent tank 558, and/or the waste container 554. In some embodiments, certain components can be excluded from the test areas (e.g., by closing one or more valves). For example, in some cases the waste container 554 can be excluded from some or all of the tests (e.g., by closing valves such the valves 590, V2b, and V4a), and/or the detergent tank 558 can be excluded from some or all of the tests (e.g., by closing valves such as valves PVO, V7b, and V4b). In some embodiments, excluding the waste container 554 and/or the detergent tank 558 can improve the testing by increasing the stability of the pressure in the system. For example, in some instances the waste container can expand, which can change the pressure in the system. In some instances, the system can apply different pressures, or can apply different pressure ranges or threshold values depending on the portion of the fluid handling network being tested. For example, if the waste container 554 is included in the area being tested, a larger acceptable pressure range can be used.

[0315] In some embodiments, leaks can be detected by measuring the length of time it takes to draw sample of fluid or otherwise move fluid within the system. For example, an abrupt change (e.g., a lengthening of the time period it takes fluid to reach a fluid sensor from a given starting point) can indicate a leak problem, assuming that other variables such as tube size and fluid viscosity remain constant. Thus, one approach to leak detection is data analysis. Even if a change does not occur abruptly, it is possible that a leak or other degradation in the fluid envelope can develop slowly. Accordingly, a gradual change in the length of time can also be investigated as a potential leak. For such measurements, it can be particularly helpful to have one or more fluid sensors that can identify a boundasy or a threshold, for example, a boundary between saline fluid and blood or a boundary between air and blood. That boundary can be tracked as a way of identifying how quickly fluid has moved between two fixed positions in a fluid path. For example, with reference to Figures 5, the system can include a plurality of arrival sensors (e.g., bubble sensor 509 (BS 1 1), bubble sensor 535 (BS9), bubble sensor 552 (BS14), arrival sensor 526 (HB12)), which can be configured to detect the arrival of a fluid (e.g., bodily fluid such as blood) at a plurality of locations in the fluid handling network. With reference to Figure 6, the system can include a plurality of arrival sensors (e.g., bubble sensor 509 (BSl l), arrival sensor 51 1 (BS8 / SAT / Hb), bubble sensor 552 (BS14), arrival sensor 526 (HB 12.)), which can be configured to detect the arrival of a fluid (e.g., bodily fluid such as blood) at a plurality of locations in the fluid handling network. In some embodiments, ihe sensors can be configured to defect the departure of the fluid (e.g., bodily fluid such as blood) from the associated locations in the fluid handling network,

[0316] Tn some embodiments, a start time can be established by the time that the fluid sample arrives at a starting point in the fluid handling network. An arrival sensor can be configured to detect the arrival of the fluid at the starting point. For example, with reference to Figure 5, when the drawn fluid passes the bubble sensor 535 (BS 9) that can establish a start time, and the arrival of the drawn fluid at the bubble sensor 552 (BS 14) that can establish a finish time. The time between the finish time and the start time (e.g., the time that it took for the fluid to travel from the bubbie sensor 535 (BS 9) to the bubble sensor 552 (BS 14) can be used to determine whether there is a leak in the fluid handling network (e.g., between the bubbie sensor 535 (BS 9) and the bubble sensor 552 (BS 14). For example, if there is a leak in the fluid handing network, the pressure used to transport the fluid can be reduced, which can cause the fluid to move slower than expected. Many variations are possible. For example, if the system is configured to stop the movement of the fluid for an amount of time while the fluid is between the starting point the ending point, that amount of time can be subtracted from the time between the finish time and the start time in order to establish the time it took to move the fluid from the starting point to the ending point. In some instances, the starting point is not associated with a sensor. For example, with reference to Figure 5, bodily fluid can be drawn through the connector 524 (CI ) into the tube 528 (T4), and the system can then draw fluid out of the connector and into the tube 534 (T3). Thus, in this example, the start time can be established as the time that the bodily fluid is drawn into the tube 534 (T3) and the starting location can be established as the junction between the tube 534 (T3) and the connector 524 (CI). The arrival of the bodily fluid at the bubble sensor 535 (BS 9) can establish a finish time.

[0317] The time that it takes to transport the fluid from the starting location to ihe end location can be compared to an acceptable time threshold to determine whether the fluid handling network has a leak. The acceptable time threshold and be a range, in some cases. In some embodiments, the acceptable time threshold can be the same for each cartridge used in the system. In some embodiments, the acceptable time threshold can be specific to ihe cartridge type or to the individual cartridge. The cartridge can include information regarding the acceptable time threshold, and that information can be communicated to the system (e.g., to the controller 405), For example, the cartridge can include a bar code, which can be scanned by a bar code reader to access information about the cartridge, including the acceptable time threshold for the cartridge. Thus, if different cartridges or cartridge types are tested and found to have different acceptable threshold times, that information can be used in detecting leaks,

[0318] In some embodiments, the time that it takes to transport the fluid from the starting location to the end location can be compared to one or more times that it took to transport the fluid from the starting location to the end location during one or more previous measurement cycles. If the time it takes to move the fluid from the starting location to the ending location changes by more than a threshold amount, or has a rate of change more than a threshold amount, etc., the system can determine that a leak may be present in the fluid handling system (or that some other malfunction has occurred).

[0319] In some embodiments, the leak testing can be performed using data that is generated from the normal operation of the system, e.g., without dedicated leak detection fluidies steps. For example, in some instances, the system does not actuate val v es to isolate portions of the fluid handling network and pressurize the portions of the fluid handing network to test for leaks. Rather, the system merely transporis the fluid as during normal operation (e.g., to deliver the fluid to the sample cell), and data generated by that transportation of the fluid can be used to detect leaks. Accordingly, testing for leaks without any additional fluidies steps (e.g., without any additional valve actuations or pump actuations) can extend the usable life of the cartridge and/or of the system.

Terminology and Conclusion

[0320] Reference throughout this specification to "some embodiments" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least some embodiments. Thus, appearances of the phrases "in some embodiments" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily ail referring to the same embodiment and may refer to one or more of the same or different embodiments. Furthermore, the particular features, structures or characteristics may be combined in any- suitable manner, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art from this disclosure, in one or more embodiments.

[0321] As used in this application, the terms "comprising," "including," "having," and the like are synonymous and are used inclusively, in an open-ended fashion, and do not exclude additional elements, features, acts, operations, and so forth. Also, the term "or" is used in its inclusive sense (and not in its exclusive sense) so that when used, for example, to connect a list of elements, the term "or" means one, some, or all of the elements in the list.

[0322] Similarly, it should be appreciated that in the above description of embodiments, various features are sometimes grouped together in a single embodiment, figure, or description thereof for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure and aiding in the understanding of one or more of the various inventive aspects. This method of disclosure, however, is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that any claim require more features than are expressly recited in that claim. Rather, inventive aspects lie in a combination of fewer than all features of any single foregoing disclosed embodiment,

[0323] Embodiments of the disclosed systems and methods may be used and'or implemented with local and'Or remote devices, components, and/or modules. The term "remote" may include devices, components, and'or modules not stored locally, for example, not accessible via a local bus. Thus, a remote device may include a device which is physically located in the same room and connected via a device such as a switch or a local area network. In other situations, a remote device may also be located in a separate geographic area, such as, for example, in a different location, building, city, country, and so forth,

[0324] Methods and processes described herein may be embodied in, and partially or fully automated via, software code modifies executed by one or more general and'or special purpose computers. The word "module" refers to logic embodied in hardware and'or firmware, or to a collection of software instructions, possibly having entry and exit points, written in a programming language, such as, for example, C or C++. A software module may be compiled and linked into an executable program, installed in a dynamically linked library, or may be written in an interpreted programming language such as, for example, BASIC, Peri, or Python. It will be appreciated that software modules may be callable from other modules or from themselves, and'or may be invoked in response to detected events or interrupts. Software instructions may be embedded in firmware, such as an erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM). It will be further appreciated that hardware modules may be comprised of connected logic units, such as gates and flip-flops, and'or may be comprised of programmable units, such as programmable gate arrays, application specific integrated circuits, and'or processors. The modules described herein are preferably implemented as software modules, but may be represented in hardware and'Or firmware. Moreover, although in some embodiments a module may be separately compiled, in other embodiments a module may represent a subset of instructions of a separately compiled program, and may not have an interface available to other logical program units.

[0325] In certain embodiments, code modules may be implemented and/or stored in any type of computer-readable medium or other computer storage device. In some systems, data (and'Or metadata) input to the system, data generated by the system, and/or data used by the system can be stored in any type of computer data repository, such as a relational database and/or flat file system. Any of the systems, methods, and processes described herein may include an interface configured to permit interaction with patients, health care practitioners, administrators, other systems, components, programs, and so forth.

[0326] A number of applications, publications, and external documents may be incorporated by reference herein. Any conflict or contradiction between a statement in the body text of this specification and a statement in any of the incorporated documents is to be resol ved in favor of the statement in the body text.

[0327] Although described in the illustrative context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the disclosure extends beyond the specifically described embodiments to other alternative embodiments and'Or uses and obvious modifications and equivalents. Thus, it is intended that the scope of the claims which follow should not be limited by the particular embodiments described above.

Claims

THE FOLLOWING TS CLAIMED:
I . A bodily fluid sample analysis system comprising:
an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid;
a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes and at least one junction between the plurality of tubes, wherein the fluid handling network- comprises a patient end configured to receive bodily fluid drawn from a patient, wherein the fluid handling network is configured to provide at feast a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system;
an arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at a location in the fluid handling network;
one or more valves having a closed position and an open position;
one or more pumps configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network;
at least one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network; and
a controller configured to:
actuate at feast one of the one or more pumps to draw bodily fluid from a patient through the patient end into the fluid handling network and to transport the bodily fluid to the location in the fluid handling network- associated with the arrival sensor;
receive data from the arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the location;
determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location associated with the arrival sensor;
close at least one of the one or more valves to block fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction;
apply pressure to the fluid handling network using the one or more pumps;
receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the fluid handling network; confirm whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at feast in part on the data received from the at feast one pressure sensor; actuate the one or more valves to isolate a portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the isolated portion of the fluid handling network- using the one or more pumps;
receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the isolated portion of the fluid handling network; and determine whether the isolated portion of the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at feast one pressure sensor.
2. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time it takes for the bodily fluid to move from a starting point to the location associated with the arrival sensor.
3. The system of Claim 2, further comprising a second arrival sensor configured to detect the anival of the bodily fluid at the starting point, wherein the controller is configured to receive data from the second arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point.
4. The system of Claim 2, wherein the starting point is a junction in the fluid handling network and wherein a start time comprises the time that the bodily fluid is drawn through the junction.
5. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with an acceptable time threshold.
6. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with one or more arrival times from one or more previous measurement cycles.
7. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to cause a sample of bodily fluid to be received into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking.
8. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking.
9. The system of Claim 1 , wherem the system is configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and wherem the system is configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before receiving a fluid sample into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle.
10. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to:
isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network; measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network;
isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network;
measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network; and
determine a location of a leak based at feast in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
1 1. The system of Claim 10, wherem the first portion of the fluid handling network overlaps at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
12. The system of Claim 10, wherem the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap.
13. The system of Claim 10, wherein the controller is configured to:
determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network; and
determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network.
14. The system of Claim 10, wherein the controller is configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak.
15. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the controller is configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network when testing for leaks than when providing the at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system.
16. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the analyte comprises glucose.
17. The system of Claim 1 , wherein the fluid sample comprises whole blood.
18. A patient mo itoring system comprising:
an anafyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid;
a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes and at least one junction between the plurality of tubes, wherein the fluid handling network- comprises a patient end configured to receive bodily fluid drawn from a patient, and wrherem the fluid handling network is configured to provide at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system;
a valve having a closed position and an open position, wherein the closed position blocks fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction, and wherein the open position permits fluid flow through the tube between the patient end and the at least one junction;
at least one pump configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network;
at least one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network; and
a controller configured to:
close the valve to block fluid flow through a tube between the patient end and the at least one junction;
apply pressure to fluid handling network using the at least one pump;
receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the fluid handling network; and
determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least i part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor.
19. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherei the controller is configured to cause a sample of bodily fluid to be drawn into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking.
20. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherei the controller is configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking.
21. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherein the system is configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and wherein the system is configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before drawing bodily fluid into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle.
22. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherein the controller is configured to:
actuate one or more valves to isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pump;
measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pressure sensor;
actuate the one or more valves to isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pump;
measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network- using the at least one pressure sensor; and
determine a location of a leak based at feast in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
23. The patient monitoring system of Claim 22, wherein the first portion of the fluid handling network overlaps at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
24. The patient monitoring system of Claim 22, wherein the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap.
25. The patient monitoring system of Claim 22, wherein the controller is configured to:
determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network; and determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network.
26. The patient monitoring system of Claim 22, wherein the controller is configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak.
27. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherein the controller is configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network when testing for leaks than when drawing bodily fluid or when providing the at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system,
28. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherein the analyte comprises glucose.
29. The patient monitoring system of Claim 18, wherein the bodily fluid comprises whole blood,
30. A fluid sample analysis system comprising:
an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a fluid sample;
a fluid handling network configured to receive a fluid sample and to provide at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system; one or more valves having a closed position and an open position; at least one pump configured to apply pressure to the fluid handling network;
at least one pressure sensor configured to measure pressure in the fluid handling network; and
a controller configured to:
actuate the one or more valves to isolate a portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the isolated portion of the fluid handling network using the at least one pump;
receive data from the at least one pressure sensor regarding a pressure in the isolated portion of the fluid handling network; and determine whether the isolated portion of the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the data received from the at least one pressure sensor.
31. The system of Claim 30, wherein the controller is configured to cause a fluid sample to be received into the fluid handling network after determining that the fluid handling network is not leaking.
32. The system of Claim 30, wherein the controller is configured to post an alarm after determining that the fluid handling network is leaking.
33. The system of Claim 30, wherein the system is configured to perform a plurality of measurement cycles, and wherein the system is configured to check the fluid handling network for leaks before receiving a fluid sample into the fluid handling network for each measurement cycle.
34. The system of Claim 30, wherein the controller is configured to:
isolate a first portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the first portion of the fluid handling network; measure a pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network;
isolate a second portion of the fluid handling network;
apply pressure to the second portion of the fluid handling network;
measure a pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network; a d
determine a location of a leak based at feast in part on the measured pressure of the first portion of the fluid handling network and the measured pressure of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
35. The system of Claim 34, wherein the first portion of the fluid handling network overlaps at least part of the second portion of the fluid handling network.
36. The system of Claim 34, wherein the first portion of the fluid handling network and the second portion of the fluid handling network do not overlap.
37. The system of Claim 34, wherein the controller is configured to:
determine whether a leak is present in the first portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the first portion of the fluid handling network; and
determine whether a leak is present in the second portion of the fluid handling network based at least in part on the measured pressure in the second portion of the fluid handling network.
38. The system of Claim 34, wherein the controller is configured to output an indicator of the location of the leak.
39. The system of Claim 30, wherein the controller is configured to apply more pressure to the fluid handling network when testing for leaks than when providing the at least a portion of the fluid sample to the analyte measurement system,
40. The system of Claim 30, wherein the analyte comprises glucose.
41. The system of Claim 30, wherein the fluid sample comprises whole blood.
42. A patient monitoring system comprising:
an analyte measurement system configured to determine the concentration of an analyte in a bodily fluid;
a fluid handling network comprising a plurality of tubes, wherein the fluid handling network is configured to draw bodily fluid from a patient and to provide at least a portion of the drawn bodily fluid to the analyte measurement system; an arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at a location in the fluid handling network; and
a controller configured to:
actuate at least one pump to draw bodily fluid from a patient into the fluid handling network and to transport the bodily fluid to the location in the fluid handling network associated with the arrival sensor; receive data from the arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the location; and
determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location associated with the arrival sensor.
43. The system of Claim 42, wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking based at least in part on the time it takes for the bodily fluid to move from a starting point to the location associated with the arrival sensor.
44. The system of Claim 43, further comprising a second arrival sensor configured to detect the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point, wherein the controller is configured to receive data from the second arrival sensor indicating the arrival of the bodily fluid at the starting point.
45. The system of Claim 43, wherein the starting point is a junction in the fluid handling network and wherein a start time comprises the time that the bodily fluid is drawn through the junction.
46. The system of Claim 42, wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with an acceptable time threshold.
47. The system of Claim 42, wherein the controller is configured to determine whether the fluid handling network is leaking by comparing the time that the bodily fluid arrived at the location with one or more arrival times from one or more previous measurement cycles.
- I l l-
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